Galloway Tam Cam Here To Woo

“O, Galloway Tam Cam Here To Woo” is a humorous song sent to James Johnson from Robert Burns to be published in the “SMM” (Volume IV) The melody with the title of “Gallua Tam” is transcribed in the Lute Book ( also called Straloch Manuscript) by Robert Gordon of Straloch, 1627.
“O, Galloway Tam Cam Here To Woo” è una canzone umoristica inviata all’editore James Johnson da Robert Burns per essere pubblicata nello “SMM” (Volume IV)
La melodia con il titolo di “Gallua Tam” è trascritta nel Lute Book (detto anche Manoscritto Straloch) di Robert Gordon di Straloch, 1627.
Galloway Tam was identified with a traveler named Thomas Marshall of Galloway, a Tinkler-Gypsy famous as a musician. The Marshall family was interviewed by Andrew McCormick for his book The Tinkler-Gypsies of Galloway published in 1906, one of the first books describing the life and culture of Scottish Traveler communities.
Galloway Tam è stato identificato  con un  traveller di nome Thomas Marshall di Galloway, un gitano (Tinkler-Gypsy) famoso come musicista. La famiglia Marshallè stata intervistata da Andrew McCormick per il suo libro The Tinkler-Gypsies of Galloway pubblicato nel  1906, uno dei primi libri che descrive la vita e la cultura delle comunità scozzesi dei Traveller.
Andrew McCormick wrote: “There can be no doubt that the Marshalls have also Gypsy blood in their veins. The appearance of the various members of the family prove it, and the presence of many Romani words in their cant confirms it. Tradition related that the Marshalls have been tinklers in Galloway since time out of mind; and it is likely there were tinkler Marshalls in Galloway in 1505.”
“Non c’è dubbio che i Marshall hanno anche sangue zingaro nelle loro vene, l’aspetto dei vari membri della famiglia lo dimostra, e la presenza di molte parole rom nel loro modo di esprimersi lo conferma. Secondo la tradizione i Marshall sono stati calderai nel Galloway da sempre, ed è probabile che ci siano stati Marshalls a Galloway nel 1505. “

Ian Bruce in Alloway Tales, 1999

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 5 & 6 1996 
Ewan MacColl in Songs of Robert Burns, 1959

English translation*
I
O, Galloway (1) Tam cam here to woo;
I’d rather we’d gien him the brawnit cow;
For our lass Bess may curse and ban
The wanton wit o’ Galloway Tam.
II
O, Galloway Tam cam here to shear (2);
I’d rather we’d gien him the gude gray mare;
He kist the gudewife and strack the gudeman;
And that’s the tricks (3) o’ Galloway Tam.
III (4)
Galloway Tam rides far and near
there’s nane can graith wi’ sic
can gear (5);
the loons (6) ca’ out, wha sing the Psalm,
“Room i’ the stool (7) for Galloway Tam!”
IV
The Howdie (8) lifts frae the Beuk (9) her ee,
says “Blessing light on his pawkie ee!”
An’ she mixes ‘maist i’ the holie Psalm,
“O Davie thou wert like Galloway Tam!”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
O, Galloway Tam venne qui per fare la corte; piuttosto gli avrei dato la mucca rossa;
perche la nostra Bess maledice e condanna
lo spirito dissoluto di Tom di Galloway 
II
O, Tom di Galloway venne qui per la mietitura; piuttosto gli avrei dato la bella cavalla grigia,
lui baciò la moglie e bastonò il marito;
questo è il segreto di Tom di Galloway.
IV
Tom di Galloway corre in lungo e in largo,/ nessuno può competere con la sua bardatura,/ i giovinastri gridano a coloro che cantano il Salmo “Lo sgabello del pentimento per Tom di Galloway!”
V
La levatrice alza gli occhi dalla Bibbia e dice
“Siano benedetti i suoi occhi vivaci!”/e si confonde specie nel sacro salmo “Davide tu sei come Tom di Galloway”

NOTE
here
il frammento è troppo breve per inquadrarlo in una storia
1) Galloway, è una contea storica delle Lowland scozzesi inglobata nel 1975 con il Dumfries e si trova nel Border, dalla parte sud-ovest, dirimpetto all’Irlanda!
2) shear è la tosatura ma il termini in Scozia viene utilizzato anche per la stagione del raccolto:  “shearers” sono i mietitori  stagionali che si riversavano nelle Lowlands dal Nord della Scozia per la mietitura, Il lavoro era faticoso ancorchè monotono ma la stagione del raccolto era anche occasione di corteggiamenti come questa canzone ci ricorda (vedi)
3)  trick= il trucco, l’inganno, lo scherzo, burla
4) La versione pubblicata da Johnson nello “Scots Musical Museum” è di sole due strofe probabilmente opportunamente “censurata”  a causa dei doppi sensi, ho aggiunto la strofa III e IV collezionate da Allan Cunningham
5) credo ci sia un doppio senso, si riferisce alla bardatura del cavallo, ma in senso figurato è riferito alle sue “doti amatorie”
6) loun, lown o loon è un giovinastro o e se riferito a una donna ne sottolinea il comportamento sessuale disinibito
7) of Repentance: Lo Sgabello del Pentimento era un alto sgabello  usato dai presbiteriani scozzesi per la penitenza pubblica in chiesa, di persone che avevano offeso la moralità del tempo, spesso per fornicazione e adulterio. Poteva anche trattarsi di una struttura sopraelevata in legno
8) howdie= the midwife
9) beuck= book nel senso il Libro, la Bibbia

LINK

http://www.futuremuseum.co.uk/collections/arts-crafts/arts/photography/galloway-travellers.aspx
https://www.viewdumfriesandgalloway.co.uk/view-item?i=2000#.XPKUmBYzaUk
https://archive.org/details/remainsofnithsda00crom/page/n4
https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/91262534
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Scottish_Song/Galloway_Tam
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-iv,-song-325,-page-336-galloway-tam.aspx
http://www.horntip.com/mp3/1700s/1770ca–1986ca_songs_of_robert_burns_vol_5_and_6__jean_redpath_(CD)/14_galloway_tam.htm
https://folkways.si.edu/ewan-maccoll/galloway-tam/celtic-world/music/track/smithsonian
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Galloway_Tom_(1)
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Galloway_Tom_(1)

The Grey Selkie

Leggi in italiano

The best known of the ballads of the Orkney Islands, also as The Gray Silkie of Sule Skerry, tells of a selkie living on the rocky cliff of Sule. The ballad was collected by professor Child  ( # 113).

The legend says that to reproduce the selkie-male must be in human form and transmit his power to descendants: when his child is weaned on dry land, the selkie will return from the sea.

TRADITIONAL VERSION: The Gray Silkie

From Sailormen & Servingmaids 1961, a songs collection on field recordings from England, Scotland and Ireland with John Sinclair of the Fleet island, (melody collected in 1938 by Otto Anderson and transcribed in notation with text by Annie G. Gilchrist.)

John G. Halcro 
in Orkney, Land, Sea & Community, Scottish Tradition vol 21, recordings from the archives of the Scottish School of Studies of the University of Edinburgh (fragment recorded in 1973): “A brief version of it appears as no. 113 in Child without a tune, but this is no match for the variant which old John Sinclair of Flotta in the Orkney Isles turned up with in January 1934. He has since been visited by Swedish folklorists [i.e. Otto Andersson] and recorded for the BBC. Bronson remarks that his tune is a variant of the air often associated with Hind Horn, another ballad of traffic between spirits and mortals. Sinclair (who learned the song from his mother), worked all his life as a seaman, and a farmer-fisherman until his retirement. He now lives in a cottage by the sea where Silkies perhaps may still appear.”

Alison McMorland in Rowan in the Rock 2001

Jean Redpath 1975

June Tabor from Ashore 2011

I
In Norway’s Land there lived a maid
“Hush ba-loo-lilly”. this maid began,
“I know not where my babe’s father is
Whether by land or sea does he travel in”
II
It happened on a certain day
When this fair lady fell fast asleep
That in came a good grey silkie
And set him down at her bed feet
III
Saying, “Awak’, awak’, my pretty fair maid,
For oh, how sound as thou dost sleep,
And I’ll tell thee where thy babe’s father is,
He’s sitting close at thy bed feet.”
IV
“I pray thee tell to me thy name,
Oh, tell me where does thy dwelling be?”
“My name is good Hill Marliner,
And I earn my living oot o’er the sea.
V
I am a man upon the land,
I am a silkie in the sea,
And when I’m far from every strand
My dwelling it’s in Sule Skerry”
VI
“Alas, alas, that’s woeful fate,
That’s weary fate that’s been laid on me,
That a man should come from the West o’ Hoy
To the Norway Lands to have a bairn wi’ me.”
VII (1)
“My dear, I’ll wed thee with a ring,
With a ring, my dear, will I wed with thee.”
“Thee may go to thee weddings with whom thou wilt,
For I’m sure thou never will wed wi’ me.”
VIII
She has nursed his little wee son
For seven long years upon her knee
And at the end of seven long years
He came back with gowd and white monie (2)
IX
For she has got the gunner good
And a gay good gunner it was he,
He gaed oot on a May morning
And he shot the son and the grey silkie.
X
“Alas, alas, that’s woeful fate,
That’s weary fate that’s been laid on me.”
And eenst or twice she sobbed and sighed
And her tender hairt did break in three.(3)

NOTES
1) she asks silkie to marry her, but he refuses, telling her that she will marry another.
2) silkie pays the Norse tribute for his child
3) in another version, however, the woman decides to follow selkie and son throwing herself into the sea to prevent the prophecy from coming true

But the most widespread melody that became standard it is that of the American James Waters  (see first part)

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sule-skerry.htm

https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/the-great-selkie-of-sule-skerry/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/greatsilkieofsuleskerry.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4882

There grows a bonie brier-bush

Leggi in italiano

“There grows a bonie brier-bush” is a traditional Scottish song modified by Robert Burns for editorial purpose and published in 1796 in the “Scots Musical Museum”; the double meaning concerned both the allusion to the relationship between a Jacobite rebel “Highland laddie” and a “Lowland lassie” follower of King George that the erotic context of the relationship (as we find it in the variant”The Cuckoo’s nest“)
A version is also adapted by Carolina Oliphant, always on the melody “The Brier Bush”.

James Malcolm in The Complete Songs of Robert Burns Vol V, 1998

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 3 & 4 1996
Junkman’s Choir in The Burns Sessions – Footage of recordings from inside Robert Burns’ Cottage, Alloway, Scotland (January 2018)

I
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush (1) in our kail-yard (2),
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush in our kail-yard;
And below the bonnie brier-bush
there’s a lassie and a lad,
And they’re busy, busy
courting in our kail-yard.
II
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard,
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard;
We’ll awa to Athole’s green (3),
and there we’ll no be seen,
Whare the trees and the branches
will be our safe-guard.
III
‘ Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ (4)?
Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ ?
Where Sandy (5) and Nancy
I’m sure will ding (6) them a’?’
‘ I winna gang to the dance
in Carlyle ha.’
IV
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa?
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa ?
I will awa to Edinburgh,
and win a penny fee (7),
And see an onie bonnie lad
will fancy me.
V
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me,
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me ;
A feather in his bonnet
and a ribbon at his knee (8),
He ‘s a bonnie, bonnie laddie,
and yon be he !

NOTES
Enghish translation *
1) in the ballads the rose is not only “a rose” but it is the symbol of love, symbolizes here the loss of virginity, the thorns are also a memento to the dangers of a sexuality outside of marriage
2) kail-yard is the garden in front of the door of the cottage, it has become synonymous with a group of storytellers of the end of the 19th century who often described Scottish rural life, often using dialectal forms.
3) Athole: Atholl is located in the heart of the Scottish Highlands and derives its name from the Gaelic “ath Fodla” or New Ireland following the invasions in the island of the Irish tribes in the seventh century, Athole is the old name for the area of Perthshire

4) “Carlisle Castle is situated in Carlisle, in the English county of Cumbria, near the ruins of Hadrian’s Wall. Given the proximity of Carlisle to the border between England and Scotland, it has been the centre of many wars and invasions. The most important battles for the city of Carlisle and its castle were during the Jacobite rising of 1745 against George II of Great Britain” (da Wiki)
5) Sandy is short for Alexander
6) to ding= overcome; wear out, weary; to beat, excel, get the better of.
7) penny fee= wages
8) in the eighteenth century there were no stretch fabrics so as to support the socks to the calves of the man (and the thighs of women) were used garters or ribbons turned several times around the leg and knotted (among which we must hide a small dagger) , even those who wore pants (adhering a bit like a tights) used to tie ribbons under the knee

Lady Nairne’s version is often dismissed by critics as an imitation of Burns’ version and unfortunately many were prejudices against her literary production ..

CAROLINA OLIPHANT VERSION
I
There grows a bonnie brier-bush 
in our kail-yard,
And white are the blossoms o’t 
in our kail-yard;
Like wee bit cockauds (1) to deck
our Hieland lads
And the lasses lo’e the bonnie bush
in our kail-yard.
II
An it’s hame, an’ it’s hame
to the north countrie,
An’ it’s hame, an’ it’s hame
to the north countrie,
Where my bonnie Jean is waiting for me,
Wi’ a heart kind and true,
in my ain countrie.
III
But were they a’ true that were far awa’?
Oh! were they a’ true that were far awa’?
They drew up wi’ glaikit Englishers
at Carlisle ha’, 
And forgot auld frien’s
that were far awa’.
IV
“Ye’ll come nae mair, Jamie,
where aft ye have been,
Ye’ll come nae mair, Jamie,
to Atholl’s green;
Owre weel ye lo’ed the dancin’
at Carlisle ha’, 
And forgot the Hieland hills
that were far awa’.”
V
“I ne’er lo’ed a dance
but on Atholl’s green,
I ne’er lo’ed a lassie
but my dorty Jean,
Sair, sair against my will
did I bide sae lang awa’, 
And my heart was aye in Atholl’s green
at Carlisle ha’.”
VI
The brier bush was bonny ance
in our kail-yard; 
That brier bush was bonny ance
in our kail-yard;
A blast blew owre the hill,
that ga’e Atholl’s flowers a chill,
And the bloom’s blawn aff the bonnie bush
in our kail-yard.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
There grows a lovely brier-bush 
in our kitchen garden
And white are the blossoms out 
in our kitchen garden,
Like tiny rosettes to deck
our Highland lads
And the lasses love the lovely bush
in our kitchen garden.
II
And it’s home, and it’s home
to the north country,
An it’s home, and it’s home
to the north country,
Where my pretty Jean is waiting for me,
With a heart kind and true,
in my own country.
III
But were they all true that were far away?
Oh! were they all true that were far away?
They drew up with stupid Englishmen 
at Carlisle hall, 
And forgot old friends
that were far away.
IV
“You’ll come no more Jamie,
where often you have been,
You’ll come no more, Jamie,
to Atholl’s green;
Over well you loved the dancing
at Carlisle hall, 
And forgot the Highland hills
that were far away.”
V
“I never loved a dance
but on Atholl’s green,
I never loved a lassie
but my saucy Jean,
Sore, sore against my will
did I bide so long away, 
And my heart was always in Atholl’s green
at Carlisle hall.”
VI
The brier bush was lovely once
in our kitchen garden; 
That brier bush was lovely once
in our kitchen garden;
A blast blew over the hill,
that gave Atholl’s flowers a chill,
And the blooms blown off the lovely bush
in our kitchen garden

NOTE
1) the white cockade of the Jacobites

LINK
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/kailyard.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/cuckoosnest.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=86781
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/90262457
https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14959

There grows a bonnie brier-bush

Read the post in English  

ritratto di Robert Burns“There grows a bonnie brier-bush” è una canzone tradizionale scozzese modificata da Robert Burns per esigenze editoriali e pubblicata nel 1796 nello “Scots Musical Museum“; il doppio senso riguardava sia l’allusione alla relazione tra un ribelle giacobita “Highland laddie”  e una “Lowland lassie” seguace di re Giorgio che il contesto erotico della relazione (così come lo ritroviamo nella variante “The Cuckoo’s nest“).
Una versione è adattata anche da Carolina Oliphant, sempre sulla melodia “The Brier Bush”.

James Malcolm in The Complete Songs of Robert Burns Vol V, 1998

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 3 & 4 1996
Junkman’s Choir in The Burns Sessions – Footage of recordings from inside Robert Burns’ Cottage, Alloway, Scotland (January 2018)

ROBERT BURNS 
I
There grows a bonnie brier-bush (1)
in our kail-yard (2),
There grows a bonnie brier-bush
in our kail-yard;
And below the bonnie brier-bush
there’s a lassie and a lad,
And they’re busy, busy
courting in our kail-yard.
II
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard,
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard;
We’ll awa to Athole’s green (3),
and there we’ll no be seen,
Whare the trees and the branches
will be our safe-guard.
III
‘ Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ (4)?
Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ ?
Where Sandy (5) and Nancy (6)
I’m sure will ding (7) them a’?’
‘ I winna gang to the dance
in Carlyle ha.’
IV
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa?
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa ?
I will awa to Edinburgh,
and win a penny fee (8),
And see an onie bonnie lad
will fancy me.
V
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me,
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me ;
A feather in his bonnet
and a ribbon at his knee (9),
He ‘s a bonnie, bonnie laddie,
and yon be he !
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Una bella rosa selvatica cresce,
nel nostro orto in cortile
cresce una bella rosa selvatica
nel nostro orto in cortile
e sotto al bel rovo
ci sono una ragazza e un ragazzo
molti affaccendati
ad amoreggiare nel nostro orto
II
Non amoreggeremo più sotto
al cespuglio di rose nel nostro orto
non amoreggeremo più sotto
al cespuglio di rose nel nostro orto
partiremo per le praterie di Atholl,
e là non saremo più spiati
dove gli alberi e i rami
ci faranno da riparo
III
“Andrai al ballo
nel castello di Carlyle?
Andrai al ballo
nel Castello di Carlyle?
Dove Sandro e Agnese
di certo li batteranno tutti”
“Non andrò al ballo
nel Castello di Carlyle”
IV
Come troverò un ragazzo
se Sandro se ne andrà?
Come troverò un ragazzo
se Sandro se ne andrà?
Andrò a Edimburgo
a guadagnarmi un salario
e vedere se qualche bel ragazzo
mi vorrà bene
V
Viene dal Nord
colui che mi sposerà
Viene dal Nord
colui che mi sposerà
Una piuma sul berretto
e un nastro alle ginocchia
E’ un bel, bel ragazzo
e da laggiù lui viene!

NOTE
1) nelle ballate la rosa non è solo “una rosa” ma è il simbolo della passione amorosa, simboleggia qui la perdita della verginità, le spine sono anche un memento ai pericoli di una sessualità fuori dal matrimonio
2) kail-yard è l’orticello davanti alla porta del cottage, è diventato sinonimo di gruppo di narratori di fine ’800 che descrissero, spesso servendosi di forme dialettali, la vita rurale scozzese.
3) Athole: Atholl si trova nel cuore delle Highlands scozzesi e deriva il nome dal gaelico “ath Fodla” ovvero Nuova Irlanda conseguente alle invasioni nell’isola delle tribù irlandesi nel VII sec, Athole è l’antico nome per l’area del Perthshire
4) “Il Castello di Carlisle  è un castello medievale inglese che si trova nella città di Carlisle, in Cumbria. Il castello ha oltre novecento anni ed è stato scenario di molti importanti episodi militari della storia inglese. Data la sua vicinanza ai confini fra Inghilterra e Scozia, fu per tutto il medioevo luogo di scontri e di invasioni. Le più importanti battaglie vissute però dalla città e dal castello di Carlisle furono durante le rivolte giacobite contro Giorgio I e Giorgio II, rispettivamente nel 1715 e nel 1745.” (da Wiki)
5) Sandy diminutivo di Alessandro
6) Nancy nel Settecento veniva usato come diminutivo di Anne ma anche più anticamente era il diminutivo di Annis (la forma medievale di Agnese)
7) to ding è un verbo scozzese usato nel senso di eccellere, avere la meglio, superare, nel contesto vuole indicare la bravura della coppia di danzatori al gran ball di Carlisle
8) penny fee= wages
9) nel Settecento non esistevano i tessuti elasticizzati così per reggere le calze ai polpacci dell’uomo ( e alle cosce delle donne) si usavano delle giarrettiere o dei nastri girati più volte intorno alla gamba e annodati (tra cui alla bisogna si nascondeva un piccolo pugnale), anche chi portava i pantaloni (aderenti un po’ come una calzamaglia) usava annodare dei nastri sotto al ginocchio

La versione di Lady Nairne viene spesso liquidata dalla critica come una imitazione della versione di Burns e purtroppo molti furono i pregiudizi nei confronti della sua produzione letteraria..

CAROLINA OLIPHANT
I
There grows a bonnie brier-bush 
in our kail-yard,
And white are the blossoms o’t 
in our kail-yard;
Like wee bit cockauds (1) to deck
our Hieland lads
And the lasses lo’e the bonnie bush
in our kail-yard.
II
An it’s hame, an’ it’s hame
to the north countrie,
An’ it’s hame, an’ it’s hame
to the north countrie,
Where my bonnie Jean is waiting for me,
Wi’ a heart kind and true,
in my ain countrie.
III
But were they a’ true that were far awa’?
Oh! were they a’ true that were far awa’?
They drew up wi’ glaikit Englishers
at Carlisle ha’, 
And forgot auld frien’s
that were far awa’.
IV
“Ye’ll come nae mair, Jamie,
where aft ye have been,
Ye’ll come nae mair, Jamie,
to Atholl’s green;
Owre weel ye lo’ed the dancin’
at Carlisle ha’, 
And forgot the Hieland hills
that were far awa’.”
V
“I ne’er lo’ed a dance
but on Atholl’s green,
I ne’er lo’ed a lassie
but my dorty Jean,
Sair, sair against my will
did I bide sae lang awa’, 
And my heart was aye in Atholl’s green
at Carlisle ha’.”
VI
The brier bush was bonny ance
in our kail-yard; 
That brier bush was bonny ance
in our kail-yard;
A blast blew owre the hill,
that ga’e Atholl’s flowers a chill,
And the bloom’s blawn aff the bonnie bush
in our kail-yard.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Una bella rosa selvatica cresce,
nel nostro orto in cortile
e bianchi sono spuntati i boccioli
nel nostro orto in cortile
come piccole coccarde per ornare
i nostri ragazzi degli Altopiani
e le ragazze amano il bel cespuglio
nel nostro orto in cortile
II
E’ casa, è casa
al Nord 
E’ casa, è casa
al Nord
dove la mia bella Jean mi aspetta
con cuore gentile e sincero
nel mio paese 
III
Ma era proprio vero che erano tutti lontano?
era proprio vero che erano lontani?
Si avvicinarono ai frivoli Inglesi
al castello di Carlisle
e dimenticarono i vecchi amici
che erano lontani
IV
“Non tornerai più, Jamie
dove spesso sei stato
Non tornerai più, Jamie
ai pascoli di Atholl;
Amavi soprattutto le danze 
al castello di Carlisle
e dimenticasti le colline degli Altopiani
che erano assai lontane”
V
“Mai amai una danza
se non i prati di Atholl
e mai amai una ragazza
se non la mia impertinente Jean.
Duramente contro la mia volontà
dovetti assentarmi così lontano
ma il mio cuore era nelle praterie di Atholl
piuttosto che al castello di Carlisle”
VI
Il roseto era bello un tempo
nel nostro orto in cortile
quel roseto era bello un tempo
nel nostro orto in cortile
una tempesta soffiò sulla collina
che fece raggelare i fiori di Atholl
e i boccioli sono volati via dal cespuglio
nel nostro orto in cortile

NOTE
1) la coccarda bianca dei Giacobiti 

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/kailyard.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/cuckoosnest.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=86781
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/90262457
https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14959
https://allpoetry.com/There-Grows-a-Bonnie-Brier-Bush

Outlander: Baroque Boogie Woogie

Read the post in English

DAL LIBRO LA STRANIERA

Diana Gabaldon

Nel primo libro della saga Outlander scritto da Diana Gabaldon il capitolo 34 è dedicato alla ricerca dello scomparso Jamie e Claire si accompagna al  fedele e inossidabile Roger Murtaugh. Improvvisandosi imbonitori (nel tentativo di attrarre l’attenzione di Jamie affinchè si metta in contatto con loro) i due si esibiscono nelle taverne e nelle fiere con Murtaugh come principale intrattenitore e Claire che lo accompagna nel canto, arrangiandosi anche come chiromante. La canzone che è menzionata nel libro è la ballata del Border “The Dowie Dens of Yarrow“.

OUTLANDER TV: “The Search”

Claire Fraser (Caitriona Balfe) in “The Search.”, travestita da uomo

Nell’episodio 14 “The Search” della serie televisiva Outlander (prima stagione) Murtaugh ( interpretato dall’attore Danny Glover) è invece un ballerino un po’ maldestro e Claire non proprio versata per il canto, ma neanche stonata, spera di vivacizzare l’esibizione di un danzatore appena passabile, canticchiando un boogie woogie molto popolare ai suoi tempi, il 1945; il motivetto piace subito a Murtaugh  (nonostante il divario culturale tra la musica popolare d’epoca barocca e la musica popolare del XX secolo) ma le consiglia di abbinarlo ad un testo più da bawdy song che il pubblico del 1743 saprà meglio apprezzare: “The Reels o’ Bogie”


I
Here’s to all you lads and lasses
That go out this way.
Be sure to tip your coggie
When you take her out to play
Lads and lasses toy a kiss,
The lads never think
What they do is amiss
Chorus
Because there’s Kent and keen
And there’s Aberdeen
And there’s naan as muckle
as the Strath of boogie-woogie
II
For every lad’ll wander
Just to have his lass
An’ when they see her pintle rise,
They’ll raise a glass
And rowe about their wanton een
They dance a reel as the troopers
Go over the lea
Chorus
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
III
He giggled, goggled me
He was a banger
He sought the prize between my thighs
Became a hanger
Chorus
And no there’s naan as muckle
As the wanton tune
Of strath of boogie
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Per tutti voi dame e messeri
che andate per questa via
Ricordatevi di bere un sorso (1)
quando state in compagnia (2)
uomini e donne si scambiano un bacio, ma gli uomini non pensano mai
che quello che fanno è scorretto
Coro
Perché dal Kent al Border(3)
e fino all’Aberdeen
non c’è una valle ampia (4)
come 
la valle del boogie (5) woogie
II
Perché ogni uomo andrà in giro
solo per trovare una donna
e quando lei si concederà (6)
alzeranno il calice
e gettando occhiate (7) lascive
danzeranno un reel (8) mentre  le truppe ricontrollano i pascoli (9)
Chorus
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
III
Ridacchiava, mi faceva gli occhi dolci
era il membro di una banda (10).
e cercando il premio tra le mie cosce
si trasformava in uno spadino (11)
Coro
Non c’è una valle ampia
come la melodia spericolata
della valle del boogie

NOTE
1) doppio senso: coggie (vezzeggiativo) o cog è la scodella, ciotola di legno per bere. Una tipica tazza scozzese cerimoniale con due manici detta quaich (quaigh o quoich), tradizionalmente realizzate in legno, con fasce come quelle di una botte tenute insieme da un cerchio di salice o d’argento; oggi sono in gran parte d’argento. Uno vero scozzese, per salutarvi, vi offrirà l’ultimo sorso di whisky in un quaich, per
simboleggiare la vostra amicizia.
2) il play è chiaramente un “gioco” erotico
3) “Kent and keen” Kent è una contea nella parte sud-est dell’Inghilterra, dove si trovano le bianche scogliere di Dover quindi il punto (per i viaggiatori dal continente) più a sud: in senso lato vuol dire “Dal Sud al Nord” keen non è una contea e nemmeno un  villaggio, forse un vecchio termine per il Border, potrebbere essere usato come assonanza e stare per “dal  Kent dal forte vento” o qualcosa del genere
4) strath è una  valle fluviale che è ampia e poco profonda (al contrario del glen una vallata tipicamente più stretta e profonda).
5) il “Bogie” è un torrente nell’Aberdeenshire, che attraversa la bella valle o strath del Bogie.  Strathbogie però è anche il nome di una cittadina nella contea dell’Aberdeenshire detta Milton of Strathbogie
6) ancora un doppio senso pintle è il piolo di un cardine, o un bullone
7) een  sta per “even”= Evening letteralmente “rotolandosi senza inibizioni nella notte; oppure een è il prurale di “eye” “to roll one’s eyes” roteare gli occhi , la frase diventa “roteando gli occhi maliziosi, lascivi”
8) to dance a reel è ancora un doppio senso il reel è una tipica melodia da danza in cui i ballerini eseguono giravolte e descrivono intrecci.
9) le giubbe rosse vanno a pattugliare le highlands in cerca di ribelli o facinorosi. Il riferimento è calzante con la situazione della narrazione
10) nello slang americano sta per  gangbanger =  membro di una banda di tipacci
ma nel 1700 è uno che canta a voce alta (banda musicale)
11) doppio senso

Murtaugh  con movenze un po’ orsine balla sulle spade incrociate a tempo di Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy Of Company B

LA REALTA’ STORICA

“The Reels o’ Bogie” è una canzoncina ricca di doppi sensi del 1700 dalle molte versioni (se ne contano 5) tra le quali una attribuita al Duca Alexander Gordon su musica arrangiata da J. Haydn ancora cantata nei salotti lirici.

Hob. XXXIa no. 55, JHW. XXXII/1 no. 55 in “Haydn: Scottish and Welsh Songs”, Vol. 1, 2009 (ascolta su Spotify).


I
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Stra’bogie,
Gin I hae but a bonny lass,
Ye’re welcome to your cogie.
And ye may sit up a’ the night,
And drink till it be braid daylight;
Gie me a lass baith clean and tight,
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
II
In cotillons the French excel,
John Bull in countra dances;
The Spaniards dance fandangos well,
Mynheer an all’mand prances;
In foursome reels the Scots delight,
The threesome maist dance wound’rous light;
But twasome ding a’ out o’ sight,
Danc’d to the Reel of Bogie.
III
Now a’ the lads ha’e done their best,
Like true men of Stra’bogie;
We’ll stop a while and tak a rest,
And tipple out a cogie;
Come now, my lads, and tak your glass,
And try ilk other to surpass,
In wishing health to every lass
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Abbiamo zuppa fredda ad Aberdeen
e gambi di cavolo a Strathbogie,
e se c’è una bella ragazza
che sia la benvenuta al brindisi!
Ti puoi sedere per tutta la notte
e bere finchè spunterà la luce del giorno: datemi un ragazza fresca e soda, per ballare il Reel del Bogie.
II
Nel Cotillon i Francesi eccellono,
gli Inglesi nella Contraddanza;
gli Spagnoli danzano bene il Fandango, i Tedeschi il ballo alemanno,
gli Scozzesi si dilettano nel reel a quattro (quadriglia), il trio
ballerà in modo mirabile
ma la coppia andrà a nascondersi
per ballare il Reel del Bogie.
III
Ora che tutti i signori hanno fatto del loro meglio, come veri uomini di Strathbogie, ci fermeremo un po’ per riposarci, e bere un sorso.
Venite signori, e prendete il bicchiere e cercate di superare tutti gli altri nel bere alla salute di ogni ragazza che danza il Reel del Bogie

Lo stesso Robert Burns ne riarrangia una con il titolo “There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen” allungando con versi di suo pugno (i primo tre) la versione tradizionale riportata  da David Herd nel suo “Scots Songs” (1776, vol II).

ASCOLTA Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns Vol 1 & 2, 1996 su Spotify. La versione di Ewan McColl ricalca sostanzialmente quella di Jean.


I
Cauld kail (1)  in Aberdeen
And castocks (2)  in Strabogie
But yet I fear they’ll cook o’er soon,
And never warm the coggie (3).
II
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-gir’d cap (4)
For e’er a quine (5) on Bogie.
III
There’s Johnie Smith has got a wife
That scrimps him o’ his coggie,
If she were mine, upon my life
I wad douk her in a Bogie.
IV
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-girr’d cap
For e’er a quine on Bogie
V
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Strabogie;
When ilka lad maun hae his lass,
Then fye, gie me my coggie.
VI
The lasses about Bogie gicht (6)
Their limbs, they are sae clean and tight (7),
That if they were but girded right,
They’ll dance the reel of Bogie (8).
VII
Wow, Aberdeen, what did you mean,
Sae young a maid to woo, Sir (9)?
I’m sure it was nae joke to her,
Whate’er it was to you, Sir.
VIII
For lasses  (10) now are nae sae blate
But they ken auld folk’s out o’ date,
And better playfare can they get
Than castocks in Strabogie.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Zuppa fredda ad Aberdeen
e gambi di cavolo a Strathbogie,
temo che cucineranno velocemente senza riscaldare la scodella.
II
La mia scodella, signori, la mia scodella
non voglio altro che la mia scodella: darei la mia scodella con tre manici, di continuo, a una servetta sul Bogie
III
Johnie Smith ha una moglie
che lesina sulla sua razione (di zuppa),
se fosse la mia, giuro
che la getterei nel Bogie
IV
La mia scodella, signori, la mia scodella
non voglio altro che la mia scodella: darei la mia scodella con tre manici, di continuo, a una servetta sul Bogie
V
Zuppa fredda ad Aberdeen
e gambi di cavolo a Strathbogie,
ogni uomo deve avere la sua amica,
allora sbrigati, dammi la mia scodella.
VI
Le ragazze di Bogingicht
braccia e gambe, sono così fresche e sode (strette)
che non appena le stringi per bene
ballano il reel del Bogie.
VII
Signore di  Aberdeen, cosa vi era preso ad amoreggiare con una così giovane servetta? Di certo non era una facezia per lei, qualunque cosa fosse per voi.
VIII
Perchè le ragazze oggi non sono così timide e sanno come ottenere giocattoli migliori che i vecchi superati  gambi di cavolo nella valle del Bogie (a Strathbogie).

NOTE
1) Kail o kale è una varietà di cavolo cucinato in Inghilterra nella zuppa, forse un tempo aveva il significato di pietanza appetitosa,  ‘castocks’ sono i gambi del cavolo. Ma i doppi sensi si sprecano. La pietanza riscaldata non è poi così gustosa come sembra!
2) Strathbogie potrebbe essere  sia la valle del Bogie ma anche la cittadina Milton of Strathbogie (oggi Huntly) dimora storica del reggimento di Gordon Highlanders, tradizionalmente reclutato in tutto il nord-est della Scozia.
3) coggie è la tazza o scodella, per  sorbire la zuppa o mangiare il porridge. Il senso è “finiranno presto e riscalderanno appena la zuppa” e chi ha orecchie per intendere, intenda
4) Cap (cup) ha lo stesso significato di cog e infatti in alcune versioni è scritto three-girr’d cog (coggie);  three-girred = surrounded with three hoops, three-ringed cup
5) quine è un termine arcaico per donna, ma ha diversi significati può voler dire moglie oppure figlia,  indicare una servetta o ancora essere usato in termini dispregiativi
6) se considerata una parola divisa gicht=saucy; ma scritto anche come Bogingicht; Bog of Gight o Bogengight era l’antica designazione della sede della damiglia ducale di Seton-Gordon, oggi Gordon Castle
7) letteralmente pulite e strette
8) doppio senso
9) si mette in ridicolo un vecchio (forse il Lord di quelle terre) che si ostina a corteggiare le giovani ragazze!
10) sottointeso le ragazze di Bogingicht

E ovviamente c’è anche una scottish country dance con il titolo Cauld Kail in Aberdeen!!

E un reel irlandese dallo stesso titolo!

FONTI
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/14/scotlands-burns-and-outlander-rival-shakespeares-bawdy/
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/16/adapted-bawdy-lyrics-outlander-tv-series-episode-114-the-search/
http://www.outlandercast.com/2016/01/top-ten-musical-moments-of-season-1.html

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Scottish_Song/Cauld_Kail_in_Aberdeen_1
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-162,-page-170-cauld-kail-in-aberdeen.aspx
http://www.bartleby.com/333/222.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=92760

http://www.rscds-swws.org/news/200707/vol24-1.htm

https://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/dance-crib/cauld-kail.html
https://eatthetable.com/2014/04/30/147/
https://biblio.wiki/wiki/Songs_of_Robert_Burns/There%27s_cauld_kail_in_Aberdeen

https://thesession.org/tunes/3307
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/scottish/cauldkai.htm
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(1)_(The)
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(2)

Outlander: Baroque Boogie Woogie

Leggi in italiano

FROM OUTLANDER BOOK

Diana Gabaldon

In the first book of the Outlander saga written by Diana Gabaldon, chapter 34 is dedicated to the search for her missing Jamie and Claire is going along with the faithful and stainless Roger Murtaugh. Acting as barkers (hoping Jamie to get in touch with them) they perform in taverns and fairs with Murtaugh as the main entertainer and Claire as choir, and if necessary, fortune teller. The song that is mentioned in the book is the Border ballad “The Dowie Dens of Yarrow“.

OUTLANDER TV: “The Search”

Murtaugh (Danny Glover) is on the contrary, a rather clumsy dancer and Claire is not really versed for singing, but nor out of tune, so she hopes to liven up the performance of a barely passable dancer, humming a very popular boogie woogie in her day, 1945; Murtagh immediately likes the silly tune (despite the cultural divide between popular baroque music and 20th century folk music) but he suggests to fit a more bawdy song text that the 1743 audience will know better: “The Reels o’ Bogie”

Caitriona Balfe as Claire Fraser in “The Search.” Image credit Sony Pictures Television

Claire: May I make a suggestion? Perhaps you could sing a song to jazz up the dance a bit.
Murtaugh: Jazz?
C: To spice up, enliven.
M: A song?
C: Yes, something toe-tapping like…
♪ He was a famous trumpet man from out Chicago way ♪
♪ He had a boogie style that no one else could play ♪
♪ He was a top man at his craft ♪
♪ But then his number came up and he was gone with the draft ♪
♪ He’s in the army now a-blowin’ reveille ♪
♪ He’s the boogie-woogie bugle boy of company b ♪
M:  It’s a Bonnie tune, but you need a Scottish song. And a new look. That’s jazzed you up a bit, eh?
(http://transcripts.foreverdreaming.org/viewtopic.php?f=198&t=18201)

Claire performance of a traditional bawdy Scots song “The Reels o’ Bogie” to the tune of “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.”


I
Here’s to all you lads and lasses
That go out this way.
Be sure to tip your coggie (1)
When you take her out to play (2)
Lads and lasses toy a kiss,
The lads never think
What they do is amiss
Chorus:
Because there’s Kent and keen (3)
And there’s Aberdeen
And there’s naan as muckle
as the Strath of boogie (4)-woogie
II
For every lad’ll wander
Just to have his lass
An’ when they see her pintle (5) rise,
They’ll raise a glass
And rowe about their wanton een (6)
They dance a reel (7) as the troopers
Go over the lea

[Chorus]
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
A-root, a-toot
A rooty-a-doot
III
He giggled, goggled me
He was a banger (8)
He sought the prize
between my thighs
Became a hanger (9)
[Chorus]
And no there’s naan as muckle
As the wanton tune
Of strath of boogie

NOTES
1) a sexual metaphor: coggie – n., diminutive of “cog,” meaning cup, or wooden bowl to drink. 
 A typical ceremonial Scottish cup with two handles called quaich (quaigh or quoich), traditionally made of wood, with bands like those of a barrel held together by a circle of willow or silver; today they are largely silver.
2) erotic play
3) “Kent and keen” Kent is a county in the southeastern part of England, where the white cliffs of Dover are located so the point (for travelers from the mainland) further south; “keen” is not a county and not even a village, maybe an old term for the Border
4) Strathbogie: or Milton of Strathbogie the old name of Huntly, Scotland. A strath is a large valley, typically a river valley that is wide and shallow (as opposed to a glen which is typically narrower and deep. So it’s a sexual metaphor: its wideness and openness, is lasciviousness or moral looseness. The “Bogie,” also known as the Water of Bogie is a stream in Aberdeenshire, which runs through the beautiful strath or valley called Strathbogie
5) pintle – n., “a pin or bolt, especially one on whichsomething turns, as the gudgeon of a hinge.” – Dictionary.com. Metaphor for penis.
6) een= eyes, “to roll one’s eyes” 
7) to dance a reel: dance the miller’s reel / dance the reels of Stumpie , obsolete phrase referring to sexual intercourse; reel: a type of dance, associated with weaving and spinning, emphasizing this kind of pattern and movement
8) american slang = gangbanger , but in 700’s one’s sing very loudly  (musical group)
9) hanger=a man with a long penis 

The swords dance of Murtaugh and Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy Of Company B’s tune

THE HISTORICAL REALITY

We know five different versions dating to the 18th century of “The Reels o ‘Bogie” (aka “Cauld Kale in Aberdeen”) among which one attributed to Duke Alexander Gordon with music arranged by J. Haydn is still sung in the lyrical world
Hob. XXXIa no. 55, JHW. XXXII/1 no. 55 in “Haydn: Scottish and Welsh Songs”, Vol. 1, 2009 (su Spotify)

THE REELS O ‘BOGIE
I
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Stra’bogie,
Gin I hae but a bonny lass,
Ye’re welcome to your cogie.
And ye may sit up a’ the night,
And drink till it be braid daylight;
Gie me a lass baith clean and tight,
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
II
In cotillons the French excel,
John Bull in countra dances;
The Spaniards dance fandangos well,
Mynheer an all’mand prances;
In foursome reels the Scots delight,
The threesome maist dance wound’rous light;
But twasome ding a’ out o’ sight,
Danc’d to the Reel of Bogie.
III
Now a’ the lads ha’e done their best,
Like true men of Stra’bogie;
We’ll stop a while and tak a rest,
And tipple out a cogie;
Come now, my lads, and tak your glass,
And try ilk other to surpass,
In wishing health to every lass
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
There is cold soup in Aberdeen,
And cabbage stalks in Strathbogie,

if I have but a fair lady
you are welcome to your cup.
And you may sit up all the night,
and drink till it be broad daylight;
Give me a lass both clean and tight,
To dance the Reel of Bogie.
II
In cotillons the French excel,
the English in countrydances;
The Spaniards dance fandangos well,
Dutch an allemand prances;
In foursome reels the Scots delight,
The threesome may dance wounderous light;
But twasome ding all out of sight,
Danced to the Reel of Bogie.
III
Now all the lads have done their best,
Like true men of Strathbogie,
We’ll stop a while and take a rest,
And tipple out a cup;
Come now, my lads, and take your glass,/And try every other to surpass,
In wishing health to every lass
To dance the Reel of Bogie.

One version dates from David Herd’s Scots Songs, 1769 and Robert Burns re-worked his version several times for George Thomson’s Select Collection of Scottish Airs, 1793. He liberally combined Herd’s version with his own.
Jean Redpath in “Songs of Robert Burns” Vol 1 & 2, 1996 (Spotify)


I
Cauld kail (1)  in Aberdeen
And castocks  in Strabogie
But yet I fear they’ll cook o’er soon,
And never warm the coggie.
II
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-gir’d cap (2)
For e’er a quine (3) on Bogie.
III
There’s Johnie Smith has got a wife
That scrimps him o’ his coggie,
If she were mine, upon my life
I wad douk her in a Bogie.
IV
My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs,
I cannot want my coggie;
I wadna gie my three-girr’d cap
For e’er a quine on Bogie
V
There’s cauld kail in Aberdeen,
And castocks in Strabogie;
When ilka lad maun hae his lass,
Then fye, gie me my coggie.
VI
The lasses about Bogie gicht (4)
Their limbs, they are sae clean and tight,
That if they were but girded right,
They’ll dance the reel of Bogie.
VII
Wow, Aberdeen, what did you mean,
Sae young a maid to woo, Sir (5)?
I’m sure it was nae joke to her,
Whate’er it was to you, Sir.
VIII
For lasses  now are nae sae blate
But they ken auld folk’s out o’ date,
And better playfare can they get
Than castocks in Strabogie.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
There is cold soup in Aberdeen,
And cabbage stalks in Strathbogie,
But yet I fear they’ll cook over soon
And never warm my wooden cup.
II
My cup, Sirs, my cup, Sirs,
I cannot want my cup:
I would not give my three-ringed cup,
For ever a maid on Bogie.
III
There is Johnie Smith has got a wife
That scrimps him of his cup,
If she were mine, upon my life
I would duck her in a bog.
IV
My cup, Sirs, my cup, Sirs,
I cannot want my cup:
I would not give my three-ringed cup,
For ever a young girl on Bogie
V
There is cold soup in Aberdeen,
And cabbage stalks in Strathbogie,
When every lad must have his girl-friend,
Then fye, give me my cup.
VI
The lasses about Bogingicht
Their limbs, they are so clean and tight,
That if they were but girded right,
They’ll dance the reel of Bogie.
VII
Wow, Aberdeen, what did you mean,
So young a maid to woo, Sir?
I’m sure it was no joke to her,
Whatever it was to you, Sir.
VIII
For lasses now are no so timid
But they know old folk’s out of date,
And playthings can they get
Than castocks in Strabogie.

NOTES
1) ‘Kail’ or ‘kale’ is a type of cabbage. It grows on a stalk, has large crinkly leaves and is of the cabbage family. Kail is usually used in broth, and often a vegetable soup containing kail was called kail-broth, or simply ‘kail’. Cold kail would be such a broth that had cooled and lost its savour. Hence the familiar Scottish saying with reference to the restoration of old ideas or practices that had seen their day — ‘cauld kail het again’ (cold kail reheated!).”
2) Cap (cup)= cog also “three-girr’d cog (coggie);  three-girred = surrounded with three hoops, three-ringed cup
3) quine
4)  gicht=saucy; or Bogingicht; Bog of Gight, or Bogengight, was the ancient designation of the seat of the ducal family of Seton-Gordon. It is now termed Gordon Castle
5) he ridicules an old man (perhaps the Lord of those lands) who persists in wooing a young lass!
“From the language, the authorship may be safely assigned to an Aberdonian, we suspect the song refers to the first Earl of Aberdeen, who died 20th April 1720, in the eighty third year of his age.  As the name is specially given, there cannot be much difficulty in identifying the hero with the Sir George Gordon of Haddo, born 3rd October 1637, who was Lord Chancellor of Scotland from 1682 to 1684, and who was created Earl of Aberdeen … 1682, to him and the heirs-male of his body..
Lord Lewis Gordon … in the ’45 … declared for Prince Charles…. When all the Pretender’s hopes were blasted at Culloden … [he] fled to France, where he died in 1754. One of his sisters, a young lady of great beauty, became the third wife of William Earl of Aberdeen, which gave rise to the following lines in the well-known song of ‘Cauld Kail in Aberdeen, and Custocks in Strathbogie [VII an VIII verses]” (source: Fraser’s Magazine (London, 18668 (“Digitized by Google”)), Vol. LXXIII, p. 575).

And here is the scottish country dance “Cauld Kail in Aberdeen”!!

“The Reel of Bogie” is also claimed and played as an Irish folk song.

LINK
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/14/scotlands-burns-and-outlander-rival-shakespeares-bawdy/
https://carrielt21.wordpress.com/2015/05/16/adapted-bawdy-lyrics-outlander-tv-series-episode-114-the-search/
http://www.outlandercast.com/2016/01/top-ten-musical-moments-of-season-1.html

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Scottish_Song/Cauld_Kail_in_Aberdeen_1
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-162,-page-170-cauld-kail-in-aberdeen.aspx
http://www.bartleby.com/333/222.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=92760

http://www.rscds-swws.org/news/200707/vol24-1.htm

https://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/dance-crib/cauld-kail.html
https://eatthetable.com/2014/04/30/147/
https://biblio.wiki/wiki/Songs_of_Robert_Burns/There%27s_cauld_kail_in_Aberdeen

https://thesession.org/tunes/3307
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/scottish/cauldkai.htm
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(1)_(The)
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Reel_of_Bogie_(2)

The Laird O’ Cockpen

A  humoristic courted song written by Carolina Oliphant, (Lady Nairne 1766-1845) , on the scottish air “When she came ben she bobbed” – of seventeenth-century origin and already appeared with a winking text to an illicit liaison, revisited by Robert Burns in the “Scots Musical Museum” of 1792.
Una courting song umoristica scritta da Carolina Oliphant, (1766-1845) conosciuta con il nome da sposata di Lady Nairne, sulla melodia tradizionale “When she came ben she bobbed” – di origine seicentesca e già comparsa con un testo ammiccante a una illecita liaison, rivisitato da Robert Burns nello “Scots Musical Museum” del 1792.


Thus Lady Nairne writes in 1810 about her version “The Laird or ‘Cockpen” on the arrogant Laird of Cockpen who remains attonished in front of Mrs. Jean’s refusal to marry him (who seems to be well aware of sexual appetites of the Perthshire gentry and Cockpen in particular, towards commoner maidens). The text was printed in volume III of the “Scottish Minstrel” with only six stanzas and is also printed by George Thomson in 1825 (in “Collection of the Songs of Burns , Sir Walter Scott and other eminent lyric poets “) and yet when Thomson reprinted the song in 1843 in the V Volume of the” Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs (n 250) adds two more stanzas as “happy-ending” trivializing the song in a more common love song. Definitely a tongue twister for who is not a scottish native speaker, if he sings quickly!
Così Lady Nairne scrive nel 1810 circa la sua versione “The Laird o’ Cockpen” sull’arrogante Signorotto di Cockpen che resta con un palmo di naso davanti al rifiuto della signora Jean di sposarlo (la quale sembra essere ben consapevole degli appetiti sessuali verso le popolane, della gentry del Perthshire, e di Cockpen in particolare).
Il testo venne dato in stampa nel III volume dello “Scottish Minstrel” con solo sei strofe ed è anche stampato da George Thomson nel 1825 (in “Collection of the Songs of Burns, Sir Walter Scott and other eminent lyric poets”) e tuttavia quando  Thomson ristampa la canzone nel 1843 nel V Volume del “Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs (n 250) aggiunge ulteriori due strofe come “lieto-fine”, che l’editore si attribuisce, banalizzando la canzone in una più comune love song.
Decisamente uno scioglilingua per chi non sia scozzese se si canta velocemente! 

The Poitin (strofe da I a VII)


I
The Laird o’ Cockpen he was
proud and he’s great
But his mind was ta’en up
wi’ the things o’ the state
He’s wanted a new wife
his braw home tae keep
But favour wi’ wooin’ was
fashous (1) tae seek
II
Doon by the dykeside (2)
there’s a lady did dwell
It’s at his table heid (3)
he was sure she’d look well
McLeish’s (4) ae daughter o’ Clavers ha’ lee
A penniless lass
wi’ a lang pedigree (5)
III
His wig was well pouthered  
and as good as new
His waistcoat was white
and his suit it was blue
He’s put on a ring and a sword
and cocked hat
And who could refuse him,
the laird, wi’ a’ that?
IV
He’s ta’en the grey mare
and he’s rade cannily (6)
He’s tapped(7) at the yett (8)
o’ the Clavers ha’ lee
“Gae tell mistress Jean
tae come speedily ben(9)
For she’s wanted tae speak
tae the Laird o’ Cockpen”
V
Mistress Jean was makin’
the elder-flower wine:
‘And what brings the Laird
at sic (10) a like time?’
She put aff her apron
and on her silk goun,
Her mutch (11) wi’ red ribbons
and gaed awa doun.
VI
And when she cam’ by
it’s he bowed fu’ low
And what was his errand
he soon let her know
Amazed was the laird
when the lady said naw
And we’ a leigh (12) courtsey
she turned awa’
VII
Dumfoundered (13) he was
but nae sign did he gie
He’s mounted his horse
and he’s rade cannily (6)
And aft times he thinks
as he rides through the glen
She was daft (14) tae refuse me,
the Laird o’ Cockpen
VIII
And now that the Laird
his exit had made,
Mistress Jean she reflected
on what she had said;
’Oh, for ane I’ll get better
its waur (15) I’ll get ten,
I was daft to refuse
the Laird o’ Cockpen.’
IX
Next time that the Laird
and the lady were seen,
They were gaun arm-in-arm
to the kirk on the green;
Now she sits in the ha’
like a weel-tappit hen,
But as yet there’s nae chickens
appeared at Cockpen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il signorotto di Cockpen era
fiero e valoroso,
poichè i suoi pensieri erano presi
da questioni di stato,
voleva una nuova moglie
che badasse alla sua casa,
ma ottenere l’approvazione
con il corteggiamento era una seccatura
II
Dietro al muretto di pietra
viveva una signora
a capo della sua tavola
lui era certo che lei ci sarebbe stata bene, McLeish è una figlia di Clavers-ha’ Lee,
una fanciulla senza un soldo
con un lungo pedigree
III
La sua parrucca era ben incipriata
e come nuova
il suo panciotto era bianco
e la giacchetta blu.
si mise un anello e una spada
e un tricorno
e chi avrebbe potuto respingerlo,
il laird, così conciato?
IV
Prese la cavalla grigia
e cavalcò con prudenza
bussò alla porta
dei Clavers-ha’ Lee
“Vai a dire alla signora Jean
che venga subito qui
perché è desiderata per parlare
con il Laird di Cockpen”
V
La signora Jean stava facendo
il vino con i fiori di sambuco
“Cosa porta il laird
in un tempo così?”
Si levò il suo grembiule
e mise la gonna di seta,
la cuffia con i nastri rossi
e scese da basso
VI
E quando fu
nel salotto di sotto
tosto egli le fece sapere
quale era il suo proposito.
Stupefatto fu il laird
quando la dama disse no,
e poco cortesemente
si allontanò!
VII
Lui era perplesso,
ma non ne diede mostra
saltò sul suo cavallo
e corse con prudenza
e frequentemente pensava
mentre cavalcava per la stretta valle
“E’ stupida a rifiutare me,
il Signorotto di Cockpen”
VIII
E ora che il Signorotto
aveva fatto la sua uscita
la Signora Jean ponderò
su ciò che aveva detto;
“Oh per uno starò meglio,
di peggio ne troverò 10,
che stupida ero a rifiutare
il Signorotto di Cockpen”
IX
La prossima volta che il Signorotto
e la Lady furono visti
andavano a braccetto
nel prato della chiesa;
ora lei siede nella sala
come una gallina con una bella cresta
ma ancora non spuntano polli
a Cockpen

NOTE
1) fashious=troublesome, annoying, [ossia una faccenda noiosa a cui dedicarsi]
2) dyke. term used in Scotland to distinguish a low wall of dry stone [termine utilizzato in Scozia per distinguere una parete bassa di pietre costruita a secco]
3) table heid – head of his table
4) McLeish or McClish. (see family crest)
5) noble titles to which the laird aspires [sembra alludere al desiderio del gentiluomo di accaparrarsi dei titoli illustri.]
6) canniliie = carefully, Cautiously
7) tappit=tufted, rapped – knocked
8) yett=gate
9) ben – through the house
10) sic=such
11) mutch= bonnet, close fitting cap
12) laigh=low
13) dumfooner’d – bewildered
14) daft – stupid, Mad.
15) waur=worse. I think Jean preferred to take the first one instead of waiting for some other ten suitors, one worse than the other; Jean is not the courageous heroine of Lady Nairne who refuses marriage of convenience, indeed she immediately regrets her claims of independence
Credo che Jean abbia preferito prendere il primo invece di aspettare per altri dieci pretendenti uno peggiore dell’altro; ma come sia Jean non è più la coraggiosa eroina di Lady Nairne che rifiuta un matrimonio di comodo, anzi si pente subito delle sue pretese d’indipendenza

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/lairdc.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6554
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14867
http://kistoriches.co.uk/en/fullrecord/55605/11;jsessionid=A1C3E06E0FB75395E28652C68C713AD9
http://folktunefinder.com/tunes/171034

http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_laird.htm
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/102lyr6.htm
http://www.bartleby.com/41/333.html

WHEN I WAS NOO BUT SWEET SIXTEEN / THE BOTHY LADS

donna-culla-WILLIAM-ADOLPHE-BOUGUEREAUAncora una canzone sui cavallanti (vedi bothy ballads), proveniente dal Nord-Est della Scozia, ma questa storia finisce con una gravidanza e senza matrimonio riparatore. L’altro titolo con cui è conosciuta è “Hishie Ba” una variante in versione ninna –nanna che ci viene dal canto di Jean Redpath. La stessa storia è narrata con una melodia simile anche nella ballata “Peggy on the Banks of Spey” (che Hamish Henderson raccolse nel 1956 dalla signora Elsie Morrison di Spey Bay) Nella tradizione scozzese non sono insolite le ninne-nanne dai contenuti amari e dolorosi (vedi).

La melodia è intitolata “Jockey’s gray Breeches” già in “Caledonian Pocket Companion” di James Oswald (1745) (vedi)

WHEN I WAS NOO BUT SWEET SIXTEEN/

ASCOLTA June Tabor & Oysterband (testo qui)

ASCOLTA Colcannon con il titolo The Ploughboy lads
ASCOLTA Claire Hastings in ‘Between River and Railway‘ 2016 con il titolo The Bothy Lads che unisce il coro della versione di Hishie ba


I
Ah well I was no’ but sweet sixteen
With beauty charme a-blooming oh
It’s little little did I think
At nineteen I’d be grieving oh
Well the ploughboy lads they’re all braw  lads /But they’re false and they’re deceiving oh/They’ll take your all and 
they’ll gang away
And leave the lassies grievin’ oh
II
Ah well I was fond of company
And I gave the ploughboys freedom oh
To kiss and clap me in the dark
When all me friends were sleeping oh
III
Well if I did know what I know now
And I took me mothers biddin’ oh
I wouldn’t be sittin’ by our fireside
Crying “hush a ba my baby oh”
IV
Well it’s hush a ba  for I’m your ma/But the Lord knows who’s your daddy oh
And I’ll take care and I’ll beware
Of the ploughboys in the gloaming oh
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non avevo che 16 anni
con le grazie della giovinezza in fiore
e mai avrei pensato
che a 19 sarei stata inguaiata (1)
Beh i Cavallanti sono tutti bei (2) ragazzi
ma sono insinceri e sono traditori
ti prendono tutto
e poi vanno via

e lasciano le ragazze nei guai
II
Beh, amavo la compagnia
e ho dato ai cavallanti la libertà
di baciarmi e afferrarmi (3) nel buio
mentre tutti  i miei amici dormivano
III
Se avessi saputo quello che so ora,
e avessi dato retta a mia madre,
non starei seduta accanto al focolare
a piangere “Dormi bambino (4) mio”
IV
Fai la ninna (5) per la tua mamma,
solo il Signore sa chi è tuo padre (6)
farò attenzione e starò alla larga (7)
dai cavallanti nel crepuscolo (8).”

NOTE
1) oppure Greetin: weeping
2) gey braw: very fine, handsome
3) clap: touch
4) bairnie
5) Hishie ba: soothing sound to a baby, lullaby
6) la donna ha concesso i suoi favori a diversi giovanotti (all’epoca non c’era ancora il test del dna)
7) June Tabor dice “so it’s girls beware and you take care ”  “le ragazze stanno alla larga e tu fai attenzione ” è l’avvertimento della madre alla neonata di guardarsi dai cavallanti! Spesso le ninnananne erano delle warning songs.
8) Gloamin: twilight, dusk

HISHIE BA

ASCOLTA Lucy Stewart
ASCOLTA Jean Redpath (strofe I e III)

ASCOLTA Arthur Argo (strofe I, II, III)


I
When I was noo but sweet sixteen
and beauty aye an bloomin’ o
it’s little, little did I think
that at seventeen I’d be greetin’ o
Hishie ba, noo I’m yer ma
Oh, hishie ba, ma bairnie o
Hishie ba, noo I’m yer ma
but the guid kens fa’s yer faither o
II
If I had been a guilte lass
An taen ma mither’s biddin o
I widna be sittin at your fireside
singing hush a ba my baby oh
III
It’s keep it me frae lowpin’ dykes
Frae balls and frae waddin’s o
It’s gi’en me balance tae my stays
and that’s in the latest fashion o
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non avevo che 16 anni (1)
con la mia bellezza in fiore
e mai avrei pensato
che a 17 sarei stata inguaiata
Fai la ninna per la tua mamma
dormi bambino mio
Fai la ninna per la tua mamma,
solo il Signore sa chi è tuo padre
II
Se fossi stata una ragazza saggia
e dato retta agli avvertimenti di mia madre, non starei seduta accanto al focolare a cantare “dormi bambino mio”
III
Mi tengo lontana dai saltafossi (2),
dai balli e dai matrimoni(3)
e mi strizzo nel corsetto (4)
che è all’ultima moda

NOTE
1) Argo dice When I was a maid but sweet sixteen
2) leaping, jumping over stone walls. Ma louppar (lowpar), looper  (louper) nel Dizionario Scozzese è sinonimo di vagabondo. dyke-louper, -leaper, (a) an animal that leaps the dyke surrounding its pasture (b)fig.: a person of immoral habits, also in n.Eng. dial.; hence dyke-loupin’, ppl.adj. and vbl.n., used lit. and fig. (qui)
3) weddings
4) Stays: (a pair of) C17th and c18th term for the boned underbodice previously known as a “pair of bodies.” The term persisted into the c19th but was more usually replaced by its French equivalent, the “corset.” The term was also applied to the stiff inserts of whalebone or steel which shaped this garment. A corset made of two pieces laced together and stiffened by strips of whalebone. Il verso è da intendersi come “darsi una regolata” ovvero comportarsi da ragazza perbene oppure vuole nascondere il suo stato di partoriente ?

FONTI
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Jocky%27s_Gray_Breeches
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/85072/6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/98115/1
http://www.black-brothers.com/songs/8.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/wheniwasnoobutsweetsixteen.html
http://www.oysterband.co.uk/lyrics/songs/(When_I_was_no_but)_sweet_sixteen.html
http://mysongbook.de/mtb/r_clarke/songs/nobut16.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/hishieba.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=88570
http://sangstories.webs.com/hishieba.htm
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/16915/2
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah03/ah03_02.htm

CRAIGIEBURN WOOD

Craigieburn Wood ci riporta indietro nei  tempi in cui si corteggiava una fanciulla cantandole una canzone, e chi aveva come amico Robert Burns non poteva sperare in meglio!
La bella in questione è Jean Lorimer (1775 — 1831), la quale a quanto sembra, era più interessata al bardo che non all’amico, tale John Gilliespie (un collega di lavoro quando Burns era agente delle tasse a Ellisland). Nelle veci dell’amico Robbie scrisse per lei ben tre canzoni ‘Sweet closes the ev’ning on Craigieburn Wood’ (1791), ‘Come let me take thee to my breast’ e ‘Poortith Cauld’, ma molti altri versi vennero ispirati dalla fanciulla ovvero la musa Chloris (più di una ventina di canzoni, la più famosa “Lassie wi’ the Lintwhite Locks“.)

Her Favorite Place, Daniel F. Gerhartz

Robert Burns scrive in una lettera all’editore Thomson (ottobre 1794):‘The Lady on whom it was made, is one of the finest women in Scotland; and, in fact (entre nous), is in a manner to me what Sterne’s Eliza was to him; a Mistress or Friend, or what you will, in the guise of Platonic Love.’
Nella stessa lettera  Robbie ci spiega la sua “ricetta dell’ispirazione” ‘Do you think that the sober gin-horse routine of existence could inspire a man with life, and love, and joy — could fire him with enthusiasm, or melt him with pathos, equal to the genius of your Book? — No! No!!! — When ever I want to be more than ordinary in song; to be in some degree equal to your divine airs; do you imagine I fast and pray for the celestial emanation? Tout au contraire! I have a glorious recipe, the very one that for his own use was invented by the Divinity of Healing and Poesy when erst he piped to the flocks of Admetus. I put myself on a regimen of admiring a fine woman; and in proportion to the adorability of her charms, in proportion you are delighted with my verses.‘ (tratto da qui)

craigieburn-wood
Craigieburn Wood, Moffatdale, tavola disegnata da DG Hill, incisa da W. Forre: il nome gaelico significa torrente tra le rocce nel Dumfriesshire, Scozia

Consiglio l’ascolto della versione dei Tannahill Weavers, in Epona 1998, (su Spotify qui) una bella versione classica è quella con la voce di Meredith Hall in O Sweet Woods, 2013
ASCOLTA Ian Bruce
ASCOLTA Jean Redpath


I
Sweet closes the ev’ning on Craigieburn Wood(1),
And blythely awaukens the morrow;
But the pride o’ the spring in the Craigieburn Wood
Can yield to me nothing but sorrow.
Beyond thee, dearie, beyond thee, dearie,
And O to be lying beyond thee!
O sweetly, soundly, weel may he sleep
That’s laid in the bed beyond thee (2)!
II
I see the spreading leaves and flowers,
I hear the wild birds singing;
But pleasure they hae nane for me,
While care my heart is wringing.
III
I can na tell, I maun na tell,
I daur na for your anger;
But secret love will break my heart,
If I conceal it langer.
IV
I see thee gracefu’, straight and tall,
I see thee sweet and bonie;
But oh, what will my torment be,
If thou refuse thy Johnie!
V
To see thee in another’s arms(3),
In love to lie and languish,
‘Twad be my dead, that will be seen(4),
My heart wad burst wi’ anguish.
VI
But Jeanie, say thou wilt be mine,
Say thou lo’es nane before me;
And a’ may days o’ life to come
I’l gratefully adore thee
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mite s’avvicina sera
sul bosco di Craigieburn
e con letizia si risveglia il giorno:
ma la gloria della primavera nel bosco di Craigieburn
non mi porta altro che dolore.
Accanto a voi cara, accanto a voi, cara
e oh, stare accanto a voi! Oh sì dolcemente e profondamente dormirebbe colui che vi sta accanto nel letto!
II
Guardo le foglie rigogliose e i fiori,
ascolto gli uccelli del bosco cantare
ma non mi danno alcun piacere, mentre d’affanno il cuore mio è stretto.
III
Dire non posso e non riesco, e nemmeno oso per non farvi arrabbiare,
ma l’amore segreto mi spezzerà il cuore, se lo nasconderò più a lungo
IV
Vi vedo leggiadra, a testa alta,
vi vedo dolce e bella,
ma oh quale sarà il mio tormento
se respingerete il vostro Johnny!
V
Vedervi tra altre braccia di un altro,
in amore stare e languire,
sarebbe la morte mia, di sicuro
il cuore si spezzerebbe dall’angoscia!
VI
Eppure Jeanie ditemi che sarete mia,
ditemi che non amate nessun altro
e tutti i giorni della vita che verranno
vi adorerò con gratitudine

NOTE
1) il nome gaelico significa “torrente tra le rocce”  il bosco si trova a 5 miglia da Stirling, nel Dumfriesshire (vedi mappa)
2) dopo averla sposata ovviamente
3) Jean Lorimer (1775 — 1831) figlia di un ricco mercante viveva a Moffat (a due passi da Dumfries) la ragazza preferì fuggire con tale Andrew Whelpdale a Gretna Green e lì fu abbandonata dal bellimbusto dopo nemmeno tre settimane di “matrimonio” (probabilmente aveva speso tutti i soldi che la fanciulla si era portata dietro). Ritornata a vivere nella casa paterna rimase in buoni rapporti con Robert Burns (e i maligni disquisiscono ancora sulla natura di tali rapporti). Diventata povera dopo il fallimento dell’attività paterna andò a servizio presso una famiglia di Newington. Sulla sua tomba è stata eretta una croce celtica con l’iscrizione “This stone marks the grave of Jean Lorimer, the “Chloris” and “Lassie wi’ the lint-white locks” of the Poet Burns. Born 1775 – Died 1831. Erected under the auspices of the Ninety Burns Club, Edinburgh, 1901″.
4) will be seen è un’espressione idiomatica

LA MELODIA: LULL ME BEYOND THEE

ALTRI TITOLI “Oil of Barley,” “Cold and Raw,” “Stingo

Già riportata nell’English Dancing Master nella prima edizione di John Playford (1650), secondo gli studiosi è una variante di “Oil of Barley” o “Cold and Raw” ed è stata ritenuta da Thomas d’Urfey di origine scozzese, ma l’inglese Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Times, Vol. 1, 1859)  dal canto suo si convinse che quel “a new Northern tune,” con cui era ricordata la melodia si riferisse non alla Scozia bensì alle contee inglesi sul confine nord..

ASCOLTA William Coulter in The Crooked Road, 1999

Un’altra magica versione è quella con l’arpa di Anne Roos (in A Light in the Forest, 2007)-su Spotify

LA DANZA: English Country Dance

IL TUTORIAL

FONTI
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250&isindex=Craigieburn%20Wood&submit=Search
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1193lyr9.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/craigieburn_wood.htm
http://www.8notes.com/scores/4043.asp
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3626872

LAND OF THE LEAL

a1f86855d7044e1aa5b7af2828658bc5

La bella melodia che avevamo ascoltato in “Scots wha hae” la troviamo in questa canzone scritta da Lady Nairne (Caroline Oliphant) nel 1798: l’occasione era triste, la morte dell’unica figlia di una sua amica (Mrs. Campbell Colquhoun) e nella lettera di cordoglio Carolina include questa poesia consolatoria, “la Terra dei Beati” è il paradiso in cui adesso si trova la bimbetta circondata dagli angeli..
Si tratta di una melodia scozzese molto antica,  in “The Scottish Review,” Vol. 27 (1896) è detta “Hey Now The Day Dawes”  su di essa un autore anonimo ha scritto  le parole e così è diventata la canzone “Hey Tuttie Taitie” o “Hey Tuttie Tattie.” Robert Burns quando scrisse  “Scots Wha Hae” disse riguardo alla melodia “I have met the tradition universally over Scotland, and particularly about Stirling, in the neighbourhood of the scene, that this air was Robert the Bruce’s March at the battle of Bannockburn, which was fought in 1314.

La stesura di  Lady Nairne è stata ignorata per un bel po’ e la canzone fu ritenuta di anonimo o attribuita a Robert Burns finchè nel 1846  la sorella raccolse e pubblicò tutti i versi scritti  da Carolina in una raccolta dal titolo “Lays from Strathearn“. Ma naturalmente c’è chi continua a voler rivendicare la paternità a Robert Burns ritenendo la versione di Lady Nairne una “brutta copia”..

LA VERSIONE DI LADY NAIRNE

Che la tradizione popolare si sia impossessata del brano è assiomatico poichè di esso esistono varie versioni testuali non completamente conformi alle stesure andate in stampa (ora sotto la firma di Lady Nairne oppure attribuite a Robert Burns)

ASCOLTA Pete & Heather Heywood 1974

ASCOLTA Jean Redpath in “Will Ye No Come Back Again” 1986

VERSIONE  Lady Carolina Nairne *
I
I’m wearin’ awa’ (1), John (2);
Like snaw-wreaths in thaw, John
to the land o’ the leal (3).
There’s nae sorrow there, John;
There’s neither cauld nor care, John
The day is aye fair,
in the land o’ the leal.
II
Our bonnie bairnie (4)’s there, John;
She was baith gude and fair, John
And oh! we grudg’d her sair
to the land o’ the leal.
But sorrow’s sel’ wears past, John;
And joys a comin’ fast, John
The joy that’s aye to last,
in the land o’ the leal
III
Sae dear ‘s the joy was bought, John,
Sae free the battle fought, John,
That sinfu’ man e’er brought
To the land o’ the leal.
O, dry your glistening e’e (5), John!
My saul langs to be free, John,
And angels beckon me
To the land o’ the leal.
IV
Oh! haud ye leal an’ true, John;
Your day it’s wearin thro’, John
An’ I’ll welcome you
to the land o’ the leal
Now fare ye weel, my ain John;
This warld’s care is vain, John
We’ll meet and aye be fain (6)
in the land o’ the leal
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Sto svanendo John
come i cumuli di neve al disgelo, John
verso la Terra dei puri di cuore.
Non c’è dolore là, John
nè freddo nè affanni, John
il tempo è sempre bello,
nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
II
La nostra bella bambina è là, John
era così buona e bella, John
e oh abbiamo pianto la sua dipartita
nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
Ma il dolore appartiene al passato, John e la gioia è presto in arrivo, John la gioia che è sempre eterna nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
III
Così cara è la gioia che è stata conquistata, così libera la battaglia combattuta, che l’uomo che ha peccato mai andrà nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
Così asciuga le lacrime, John
la mia anima anela di essere libera, John e gli angeli mi chiamano
nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
IV
Oh! Resta leale e sincero, John
i tuoi giorni stanno svanendo, John
e ti saluterò
nella terra dei puri di cuore
Così addio, mio John
gli affanni di questo mondo sono vani, John, c’incontreremo e staremo bene
nella Terra dei puri di cuore

*(tratta da qui)
NOTE
1) I’m fading away
2) nella versione attribuita a Robert Burns il nome diventa Jean per riferirsi alla moglie
3) leal=loyal, faithful. Il temine loyal è propriamente giacobita. Così per un giacobita in esilio la terra descritta non è altro che la Scozia (o meglio le Highlands della Scozia) Una credenza antica, quella della Terra dei Beati, l’altro mondo celtico vedi
4) bairn=child
5) e’e=eye
6) fain= loving; si potrebbe anche tradurre come “we’ll be fine”


TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I’m fading away, John
Like snowdrift during thaw, John,
I’m fading away
To the land of the loyal.
There’s no sorrow there, John,
There’s neither cold nor care, John,
The weather is always fine
In the land of the loyal.
Our lovely child is there, John,
She was both good and fair, John;
And – o! – we hated to see her go
To the land of the loyal.
But sorrow itself will pass, John,
And joy will come fast, John,
The joy that will last forever
In the land of the loyal.
So dear is the joy that’s been bought, John,
So free the battle fought, John,
That sinful man ever brought
To the land of the loyal.
O, dry your glistening eyes, John!
My soul longs to be free, John,
And angels beckon me
To the land of the loyal.
O, remain loyal and honest, John!
Your days are passing by, John,
And I’ll welcome you
To the land of the loyal.
Now fare thee well, my own John,
This world’s cares are vain, John,
We’ll meet, and we’ll be fine,
In the land of the loyal.

Una versione condensata è stata  resa popolare dai Silly Wizard che la registrarono nel 1977 nel loro album “The Early Years” facendone uno standard.
Silly Wizard live 1988 -con le note del violino di Johnny Cunningham che ti cullano tra le nuvole

ASCOLTA Five Hand Reel, in “A Bunch Of Fives” (1979) con la voce di Sam Bracken (irlandese di Belfast) subentrato nella formazione a Dick Gaughan

ASCOLTA Hannah Rarity (Ryan MacKenzie -piano, Conal McDonagh -low whistle e Bernadette Kellermann -violino) giovanissimi della nuova scena di Glasgow

La versione è riportata in The Golden Treasury, 1875 (Francis T. Palgrave, ed. ) e in pratica  taglia gli ultimi 4 versi della II strofa e i primi 4 versi della II strofa; mentre la IV strofa è spezzata in due parti, la prima circa a metà della canzone e la seconda ancora lasciata alla fine.

VERSIONE SILLY WIZARD
I’m wearin’ awa’(1), Jean(2)
Like snaw-wreaths in thaw, Jean,
I’m wearin’ awa’
To the land o’ the leal(3).
There ‘s nae sorrow there, Jean
There ‘s neither cauld nor care, Jean
The day is aye fair
In the land o’ the leal.
Ye aye were leal and true, Jean
Your task is ended noo, Jean
And I’ll welcome you
tae the Land o’ the Leal.
Our bonnie bairn(4)’s there, Jean
She was baith guid and fair, Jean
And oh, we grudged her sair,
tae the Land o’ the Leal.
So dry that tearful ee(5), Jean,
My soul longs tae be free, Jean
And angels wait on me in
the Land o’ the Leal,
So fare-thee-weel my ain Jean,
This world’s care is vain, Jean
We’ll meet and aye be fain(6),
in the Land o’ the Leal
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Sto svanendo Jean
come i cumuli di neve al disgelo, Jean
io svanisco
verso la Terra dei puri di cuore.
Non c’è dolore là, Jean
nè freddo nè affanni, Jean
il tempo è sempre bello
nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
Tu sempre leale e sincera, Jean
il tuo compito è finito ora, Jean
e sarai la benvenuta
nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
La nostra bella bambina è là, Jean
era così buona e bella, Jean
e oh abbiamo pianto la sua dipartita
nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
Così asciuga le lacrime, Jean
la mia anima anela di essere libera, Jean e gli angeli mi aspettano
nella Terra dei puri di cuore.
Così addio, mia Jean
gli affanni di questo mondo sono vani, Jean, c’incontreremo in nome dell’amore
nella Terra dei puri di cuore

NOTE
1) I’m fading away
2) il nome John venne sostituito con quello di Jean in un presunto riferimento autobiografico con la vita di Robert Burns. Così con il titolo “Burns’s Deathbed Song”, la canzone spunta  con una riscrittura nelle edizioni edimburghesi  dei lavori di Burns (di inizio ottocento) argomentando che il bardo l’avesse composta nel 1793, la Jean quindi non sarebbe altri che la moglie..
3) leal=loyal, faithful. Il temine loyal è propriamente giacobita. Così per un giacobita in esilio la terra descritta non è altro che la Scozia (o meglio le Highlands della Scozia) Una credenza antica, quella della Terra dei Beati, l’altro mondo celtico vedi
4) bairn=child
5) e’e=eye
6) fain= loving; si potrebbe anche tradurre come “we’ll be fine” 

E quando ascolto questa canzone mi sorge spontanea un’associazione con un’altra altrettanto straziante canzone (ma molto più “internazionale”):”Tears in Heaven” di Eric Clapton scritta dedicandola al figlio piccolo, morto per una disattenzione dei suoi genitori; caduto in volo dall’alto della torre dorata nel quale viveva (insieme a dei genitori per la maggior parte del tempo strafatti)


I
Would you know my name(1)
if I saw you in heaven?
Would it be the same
if I saw you in heaven?
II
I must be strong
and carry on
‘Cause I know
I don’t belong here in heaven
III
Would you hold my hand
if I saw you in heaven?
Would you help me stand
if I saw you in heaven?
IV
I’ll find my way
through night and day
‘Cause I know
I just can’t stay here in heaven
V
Time can bring you down;
time can bend your knees
Time can break your heart,
have you begging please, begging please
IV
Beyond the door
there’s peace I’m sure
And I know there’ll be
no more tears in heaven
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO (tratta da qui)
I
Ti ricorderesti di me
se ti vedessi in Paradiso?
Sarebbe lo stesso
se ti vedessi in Paradiso?
II
Devo essere forte
ed andare avanti
perché lo so,
io non appartengo qui, al Paradiso
III
Mi terresti la mano
se ti vedessi in Paradiso?
Mi aiuteresti a stare in piedi
se ti vedessi in Paradiso?
IV
Troverò la mia via
tra la notte e il giorno
Perché lo so,
io non posso restare qui, in Paradiso
V
Il tempo può buttarti giù;
il tempo può piegarti le ginocchia
Il tempo può spezzarti il cuore,
farti implorare pietà, implorare pietà
VI
Oltre la porta
c’è pace ne sono sicuro
e lo so, non ci saranno
più lacrime in Paradiso

NOTE
1) ho preferito tradurre così la frase “Ricorderesti il mio nome”

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/scotswha.htm
http://www.rampantscotland.com/poetry/blpoems_leal.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/ExtractedLandOLeal.pdf
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/LandOTheLeal.html
http://www.bartleby.com/106/157.html