A phiùthrag ‘s a phiuthar (Sister’s lament)

Leggi in Italiano

“Sister’s lament” (Sister or sister) is a Scottish Gaelic song from the Hebrides, where a young girl kidnapped by the fairies calls her sister to come to her rescue: in the song the fairy hideout is described. The song is included in the collection “Songs of the Hebrides”, Vol 1 by Marjory Kennedy-Fraser with the title “A Fairy Plaint” (Ceol-brutha).

In folk tales, fairies are not benevolent creatures at all, attracted by the strength and vitality of mankind, they kidnap children and especially newborns, or seduce (for the purpose of kidnapping) a lot of beautiful youths.
The fairy abduction was once an attempt to rationalize the loss of loved ones, it was a great consolation thinking that the fairies had stolen that young life from a sad fate, or it was an explanation for abnormal behavior, such as autism or depression. Thus an “absent” behavior amounted to a rapture of the soul and the victim felt like a prisoner in the enchanted Kingdom; a great danger came from food, because it was enough a tasting to preserve a tormenting desire, very often fatal.

CELTIC TALE

Two sisters lived in a valley not far from a circle of fairies, where elves held a night market, offering a wide selection of juicy and tasty fruit. The market was invisible to human eyes, but one night the girls saw him: the older sister escaped frightened, but the younger intrigued, let himself be involved in the market and gave a lock of her golden hair for those fruits so inviting.
She returned home only after eating at will and the next night, driven by hunger that human food could no longer satisfy, she went to look for the elf market, no longer finding it. The older sister, realizing that her little sister was prey to an inexplicable malaise that consumed her, sought in turn the magical place, managing to find it; nevertheless the elves would have yielded their fruits only if the elder sister had also banquished with them; the girl fearing the end of her sister, she stubbornly refused, despite the elves, who did everything, even slamming the fruit in her face and pressing them against her mouth. So some juice remained on her lips ..

Goblin-Market-Arthur-Rackham
Goblin Market. Arthur Rackham.

At dawn the girl managed to return home to give a last farewell to her dying sister, a last sweet kiss .. that was how the little sister from her lips tasted elven food, her hunger was satisfied and she found healing.

A phiùthrag ‘s a phiuthar

The song shares the structure of the waulking songs and was originally perhaps a work song. The melody is very sad and some assume it is a funeral lament.

Flora MacNeil learned the song from a relative of the island of Mingulay
live in Tobar an Dualchais

Margaret Stewart in Togidh mi mo Sheolta (Along The Road Less Travelled)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum (follow the Calum Johnston version here)

The structure of the song repeats the last sentence as the first sentence in the next stanza. The choral part of the song is entrusted to “vocables”

English translation Flora MacNeil
I
Little sister, sister
My love, my sister [beloved sister]
Do you not pity(1)
My grief tonight
II
Do you not pity
My grief tonight
In a little hut(2) I am
Low and narrow
III
In a little hut I am
Low and narrow
With no roof of turf
and no thatch entwined (3)
IV
With no roof of turf
and no thatch entwined
But the rain from the hills
streaming into it(4)
V (english translation John Lorne Campbell)
But the rain from the hills
Streaming into it
I am a poor woman
sad and miserable.
VI
I am a poor woman
sad and miserable.
I climbed up
Ben Sgrìobain
VII
I climbed up
Ben Sgrìobain
and Laigheabhal Mhòr
with it’s spotted horses
VIII
and Laigheabhal Mhòr
with it’s spotted horses
I didn’t find there
what I wanted,
IX
I didn’t find there
what I wanted,
A girl
with hair like a golden daisy.
Irish gaelic, Flora MacNeil version
I
A phiùthrag ‘s a phiuthar, hu ru
Ghaoil a phiuthar, hu ru
Nach truagh leat fhèin, ho ho ill eo
Nochd mo chumha,
hu ru
II
Nach truagh leat fhèin, hu ru
nochd mo chumha, hu ru
Mi’m bothan beag, ho ho ill eo
ìseal cumhag, hu ru
III
Mi’m bothan beag, hu ru
ìseal cumhag, hu ru
Gun sgrath dhìon, ho ho ill eo
Gun lùb tughaidh, hu ru
IV
Gun sgrath dhìon air, hu ru
Gun lùb tughaidh hu ru, hu ru
Ach uisge nam beann, ho ho ill eo
Sìos ‘na shruth leis, hu ru
V (Calum Johnston version)
Ach uisge nam beann,
Sìos ‘na shruth leis,
’S mise bhean bhochd
chianail, dhuilich.
VI
’S mise bhean bhochd
chianail, dhuilich.
Dhìrich mi suas
Beinn an Sgrìobain,
VII
Dhìrich mi suas
Beinn an Sgrìobain,
’S Laigheabhal Mhòr (5)
nan each grìs-fhionn. (6)
VIII
’S Laigheabhal Mhòr
nan each grìs-fhionn.
Cha d’ fhuair mi ann,
na bha dhìth orm
IX
Cha d’ fhuair mi ann
na bha dhìth orm
Tè bhuidhe,
’s a 
falt mar dhìthein.

NOTE
1) “Can you not pity” or” Would you not pity me my mourning tonight”
2) “Small my dwelling”, or little bothy
3) or Gun lùb sìomain, (Without a roof-rope)
gun ghad tughaidh (or a wisp of thatch.)
4) “hillside wate like a running stream” or “Water from the peaks in a stream down through it”
5)  or  Flora MacNeil version: Hèabhal mhòr= Mighty Heaval
Heaval is the highest hill of Barra Island located north-east of Castlebay, the main village.
6) or  Flora MacNeil version: Nan each dhriumfhionn= with the white-maned horses.
Horses are those of fairies and therefore white. It could be the palomino or cremello breed. The origin of the Palomino is very old, in fact it is believed that golden horses with tail and silver mane were ridden by the first emperors of China. Achilles, the mythical Greek hero, rode Balios and Xantos, which were “yellow and golden, faster than the storm winds”. The cremello instead has the particularity of the blue eye, the coat is white with silver reflections.

A Fairy Plaint (Ceol-brutha)

The version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (as collected by the song of Mrs. Macdonald, Skallary, Isle of Barra

Kenneth MacLeod lyrics
Would you not pity me, o sister?
O hi o hu o ho
Would you not pity me my mourning tonight?
O hi o hu o ho
My little hut
Without a bent rope or a wisp of thatch
Water from the peaks
in a stream down through it
But that’s not the cause of my sorrow

Nach truagh leat fhéin phiùthrag a phiuthar
O hi o hu o ho
Nach truagh leat fhéin nochd mo cumha
O hi o hu o ho
Nach truagh leat fhéin nochd mo cumha
‘S mise bhean bhochd chianail dhubhach
‘S mise bhean bhochd chianail dhubhach
Mi’m bothan beag iosal cumhann
Mi’m bothan beag iosal cumhann
Gun lùb siomain gun sop tughaibh
Gun lùb siomain gun sop tughaibh
Uisge nam beann sios ‘na shruth leis
Uisge nam beann sios ‘na shruth leis
Ged’s oil leam sin cha’n e chreach mi
Ged’s oil leam sin cha’n e chreach mi
Cha’n e chuir mi cha’n e fhras mi

Rory Dall’s Sister’s Lament

Cumh Peathar Ruari — Rory Dall’s Sister’s Lament was composed by Daniel Dow about 1778 (in A Collection of Ancient Scots Music for the violin, harpsichord or German flute) referring to the analysis of the melody here

Ossian in “Borders” 1984

Sources
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/aphiuthrag.php
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/maggiemacinnes/aphiuthrag.htmdhttp://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/62594/9;jsessionid=89A212440240A80FF960AD2D4B425BD3
http://research.culturalequity.org/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=11984
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/about/songs/supernatural/index.asp
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=69117

http://www.earlygaelicharp.info/tunes/CumhPeatharRuari/
https://thesession.org/tunes/15575
http://www.cynthiacathcart.com/articles/rory_dall_lament.html

Corn Rigs are bonnie

Leggi in italiano

Corn Rigs  (Rigs o’Barley) was written entirely by Robert Burns in 1782 adapting it to an old Scottish dance air entitled “Corn Rigs are bonnie“. It seems to be particularly dear to the poet: it tells of the night of love with a beautiful girl among the sheaves of wheat, a magical full moon night…

The Annie of the song has been identified in Anne Rankie, the youngest daughter of a tenant farmer, John Rankine of Adamhill, of the farm that was a short distance from the Burns in Lochlea. In 1782, in September, the woman married a innkeeper, John Merry of Cumnock, so some doubt that in August she was among the sheaves of barley with the handsome Robert; others, however, point out that after 4 years (and once again in August) the poet, being in the neighborhood, was staying right at the inn of the two!
Burns gave Anne Rankie a lock of his hair and his portrait, which she kept together with the song.
Very bravely Burns, however, is silent on the identity of the beautiful Annie.

William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865
William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865

LAMMAS NIGHT

rigsThe analysis of the text unravels the dynamics of the relationship between the two lovers (according to my point of view): the night of Lammas, as usual in the Celtic tradition, is the night of August 1, a day of celebration for the farmers of the Scotland, day of rest and party before the beginning of the harvest.
Among the young it was customary to spend the night in the fields of wheat (or barley) but our Robert at first keeps away from such custom, the beautiful Annie is promised to another …
However, the youthful ardor finally wins and even the girl (without even being asked too much, reveals the bard) consents: the two meet in the fields of barley, at dusk, on a warm summer evening with the moon full to illuminate the night, and what a “happy night”!
The final verse takes up a concept dear to the poet: the best time is spent to love! And on that magical night it seems that the young Robert did it three times!

Ossian from Seal Song 1981 with the traditional Corn Rigs Are Bonnie melody, the video is very well done with the scrolling text, movies and vintage photos as well as “portraits” of the bard, all well structured in the evocation for images of the text

Paul Giovanni from The Wicker Man but with another melody

I
It was upon a Lammas(1) night,
When the corn rigs(2) were bonnie,
Beneath the moon’s unclouded light,
I held awa’ to Annie;
The time flew by wi’ tentless heed,
‘Til ‘tween the late and early,
Wi’ small persuasion she agreed
To see me thro’ the barley.
chorus
Corn Rigs and barley rigs,
Corn rigs are bonny:
I’ll ne’eer forget that happy night,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.
II
The sky was blue (3), the wind was still,
The moon was shining clearly;
I set her down wi’ right good will,
Amang the rigs o’ barley:
I ken’t(4) her heart, was a’ my ain(5);
I loved her most sincerely;
I kissed her o’er and o’er again,
Amang the rigs o’ barley.
III
I locked her in my fond embrace;
Her heart was beatin’ rarely:
My blessing on that happy place,
Amang the rigs o’ barley!
But by the moon and stars so bright,
That shone that hour so clearly!
She aye shall bless that happy night
Amang the rigs of barley.
IV
I hae been blythe(6) wi’ comrades dear;
I hae been merry drinking;
I hae been joyful gath’rin’ gear(7);
I hae been happy thinking:
But a’ the pleasures e’er I saw,
Tho’ three times doubled fairly,
That happy night was worth them a’,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.

NOTES
1) Lammas is the harvest festival that is celebrated on the first of August, whose origins date back to the Celtic festival of Lugnasad, a festival that marks the beginning of the first harvest (wheat and barley). In the Scottish country tradition it is like our day in San Martino, when the land is rented and the contracts are renewed.(see more)
2) The term Rigs describes an old cultivation technique that involves working the land in long and narrow strips of raised land (the traditional drainage system of the past): the fields were divided into earthen banks raised, so that the excess water drained further down the deep side furrows.
3) the indicated hour is that of twilight
4) knew
5) own
6) joyous
7) earning money

MELODY

Alasdair Fraser · Paul Machlis · Barry Phillips · Martin Hayes

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE

This song is best known with the title of Corn Rigs or Corn Rigs Are Bonnie and it is also a scottish country dance (see more) taken from the old traditions. During the harvest it was customary to dance among the sheaves of wheat, as shown in this vintage movie by the Royal Scottish Country Dance Society.
VIDEO

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lugnasad.html
https://giulsass.wordpress.com/istruzione/esperienza-antica/gest_terra_p_s/

Beltane Chase: Fith Fath song

Leggi in italiano

THE  BELTANE CHASE SONG

The text was written by Paul Huson in his “Mastering Witchcraft” – 1970 inspired by the Scottish ballad “The Twa  Magicians“: Fith Fath is a enchantment of concealment or transmutation, in this lyrics it is the seasonal cycle of transmutations. Caitlin Matthews added a melody in 1978. Today the song is considered a traditional one.

The ritual of the Love chase was to be typical in Beltane when the Queen of May or the Goddess Maiden and the King of May, the Green Man was united to renew the life and fertility of the Earth: still in the Middle Age the boys dressed in green like forest elves ventured into the greenwood (the sacred wood), playing a horn so the girls could find them. Or they turned into hunters and followed magical transmutations with their prey.

Beltane Fire Festival: Green Man and the May Queen

Caitlin Matthews 
Damh The Bard from Herne’s Apprentice – 2003

Pixi Morgan

FITH FATH SONG
I
I shall go as a wren(1) in Spring
With sorrow and sighing on silent wing(2)
CHORUS I
I shall go in our Lady’s name
Aye till I come home again
II
Then we shall follow as falcons grey
And hunt thee cruelly for our prey
CHORUS II
And we shall go in our Horned God’s name(3)
Aye to fetch thee home again
III
Then I shall go as a mouse in May
Through fields by night and in cellars by day.
CHORUS I
IV
Then we shall follow as black tom cats
And hunt thee through the fields and the vats.
CHORUS II
V
Then I shall go as an Autumn hare
With sorrow and sighing and mickle care. (4)
CHORUS I
VI
Then we shall follow as swift greyhounds/ And dog thy steps with leaps and bounds
CHORUS II
VII
Then I shall go as a Winter trout
With sorrow and sighing and mickle doubt.
CHORUS I
VIII
Then we shall follow as otters swift
And bind thee fast so thou cans’t shift
CHORUS II

NOTES
1) The Gaelic name “Druidh dhubh” translates as “bird druid” also called “Bran’s sparrow” (the god of prophecy). Sacred animal whose killing was considered taboo and a bearer of misfortune, but not during the time of Yule. In his book “The White Goddess”, Robert Graves explains that in the Celtic tradition, the struggle between the two parts of the year is represented by the struggle between the king holly (or mistletoe), -the nascent year- and the king oak -the dying year. At the winter solstice the king holly wins over the king oak, and vice-versa for the summer solstice. In oral tradition, a variant of this fight is represented by the robin and the wren, hidden between the leaves of the two respective trees. The wren represents the waning year, the robin the new year and the death of the wren is a passage of death-rebirth. see more 
2) the mystery can not be revealed in words: the initiatory path is accomplished and once understood it is not possible to express.
3) the Horned God is a syncretic sum of ancient deities represented with horns and symbols of fertility and abundance (Celtic Cernunnos and Greek-Roman divinities Pan and Dionysus). According to some scholars, this deity was the pagan alternative of the Christian God, to whom those who remained anchored to the old traditions continued to pay veneration, in short, the ideal candidate for the figure of the Devil! But in my opinion it was been the Christian fanaticism to flatten and standardize all the other cults in a single devilish cult.
The idea of ​​the Horned God developed in the occult circles of France and England in the nineteenth century and his first modern depiction is that of Eliphas Levi of 1855, but it was Margaret Murray in “The Witch-cult in Western Europe”, 1921 to build the thesis of a unique pagan cult that survived the advent of Christianity. This theory, however, is not supported by rigorous documentation and certainly we can find the persistence up to the modern age of cults or beliefs present in various parts of Europe attributable to religion towards the Ancient Gods. Many of these beliefs were absorbed into Christianity and finally fought as diabolical when it was not possible to incorporate them into the new cult.
According to the Wicca tradition, the God is born at the Winter solstice, marries the Goddess to Beltane and dies at the Summer Solstice being the masculine principle equivalent to the triple lunar Goddess that governs life and death.

65440797_zernunn4

4) Similarly Isobel Gowdie, tried for witchcraft in 1662 in Scotland reveals to his torturers the formula of a Fith Fath
I sall gae intil a haire,
Wi’ sorrow and sych and meikle care;
And I sall gae in the Devillis name,
Ay quhill I com hom againe.
Much has been written about witches, especially on the great witch-hunt that took place on the two sides of the Christian religion one step away from the “Century of Enlightenment” and not in the dark Middle Ages. Symptom of a cultural change that will shake the “certainties” of the Western religion. Witches or sorcerers have always existed, they are those who use magic, who can see beyond the material accidents and undertake a journey of research and ancient knowledge. Obscene it was been what Catholics and Protestants did in their “struggle” for power, to annihilate those who were seen as a threat to the True Faith: a bloody struggle of religion that has exacerbated the boundaries of tolerance.

DEER ASPECT

Fith Fath is a spell of concealment or transmutation. It is reported and described in the book “Carmina Gadelica” by Alexander Carmicheal (vol II, 1900)
“They are applied to the occult power which rendered a person invisible to mortal eyes and which transformed one object into another. Men and women were made invisible, or men were transformed into horses, bulls, or stags, while women were transformed into cats, hares, or hinds. These transmutations were sometimes voluntary, sometimes involuntary. The ‘fīth-fāth’ was especially serviceable to hunters, warriors, and travellers, rendering them invisible or unrecognisable to enemies and to animals.” (from here)

English translation*
FATH fith(1)
Will I make on thee,
By Mary(2) of the augury,
By Bride(3) of the corslet,
From sheep, from ram,
From goat, from buck,
From fox, from wolf,
From sow, from boar,
From dog, from cat,
From hipped-bear,
From wilderness-dog,
From watchful ‘scan,'(4)
From cow, from horse,
From bull, from heifer,
From daughter, from son,
From the birds of the air, (5)
From the creeping things of the earth,
From the fishes of the sea,
From the imps of the storm.

FATH fith

Ni mi ort,
Le Muire na frithe,
Le Bride na brot,
Bho chire, bho ruta,
Bho mhise, bho bhoc,
Bho shionn, ‘s bho mhac-tire,
Bho chrain, ‘s bho thorc,
Bho chu, ‘s bho chat,
Bho mhaghan masaich,
Bho chu fasaich,
Bho scan (4) foirir,
Bho bho, bho mharc,
Bho tharbh, bho earc,
Bho mhurn, bho mhac,
Bho iantaidh an adhar,
Bho shnagaidh na talmha,
Bho iasgaidh na mara,
‘S bho shiantaidh na gailbhe

NOTES
* translated by Alexander Carmicheal
1) “deer aspect”; in reality with the spell it is possible to change into any animal form.
The red deer is the animal par excellence of the woods, the coveted prey of hunting, but also mythological animal lord of the Wood and of the Rebirth. For the Celts of the Gauls Cernunnos was the god of fertility with antlers on his head, the animal equivalent of the spirit of wheat. Magic guide, messenger of the fairies, the deer (especially if white) is associated with the Great Mother (and the lunar goddesses) but also with Lug (the Celtic equivalent of a solar deity). As Lugh’s animal it represents the rising sun (with the horns equivalent to the rays) and so in Christianity it is the representation of Christ (or of the soul that yearns to God): it is the king Deer cyclically sacrificed to the Mother Goddess to ensure fertility of the earth. “I am the seven-stage stag” sings the bard Amergin and so the druid-shaman should be dressed during the rituals with horns and deer skins see more
2) Danu (or Anu) mother goddess of the waters. It was the time of primordial chaos: dry deserts and boiling volcanoes, it was the time of the great emptiness. Then from the dark sky a trickle of water fell on the earth and life began to blossom: from the ground grew the sacred tree and Danu (the goddess Mother), the water that descended from the sky, nourished it. From their union the Gods were born ..
Hypogeic waters, labyrinthine caves, spring waters but also river running waters were the sites of prehistoric and protohistoric worship throughout Europe. In particular for the Keltoi Danu was the Danube near whose springs their civilization was born. see more
3) The name derives from the root “breo” (fire): the fire of the blacksmith’s forge combined with that of artistic inspiration and the healing energy. Also known as Brighid, Brigit or Brigantia, she is the goddess of the triple fire, patron saint of blacksmiths, poets and healers. He bore the nickname Belisama, the “Shining” and was a Solar Goddess (near the Celts and the Germans the Sun was female). It was dedicated to her the End of Winter Festival which was celebrated in Celtic Europe at the Calends of February. It was the party of IMBOLC, the festival of the purification of the fields and of the house to mark the slow awakening of Nature.
4) nobody knows that animal is a vigilant explorer, surely a mistake of transcription of Carmicheal
5) follows an invocation of the three kingdoms, Nem (sky), Talam (Earth) Muir (sea) and or if we want world above, middle and below

THE MIST OF AVALON

With the invocation a magical fog it is materialized, that is the mist of Avalon (or Manannan), which acts as a means of transport to the Otherworld. The fog has a dual nature, of concealment and of passage. Another word for “fog”, in Irish origins, is féth fiadha which means “the art of resembling”. Both gods and druids can evoke magical fog as a means of communication between the two worlds. The divination was therefore the féth fiadha.
The prayer “Fath Fith” seems to be the invocation of the hunter to hide from his prey, but it was also used as a form of divination in a “threshold place” for the magical experience of space such as the river bank or the coast of the sea, the compartment of an access door to the building or a bridge. But also time like dawn and sunset which are neither day nor night nor the holy days that are on the border between the seasons.
In doing so you find yourself in a place that is a non-place that some call the opaque world.

The Tale of Ossian and the Fawn

Still Alexander Carmicheal always in the chapter of Fith Fath tells the meeting of the boy Oisin (Ossian) with his mother: Ossian is a legendary bard of ancient Scotland or Ireland, compared to Homer and Shakespeare, thanks to the alleged discovery of his poems in Scotland . His legends chase in Ireland, Isle of Man and Scotland, but his popularity only grew in the mid-1700s when James MacPherson wrote “The Songs of Ossian” claiming to have found his manuscripts and fragments in the Scottish Highlands, among them a epic poem about Fingal, the father, who said he had “simply” translated, actually inventing: the ossianic fashion flared up throughout Europe giving life to Romanticism. continua

According to this Scottish version, Oisin borned by Finn Mac Coll (Fionn Mac Cumhaill) and a mortal woman, but previously Finn had been the lover of a fairy that he had abandoned to marry the daughter of men; so the fairy for revenge made the spell of the “Fath Fith” on the human bride turning her into a hind that went away and shortly thereafter gave birth to Oisin (the little fawn) on the island of Sandray (Outer Hebrides) in the Loch-nan-ceall in Arasaig.
Now we must make a leap of time and resume the story at the time of Ossian’s childhood when he returned to live with his father and the rest of the Fianna. One fine day, as usual, the are a-chasing a majestic deer on the mountain, when a magical mist descended over them, causing them to separate and disperse.
So Ossian wandered without knowing where he was and found himself in a deep green valley surrounded by high blue mountains, when he saw a fawn so beautiful and graceful that he remained admired to look at her. But when the spirit of the hunt took over in him and he was about to hurl the spear, she turned to look him straight in his eye and said “Do not hurt me, Ossian,I am thy mother under the “fīth-fāth,” in the form of a hind abroad and in the form of a woman at home. Thou art hungry and thirsty and weary. Come thou home with me, thou fawn of my heart “And Ossian followed her and passed a door in the rock and as soon as they crossed the threshold, the door disappeared and while the hind changed into a beautiful woman dressed in green and with golden hair.
After feasting on his fill, refreshed by drinks and music and having rested for three days, Ossian wanted to return to his Fianna, so he discovered that the three days in the mound under the hill, was equivalent to three years on earth. Ossian then wrote his first song to warn the mother-hind to stay away from the hunting grounds of the Fianna: ‘Sanas Oisein D’a Mhathair (Ossian’s To-To-His-Mother) of which Carmicheal reports a dozen stanzas

Stanilaus Soutten Longley (1894-1966)-Autumn

third part 

LINK
“I misteri del druidismo” di Brenda Cathbad Myers
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/beltane-love-chase/
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2014.htm
http://www.annwnfoundation.com/ians-blog/pwyll-pen-annwn-shapeshifting-and-the-fith-fath
http://www.devanavision.it/filodiretto/default.asp?id_pannello=2&id_news=6950&t=IL_DRUIDISMO
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59312
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/print.php?sid=252

To the Begging I Will Go

La protesta contro il “sistema” all’insegna del sex-drinks&piping s’incanala in uno specifico filone di canti popolari (britannici e irlandesi) sul mestiere di mendicante, uno spirito libero che vagabonda per il paese senza radici e vuole solo essere lasciato in pace. Molti sono i canti in gaelico in cui il protagonista rivendica l’esercizio della libera volontà, niente tasse, preoccupazioni e dispiaceri, ma la vita presa come viene affidandosi a lavori saltuari e alla carità della gente. (continua)

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE: To the Begging I Will Go

Esistono molte varianti della canzone a testimonianza della sua vasta popolarità e diffusione. Una vecchia bothy ballad che affonda nella materia medievale dei canti dei vaganti, quel vasto sottobosco di umanità un po’ artistoide, un po’ disadattata, un po’ morta di fame che si arrabattava a sbarcare il lunario esercitando i mestieri più improbabili e spesso truffaldini.
Probabilmente già lo stesso Richard Brome si ispirò  a questi canti dei mendicanti per la sua commedia “A Jovial Crew, or the Merry Beggars” (1640), in cui scrive il coro “The Beggar” detto anche The Jovial Beggar, con il refrain: 
And a Begging we will go, we’ll go, we’ll go,
And a Begging we will go.
Come sia la melodia raggiunge una notevole popolarità moltiplicandosi in tutta una serie di “clonazioni” A bowling we will go, A fishing we will go, A hawking we will go, and A hunting we will go e così via.

ASCOLTA l’arrangiamento strumentale di Bear McCreary “To the Begging I Will Go” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

PRIMA VERSIONE
Tae the Beggin’ / Maid Behind the Bar

ASCOLTA Ossian, la melodia che accompagna il canto è “Maid Behind the Bar”, un Irish reel


I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

II
And I’ll gang tae the tailor
wi’ a wab o’ hoddin gray,
and gar him mak’ a cloak for me
tae hap me night and day.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

III
An’ I’ll gang tae the cobbler
and I’ll gar him sort my shoon
an inch thick tae the boddams
and clodded weel aboun.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
IV
And I’ll gang tae the tanner
and I’ll gar him mak’ a dish,
and it maun haud three ha’pens,
for it canna weel be less.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

V
And when that I begin my trade,
sure, I’ll let my beard grow strang,
nor pare my nails this year or day
for beggars wear them lang.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VI
And I will seek my lodging
before that it grows dark –
when each gude man is getting hame, and new hame frae his work.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VII
And if begging be as good as trade,
and as I hope it may,
it’s time that I was oot o’ here
an’ haudin’ doon the brae.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VIII=I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for  when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
 
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri che conosco,
di sicuro il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
E andrò dal sarto
con una pezza di ruvida lana grigia
e gli chiederò di farmi un mantello
per ricoprirmi di notte e giorno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò, a mendicare andrò
III
Andrò dal calzolaio
e gli chiederò di risuolare le mie scarpe con del cuoio spesso
per camminare bene sulle zolle.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
IV
E andrò dal tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte perchè non si può fare con meno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

V
E quando poi inizierò il mio mestiere, di sicuro mi lascerò crescere la barba quest’anno o oggi, nè mi taglierò le unghie, perchè i mendicanti le portano lunghe. A mendicare andrò,
andrò, a mendicare andrò

VI
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cali la sera –
quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

VII
E se il mendicare sarà un buon affare, come spero lo sia,
è tempo che io vada via da qui e m’incammini per la collina.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

SECONDA VERSIONE: To the Beggin’ I Will Go

ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs

Chorus
To the beggin’ I will go, go
To the beggin’ I will go
O’ a’ the trades a man can try,
the beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s weary
he can just sit down and rest.
First I maun get a meal-pock
made out o’ leather reed
And it will haud twa firlots (1)
wi’ room for beef and breid.
Afore that I do gang awa,
I’ll lat my beard grow strang
And for my nails I winna pair,
for a beggar wears them lang.
I’ll gang to find some greasy cook
and buy frae her a hat(2)
Wi’ twa-three inches o’ a rim,
a’ glitterin’ owre wi’ fat.
Syne I’ll gang to a turner
and gar him mak a dish
And it maun haud three chappins (3)
for I cudna dee wi’ less.
I’ll gang and seek my quarters
before that it grows dark
Jist when the guidman’s sitting doon
and new-hame frae his wark.
Syne I’ll tak out my muckle dish
and stap it fu’ o’ meal
And say, “Guidwife, gin ye gie me bree,
I winna seek you kail”.
And maybe the guidman will say,
“Puirman, put up your meal
You’re welcome to your brose (4) the nicht, likewise your breid and kail”.
If there’s a wedding in the toon,
I’ll airt me to be there
And pour my kindest benison
upon the winsome pair.
And some will gie me breid
and beef and some will gie me cheese
And I’ll slip out among the folk
and gather up bawbees (5).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
Di tutti i mestieri che un uomo può fare, il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare.
Per prima cosa prenderò una bisaccia
fatta di cuoio
e conterrà due staia
con un posto per carne e pane.
Prima di andare via
mi farò crescere la barba lunga
e non mi taglierò le unghie
perchè il mendicante le porta lunghe.
(Andrò a cercare un grassa cuoca
e comprerò da lei un cappello
con la falda di due o tre pollici
tutto scintillante di grasso.)
E andrò da un tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte
perchè non posso fare con meno.
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cada il buio
– quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
Poi tirerò fuori il mio grande piatto
e lo riempirò di farina d’avena
e dico “Buona donna, se mi date del brodo, non vi chiedo del cavolo”
E forse il padrone di casa dirà
“Poveruomo, metti da parte la tua farina, saluta il tuo brose di stasera
come pure il pane e cavolo”
Se ci sarà un matrimonio in città
mi recherò là
ed elargirò la mia più cara benedizione
su quella bella coppia.
E qualcuno mi darà il pane
e manzo e qualcuno mi darà del formaggio e mi aggirerò tra la gente
a raccogliere delle monetine

NOTE
1) unità di misura scozzese
2) il senso della frase mi sfugge
3) vecchia misura scozzese per liquidi equivalente e mezza pinta
4) il brose è il porrige preparato alla maniera scozzese. Se ho capito bene il senso del discorso , il mendicante chiede alla padrona di casa un po’ di brodo caldo per prepararsi il suo brose a base di farina d’avena, ma il padrone di casa lo invita a mangiare alla sua tavola cibi ben più sostanziosi
5) bawbees: half pennies

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

E’ la versione del Lancashire riportata in “Folk Songs of Lancashire” (Harding 1980). Leggiamo nelle note ” This version was collected from an old weaver in Delph called Becket Whitehead by Herbert Smith and Ewan McColl.”
ASCOLTA Ewan McColl


I
Of all the trades in England,
a-beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s tired,
he can sit him down to rest.
And to a begging I will go,
to the begging I will go
II
There’s a poke (1) for me oatmeal,
& another for me salt
I’ve a pair of little crutches,
‘tha should see how I can hault
III
There’s patches on me fusticoat,
there’s a black patch on me ‘ee
But when it comes to tuppenny ale (2),
I can see as well as thee
IV
My britches, they are no but holes,
but my heart is free from care
As long as I’ve a bellyfull,
my backside can go bare
V
There’s a bed for me where ‘ere I like,
& I don’t pay no rent
I’ve got no noisy looms to mind,
& I am right content
VI
I can rest when I am tired
& I heed no master’s bell (3)
A man ud be daft to be a king,
when beggars live so well
VII
Oh, I’ve been deef at Dokenfield (4),
& I’ve been blind at Shaw (5)
And many the right & willing lass
I’ve bedded in the straw
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri in Inghilterra
il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
Ho una tasca per la farina d’avena
e un’altra per il sale
ho un paio di stampelle, dovreste vedere come riesco a zoppicare!
III
Ci sono toppe sul mio cappotto frusto e una toppa nera sul mio occhio ma quandosi tratta di birra da due penny, riesco a vedere bene quanto te!
IV
I miei pantalono non hanno che buchi
ma il mio cuore è libero dall’affanno
finchè ho la pancia piena
il mio fondoschiena può andare nudo
V
C’è un letto per me ovunque mi piaccia
e non pago l’affitto
non ho pensieri fastidiosi in testa
e sono proprio contento
VI
Mi riposo quando sono stanco
e non ascolto la campana del padrone
è da pazzi voler essere un re 
quando i mendicanti vivono così bene!
VII
Sono stato sordo a Dokenfield
e sono stato cieco a Shaw
e più di una ragazza ben disposta
ho portato a letto nella paglia

NOTE
1) poke è in senso letterale un sacchetto ma in questo contesto vuole dire pocket
2) tippeny ale è la birra a buon mercato bevuta normalmente dalla gente comune
2) non ha un padrone o un principale da cui correre appena sente suonare il campanello/sirena
3) Dukinfield è una cittadina nella Grande Manchester
4) Shaw and Crompton, detta comunemente Shaw è una cittadina industriale nella Grande Manchester

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: The Beggarman’s song

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://www.spiersfamilygroup.co.uk/Tae%20the%20Beggin%20I%20will%20go.pdf
https://tullamore.band/track/1238160/tae-the-beggin-maid-behind-the-bar
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/thebeggingsong.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/tothe.htm
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=49513&lang=it
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82650
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/gd/fullrecord/60319/9
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/126.html
http://www.kitchenmusician.net/smoke/beggin.html

Gli Ossian e la scottishness

Il gruppo scozzese (dalle parti di Glasgow) degli Ossian prende il nome dal leggendario bardo di Scozia, si fonda nel 1976 per dare vita a una miscela acustica raffinata ma piena di grinta (il cosiddetto drive tanto osannato nella musica rock): eppure rimarrà sempre una formazione acustica di musica tradizionale scozzese; la formazione è capitanata dai fratelli William e George Jackson (Billy arpa bardica, uillean pipes, whistle – George chitarra, cittern, violino, whistle, flauto) affiancati dal violino, mandolino, violoncello di  John Martin (che fu anche membro dei Tannahill Weavers)  e dalla voce solista, chitarra, whistle, dulcimer di Billy Ross. Quando Ross se ne andò subentrò Tony Cuffe (1981) e qualche anno più tardi il quartetto divenne un quintetto con l’aggiunta del pipaiolo Iain MacDonald (cornamuse, flauto, whistle).
Gli Ossian hanno sempre eseguito dell’ottima musica tradizionale scozzese anche se negli anni 70 era la musica tradizionale irlandese ad andare di moda! Il primo tour negli Stati Uniti (e sono finiti anche in Alaska) arriva nel 1983, ma cinque anni più tardi il gruppo si scioglie e i componenti  prendono altre strade.

Nella foto sopra da sin in alto : Tony Cuffe, George Jackson, da destra: Iain MacDonald, Billy Jackson, John Martin; nella foto sotto da sinistra: Billy Ross, Billy Jackson, George Jackson, John Martin

Tutti eccellenti polistrumentisti e cantanti, abili tessitori di trame sonore ricche e preziose sulle melodie della tradizione con un approccio quasi cameristico: canti in gaelico e in dialetto scozzese (in specie di Robert Burns), set da danza e slow air.
La loro musica ha influenzato una generazione di musicisti.

The Sound of Sleat / Aandowin’ a prua / The Old Reel in “Seal Song” 1981 nella formazione quartetto

Troy’s Wedding Biddy from Sligo in “Borders” 1986 nella formazione quintetto

LA RIFONDAZIONE

Ci fu una rifondazione nel 1997 con Billy Jackson e Billy Ross che si portò dietro Iain MacInnes (smallpipes, whistle) e Stuart Morison (violino, cittern) con i quali aveva formato un trio pochi anni prima, sigillata dall’uscita dall’album “The Carrying Stream” e anche se il nuovo gruppo non è mai stato ufficialmente sciolto non è più -al momento- in attività.

ST. KILDA WEDDING

Saint Kilda è un minuscolo arcipelago a occidente delle Ebridi Esterne e abitato fin dai tempi antichi. Di fatto isolato dalla terra ferma per buona parte dell’anno è stato abbandonato nel 1930.
Per comunicare con la terraferma gli isolani mettevano la posta in piccole sacche di cuoio impermeabile e le affidavano alla corrente marina.
Scrive Wikipedia “L’intero arcipelago è di proprietà del National Trust for Scotland, e, nel 1986, è diventato uno dei quattro Patrimoni dell’umanità scozzesi. Si tratta uno dei pochi patrimoni al mondo a essere considerati contemporaneamente ‘naturale’, ‘marino’ e ‘culturale’.
Gruppi di volontari lavorano sull’isola nei mesi estivi per recuperare gli edifici originari che gli antichi Kildani hanno lasciato. Condividono l’isola con una piccola base militare creata nel 1957
.”


La prima parte del filmato qui

La testimonianza degli antichi rituali matrimoniali praticati sull’isola ci viene da un album pubblicato dal gruppo scozzese Ossian “St. Kilda wedding”: la prima traccia è un set di musica da danza trascritto nella collezione del capitano Simon Fraser (The Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland and the Isle, 1816 – l’archivio digitale qui)

WILLIAM JACKSON

La formazione classica di Billy lo porta a un progetto ambizioso quello di comporre musica per una “folk orchestra”  composta cioè da musicisti tradizionali e classici. Pubblica una ventina di album di cui ben tre album per orchestra: The Wellpark Suite (1985), A Scottish Island (1998) e Duan Albanach (2003).

The Wellpark Suite è stata commissionata dalla Tennents per celebrare il centenario dell’omonimo stabilimento.
Nella sua lunga carriera come arpista gira in tour per l’Europa (è venuto diverse volta anche in Italia) e il Nord America. Ha rispolverato anche le sue origini irlandesi (i nonni venivano dal Donegal) spaziando così tra le musiche tradizionali di Scozia e Irlanda. Cito tra tutti Heart Music e The Ancient Harp of Scotland
William è anche il curatore del progetto discografico della Linn Records “Celtic Experience” vol I e II

TONY CUFFE

Trasferitosi negli Stati Uniti nel 1988 si dedica all’insegnamento e alla carriera solistica, nel 1994 esce l’album “When first I went to Caledonia”, – la Caledonia non è la Scozia bensì la Nuova Scozia (Canada)- in cui sfodera tutte le sue doti d’interprete, compositore e polistrumentista; Tony è rinomato per il suo tocco chitarristico, suona l’arpa con le corde di metallo che si è costruito da solo e una decina circa di strumenti. E’ stato anche coinvolto nel progetto di Fred Freeman “The Complete Song of Robert Burns” (vol I )Muore nel 2001 vinto dal cancro. Un altro cd esce postumo dal titolo “Sae Will We Yet” (2003)

Nel Blog il tag Ossian e il tag Tony Cuffe

FONTI
https://projects.handsupfortrad.scot/hall-of-fame/ossian/
http://standinatthecrossroads-blackcatbone.blogspot.it/2008/05/ossian-st-kilda-wedding-scottish-celtic.html
https://thesession.org/recordings/4022
http://www.wjharp.com/
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/tony-cuffe-9257148.html
http://www.scotsman.com/news/obituaries/tony-cuffe-1-590567
https://raretunes.org/tony-cuffe/

I will set my ship in order

A traditional Scottish song (from “Bothy Songs and Ballads” by John Ord, 1930) entitled “I Drew My Ship” on the fruitful theme of the night visiting song, begins with a ship that sets sail for a quiet harbor. The model referred to is the ballad ‘The Drowsy Sleeper‘ but with several matching melodies (Allan Moore has counted eight)
Una canzone tradizionale scozzese (da “Bothy Songs and Ballads”  di John Ord, 1930) dal titolo “I Drew My Ship” sul fecondo tema delle night visiting song, inizia con una nave che salpa per dirigersi verso un porto tranquillo. Il modello a cui si fa riferimento è la ballata ‘The Drowsy Sleeper‘ ma con svariate melodie abbinate (Allan Moore ne ha contate otto).

I Drew My Ship

Shirley Collins recorded it in 1958 and Alan Lomax wrote in the notes “I Drew My Ship was collected by John Stokoe in Songs and Ballads of Northern England [1899] with no source mentioned. Though it is similar in form and content to many other aubades or dawn serenades, we have not been able to find another song to which this is precisely akin. The listener who cares to compare the recorded version with that published by Stokoe will see how Miss Collins has breathed life back into the print and made something lovely and alive out of an unimpressive folk fragment.” (from here)
Shirley Collins la registrò nel 1958 e Alan Lomax scrisse nelle note “I Drew My Ship fu raccolta da John Stokoe in “Songs and Ballads of Northern England” [1899] senza alcuna fonte menzionata. È simile nella forma e nel contenuto a molte altre aubade o !serenate dell’alba”, ma non siamo riusciti a trovare un’altra canzone alla quale questa proprio simile. L’ascoltatore che si preoccupa di confrontare la versione registrata con quella pubblicata da Stokoe vedrà come Miss Collins ha restituito la vita alla stampa e ha reso qualcosa di bello e vivo da un modesto frammento folk.


I
I drew my ship into the harbour,
I drew it up where my true love lay.
I drew it close by into her window
To listen what my love did say.
II
“Who’s there that knocks loud at my window?
Who knocks so loud and would come in?”
“It is your true love who loves you dearly,
Then rise, dear love, and let him in.”
III
Then slowly, slowly she got up
And slowly, slowly came she down,
But before she got her door unlocked
Her true love had both come and gone.
IV
He’s brisk and braw, he’s far away,
He’s far beyond yon raging main,
Where fishes dancing and bright eyes glancing
Have made him quite forget his ain. (1)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Guidai la mia nave in porto
la portai fin dove il mio vero amore stava
la portai vicino alla sua finestra
per sentire ciò che il mio amore diceva.
II
“Chi è là, alla finestra
che bussa così forte e vuole entrare?”
“Sono io, il tuo vero amore, che ti ama tanto
allora alzati, cara e fammi entrare”
III
Piano, piano lei si alzò
e piano, piano scese giù
ma prima di aver la porta sbloccato,
il suo vero amore se n’era già andato!
IV
Sveglio e in gamba, è lontano
è lontano in mare aperto
dove i pesci danzano e occhi spavaldi brillano, facendogli dimenticare presto i suoi.

NOTE
1) the eyes of his sweetheart [gli occhi della sua innamorata]

I will set my ship in order

From the archives of Tobar an Dualchais a 1952 field recording from the voice of Willie Mathieson (1879-1958). Born in Ellon, Aberdeenshire, he was an agricultural laborer on several farms in Banffshire. He collected and transcribed a large number of Scottish folk songs that are now stored at “the School of Scottish Studies” – University of Edinburgh.
Dagli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais una registrazione sul campo del 1952 dalla voce di Willie Mathieson (1879- 1958). Nato a Ellon, Aberdeenshire, fu un bracciante agricolo in diverse fattorie del Banffshire. Raccolse e trascrisse un grande numero di canti popolari scozzesi che si trovano ora depositati presso “the School of Scottish Studies” -Università di Edimburgo.

The six verses that Willie sings are close to those in Ord. In the remaining verses the sailor swears he has not in any way slighted his sweetheart and asks her to seek her mother’s approval, but she says her mother is asleep and cannot be disturbed, so he can go and court someone else. She then goes to let him in but he has left and set sail. She begs him to come back but he is too far away and she flings herself into the sea. (from here)
“I sei versi che Willie canta sono simili a quelli di Ord. Nei versi rimanenti il marinaio giura di non aver minimamente offeso la sua innamorata e le chiede di cercare il permesso della madre, ma lei dice che sua madre dorme e non può essere disturbata, così lui può andare a corteggiare un altra. Poi va per farlo entrare ma lui è andato a imbarcarsi. Lei lo prega di tornare, ma lui è troppo lontano e lei si butta in mare.”

Fiona Kelleher

The text is taken up by June Tabor from the CD A Quiet Eye 1999, stopping, however, at the fifth stanza. In this version the girl lingers to open and the boy, believing himself refused, returns to his ship.
Il testo è ripreso da June Tabor dal  CD A Quiet Eye 1999, fermandosi però alla V strofa. In questa versione la ragazza indugia troppo ad aprire e il ragazzo credendosi rifiutato, ritorna alla sua nave.


I
Oh, I will set my ship in order,
And I will set it to the sea;
And I will sail to yonder harbour
To see if my love minds on me.
II
I drew my ship into the harbour,
I drew her up where my true love lay.
And I did listen all at the window
To hear what my true love did say.
III
“Who’s there, all on my window?
Who raps so loud and would be in?”
“Oh, it is I, your own true lover,
I pray you rise, love, and let me in.”
IV
Slowly, slowly rose she up
And slowly, slowly came she down,
But when she had the door unlocked
Her true love had both been and gone.
V
“Come back, come back, my own true lover,
Come back, come back, all to my side.
I never left you nor yet deceived you
And I will surely be your bride.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Metterò a posto la mia barca
e la porterò in mare
navigherò fino a quel porto
per vedere se il mio amore mi pensa.
II
Guidai la mia nave nel porto,
la guidai fin dove il mio amore stava.
E mi misi in ascolto alla finestra
per sentire ciò che il mio amore diceva.
III
“Chi è là, alla finestra
che bussa così forte e vuole entrare?”
“Sono io, il tuo vero amore
ti prego alzati, cara e fammi entrare”
IV
Piano, piano lei si alzò
e piano, piano scese giù
ma quando aveva la porta sbloccato,
il suo vero amore se n’era già andato!
V
“Ritorna, ritorna, mio solo vero amore,
ritorna, ritorna da me.
Non ti lascerò e non t’ingannerò mai
e di certo sarò tua moglie”

Another melody, however, accompanies the song and is the one written by Tony Cuffe for the Scottish folk music group Ossian. In this textual version the girl’s indifference is due to the parents’ refusal to welcome the boy as a suitor. The ending is tragic, the girl throws herself into the sea for having been abandoned.
Un’altra melodia però accompagna la canzone ed è quella scritta da Tony Cuffe per il gruppo di musica folk scozzese Ossian. In questa versione testuale l’indifferenza della ragazza è dovuta al rifiuto dei genitori di accogliere il ragazzo come corteggiatore. Il finale è tragico, la ragazza si getta in mare per essere stata abbandonata.

Ossian –in “Borders” 1984
[formazione quintetto Tony Cuffe (voce e chitarra), George Jackson (cittern), Iain MacDonald (flauto), Billy Jackson (arpa bardica), John Martin (violino)]

Capercaillie in “Choice Language” 2003 
[con la coppia con Karen Matheson (voce) e Donald Shaw (organetto e tastiere), una robusta sezione ritmica (Che Beresford batteria, David ‘Chimp’ Robertson percussioni e Ewen Vernal basso),  Mànus Lunny (chitarra e bouzouki)Michael McGoldrick (flauto, whistle e uillieann pipes) e Charlie McKerron (violino), uno tra i migliori album del gruppo]

Catriona Evans


I
Oh, I will set my ship in order,
I will sail her on the sea;
I’ll go far over yonder border
To see if my love minds on me.
II
And he sailed East, and he sailed West,
He sailed far, far, seeking land,
Until he cam’ to his true love’s window
And he knocked loud and would be in.
III
“Oh, who is that at my bedroom window
Who knocks so loud and would be in?”
“‘Tis I, ‘Tis I, your ain true lover
and I am drenched untae my skin.”
IV
“So go and go, and ask your faither
See if he’ll let you marry me;
And if he says no, come back and tell me
And it’s the last time I’ll trouble thee.”
V
“My father’s in his chamber writing,
Setting down his merchandise;
And in his hand he holds a letter
And it speaks much in your dispraise.
VI
“My mother’s in her chamber sleeping
And words of love she will not hear;
So you may go and court another
And whisper softly in her ear.”
VII
Then she arose put on her clothing,
It was to let her true love in;
But e’er she had the door unlockit
His ship was sailing on the main.
VIII
“Come back, come back, my ain dear Johnnie,
Come back, come back, and marry me.”
“How can I come back and marry you, love?
Oor ship is sailing on the sea.”
IX
“The fish may fly, and the seas run dry,
The rocks may melt doon wi’ the sun,
And the working man may forget his labour
Before that my love returns again.”
X
She’s turned herself right roun’ about
She’s flung herself intae the sea;
“Farweel for aye, my ain dear Johnnie
Ye’ll ne’er hae tae come back to me.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Metterò a posto la mia barca (1)
e la porterò in mare
andrò lontano verso l’orizzonte
per vedere se il mio amore mi pensa.
II
E navigò a Est e navigò a Ovest
Navigò alla ricerca di terre lontane
finchè ritornò alla finestra del suo vero amore
e bussò forte per poter entrare
III
“Oh chi è alla finestra della mia camera
che bussa così forte e vuole entrare?”
“Sono io, sono io il tuo vero amore
e sono inzuppato fino alle ossa (2).
IV
Allora vai, vai e chiedi a tuo padre
vedi se ti lascerà sposare con me;
e se dice no, ritorna da me a dirmelo
e sarà l’ultima volta che ti disturberò”
V
“Mio padre è nella sua stanza a scrivere
seduto accanto alla sua mercanzia
e in mano tiene una lettera
che è più di calunnie verso di te.
VI
Mia madre è nella sua stanza a dormire
e parole d’amore non sentirà;
così puoi andare e corteggiare un’altra
e sussurrare dolcemente nel suo orecchio”
VII
Allora lei si alzò e si vestì e stava per far entrare il suo vero amore,
ma non aveva la porta sbloccato,
che la nave salpò per il mare!
VIII
“Ritorna, ritorna mia caro Johnny
ritorna ritorna e sposami”
“Come posso tornare indietro e sposarti amore?
La nostra nave è salpata in mare”
IX
“I pesci voleranno e i mari si prosciugheranno
Le rocce si fonderanno al sole
e il lavoratore dimenticherà il suo lavoro
prima che il mio amore ritorni di nuovo”
X
Senza tanti indugi prese la decisione
e si gettò nel mare
“Addio per sempre, mio caro Johnny
non dovrai più ritornare da me”

NOTE
1) the sentence is a metaphor [la frase è una metafora]
2) a classic of the genre: the suitor is cold in the snow, frost or rain! [un classico del genere: lo spasimante è infreddolito sotto la neve, il gelo o è zuppo di pioggia!]

LINK
http://allanfmoore.org.uk/approcelt.pdf
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/idrewmyshipintotheharbour.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120478

Night visiting songs

In the popular tradition there are many ballads called “night visiting songs” with a stereotypical love adventure in which a young man (a soldier or a sailor or even a passing nobleman) for his attractiveness and gallantry, he manages to obtain the virtue of a young girl, entering her bedroom at night (usually on a rainy night). A popular version of Romeo’s night visit to Juliet’s balcony. (see archive)
Nella tradizione popolare sono assai numerose le ballate dette  “night visiting song” ovvero le avventure amorose abbastanza stereotipate in cui un giovanotto (un soldato o un marinaio o anche un nobiluomo di passaggio) per la sua avvenenza e galanteria, riesce a ottenere la virtù di una giovane ragazza, spesso intrufolandosi in camera sua nottetempo (in genere in una notte di pioggia). Una versione popolare della visita notturna di Romeo al balcone di Giulietta. (vedi prima parte)

Robert Burns: Let me in this ae night

First published in The Scots Musical Museum in 1787, Robert Burns wrote his version of the story in 1795 (but the attribution is controversial). The melody is ‘I would have my gowne made’ or ‘The newe Goune made‘ (“The New Made Gowne“) found in a flute manuscript of 1694 (cf). Another melody to which the ballad has most often been combined is ‘Lend me your Loom Lass‘ (cf)

Dapprima pubblicato nello Scots Musical Museum nel 1787 Robert Burns ha scritto la sua versione della storia nel 1795 (ma l’attribuzione è controversa).
La melodia abbinata al testo è detta ‘I would have my gowne made‘ oppure ‘The newe Goune made‘ (“The New Made Gowne”) trovata in un manoscritto per flauto del 1694 (vedi). Un’altra melodia a cui la ballata è stata più spesso abbinata è ‘Lend me your Loom Lass‘ (vedi)

Le Melodie

Charlotte Balzereit in Celtic Impression 1997

Catherine Fraser & Duncan Smith in Rhymes & Reasons 2009

The lyrics is a conversation between a young man and a young woman of whom he is infatuated. He begs to be let ‘in’; she lists the reasons that she cannot do so.
Il testo è basato sul dialogo tra un giovanotto e una fanciulla di cui egli è invaghito. Lui la supplica di lasciarlo “entrare”, ma lei elenca le ragioni per cui non può farlo.

Burns’s lyric also appears under the title “Oh lassie art thou sleeping yet?”- “Her Answer” 
Il testo è anche trascritto da Burns con il titolo “Oh lassie art thou sleeping yet?” – “Her Answer” 

Ossian in “Ossian” 1977 (Spotify) live 1976 

Billy Ross in The Complete Songs of Robert Burns Volume 1 1996

Robert Burns 1795
I
“Oh lassie are ye sleepin yet?
Or are thou waukin, I wad wit?
For loove has bound me hand and fitt,
An I wad fain be in Jo.”
Chorus:
“Oh let me in this ae nicht
This ae, ae, ae nicht,
For pity’s sake this ae nicht,
Oh rise an let me in Jo.”
II
“Thou hear’st the winter wind an weet,
Nae star blinks through the drivin sleet,
Oh tak pity on my weary feet,
An shield me frae the rain Jo.”
III
“Oh the bitter blast that round me blaws,
Unheeded howls, unheeded faas,
Oh the cauldness o thy hert’s the cause,
Of aa my grief an pine Jo.”
IV
“Oh tell na me o wind an rain,
Upbraid na me wi cauld disdain;
Ah gae back the gait ye cam again,
I winna let ye in Jo.”
V
“Oh the bird that charmed the summer’s day,
Is now the cruel fowler’s prey,
Ah let witless, trusting woman say,
How aft her fate’s the same Jo.”
SECOND CHORUS
“For I tell ye noo this ae nicht,
This ae, ae, ae nicht,
For aince an aa this ae nicht,
I winna let ye in Jo.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
“Oh lassie are you sleeping yet?
Or are you awake, I would wait?
For love has bound me hand and foot,
An I would fond be in, dear.”
Chorus:
“Oh let me in tonight
This night,
For pity’s sake this night,
Oh rise an let me in dear.”
II
“Do you hear the winter wind and weet,
No star blinks through the driving sleet,
Oh take pity on my weary feet,
An shield me from the rain dear.”
III
“Oh the bitter blast that round me blows,
Unheeded howls, unheeded falls,
Oh the coldness of your heart’s the cause,
Of all my grief and pain dear.”
IV
“Oh tell not me of wind and rain,
Upbraid not me with cold disdain;
Ah go back the gait you came again,
I would not let you in dear.”
V
“Oh the bird that charmed the summer’s day,
Is now the cruel fowler’s prey,
Ah let witless, trusting woman say,
How after her fate’s the same dear.”
SECOND CHORUS
“For I tell you now this night,
This night,
For once an all this night,
I will not let you in dear.

NOTE
1) letteralmente: mi ha legato mani e piedi
2) jo è una vecchia parola scozzese che indica una persona amata
3) ae = a, an nel senso di una notte intera
4) la donna si lascia convincere e lascia entrare l’uomo, anche se teme che lui possa abusare della sua fiducia – come puntualmente accade!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I (UOMO)
Ragazza stai ancora dormendo?
Devo aspettare che ti svegli?
Perchè l’amore mi ha preso al laccio (1) 
e io vorrei stare dentro con te, amore (2)
Ritornello:
O fammi entrare questa notte
per tutta questa notte (3)
per carità questa notte
alzati e fammi entrare amore
II
Non senti il vento invernale e il nevischio,
nessuna stella brilla a guidare il cammino,
abbi pietà dei miei piedi stanchi,
e dammi riparo dalla pioggia, cara
III
Oh la tempesta che sferza intorno a me,
urla e si abbatte invano,
oh la freddezza del tuo cuore è la causa 
di tutto il mio dolore e della mia pena, amore”
IV (DONNA)
“Oh non dirmi del vento e della pioggia,
non disprezzarmi con la tua freddezza,
tornatene da dove sei venuto, 
non ti lascerò entrare, caro.
V
L’uccello che affascina il giorno dell’estate, 
è ora preda del crudele cacciatore.
Così dico che per la donna fiduciosa e sciocca (4) ,
il destino è spesso uguale, caro”
Secondo coro
Perchè  ti dico questa notte
proprio questa notte
per una volta proprio questa notte
non ti lascerò entrare caro”

O Lassie, art thou Sleeping Yet

This courting song was initially sent by Burns to Thomson in August 1793, followed by a revised version in February 1795. Thomson felt that the piece ‘displayed great address’, but they disagreed over the delicacy of the closing section, with Burns prompted to explain that his ‘heroine […] gives not the least reason to believe that she speaks from her own experience’. Impatiently however, the poet announced that, ‘of all boring matters in this boring world, criticising my own works is the greatest bore’. Thomson’s printing of the song was arranged by Haydn. The opening of the text is adapted from a traditional piece, that was reworked by Burns for the Scots Musical Museum, no. 311. (from here)
Questa “canzone di corteggiamento” fu inizialmente inviata da Burns a Thomson nell’agosto del 1793, seguita da una versione riveduta nel febbraio 1795. Thomson sentì che il pezzo ‘mostrava un ottimo intervento’, ma non erano d’accordo sulla delicatezza della sezione di chiusura, con Burns sollecitato a spiegare che la sua “eroina […] non dà il minimo motivo di credere che lei parli per sua diretta esperienza”. Tuttavia, con impazienza, il poeta annunciò che “di tutte le cose noiose in questo mondo noioso, criticare le mie opere è la più grande noia”. La stampa della canzone di Thomson è stata arrangiata da Haydn. L’apertura del testo è tratta da un pezzo tradizionale, che è stato rielaborato da Burns per lo “Scots Musical Museum”, no. 311. (tradotto da qui)

Alison McNeill, Recorded at The Green Door studio in Glasgow, 2016 (engineer: Sam Smith)

I
O lassie, art thou  sleeping yet
Or art you waking, I wou’d wit?
For love has bound me hand and foot,
And I wou’d fain be in, jo.
Chorus:
O let me in this ae night,
this ae night, this ae night,

For pity’s sake this ae night
O rise and let me in, jo.
II
“Thou hear’st the winter wind an weet,
Nae star blinks through the drivin sleet,
Oh tak pity on my weary feet,
An shield me frae the rain Jo.”
Chorus
III
O tell na me o’ wind an’ rain,
Upbraid na me wi’ cauld disdain,
Gae back the gate ye cam again,
I winna let ye in, jo.
Chorus variation
I tell you now, this ae night
this ae night,  this ae night
And ance for a’  this ae night,
I winna let you in, jo
IV
Oh the bitter blast that round me blaws,
Unheeded howls, unheeded faas,
Oh the cauldness o thy hert’s the cause,
Of aa my grief an pine Jo
Chorus
V
The snellest blast, at mirkest hours,
That round the pathless wand’rer pours
Is nocht to what poor she endures,
That’s trusted faithless man, jo.
Chorus variation
VI
The bird that charm’d his summer day,
Is now the cruel Fowler’s prey;
Let witless, trusting, Woman say
How aft her fate’s the same, jo!
Chorus variation
VII
The sweetwst flowers that deck’d the mead,
Now trodden like the vilest weed
Let simple maid the lesson read 
The weird may be her ain, jo
Chorus variation
 English translation Cattia Salto
I
“Oh lassie are you sleeping yet?
Or are you awake, I would wait?
For love has bound me hand and foot,
An I would fond be in, dear.”
Chorus:
“Oh let me in tonight
This night, This night,
For pity’s sake this night,
Oh rise an let me in dear.”
II
“Do you hear the winter wind and weet,
No star blinks through the driving sleet,
Oh take pity on my weary feet,
An shield me from the rain dear.”
Chorus
III
“Oh tell not me of wind and rain,
Upbraid not me with cold disdain;
Ah go back the gait you came again,
I would not let you in dear.”
Chorus variation
“For I tell you now this night,
This night,
For once an all this night,
I will not let you in dear.
IV
“Oh the bitter blast that round me blows,
Unheeded howls, unheeded falls,
Oh the coldness of your heart’s the cause,
Of all my grief and pain dear.”
Chorus
V
The hardest blast, at darkest hours,
That round the pathless wanderer pours
Is nothing to what poor she endures,
That’s trusted faithless man, dear.
Chorus variation
VI
“Oh the bird that charmed the summer’s day,
Is now the cruel fowler’s prey,
Ah let witless, trusting woman say,
How after her fate’s the same dear.”
Chorus variation
VII
The sweetwst flowers that decked the meadow,
Now trodden like the vilest weed
Let simple maid the lesson read 
The fate may be her own, dear
Chorus variation

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I (UOMO)
“Ragazza stai ancora dormendo?
Devo aspettare che ti svegli?
Perchè l’amore mi ha preso al laccio (1) 
e io vorrei stare dentro con te, amore (2)
Ritornello:
O fammi entrare questa notte
per tutta questa notte (3)
per carità questa notte
alzati e fammi entrare amore
II
Non senti il vento invernale e il nevischio,
nessuna stella brilla a guidare il cammino,
abbi pietà dei miei piedi stanchi,
e dammi riparo dalla pioggia, cara”
III (DONNA)
“Oh non dirmi del vento e della pioggia,
non disprezzarmi con la tua freddezza,
tornatene da dove sei venuto, 
non ti lascerò entrare, caro.
Secondo coro
Perchè  ti dico questa notte
proprio questa notte
per una volta proprio questa notte
non ti lascerò entrare caro”
IV (UOMO)
“Oh la tempesta che sferza intorno a me,
urla e si abbatte invano,
oh la freddezza del tuo cuore è la causa 
di tutto il mio dolore e della mia pena, cara”
V (DONNA)
“La raffica di vento più forte nelle ore più buie
che si rovescia sul vagabondo senza meta
non è nulla in confronto a ciò che la poveretta sopporta
per essersi fidata di un uomo infedele.
VI 
L’uccello che affascina il giorno dell’estate, 
è ora preda del crudele cacciatore.
Così dico che per la donna fiduciosa e sciocca,
il destino è spesso uguale, caro
VII
I più bei fiori che ornavano il prato
sono ora calpestati come l’erba più vile
che la modesta fanciulla impari la lezione
potrebbe essere il suo destino, caro”

LINK
http://www.robertburns.org/works/512.shtml
http://ingeb.org/songs/olassiea.html
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-iv,-song-311,-pages-320-and-321-let-me-in-this-ae-night.aspx
https://www.springthyme.co.uk/1004/cd04_09.htm

https://burnsc21.glasgow.ac.uk/o-lassie-art-thou-sleeping-yet/
https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Oh_lassie_art_thou_sleeping_yet
http://www.robertburns.org/works/513.shtml

OSSIAN’S LAMENT

Ossian’s Lament, anche conosciuta come “Cumhadh Fhinn“, “Ossian’s Lament for his Father“, “Oisin’s Lament” è una melodia antica con cui si dice Ossian abbia accompagnato i suoi canti.
Ossian è un bardo leggendario dell’antica Scozia o Irlanda, paragonato ad Omero e a Shakespeare, grazie al presunto ritrovamento dei suoi poemi in Scozia. Le sue leggende si rincorrono in Irlanda, Isola di Man e Scozia, ma la sua popolarità crebbe solo nella metà del 1700 quando James MacPherson scrisse “I Canti di Ossian” affermando di aver ritrovato suoi manoscritti e frammenti nelle Highlands scozzesi, tra i quali un poema epico su Fingal, il padre, che disse di aver “semplicemente” tradotto, in realtà inventando di sana pianta: la moda ossianica divampò per tutta Europa dando vita al Romanticismo.

Ossian Singing, Nicolai Abildgaard, 1787 (by Wiki)

OISIN DEI FIANNA

Gli studiosi identificano Ossian con l’Oisin (pronunciato Osciin) guerriero dei Fianna, che visse in Irlanda secondo alcuni nel VII secolo a.C. e secondo altri nel II o IV secolo, di cui si narrano molte leggende. Suo padre era Finn Mac Coll (Fionn Mac Cumhaill) il più famoso degli eroi irlandesi e sua madre nientemeno che la dea Sadb (Sava). Tuttavia un racconto scozzese riportato da Alexander Carmicheal nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” (1900) ci racconta invece che la fata era l’amante tradita avendo Finn preferito sposare ua donna della terra degli uomini (continua).
Oisin Mac Finn fu un guerriero-poeta, amante delle belle donne. Dalla sua moglie terrena Eobhir dai capelli di lino ebbe Oscar, un prode guerriero, l’ultimo comandante dei Fianna o Feniani e dalla compagna divina Niamh una figlia, Plur na mBan (il fiore delle donne), la fanciulla di Beltane.

Oisin a caccia incontra Niamh sul suo bianco cavallo

La bella Niamh dai Capelli d’Oro figlia di Manannan ovvero il dio del Mare lo portò sulla sua Isola di Tír na nÓg (l’Altro Mondo, la Terra dell’Eterna Giovinezza), insieme vissero trecento anni che a Oisin parvero solo pochi giorni (vedi); quando ebbe il desiderio di ritornare a visitare la sua terra Niamh gli donò un cavallo, il quale magicamente lo avrebbe riportato sulla terra: ma il padre era morto da centinaia d’anni, le grandi fortezze dei Fianna erano in rovina e i luoghi che lui ricordava erano cambiati. Amareggiato, sulla via del ritorno, Oisin cadde di sella e divenne improvvisamente vecchio: i tre anni trascorsi nell’AltroMondo corrispondevano a trecento anni sulla terra!
Secondo una versione della storia Oisin non morì ma sopravvisse magicamente fino all’arrivo in Irlanda di San Patrizio, al quale ebbe modo di narrare le gesta dei Fianna, guerrieri e cacciatori della mitologia irlandese.

IL CICLO FENNIANO

Questi racconti mitologici dell’antica Irlanda vengono anche chiamati “Ciclo Ossianico” perchè si ritenne fossero stati in buona parte scritti da Ossian. Iniziano con l’ascesa di Fionn, il Biondo a capo dei Fianna e si concludono con la sua morte. (e se volete sapere perchè Fionn sia stato soprannominato il Bianco ecco un’altro racconto su in incontro fatato con la Cailleach Biorar  sullo Slieve Gullion !
I fianna furono una milizia che conduceva incursioni guerresche per proprio conto, ma non necessariamente erano dei fuorilegge o predoni. Si trattava spesso di uomini espulsi dal clan di appartenenza, figli di re in contrasto con i padri, individui che volevano vendicare torti privati facendosi giustizia da soli, occasionalmente potevano diventare una milizia al servizio dei diversi re d’Irlanda, per i quali raccoglievano le imposte, ristabilivano l’ordine in caso di necessità, difendevano il regno dalle incursioni dei nemici.
Per essere ammesso nel gruppo ogni candidato doveva superare prove di resistenza e di agilità, ma doveva anche dimostrare di conoscere la poesia e quindi la magia e la sapienza.
I Fenniani vennero annientati dal re supremo Cairbre Mac Cormac “Lifechair” nella battaglia di Gabhra (Cat Gabhra) in cui Caibre venne ucciso da Oscar il quale morì anch’egli poco dopo per le ferite riportate.

Manifattura di Giovanni Volpato (Roma, 1785-1803) Galata morente, 1786-1789 biscuit, Collezione privata © Foto Giuseppe Schiavinotto
Manifattura di Giovanni Volpato (Roma, 1785-1803) Galata morente, 1786-1789 biscuit, Collezione privata © Foto Giuseppe Schiavinotto

L’intero ciclo presenta molte analogie con il ciclo britannico di re Artù e molto probabilmente le leggende di Finn e di Artù derivano entrambe dalla comune tradizione celtica insulare di una confraternita di cacciatori-guerrieri guidati da un formidabile capo che difendeva il reame contro le incursioni provenienti dall’esterno.

il mio amore è figlio della collina. Insegue il cervo che fugge
i suoi cani grigi ansimano intorno a lui; la corda del suo arco risuona nella foresta. (frammento Ossian)

La melodia è stata abbinata ad un testo in gaelico scozzese all’epoca delle “Highland clearances” (1750 -1880) con il titolo “Ó mo dhùthaich“: il brano contenuto nel “Folksongs and Folklore of South Uist”, 1955 è stato raccolto nell’isola di South Uist (isole Ebridi) da Margaret Fay Shawe scritto originariamente da un nativo isolano, Allan MacPhee di Loch Carnan.

Se avete un po’ di tempo per guardatevi questo reportage dall’isola..

LA MELODIA: Oran an Fheidh

“The air, according to Neil (1991), is thought to be the original melody popular in Lochaber and environs as “Oran an Fheidh” (Song of the Deer). It commemorates the legendary warrior Fingal, Ossian’s father, a brave and shrewd Highland warrior chieftain who was “a faithful friend but an awesome and unforgiving foe as was illustrated when he showed no mercy towards his nephew Diarmid, who had eloped with his beautiful Queen Grainne.” O’Neill (1913) is of the opinion that this ancient lament “makes no appeal to modern ears” and points out that old laments as a genre display much diversity in composition. Paul de Grae finds O’Neill’s air to be a near-duplicate of “Cumhadh Fion: Ossian’s Lament for his Father,” printed in The Scottish Gael, vol. 2 (London, 1831), by James Logan. ” (tratto da qui)
Secondo la leggenda Fionn non è morto realmente, ma dorme in una caverna in attesa di essere richiamato.

ASCOLTA David Tomlinson &Kate Liddell

ASCOLTA William Jackson

Ó MO DHÙTHAICH

Ascoltiamo tutto il brano nella versione del gruppo scozzese Capercaillie (registrato in

I
Ó mo dhùthaich, ‘s tu th’air m’aire,
Uibhist chùmhraidh ùr nan gallan,
Far a faighte na daoin’ uaisle,
Far ‘m bu dual do Mhac ‘ic Ailein.
II
Tìr a’ mhurain, tìr an eòrna,
Tìr ‘s am pailt a h-uile seòrsa,
Far am bi na gillean òga
Gabhail òran ‘s ‘g òl an leanna.
III
Thig iad ugainn, carach, seòlta,
Gus ar mealladh far ar n-eòlais;
Molaidh iad dhuinn Manitòba,
Dùthaich fhuar gun ghual, gun mhòine.
IV
Cha ruig mi leas a bhith ‘ga innse,
Nuair a ruigear, ‘s ann a chìtear,
Samhradh goirid, foghar sìtheil,
Geamhradh fada na droch-shìde.
V
Nam biodh agam fhìn do stòras,
Dà dheis aodaich, paidhir bhrògan,
Agus m’fharadh bhith ‘nam phòca,
‘S ann air Uibhist dheanainn seòladh.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
I
Oh my country, of thee I am thinking,
Fragrant fresh Uist of the handsome youths(1),
Where may be seen young noblemen,
Where once was the heritage of Clanranald(2).
II
Land of bent grass, land of barley,
Land of all things in plenty,
Where there are young men and youths,
A place of songs and drinking ale.
III
They come to us, cunning and deceitful,
From our homes they would entice us;
To us they praise Manitoba(3),
A cold country without coal or peat.
IV
To tell you of it I need not trouble,
For when one arrives it may be seen,
A short summer, a peaceful autumn,
And a long winter of bad weather.
V
If I was in possession of the wealth,
Of two suits of clothes and a pair of shoes,
And if the fare was in my pocket,
Then for Uist I would be sailing.(4)
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Isola mia a te penso
fragrante e fresca Uist della giovinezza(1)
dove si trova la giovane nobiltà
che un tempo fu fedele al Clanranald(2)
II
Terra di erba frusciante, terra d’orzo,
terra ricca di ogni cosa
dove ci sono uomini giovani
e nobili
un posto di canzoni e bevute.
III
Vennero da noi, con l’astuzia e l’inganno
dalle nostre case ci illusero
e ci lodarono Manitoba(3) un paese freddo, senza carbone o torba
IV
Per raccontarti di ciò, non ho bisogno di darmi tanta pena, perchè quando si arriva si può  vedere una breve estate, un autunno tranquillo e un lungo inverno di maltempo
V
Se fossi ricco e avessi due vestiti eleganti e un paio di scarpe
e cibo nelle mie tasche
allora per Uist vorrei salpare(4).

NOTE
1) nel ricordo l’isola diventa Tír na nÓg (l’Altro Mondo, la Terra dell’Eterna Giovinezza) continua
2) Clan Ranald è un ramo del Clan Donald, uno dei clan scozzesi più numeroso ed articolato in numerose suddivisioni.
3) Manitoba è una provincia del Canada occidentale, nelle Praterie canadesi.
4) evidentemente il signor Allan MacPhee riuscì a ritornare nella sua amata isola e morì a Loch Caman

FONTI
https://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Fingal_poema_epico_di_Ossian/Ossian_(Giacomo_Macpherson)
http://www.cima-asso.it/2009/10/i-canti-di-ossian/
http://www.timelessmyths.com/celtic/ossian.html
https://sites.google.com/site/finscealtanaheireann/home/introduction-oisin
http://guide.supereva.it/musica_celtica_/interventi/2003/12/146119.shtml
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Cumhadh_Fhinn
http://www.ceolsean.net/content/CeolMead/Book01/Book01%208.pdf
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/farewell-to-fiunary/ http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ohmodhuthaich.htm
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/omodhuthaich.asp
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/o_mo_dhuthaich_s_tu_th_air_m_aire/
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/1004/cd04_04.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/38295/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/person/4814

A phiùthrag ‘s a phiuthar

Read post in English

Sister’s lament” (Sister o sister) è un canto in gaelico scozzese proveniente dalle Isole Ebridi, in cui una fanciulla rapita dalle fate, chiama la sorella perchè giunga in suo soccorso: nel canto si descrive il nascondiglio delle fate. Il brano è compreso nella collezione “Songs of the Hebrides”, Vol 1 di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser con il titolo “A Fairy Plaint” (Ceol-brutha).

Nei racconti popolari le fate non sono affatto creature benevole, attratte dalla forza e vitalità del genere umano, rapiscono i bambini e in particolare i neonati, o seducono (a scopo di rapimento) belle fanciulle e giovinetti.
Il rapimento fatato era un tempo un tentativo di razionalizzare la perdita dei propri cari, si trovava consolazione nel pensare che le fate avessero sottratto quella giovane vita a un triste destino, oppure si cercava una spiegazione per i comportamenti anomali, come l’autismo o la depressione.  Così un comportamento “assente” equivaleva a un rapimento dell’anima e il malcapitato si sentiva come prigioniero nel Regno fatato; un grande pericolo veniva dal cibo, perchè bastava un assaggio per conservarne uno struggente desiderio, molto spesso fatale.

LA FIABA CELTICA

Due sorelle vivevano in una valle non molto lontano a un cerchio delle fate, in cui gli elfi  tenevano un mercato notturno, offrendo una vasta scelta di frutta succosa e saporita. Il mercato era invisibile agli occhi umani, ma una notte le fanciulle lo videro, la più anziana d’istinto fuggì spaventata, ma la più giovane incuriosita, si lasciò coinvolgere nello scambio e diede una ciocca dei suoi capelli dorati per quei frutti così invitanti.
Ritornò a casa solo dopo averne mangiato a volontà, ma la notte dopo, spinta dalla fame che il cibo umano non riusciva più a saziare, andò a cercare il mercato degli elfi,  senza più trovarlo. La sorella più grande accorgendosi che la sorellina era preda di un malessere inspiegabile che la consumava, cercò a sua volta il luogo magico, riuscendo a trovarlo; tuttavia gli elfi avrebbero ceduto i loro frutti solo se anche la sorella maggiore avesse banchettato con loro;  la ragazza temendo la fine della sorella, si rifiutò ostinatamente, nonostante la furia degli elfi, che fecero di tutto, anche sbatterle i frutti in faccia e premerli contro la sua bocca. Così un po’ di succo le restò sulle labbra..

Goblin-Market-Arthur-Rackham
Goblin Market. Arthur Rackham.

All’alba la ragazza riuscì a rientrare a casa per dare un ultimo saluto alla sorella morente, un ultimo dolce bacio.. fu così che la sorellina dalle sue labbra gustò il cibo elfico, la sua fame fu saziata e trovò la guarigione.

A phiùthrag ‘s a phiuthar

Il canto condivide la struttura delle waulking songs e in origine forse era un canto di lavoro.  La melodia è molto triste e alcuni ipotizzano si tratti di un lamento funebre.

Flora MacNeil che ha imparato la canzone da un suo parente dell’isola di Mingulay  Tobar an Dualchais

Margaret Stewart in Togidh mi mo Sheolta (Along The Road Less Travelled)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017 video ufficiale illustrato da Eleonore Dambre e Dima Nowarah

La struttura del canto ripete l’ultima frase come prima frase nella successiva strofa. La parte corale del canto è affidata a “vocables” ovvero suoni sillabici senza senso.


A phiùthrag ‘s a phiuthar, hu ru Ghaoil a phiuthar, hu ru
Nach truagh leat fhèin, ho ho ill eo Nochd mo chumha, hu ru
Nach truagh leat fhèin, nochd mo chumha,
Mi’m bothan beag,  ìseal cumhag, 
Mi’m bothan beag, ìseal cumhag,
[Gun lùb sìomain, gun ghad tughaidh] [Gun sgrath dhìon, Gun lùb tughaidh] (3)
[Gun lùb sìomain, gun ghad tughaidh] [Gun sgrath dhìon, Gun lùb tughaidh] (3)
Ach uisge nam beann, Sìos ‘na shruth leis, 
Ach uisge nam beann,  Sìos ‘na shruth leis,
’S mise bhean bhochd, Chianail, dhuilich,
’S mise bhean bhochd,  Chianail, dhuilich,
Dhìrich mi suas,  Beinn an Sgrìobain,
Dhìrich mi suas,  Beinn an Sgrìobain,
[’S Laigheabhal Mhòr , nan each grìs-fhionn.] [Hèabhal mhòr(5),  Nan each dhriumfhionn, (6)]

[’S Laigheabhal Mhòr , nan each grìs-fhionn.] [Hèabhal mhòr(5),  Nan each dhriumfhionn, (6)]
Cha d’ fhuair mi ann, Na bha dhìth orm
Cha d’ fhuair mi ann, Na bha dhìth orm
Tè bhuidhe, ’s a falt mar dhìthein.

Traduzione inglese di  John Lorne Campbell*
Little sister, sister
beloved sister
Do you not pity(1)
My grief tonight
In a little hut(2) I am
Low and narrow
Without a roof-rope
or a wisp of thatch. (3)
The rain of the hills
streaming into it(4)
I am a poor woman
sad and miserable.
[second sister]
I climbed up (5)
Ben Sgrìobain
and Laigheabhal Mhòr (5)
with it’s spotted horses (6)
I didn’t find there
what I wanted,
A girl
with hair like a golden daisy.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Sorella, sorellina
mia cara sorella
come non compatire
il mio dolore di stasera?
Mi trovo in una piccola casetta
bassa e stretta
senza graticci
e tetto di zolle
l’acqua delle colline
che ci piove dentro
Sono una povera donna
triste e miserabile!
[seconda sorella]
Sono salita
sul Ben Sgrìobain
nell’alta Heaval
dei cavalli pezzati!
Non ho trovato
quello che cercavo:
una fanciulla
con i capelli come una margherita dorata

NOTE
1) “Can you not pity” oppure tradotto ” Would you not pity me my mourning tonight”
2) “Small my dwelling”, tradotto anche come little bothy
3) “With no protection no thatching” oppure tradotto “Without a bent rope or a wisp of thatch”
Gun sgrath dhìon= With no roof of turf, Gun lùb tughaidh= and no thatch entwined
4) “hillside wate like a running stream” oppure tradotto “Water from the peaks in a stream down through it”
5) Hèabhal mhòr= Mighty Heaval
Heaval è la collina più alta dell’isola di Barra si trova a nord-est di Castlebay, il villaggio principale. Non c’è però una cima con il nome Sgrìobain
6) sono i cavalli delle fate che vivono liberamente sulla collina.
grìs-fhionn oppure dhriumfhionn (white-maned horses) ossia bianco. I cavalli sono quelli delle fate e quindi bianchi o dal crine d’argento tuttavia grìs-fhionn=brindled colour, a mixture of black and white. Potrebbe trattarsi della razza palomino o cremello. L’origine del Palomino è molto antica, infatti si ritiene che cavalli dorati con coda e criniera argentea fossero cavalcati dai primi imperatori della Cina. Achille, il mitico eroe greco, cavalcava Balios e Xantos, che erano “gialli e dorati, più veloci dei venti di tempesta”. Il cremello invece ha la particolarità dell’occhio azzurro, il manto è bianco con riflessi d’argento.

Un tour per l’isola di Barra nel video di Pascal Uehli

A Fairy Plaint (Ceol-brutha)

La versione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (come raccolto dal canto della signora Macdonald, Skallary, isola di Barra
Nach truagh leat fhéin phiùthrag a phiuthar O hi o hu o ho
Nach truagh leat fhéin nochd mo cumha O hi o hu o ho
Nach truagh leat fhéin nochd mo cumha
‘S mise bhean bhochd chianail dhubhach
‘S mise bhean bhochd chianail dhubhach
Mi’m bothan beag iosal cumhann
Mi’m bothan beag iosal cumhann
Gun lùb siomain gun sop tughaibh
Gun lùb siomain gun sop tughaibh
Uisge nam beann sios ‘na shruth leis
Uisge nam beann sios ‘na shruth leis
Ged’s oil leam sin cha’n e chreach mi
Ged’s oil leam sin cha’n e chreach mi
Cha’n e chuir mi cha’n e fhras mi

Versione di Kenneth MacLeod
Would you not pity me, o sister?
Would you not pity me my mourning tonight?
My little hut
Without a bent rope or a wisp of thatch
Water from the peaks
in a stream down through it
But that’s not the cause of my sorrow
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Non mi compatisci, sorella?
Non mi compatisci per il mio lutto di stasera?
La mia piccola capanna
senza un tetto o un filo di paglia,
l’acqua delle colline
che ci piove dentro
ma non è questo la causa del mio dolore

Rory Dall’s Sister’s Lament

Per restare in tema di lamento e sorelle  Cumh Peathar Ruari — Rory Dall’s Sister’s Lament composto da Daniel Dow circa 1778 (in A Collection of Ancient Scots Music for the violin, harpsichord or German flute) rimando all’analisi della melodia qui
Ossian in “Borders” 1984

FONTI
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/aphiuthrag.php
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/maggiemacinnes/aphiuthrag.htmd

https://www.juliefowlis.com/alterum/

http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/62594/9;jsessionid=89A212440240A80FF960AD2D4B425BD3
http://research.culturalequity.org/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=11984
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/about/songs/supernatural/index.asp
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=69117

http://www.earlygaelicharp.info/tunes/CumhPeatharRuari/
https://thesession.org/tunes/15575
http://www.cynthiacathcart.com/articles/rory_dall_lament.html

L’incantesimo del cervo

Read the post in English

THE  BELTANE CHASE SONG

Il testo è stato scritto da Paul Huson nel suo “Mastering   Witchcraft“- 1970 (pubblicato in lingua italiana dalla casa editrice Astrolabio con  l’infelice titolo Il dominio della magia nera) ispirandosi alla ballata scozzese “The Twa  Magicians”: Fith Fath è un’incantesimo di occultamento o di trasmutazione.
Caitlin Matthews nel 1978 ci aggiunse una melodia. Oggi il brano è considerato un tradizionale.

Nel testo si compie il ciclo stagionale delle trasmutazioni. Il rituale della Caccia d’Amore che doveva essere tipico a Beltane quando la Regina del Maggio ossia la Dea Fanciulla e il Re del Maggio, l’Uomo Verde si univano per  rinnovare la vita e la fertilità della Terra: ancora nel Medioveo i ragazzi vestiti di verde come elfi dei boschi si avventuravano nel greenwood (il bosco sacro), suonando un corno di modo che le ragazze potessero trovarli. Oppure si trasformavano in cacciatori e seguivano le trasmutazioni magiche con le loro prede.

Beltane Fire Festival: L’Uomo Verde e la Regina del Maggio

Caitlin Matthews 
Damh The Bard in Herne’s Apprentice – 2003

Pixi Morgan

FITH FATH SONG
I
I shall go as a wren(1) in Spring
With sorrow and sighing on silent wing(2)
CHORUS I
I shall go in our Lady’s name
Aye till I come home again
II
Then we shall follow as falcons grey
And hunt thee cruelly for our prey
CHORUS II
And we shall go in our Horned God’s name(3)
Aye to fetch thee home again
III
Then I shall go as a mouse in May
Through fields by night and in cellars by day.
CHORUS I
IV
Then we shall follow as black tom cats
And hunt thee through the fields and the vats.
CHORUS II
V
Then I shall go as an Autumn hare
With sorrow and sighing and mickle care. (4)
CHORUS I
VI
Then we shall follow as swift greyhounds/ And dog thy steps with leaps and bounds
CHORUS II
VII
Then I shall go as a Winter trout
With sorrow and sighing and mickle doubt.
CHORUS I
VIII
Then we shall follow as otters swift
And bind thee fast so thou cans’t shift
CHORUS II
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Uno scricciolo  di primavera cavalcherò
con dolore e affanno sull’ali silenti
Coro I
Mi trasformerò nel nome di nostra Signora, finchè ritornerò in me.
II
Così t’inseguiremo come falchi grigi
e ti cacceremo spietati come  nostra preda
Coro II
E ci trasformeremo  nel nome del Signore Cornuto per riportarti a casa.
III
Mi trasformerò in un topo di Maggio, per i campi di notte e nelle cantine di giorno.
Coro I
IV
Allora ci trasformeremo in grossi gatti neri, e ti daremo la caccia per i campi e le botti.
Coro II
V
Poi mi trasformerò in lepre d’autunno
con dolore e affanno e grande tribolazione.
Coro I
VI
Allora ci trasformeremo in rapidi levrieri e inseguiremo
le tue orme con grandi balzi.
Coro II
VII
Poi mi trasformerò in  trota d’Inverno
con dolore e affanno e grande tribolazione.
Coro I
VIII
Allora ci trasformeremo in lontre veloci e t’incateneremo bene in modo che tu non possa mutare.
Coro II

NOTE
1) Il nome gaelico “Druidh dhubh” si traduce come “druido degli uccelli” detto anche “passero di Bran” (il dio della profezia). Animale sacro la cui uccisione era considerata tabù e portatrice di sventura, ma non durante il tempo di Yule. Nel suo libro “La dea bianca”, Robert Graves spiega che nella tradizione celtica, la lotta tra le due parti dell’anno, è rappresentata dalla lotta tra il re-agrifoglio (o vischio), che rappresenta l’anno nascente e il re-quercia, che rappresenta l’anno morente. Al solstizio d’inverno il re-agrifoglio vince sul re-quercia, e viceversa per il solstizio d’estate. Nella tradizione orale, una variante di questa lotta è rappresentata dal pettirosso e lo scricciolo, nascosti tra le foglie dei due rispettivi alberi. Lo scricciolo rappresenta l’anno calante, il pettirosso l’anno nuovo e la morte dello scricciolo è un passaggio di morte-rinascita. continua
2) il mistero non può essere rivelato a parole: il percorso iniziatico viene compiuto e una volta compreso non si riesce ad esprimere.
3)  l’Horned God è un dio sincretico somma di antiche divinità rappresentate con le corna e simboli di fertilità e abbondanza (il Cernunnos celtico e le divinità greco-romane Pan e Dioniso). Secondo alcuni studiosi tale divinità era l’alternativa pagana del Dio cristiano, al quale coloro che restarono ancorati alle vecchie tradizioni continuarono a tributare venerazione, insomma il candidato ideale per la figura del Diavolo! Ma a mio parere è stato più il fanatismo cristiano ad appiattire e uniformare i culti tributati agli antichi dei in un unico culto diabolico.
L’idea del Dio Cornuto si sviluppò nei circoli  occultistici di Francia e Inghilterra nel XIX secolo e la sua prima raffigurazione moderna è quella di Eliphas Levi del 1855, fu però Margaret Murray nel The Witch-cult in Western Europe (Il culto delle streghe nell’Europa Occidentale, 1921) a costruire la tesi di un culto pagano unico sopravvissuto all’avvento del cristianesimo. Tale teoria non è però supportata da documentazioni  rigorose e di certo si può riscontrare la persistenza fino all’età moderna di culti o credenze presenti in varie parti d’Europa riconducibili alla religione verso gli Antichi Dei. Molte di tali credenze sono state assorbite nel Cristianesimo e infine combattute come diaboliche quando non si riusciva ad inglobarle nei nuovi culti.
Il Dio, secondo la tradizione Wicca, nasce al solstizio d’Inverno, sposa la Dea a Beltane e muore al Solstizio d’Estate essendo il principio maschile equivalente alla triplice Dea lunare che governa la vita e la morte.

65440797_zernunn4

4) Similmente Isobel Gowdie, processata per stregoneria nel 1662 in Scozia rivela ai suoi aguzzini la formula di un Fith Fath

I sall gae intil a haire,
Wi’ sorrow and sych and meikle care;
And I sall gae in the Devillis name,
Ay quhill I com hom againe.
in lepre entrerò
con dolore e grande affanno
e andrò nel nome del diavolo
finchè ritornerò un’altra volta nella mia forma

Molto è stato scritto sulle streghe, specialmente sulla grande caccia alle streghe che ebbe luogo sui due versanti della religione cristiana a un passo dal “Secolo dei Lumi” e non nell’oscuro medioevo.  Sintomo di un  cambiamento culturale che scuoterà le “certezze” della religione occidentale.  Streghe o fattucchiere (come stregoni e maghi) sono sempre esistiti, sono coloro che fanno uso della magia, che riescono a vedere oltre agli accidenti materiali e intraprendono un cammino di ricerca e di antica conoscenza. Turpe e osceno è stato quello che cattolici e protestanti hanno fatto nella loro “lotta” per il potere, per annientare coloro che erano visti come una minaccia contro la Vera Fede: una sanguinosa lotta di religione che ha inasprito i confini della tolleranza.

L’INCANTESIMO DEL CERVO

Il Fith Fath è un’incantesimo di occultamento o di trasmutazione. E’ riportato e descritto nel libro “Carmina Gadelica” di Alexander Carmicheal (vol II, 1900)
“Uomini e donne venivano resi invisibili o gli uomini venivano trasformati in cavalli, tori o cervi, mentre le donne venivano mutate in gatti, lepri o cerve. Queste trasformazioni erano talvolta volontarie, talvolta no. Il “fīth-fath” era particolarmente utile ai cacciatori, ai guerrieri ed ai viaggiatori, rendendoli invisibili o irriconoscibili ai nemici ed agli animali.” (traduzione del testo tratto da qui)

FATH fith
Ni mi ort,
Le Muire na frithe,
Le Bride na brot,
Bho chire, bho ruta,
Bho mhise, bho bhoc,
Bho shionn, ‘s bho mhac-tire,
Bho chrain, ‘s bho thorc,
Bho chu, ‘s bho chat,
Bho mhaghan masaich,
Bho chu fasaich,
Bho scan (4) foirir,
Bho bho, bho mharc,
Bho tharbh, bho earc,
Bho mhurn, bho mhac,
Bho iantaidh an adhar,
Bho shnagaidh na talmha,
Bho iasgaidh na mara,
‘S bho shiantaidh na gailbhe

Traduzione inglese*
FATH fith(1)
Will I make on thee,
By Mary(2) of the augury,
By Bride(3) of the corslet,
From sheep, from ram,
From goat, from buck,
From fox, from wolf,
From sow, from boar,
From dog, from cat,
From hipped-bear,
From wilderness-dog,
From watchful ‘scan,'(4)
From cow, from horse,
From bull, from heifer,
From daughter, from son,
From the birds of the air, (5)
From the creeping things of the earth,
From the fishes of the sea,
From the imps of the storm.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
L’incanto del cervo
farò su di te
per Danu delle Profezie
per Bride dalla Corazza,
da pecora, da ariete,
da capra, da caprone,
da volpe, da lupo,
da scrofa, da cinghiale,
da cane, da gatto,
da orso dai fianchi opimi,
da cane selvatico,
da vigile “esploratore‟ ,
da mucca, da cavallo,
da toro, da giovenca,
da figlia, da figlio,
dagli uccelli dell‟aria,
dalle creature che strisciano sulla terra
dai pesci del mare
dai folletti della tempesta

NOTE
* tradotto da Alexander Carmicheal
1) letteralmente si traduce con “deer aspect”; in realtà con l’incantesimo è possibile mutare in una qualunque forma animale.
Il cervo nobile o cervo rosso (red deer) è l’animale per eccellenza dei boschi, preda ambita della caccia, ma anche animale mitologico signore del Bosco e della Rinascita. Per i Celti delle Gallie Cernunnos era il dio della fertilità con palchi di cervo sul capo, l’equivalente animale dello Spirito del Grano. Guida magica, messaggero delle fate o animale psicopompo, il cervo (specie se bianco) è associato alla Grande Madre (e alle dee lunari) ma anche a Lug (l’equivalente celtico di una divinità solare). Come animale di Lugh rappresenta il sole nascente (con le corna che raffigurano i raggi) e così nel Cristianesimo è la rappresentazione di Cristo (o dell’anima che anela a Dio): è il re Cervo ciclicamente sacrificato alla Dea Madre per assicurare la fertilità della terra. “Io sono cervo dai sette palchi” canta il bardo Amergin e così doveva essere vestito il druido-sciamano durante i rituali con corna e pelli di cervo continua
2) Danu (o Anu) dea madre delle acque. Era il tempo del caos primordiale: aridi deserti e vulcani ribollenti, era il tempo del grande vuoto. Allora dal cielo oscuro un rivolo d’acqua cadde sulla terra e la vita cominciò a fiorire: dal suolo crebbe l’albero sacro e Danu (la dea Madre), l’acqua che scende dal cielo, lo nutrì. Dalla loro unione nacquero gli Dei..
Acque ipogeiche, grotte labirintiche, acque sorgive ma anche acque correnti dei fiumi furono i siti del culto preistorico e protostorico in tutta l’Europa. In particolare per i Keltoi Danu era il Danubio presso le cui sorgenti nacque la loro civiltà. continua
3) Il nome deriva dalla radice “breo” (fuoco): il fuoco della fucina del fabbro unito a quello dell’ispirazione artistica e dell’energia guaritrice. Conosciuta anche come Brighid, Brigit o Brigantia, è la dea del triplice fuoco, patrona dei fabbri, dei poeti e dei guaritori. Portava il soprannome di Belisama, la “Splendente” ed era una Dea Solare(presso i Celti e i Germani il Sole era femmina). A lei era dedicata la Festa di Fine Inverno che si celebrava nell’Europa celtica alle Calende di Febbraio. Era la festa di IMBOLC, la festa della purificazione dei campi e della casa a segnare il lento risveglio della Natura. continua
4) nessuno sa che animale sia un vigile esploratore, sicuramente un errore di trascrizione di Carmicheal
5) segue una invocazione dei tre regni, Nem (cielo), Talam (Terra) Muir (mare) e o se vogliamo mondo di sopra, di mezzo e di sotto

LA NEBBIA DI AVALON

Con l’invocazione si materializza una nebbia magica ovvero la nebbia di Avalon (o di Manannan), che funge da mezzo di trasporto verso l’Altromondo. La nebbia ha una duplice natura, di occultamento e di passaggio. Un’altra parola per “nebbia”, nell’irlandese delle origini, è féth fiadha che significa “l’arte di rassomigliare”. Sia gli dei che i druidi possono evocare la nebbia magica come mezzo di comunicazione tra i due mondi. La divinazione era quindi la féth fiadha.
La preghiera “Fath Fith” sembra proprio l’invocazione del cacciatore per occultarsi  dalle sue prede, ma era anche usata come forma di divinazione in un “luogo di soglia” per l’esperienza magica,  dello spazio come ad esempio la riva del fiume o il litorale del mare, il vano di una porta d’accesso all’edificio oppure un ponte. Ma  anche del tempo come l’alba e il tramonto che non sono nè giorno, nè notte o i giorni sacri che stanno a confine tra le stagioni.
Così facendo ci si trova in un luogo che è un non-luogo che alcuni chiamano il mondo opaco.

Il Racconto di Ossian e la Cerva

Ancora Alexander Carmicheal sempre nel capitolo del Fith Fath  racconta l’incontro del fanciullo Oisin (Ossian) con la madre: Ossian è un bardo leggendario dell’antica Scozia o Irlanda, paragonato ad Omero e a Shakespeare, grazie al presunto ritrovamento dei suoi poemi in Scozia. Le sue leggende si rincorrono in Irlanda, Isola di Man e Scozia, ma la sua popolarità crebbe solo nella metà del 1700 quando James MacPherson scrisse “I Canti di Ossian” affermando di aver ritrovato suoi manoscritti e frammenti nelle Highlands scozzesi, tra i quali un poema epico su Fingal, il padre, che disse di aver “semplicemente” tradotto, in realtà inventando di sana pianta: la moda ossianica divampò per tutta Europa dando vita al Romanticismo. continua

Secondo questa verione scozzese Oisin è stato generato da Finn Mac Coll (Fionn Mac Cumhaill) e da una donna mortale, ma precedentemente Finn era stato l’amante di una fata che aveva abbandonato per sposare la figlia degli uomini; così la fata per vendetta fece l’incantesimo del “Fath Fith” sulla donna trasformandola in cerva che andò raminga e poco dopo partorì Oisin (il piccolo cerbiatto)  nell’isola di Sandray  (Ebridi Esterne) nel Loch-nan-ceall ad Arasaig.
Ora dobbiamo fare un salto temporale e riprendere il racconto al tempo della fanciullezza di Ossian quando era ritornato a vivere con il padre e il resto dei Fianna. Un bel giorno intenti come di consueto alla caccia erano all’inseguimento di un maestoso cervo sulla montagna, quando una nebbia magica calò su di loro, facendoli separare e disperdere.
Così Ossian vagava senza più sapere dove fosse e si ritrovò in una profonda valle verde circondata da alte montagne azzurre, quando vide una cerbiatta talmente bella e aggraziata che restò ammirato a guardarla. Ma quando lo spirito della caccia prese il sopravvento in lui e stava per scagliare la lancia, lei si voltò a guardarlo fisso negli occhi e gli disse “Non farmi del male Ossian, sono tua madre sotto l’incantesimo del cervo, e sono cerva fuori e donna in casa. Tu sei affamato, assetato e stanco, vieni con me, cuore mio” E Ossian la seguì e oltrepassarono una porta nella roccia e appena attraversata la soglia la porta scomparve e ci fu solo la perete rocciosa, mentre la cerva si mutò in una bella donna vestita di verde e con i capelli dorati.
Dopo aver banchettato a sazietà, dilettato da bevande e musiche ed essersi riposato per tre giorni, Ossian volle ritornare dai Fianna, così scoprì che i tre giorni nel tumulo sotto la collina, equivalevano a tre anni sulla terra. Allora Ossian scrisse la sua prima canzone per avvertire la madre-cerva di stare lontano dalle zone di caccia dei Fianna  ‘Sanas Oisein D’a Mhathair (Ossian’s Warning To His Mother) di cui Carmicheal riporta una decina di strofe (vedi)

Stanilaus Soutten Longley (1894-1966)-Autumn

terza parte 

FONTI
“I misteri del druidismo” di Brenda Cathbad Myers
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/beltane-love-chase/
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2014.htm
http://www.annwnfoundation.com/ians-blog/pwyll-pen-annwn-shapeshifting-and-the-fith-fath
http://www.devanavision.it/filodiretto/default.asp?id_pannello=2&id_news=6950&t=IL_DRUIDISMO
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59312
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/print.php?sid=252