Archivi tag: John Short

Blow away the morning dew sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

The ballad known as The Baffled Knight is reported in many text versions both in the eighteenth-century collections and in the Broadsides, as well as orally transmitted in Great Britain and America with the titles of “Blow (Clear) (Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” or “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning “: the male protagonist from time to time, is a gentleman, or a shepherd boy / peasant.

It could not miss the sea shanty version of this popular ballad in the text version best known as “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 version D), summarized in four stanzas

Nils Brown from Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)

I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”

JOHN SHORT VERSION

Another sea shanty version comes from the testimony of John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] comments that although Short started his Blow Away the Morning Dew with a verse of The Baffled Knight, he then digresses into floating verses. In fact three of the verses recorded and published by Terry, not one derive from The Baffled Knight! Short sang only the “flock of geese” verse to Sharp. Sharp did not publish the shanty, but other authors also give Baffled Knight versions. The other predominant version in collections is the American whaling version but still using the tune associated with The Baffled Knight and the chorus remaining close to the usual words. (from here)

Jim Mageean  from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3

I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609

Rolling Sally Brown!

Leggi in italiano

In the sea shanties Sally Brown is the stereotype of the cheerful woman of the Caribbean seas, mulatta or creole, with which our sailor  tries to have a good time. Probably of Jamaican origin according to Stan Hugill, it was a popular song in the ports of the West Indies in the 1830s.
The textual and melodic variations are many.

ARCHIVE

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

 

Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!

In this version the chorus doubles in two short sentences repeated by the crew in sequence after each line of the shantyman, here the work done is the loading of the ship
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!

Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · Nils Brown from Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!
 
(Oh way down South, way down South boys
Oh bound away, with a bone(1) in her mouth boys)
It’s down to Trinidad(2) to see Sally Brown boys,
She’s lovely on the foreyard, an’ she’s lovely down below boys,
She’s lovely ‘cause she loves me, that’s all I want to know boys,
Ol’ Captain Baker, how do you store yer cargo?
Some I stow for’ard (3) boys, an’ some I stow a’ter
Forty fathoms or more below boys,
There’s forty fathoms or more below boys,
Oh, way high ya, an’ up she rises,
Way high ya, and the blocks (4) is different sizes,
Oh, one more pull, don’t ya hear the mate a-bawlin?
Oh, one more pull, that’s the end of all the hawlin’
Sally Brown she’s the gal for me boys

NOTE
1) “Bone in her teeth” is the expression used for a bow wave, usually implying that the vessel in question was moving pretty fast. (see more here)
2) the southernmost of the Caribbean islands
3) the front and the back of a ship have a specific terminology
4) In sailing, a block is a single or multiple pulley

JOHN SHORT VERSION: ROLL AND GO

Not to be confused with “Spent My Money On Sally Brown”. Cecil Sharp ranks as capstan shanty.
In Short Sharp Shanties the project’s curators write”A
lthough, by Hugill’s time, ‘this shanty had only one theme – Sally and her daughter’, Short’s text is not on this ‘one theme’ – it is based around a less overtly sexual relationship.  Short gave Sharp more text than he actually published. It is always possible that Short may be self censoring – but there is no indication that this is the case, and from other textual evidence in Sharp’s field notebooks (e.g. see the notes to Hanging Johnny), rather the reverse. We have added just two floating verses at the end

Roger Watson from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2


Way, hey, roll and go

Oh Sally Brown, Oh Sally Brown
a long time ago
She promised for to marry me
Way, hey, roll and go
She promised for to marry me.
a long time ago

Oh Sally Brown is the girl for me
Oh Sally Brown has slighted me.
As I walked down one morning fair
it’s there I met her I do declare.
And I asked for to marry me
to marry me or let me be.
She spent me pay all around the town
she left me broken bad and dow.
Than I will pack me bags and go to sea
and I’ll leave my Sally on the quey

LINK
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2012/03/104-105-sally-brown-series.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html
http://www.capstanbars.com/time_ashore/taio_lyrics/roll_boys_roll.htm

Blow Boys Blow (Banks of Sacramento)

Leggi in italiano

“Blow Boys Blow” or “Hoodah Day Shanty” but also “Banks of Sacramento” is a popular sea shanty with several versions.

JOHN SHORT VERSION

With the title “Blow Boys Blow” the version of John Short mixes the verses of “Banks od Sacramento” with the minstrel song “Campton Races” written by Stephen Foster in 1850. But some scholars are inclined to believe that it is the sea shanty on Golden Rush in California, to precede the minstrel song for a few years
Tom Brown Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1  
The authors write in the project notes “Neither Sharp nor Terry published this shanty.  All the other collectors give it as a capstan song, Hugill, in particular, says it was a favourite for raising the anchor.  Short gave it as a capstan shanty, and sang Sharp one verse only – straight from Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races which was written in 1850.  Doerflinger credits the Hutchinson Family, a famous New England concert troupe with the song Ho For California!, the chorus of which ran: “Then Ho Brothers Ho! To California go, There’s plenty of gold in the world, we’re told, On the Banks of the Sacramento” and dates it to the 1849 gold rush when, between 1849 and 1852, over ninety thousand emigrants shipped ‘round the corner’ (Cape Horn) in the hopes of finding riches in the gold fields. It was Sharp’s editorial policy that made him omit this shanty from his publication: as he said in the introduction to English Folk-Chanteys, “I have omitted certain popular and undoubtedly genuine chanteys, such as ” The Banks of the Sacramento”, ”Poor Paddy works on the Railway”, “Can’t you dance the Polka,” “Good‑bye, Fare you Well,”,etc.,… on the ground that the tunes are not of folk-origin, but rather the latter‑day adaptations of popular, “composed” songs of small musical value.” Doerflinger quotes three different sets of words that have been used for this shanty: we have expanded Short’s verse with others that relate to the message of the chorus. It is another of the many shanties that ultimately derive from contemporary song-writing for the stage in concert-troupe and minstrel show – and this is reflected in our use of fiddle and banjo.”


I
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah(1), to my hoodah,
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah, hoodah day,
It’s round Cape Horn(2) in the month o’ May
now around Cape Horn
we are bound to straigh
Blow boys blow,
For California O,
There’s
plots of gold
so I’ve been told
On the banks of Sacramento (3).

II
It’s to Sacramento we ‘ll go
For we are the bullies (4) who kick ‘er through.
Round the Horn an’ up the Line
We’re the bullies for to make ‘er shine.
III
Around Cape Stiff (2) in seventy days
it’s two thousand miles or so they said
Breast yer bars (5) an’ bend yer backs,
Heave an’ make yer spare ribs (6) crack.

 NOTES
1) or Doo-dah! From  “Who da hell is dat?” Who-Da…hoodah
2) Cape Horn said by the sailors “Cape Stiff”, is often mentioned in the sea shanties, it’s the black cliff at the end of South America, where the masses of water and air from the Atlantic and the Pacific collide, causing winds that they range from 160 to 220 km / h and an almost prohibitive ascent to the west. Several factors combine to make the passage around Cape Horn one of the most hazardous shipping routes in the world (cemetery of numerous unlucky ships): strong winds, waves and wandering icebergs.
3) the Californian gold rush began in January 1848 right on the banks of the Sacramento
4) “bully” has many meanings: in a positive sense a “very good” sailor, or “first rate”, but “bully” is also the troublemaker always ready to fight.
5) Breast the bars: leaning deeply so as to push the weight of the body at the chest against the capstan bars.
6) “spare ribs” are pork ribs

LINK
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm
https://mnheritagesongbook.net/the-songs/addition-song-with-recordings/banks-of-sacramento/
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sacramento/index.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/singandh.htm
http://cazoo.org/folksongs/BanksOfSacramento.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14644
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=497

Lucy Long sea shanty

Derivata da una minstrel song in voga nel 1842, la versione sea shanty è al contrario piuttosto rara. La versione di John Short come sempre è particolare, Short sembra mettere insieme una verie di versi non correlati. Così scrivono i curatori del progetto: Indeed, Short’s text for Won’t You Go My Way, feels more like deliberate positive reworking of the Minstrels’ original than this set. It wasn’t until we started selecting shanties for each CD that we realised that Short’s tune for Lucy Long is actually closely akin to So Early in the Morning although it’s deceptive!
Ovviamente Miss Lucy è una “signorinella allegra” e l’incontro con il marinaio appena sbarcato è squisitamente carnale.

ASCOLTA Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


To my way-ay-ay ha, ha
My Johnny, boys, ha ha
Why don’t you try for to wring[1]
Miss Lucy Long?

I
When I was out one mornig fair
To view the views
and take the air.
II
‘Twas there I met Miss Lucy fair,
‘Twas there we met I do declare.
III
Oh, I raised my hat and I said “Hello”
Hitched her up and I took her in tow
IV
Well, I wrung her all night and I wrung her all day
I wrung her before she went away
V
Oh she left me there upon the quay
Left me there and went away
VI
Now Miss Lucy had a baby[2] ,
She dressed it all in green-o
VII
Was you ever on the Brumalow[3] ,
Where the Yankee boys are all the go?
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
A me ay-ay ha, ha
mio marinaio, ragazzi ha, ha perchè non provi a “corteggiare”
la signorina Lucy Long?
I
Sono uscito un bel mattino, per ammirare il panorama
e prendere il fresco
II
Ecco che t’incontro la bella signorina Lucy, fu là che c’incontrammo così dico
III
Oh sollevai il cappello e dissi “Ciao”
l’afferrai e la presi a rimorchio
IV
La corteggiai tutta la notte e la corteggiai tutto il giorno,
la corteggiai prima che se ne andasse
V
Mi lasciò là sulla banchina
mi lasciò là e andò via
VI
Ora la signorina Lucy ha avuto un bambino e lo veste tutto in verde.
VII
Sei mai stato a Broomielaw? Dove i marinai americani sono tutti a passeggio?

NOTE
1) un eufemismo molto esplicito: Hugill dice “ring” trovato anche “woo”
2) mettere incinta la ragazza con cui si è fatto sesso era un tempo sinonimo di grande virilità maschile, così nelle canzoni del mare i marinai parlano con noncuranza delle loro paternità!
3) Broomielaw è il vecchio pontile di Glasgow sulla sponda settentrionale del fiume Clyde

FONTI
http://bluegrassmessengers.com.temp.realssl.com/lucy-long–see-also-rock-the-cradle-lucy-.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com.temp.realssl.com/miss-lucy-long–version-2-stan-hugill-.aspx
https://www.paddlesteamers.org/scottish/last-paddle-steamer-at-the-broomielaw/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/miss-lucy-long.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=119975

Bulgine run

Bulgine Run (Let the Bulgine Run) è una sea shanty meno conosciuta di Eliza Lee con la quale condivide la frase “Let the bulgine run.”
Secondo Stan Hugill “bulgine” o “bullgine” e un termine gergale americano  per  “locomotiva”, su Mudcat leggiamo “Bullgine is, indeed a term applied a small steam loco- motive which runs on short tracks and is usually used to haul ships through locks and canals. A donkey engine is a stationary engine which might be used on board ship to power a winch or to run a pump; it has no tracks, tending to be portable, if not mobile. A pony engine is a similar small locomotive built to use regulation-gauge railroad rails, and used for moving cars in a railroad switchyard. The earliest entry I could find for the word in a quick search was 1846; it was in use as late as 1939.” (da qui)
Stan la classifica tra le pumping shanty per non annoiarsi durante il lungo lavoro di pompaggio dell’acqua di sentina.

JOHN BULL

Robert Stevens era il figlio del colonnello Stevens, considerato il padre delle ferrovie americane. Infatti, già nel 1815 John Stevens aveva richiesto, senza successo, l’autorizzazione di costruire una ferrovia nel New Jersey. Aveva riprovato nel 1823 nello Stato di Pennsylvania, ma con uguali risultati.
Nel 1824 il colonnello Stevens costruì a sue spese un circuito dimostrativo a Hoboken, nel New Jersey, dove fece circolare una piccola locomotiva con caldaia verticale e un solo cilindro. Questa macchina, che pesava appena 450 kg e raggiungeva i 20 km/h, fu, di fatto, la prima locomotiva americana, ma non raccolse il successo sperato.
Il figlio del colonnello, decise di seguire le orme paterne. Riuscì a farsi assumere dalla giovane compagnia Camden & Amboy, ma invece di cimentarsi in esperimenti con prototipi, consigliò saggiamente l’acquisto di locomotive in Inghilterra, presso la ben nota ditta Stephenson. Organizzò così un viaggio d’affari, durante il quale ebbe anche tutto il tempo necessario per inventare una nuova forma di binario che, disegnato successivamente dall’inglese Charles Vignoles, diventò il binario più utilizzato di tutto il mondo.
Ritornato negli Stati Uniti nel 1831 con una locomotiva smontata, Stevens cominciò a farla riassemblare dal meccanico della rete, Isaac Dripps. Sembra però che mancassero le istruzioni e, in assenza di precise indicazioni, Dripps fece di testa sua. La locomotiva venne assemblata con una forma del tutto diversa da quella prevista dal fornitore. La macchina viaggiava con una traiettoria piuttosto imprecisa a causa degli eccessivi giochi laterali degli assi, dovuti al montaggio improvvisato. Dripps pensò allora di dotare la locomotiva di un terzo asse supplementare posto in avanti, montato su un piccolo telaio articolato rispetto a quello principale, inventando così il carrello-sterzo anteriore, ma per far questo dovette smontare le bielle di collegamento tra gli assi lasciando così la macchina con un solo asse motore anziché i due previsti.
Su questo carrello-sterzo collocò anche un cacciapietre a forma di cuneo per eliminare tutto ciò che poteva depositarsi o ingombrare i binari delle linee mal custodite: pietre, rami, alberi, animali, ecc. Questo “cowcatcher” (scaccia mucche) diventò la caratteristica delle locomotive americane.
Successivamente alla locomotiva fu montata una cabina in legno per proteggere le squadre di guida dalle intemperie e anche il tender fu chiuso per avere sempre legna asciutta da ardere.


La locomotiva entrò in servizio solo nel novembre del 1833, dovendo attendere che la breve linea Camden-Bordentown, lunga 42,5 km, fosse ultimata. Rimase in funzione fino al 1866, poi venne parcheggiata in uno dei depositi della Pennsylvania Railroad che, nel frattempo, aveva acquistato la linea. Dimenticata, la locomotiva rimase intatta e, nel 1885, la Pennsy la regalò allo Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History di Washington, dove si trova tuttora. (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT: BULGINE RUN

“John Short called two of his shanties Bulgine Run – this capstan shanty is better known as Run, Let the Bulgine Run to distinguish it from Clear the Track, Let the Bulgine Run also known as Liza Lee.  Short gave this to Sharp as a capstan shanty although, given the elaborate second shantyman’s line, its structure is that of a halyards song.” (tratto da qui)
In effetti nel testo riportato nel “The Advent and Development of Chanties” richiama più un canto salpa ancora che una pumping shanty.
We’ll run from Dover to Calais.
We sailed away from Mobile Bay.
We gave three cheers and away we went.
Now up aloft this yard must go.
We’re homeward bound for Liverpool Docks.

ASCOLTA Barbara Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


We’ll run from night till morning.
O run, let the bullgine (1) run.
Way yah, oo-oo oo-oo-oo, (2)
O run, let the bullgine run.
We’ll run from here to dinnertime
We’ll run from Dover to Calais
We sailed all day to Mobile
Bay.
Pump me bullies pump
or drown
Oh we’ll run down south round the Horn
From Liverpool to Frisco
we’ll pump her dry and away we’ll go
she is a dandy clipper(3) and a bully crew
The captain (?make her hosenose clear?)*
so we’ll rock and roll her over (4)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Correremo notte e giorno
Oh correre, fai correre il motore
Way yah, oo-oo oo-oo-oo,
Oh correre, fai correre il motore.
Correremo da qui all’ora di pranzo
correremo da Dover a Calais
Navighiamo tutto il giorno per Mobile Bay
Pompate miei bravacci pompate o annegate!
Correremo verso Sud per doppiare l’Horn
da Liverpool a San Francisco
pomperemo e poi la lasceremo
è un dandy clipper e una ciurma di sbruffoni
il capitano ??
così ce la metteremo tutta

NOTE
* ho ancora delle difficoltà nella trascrizione del testo non riuscendo a individuare bene la pronuncia di alcune parole
1) scritto anche come Bull John
2) una tipica frase delle halyard shanty
3) Dandy è il nome di uno specifico modello di nave del 1825, un vascello a due alberi
4) rock and roll over  assume molti significati a seconda del contesto

FONTI
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/LETTHEBU.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16554
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/eliza-lee/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/letthebulginerun.html
http://www.kbapps.com/lyrics/sailor-shanties/OhrunlettheBullginerun.php
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/bulgine.htm

Blow Boys Blow (Banks of Sacramento)

Read the post in English

Anche con il titolo “Hoodah Day Shanty” ma anche “Banks of Sacramento” è una sea shanty che presenta svariate versioni dovute alla sua vasta popolarità.

LA VERSIONE JOHN SHORT

Con il titolo “Blow Boys Blow” la versione di John Short mescola i versi di “Banks od Sacramento” con la minstrel song “Campton Races” scritta da Stephen Foster nel 1850. Ma alcuni studiosi sono propensi a credere che sia la sea shanty sulla Golden Rush in California, a precedere di qualche anno la minstrel song
Tom Brown Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1  
Nelle note del progetto gli autori scrivono “Né Sharp né Terry hanno pubblicato questa sea shanty. Tutti gli altri collezionisti la danno come una canzone all’argano, Hugill, in particolare, dice che era per l’alzata dell’ancora. Short la classifica come capstan shanty, e ha cantato a Sharp solo un verso- direttamente dalla Campbell Races di Stephen Foster che ha scritto nel 1850. Doerflinger l’accredita alla famiglia Hutchinson, una famosa compagnia concertistica del New England con il titolo “Ho For California !”, con il coro  che recita “Then Ho Brothers Ho! To California go, There’s plenty of gold in the world, we’re told, On the Banks of the Sacramento” e la data alla corsa all’oro del 1849 quando, tra il 1849 e il 1852, oltre novantamila emigranti navigarono” round the corner “( Capo Horn) nella speranza di trovare la ricchezza. È stata la politica editoriale di Sharp a fargli omettere questa sea shanty dalla sua pubblicazione: così disse nell’introduzione ai English Folk-Chanteys “Ho omesso certi canti popolari e indubbiamente genuini, come ” The Banks of the Sacramento”,” Poor Paddy works on the Railway”, “Can’t you dance the Polka,” “Good‑bye, Fare you Well,” ecc., per il fatto che le melodie non sono di origine popolare, ma piuttosto l’adattamento dell’ultima ora di canzoni popolari, “composte” di scarso valore musicale.” Doerflinger cita tre diverse serie di parole che sono state usate per questa sea shanty: abbiamo ampliato il verso di Short con altri che si riferiscono al messaggio del coro. È un’altra delle tante sea shanty che derivano in ultima analisi dal cantautorato contemporaneo per il palcoscenico vaudeville dell’avanspettacolo – e questo si riflette nel nostro uso del violino e del banjo


I
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah(1), to my hoodah,
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah, hoodah day,
It’s round Cape Horn(2) in the month o’ May
now around Cape Horn
we are bound to straigh
Blow boys blow,
For California O,
There’s
plots of gold
so I’ve been told
On the banks of Sacramento (3).

II
It’s to Sacramento we ‘ll go
For we are the bullies (4) who kick ‘er through.
Round the Horn an’ up the Line
We’re the bullies for to make ‘er shine.
III
Around Cape Stiff (2) in seventy days
it’s two thousand miles or so they said
Breast yer bars (5) an’ bend yer backs,
Heave an’ make yer spare ribs (6) crack.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Uscivo con il mio berretto floscio
Hoodah, to my hoodah,
Uscivo con il mio berretto floscio
Hoodah, hoodah day.
A doppiare Capo Horn nel mese di Maggio
verso Capo Horn
siamo diretti
Forza ragazzi forza
per la California
c’è un sacco d’oro
così mi hanno detto

sulle rive del Sacramento
II
A Sacramento andremo
perchè siamo noi i maschioni che la fanno divertire.
A doppiare l’Horn e oltre all’Equatore
siamo i bulli che la faranno risplendere.
III
A doppiare Capo Stiff in 70 giorni
sono duemila miglia o così dicono.
Petto sulle aspe, e piegate le schiene
tirate fino a rompervi le costole

 NOTE
1) hoodah ha diversi significati gergali, anche  scritto come Doo-dah! Dall’esclamazione  “Who da hell is dat?” Who-Da…hoodah
2) detto dai marinai “Cape Stiff”, il temuto Capo Horn è spesso menzionato negli shanties, la nera scogliera all’estremità dell’America Meridionale dove si scontrano le masse d’acqua e d’aria dell’Atlantico e del Pacifico, provocando venti che vanno dai 160 ai 220 Km/h e una risalita verso Ovest quasi proibitiva. Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, per i forti venti, le grani onde e gli iceberg vaganti, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
 “Grandi Naufragi” impossibile stabilire il numero delle navi che sono andate perdute in queste estreme acque tra le onde alte anche 20 metri. Tempeste di neve, violenti uragani, nebbie e pericolosi iceberg alla deriva, fanno capire quanto sia stato difficile passare indenni per la via di Capo Horn. I pochi naufraghi dovevano affrontare oltre all’inospitalità di quelle terre anche l’avversità degli indigeni che aggredivano i superstiti per depredarli di alcool ed armi. (tratto da qui)
3) la corsa all’oro californiano ebbe inizio nel gennaio del 1848 proprio sulle rive del Sacramento
4) bully è un termine da marinai con molti significati: in senso positivo per dire che il marinaio è un tipo “very good”, o “first rate”, ma bully è anche l’attaccabrighe sempre pronto a fare a pugni.  Quando il comandante dava del bullies alla sua ciurma gli appellava come degli “sbruffoni”
5) Breast the bars: leaning deeply so as to push the weight of the body at the chest against the capstan bars.
6) spare ribs sono le costine del maiale

FONTI
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm
https://mnheritagesongbook.net/the-songs/addition-song-with-recordings/banks-of-sacramento/
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sacramento/index.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/singandh.htm
http://cazoo.org/folksongs/BanksOfSacramento.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14644
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=497

Blow away the morning dew shanty

Read the post in English

La ballata nota come The Baffled Knight è riportata in moltissime versioni testuali sia nelle raccolte settecentesche che nei Broadsides, oltrechè trasmessa oralmente in Gran Bretagna e America con i titoli di ” Blow (Clear)(Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” oppure “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning”: il protagonista maschile di volta in volta è un gentleman, o un pastorello / contadinello.

Non poteva mancare la versione sea shanty di questa popolarissima ballata nella versione testuale più nota come “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 versione D), riassunta in quattro strofe
Nils Brown in Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era un pastorello
che governava le pecore sulla collina
posò l’arco e la freccia
per dissetarsi
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Guardò in alto e guardò in basso
e di guardò intorno
e là vide una bella fanciulla
che nuotava nel ruscello
III
“Portami a casa da mio padre
prima di mettermi sotto,
poi avrai la mia verginità
e ventimila sterline”
IV
Quando arrivò al portone della casa paterna
in un guizzò lei entrò
e disse ” Puah! Sei uno scemo fuori
e io una fanciulla dentro”

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

Un’altra versione sea shanty viene dalla testimonianza di John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] commenta che sebbene Short abbia iniziato il suo Blow Away the Morning Dew con un versetto da “The Baffled Knight”, poi divaga con versi fluttuanti. In effetti dei tre dei versi registrati e pubblicati da Terry, nemmeno uno derivano da The Baffled Knight! Short cantava solo la strofa “flock of geese” di Sharp. Sharp non ha pubblicato la shanty ma anche altri autori danno delle versioni di Baffled Knight. L’altra versione predominante nelle collezioni è la versione americana della caccia alle balene, ma che usa ancora la melodia associata a The Baffled Knight con  il coro che resta simile alle solite parole. (tratto da qui)

Jim Mageean  in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3


I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
* ci sono ancora troppe parole di cui non capisco bene la pronuncia
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo un bel mattino
per ammirare i prati nei dintorni
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
in giro per la campagna
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Mio padre aveva un destriero bianco latte, è nella stalla
non mangerà nè fieno, nè grano
e non andrà affatto
III
Quando andiamo in un aia
a vedere uno stormo di oche
le fissiamo negli occhi
chiudiamo i loro occhi
e ne abbattiamo cinque o sei
IV
Mentre camminavo
lungo le rive del fiume
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
che aspettava la marea.
V
Mentre camminavo
sotto il chiaro di luna
fu là che vidi una  fanciulla bionda
?
VI
?
?
dice lei: “Giovanotto questo è il posto giusto dove un uomo può giocare”
VII
Mentre camminavo
per Paradise Street
là incontrai un fantasma
dice “
ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609

SING FARE YOU WELL

Una sea shanty dal titolo “Hurrah, Sing Fare Ye Well” – ma anche “O Fare Ye Well, My Bonnie Young Girl”- da non confondersi con “Goodbye, Fare Thee Well”   è comunque un brano “salpa ancora”, cioè uno di quei canti speciali che i  marinai intonavano quando levavano l’ancora per l’ultima volta prima di ritornare a casa!
Raccolto dal marinaio John Short è il primo brano nel progetto Short Sharp Shanties.
Per la versione di Stan Hugill nella sua Bibbia dei Mari (Shanties from the Seven Seas) qui

ASCOLTA Keith Kendrick in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su Spotify) oppure qui


O fare you well! I wish you well
Hurrah! and fare you well!
O fare you well till I return
Hurrah! sing fare you well!
O fare you well we’re bound away
bound away this very day.
As I walked out one morning fair
it’s there I met a lady fair.
She winked (1) at me I do declare
black as night was her reven hair.
O fare you well, my bonny young girl
O fare you well! I wish you well.
Up aloft this yard must go
Mister Mate has told us so
I thought I have the skipper said
“just one more pull and then belay”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Addio e tanti auguri
Evviva e addio!
Addio fino al mio ritorno
Evviva e canta addio!
O addio siamo in partenza
pronti a salpare questo giorno.
Mentre passeggiavo un bel mattino
incontrai una graziosa madama.
Mi ha fatto l’occhiolino,
neri come la notte i suoi capelli corvini.
Oh addio, mia bella ragazzina
oh addio e tanti auguri.
In alto questo pennone deve andare
il signor Primo Ufficiale ci ha detto così
credo di aver sentito dire al Capitano
“Ancora un tiro e poi lasciare”

NOTE
1) siccome non capisco bene la pronuncia ripiego sul verso usato da Stan

FONTI
http://www.judybwebdesign.com/handspikes/with_shipmates/wsaa_lyrics/wsaa21hurrah.htm
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/12/64-hurrah-sing-fare-ye-well.html

Yankee John Stormalong

Appartentente alla “Stormalong family, un vasto gruppo di halyard shanties d’origine afro-americana, Lize Lee (Yankee John, Stormalong) è classificata da Fred Buryeson come una “timber shanty,” cantata durante il lavoro di stivaggio del legname nei porti del Sud
“The most popular of the timber shanties were Miss Rosa Lee, Somebody Told Me So, and Yankee John, Storm Along. They are still sung by the negro timber stowers in the seaports of the South.”

ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


Liza Lee she promised me
(Yankee John, Stormalong (1))
she promised for to marry me
When I sailed across the sea
Liza said she be true to me
I promised her a golden ring
She promised me that little thing
Liza Lee she’s slighted me
Now she will not marry me
O up aloft this yard must go
Mister Mate told the song
I thought I heard the skipper said
“One more pull and than belay”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Lize Lee mi promise
(Yankee John, Stormalong)
promise di sposarmi.
Quando navigano in mare
Liza disse che mi sarebbe stata fedele.
Io le promisi l’anello matrimoniale
lei mi promise quella” cosina”.
Lize Lee mi mentiva
e non mi vuole sposare.
O su in alto questo pennone deve andare e il Primo cantava la canzone,
credo di aver sentito il capitano dire
“Ancora un tito e poi lasciare”

NOTE
1) Stormie cioè il marinaio per eccellenza

FONTI
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.com/2011/11/29-yankee-john-stormalong.html

Tommy’s Gone

Sea shanty variante della famiglia “To Hilo” nel progetto Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor sono riportate ben due versioni.
Il marinaio di queste sea shanty è Tom e al suo nome si abbinano un buon numero di porti, la lunghezza della canzone dipendeva dalla durata del lavoro (‘Stringing out’) e quindi la lista dei porti visitati dal nostro Tom è molto vasta.

Tommy’s Gone (Tommy’s Gone Away)

ASCOLTA Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


Tommy’s gone, what will I do?
Tommy’s gone away.
Tommy’s gone, what will I do?
Tommy’s gone away.
Tommy’s gone to Liverpool,
To Liverpool that noted school.
Tommy’s gone to Baltimore
To dance upon that sandy floor
Tommy’s gone to Mobile Bay,
To screw the cotton all the day..
Tommy’s gone to Singapore,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Tommy’s gone to Buenos Aires,
Where the girls have long black hair,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito
Tommy è andato a Liverpool
a Liverpool quella scuola rinomata
Tommy è andato a Baltimora
a ballare sulla sabbia gialla
Tommy è andato a Mobile Bay
a raccogliere il cotone tutto il giorno
Tommy è andato a Singapore
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre
Tommy è andato a Buenos Aires
dove le ragazze portano i capelli neri e lunghi
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre

Tommy’s Gone to Ilo

La variante diffusa nel Canada.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


My Tom’s gone, what shall I do?
Away you Ilo (1).
My Tom’s gone, what shall I do?
My Tom’s gone to Ilo.
Tom’s gone to Liverpool
To Liverpool that packet school
Tom’s gone to Merasheen (2)
where they tied up
to tree (3)
Tom’s gone to Vallipo (4)
When he’ll come back I do not know
Tom’s gone to Rio
Where the girls put on show
Hilo town is in Peru
It’s just the place for me an’ you.
I wish I was in London town
then to see no more Ilo
A bully ship and a bully crew
Tom’s gone and I’ll gone too
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tom se n’è andato, cosa farò?
via a Hilo
Tom se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito per Hilo
Tom è andato a Liverpool
a Liverpool a quella scuola navale
Tom è andato a Merasheen
dove bisognava agguantarsi alla crocetta
Tom è andato a Vallipo
quando ritornerà non lo so
Tom è andato a Rio
dove le ragazze si mettono in mostra
Hilo è una città del Perù
ed è il posto perfetto per me e te
Vorrei essere a Londra
e non andare più a Hilo
Una nave tosta e una ciurma di bulli
Tom è partito e partirò anch’io

NOTE
1) Hilo è il nome di un porto che si trova sia in Perù che  nelle Hawai (vedi)
2) anche scritto come Merrimashee c’è un isola di Merasheen a Terranova (Canada), ma più probabilmente è Miramichi, una cittadina del Canada, situata nella provincia del Nuovo Brunswick, ma anche un grande fiume che da il nome alla baia in cui sfocia, nel Golfo di San Lorenzo. Spesso i marinai ripetevano le canzoni ad orecchio ed era più probabile che venissero storpiati i nomi delle località che non si conoscevano.
3) vedi commento in Bonny Laddie, Heiland Laddie (My Bonnie Highland Lassie) 
4) Valparaiso in Cile

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/hilo-in-the-sea-shanties/
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/514.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/tomsgonetohilo.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=147564