The Dead Horse sea shanty: Working off the Dead Horse

Leggi in italiano

kw294114Paying off the Dead Horse” perhaps derives from a custom in negotiations between breeders: once the agreement was sanctioned with a handshake there was no way to go back even if the horse died soon after.
Flogging a dead horse” or “beating a dead horse” has entered the nineteenth-century ways of saying to indicate a way of doing that has no prospects or outlets (it is useless to whip a horse when it is dead because it will never rise again).
But “to work (for) the dead horse” means wasting money to buy useless things (like a dead horse).

Working off the Dead Horse

“Working off the Dead Horse” still has a further meaning in marine jargonas, explained by Italo Ottonello: at the signing of the recruitment contract for long journeys, the sailors received an advance equal to three months of pay which, to guarantee the respect of the contract, it was provided in the form of “I will pay”, payable three days after the ship left the port, “as long as said sailor has sailed with that ship.” Everyone invariably ran to look for some complacent sharks who bought their promissory note at a discounted price, usually of forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind.
So often there was nothing left of the advance, spended for the personal equipment (boots, wax, knives etc that were charged to the sailor) or more commonly for women and “drinks”.
Thus the sailor worked for the first month for “nothing” that is for “the dead horse”; others mean that it is the sailor who is an exploited horse because in the first month on the ship he does not work for himself, but for his creditors.
In support of the first hypothesis there are those who maintain that once the driver of a horse who was employed by a chief was responsible for the death of the horse and would no longer receive his salary until he repaid the cost of the horse.

HORSE ON THE DECK AT THE AUCTION!

A curious ceremony took place aboard the sailing vessels: a horse was assembled with discarded objects (stitched worn sails, old barrels and worn ropes) and dragged around the deck of the ship; then an auction was opened with the auctioneer who praised the good qualities of the animal, at the end the horse was hoisted with a rope on the highest flagpole and thrown into the sea, while the last part of a song’s melody was sung as requiem. called “Paying off the dead horse”.
The ceremony … became a rather half-hearted affair in the latter days of sail, whereas in days gone by it was a spectacular effort, particularly in the emigrant ships, and one of the best descriptions is given in Reminiscences of Travel in Australia, America, and Egypt,by R Tangye (London, 1884).” (Stan Hugill)

BURYING THE DEAD HORSE

The custom gradually declined and the song became a halyard shanty. Thus R Tangye writes : “Being a month at sea the sailors performed the ceremony called ” Burying the Dead Horse,” the explanation of which is this: Before leaving port seamen are paid a month in advance, so as to enable them to leave some money with their wives, or to buy a new kit, etc., and having spent the money they consider the first month goes for nothing, and so call it ” Working off the Dead Horse.” The crew dress up a figure to represent a horse; its body is made out of a barrel, its extremities of hay or straw covered with canvas, the mane and tail of hemp, the eyes of two ginger beer bottles, sometimes filled with phosphorus. When complete the noble steed is put on a box, covered with a rug, and on the evening of the last day of the month a man gets on to his back, and is drawn all round the ship by his shipmates, to the chanting of the following doggerel: oh! now, poor Horse, your time is come; And we say so, for we know so. Oh! many a race we know you’ve won, Poor Old Man. You have come a long long way, And we say so, for we know so. For to be sold upon this day, Poor Old Man. You are goin’ now to say good-bye, And we say so, for we know so. Poor old horse you’re a goin’ to die, Poor Old Man.
Having paraded the decks in order to get an audience, the sale of the horse by auction is announced, and a glib-mouthed man mounts the rostrum and begins to praise the noble animal, giving his pedigree, etc., saying it was a good one to go, for it had gone 6,000 miles in the past month ! The bidding then commences, each bidder being responsible only for the amount of his advance on the last bid. After the sale the horse and its rider are run up to the yard-arm amidst loud cheers. Fireworks are let off, the man gets off the horse’s back, and, cutting the rope, lets it fall into the water. The Requiem is then sung to the same melody. Now he is dead and will die no more, And we say so, for we know so. Now he is gone and will go no more; Poor Old Man.
After this the auctioneer and his clerk proceed to collect the ” bids,” and if in your ignorance of auction etiquette you should offer yours to the auctioneer, he politely declines it, and refers you to his clerk!”

The ritual echoes ancient propitiatory and auspicious rituals such as those of the Poor Old Horse at Christmas.

SEA SHANTY

Other titles: Poor old man, Poor old Horse
Use: Halyard e Long drag shanty

Assassin’s Creed -IV Black Flag


A poor old man came riding by.
And we say so, And we know so.
O, a poor old man came riding by,
O, poor old man.

Says I, “Old man, your horse will die.
“And if he dies we’ll tan his hide.
And if he don’t, I’ll ride him again.
And I’ll ride him ‘til the Lord knows”
He’s dead as a nail in the lamp room door (1), And he won’t come worrying us no more
We’ll use the hair of his tail to sew our sails
and the iron of his shoes (2) to make deck nails,
Drop him down with a long long rope
Where the sharks have his body
And the devil takes his soul (3)!

NOTE
1)Charles Dickens in “A Christama Carol”:  “that Marley was as dead as a door-nail”. The expression is very ancient used both by Shakespeare and even before in the Middle Ages c. 1350. Will. Palerne: For but ich haue bot of mi bale I am ded as dorenail
But William and Mary Morris, in The Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins, quote a correspondent who points out that it could come from a standard term in carpentry. If you hammer a nail through a piece of timber and then flatten the end over on the inside so it can’t be removed again (a technique called clinching), the nail is said to be dead, because you can’t use it again. Doornails would very probably have been subjected to this treatment to give extra strength in the years before screws were available. So they were dead because they’d been clinched.” One of our traditional ceremonial sea songs, “Dead Horse Shanty,” uses the line “dead as a nail on the lamproom door.” We might assume that these nail heads were appropriately flattened. For those who are now curious to know what a “dead horse” had to do with sailors, it was a symbol of the advance pay they or their crimp received before boarding ship. So they didn’t earn any additional pay until they had worked off the “dead horse.” (from here). 
In the old-time navy, you get the combination of a wooden ship and gunpowder – potentially troublesome. Especially as the gunpowder was stored down below decks where there were no windows to let in the light. Taking a lit torch or candle into the gunpowder store was frowned upon, often briefly and from a great height. The lamp-room was next to the gunpowder store, with a glass window to throw light on the powder without risk of ignition. Nails in the woodwork were also a source of risk, because if struck they could create a spark. Nails in the lamp-room door and around the powder store were ‘deadened’ by being painted over with pitch to protect from this eventuality. With people ashore living in wooden houses with thatched roofs, the practice of ‘deadening’ door nails with pitch or something similar was probably more widespread“,
2) the hooves
3) or
We’ll hoist him up to the main yardarm
We’ll drop him down to the depths of the sea

We’ll sing him down with a long, long roll
Where the sharks’ll have his body
and the devil have have his soul

Robin Holcomb Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006

I
Poor old man came ridin’ along
And we say so,
And we hope so.
Poor old man came ridin’ along
Poor old man.
II
Well poor old man your horse he must die
And we say so,
And we hope so.
Poor old man your horse he must die
Poor old man.
III
Well 30 days have come and gone (1)
And we say so,
And we hope so.
30 days have come and gone
Poor old man.

IV
And now we are on a good month’s pay
And we say so,
And we hope so.
I think I hear our wharfing man say
Poor old man.
V
So give them grog for the 30th day
And we say so,
And we hope so.
Give them their grog for the 30th day
Poor old man.
VI
Then up hail ox (2) to the old main yard arm
And we say so,
And we hope so.
Then cut him drip and do him no harm
Poor old man.
A poor old man came ridin’ along

NOTE
1) in this version the ceremony obviously takes place after the first month of navigation
2) it was the simulacrum of the horse to be hoisted on the highest yard and then thrown into the sea, so why an ox?

Ian Campbell – Farewell Nancy 1964


I say, “Old man, your horse is dead.”
And we say so, And we know so.
I say, “Old man, your horse is dead.”
O, poor old man.
One month a rotten live we’ve led
While you lay on y’er feather bed
But now the month is up, ol’ turk
get up, ye swine, and look for work
get up, ye swine, and look for graft
while we lays on an’ yanks(1) ye aft
An’ yanks ye aft t’ th’ cabin door
and hopes we’ll never see ye more

NOTE
1) to yank: pull, or move with a sudden movement

JOHN SHORT VERSION: DEAD HORSE

Keith Kendrick – Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 


A poor old man came riding by.
And we say so,
And we know so.

O, a poor old man came riding by,
O, poor old man.

Says I, “Old man, your horse will die
Says I, “Old man, your horse will die.
And if he dies I’ll tan his hide
(if he leaves my old sail a ride?)
As I was rambling down the street
flesh young girl I chanced for to meet
say I “Young girl (whan’t you send a treat?)
Yes you’ve come to the bottom of the street
Aloft we went in a low back car
she took me to jack store’s bar
She pull him for some cakes and wine
to plumb well as my desire
I plumbed the well and the fancy was gone
but now I left her on the strand

FONTI
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/dead_horse/bone.htm
l
http://crydee.sai.msu.su/public/lyrics/cs-uwp/folk/d/dead_horse
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108766
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/poor-old-horse.html

He Back, She Back (Old Moke Picking on the Banjo)

Hulton Clint writes: “The lyrics are cobbled together from railroad work songs, minstrel jingles, mis-hearings of “Shule Aroon” (Cecil Sharp thought it was a variant of that song), and rough ‘n’ ready sailors phrases.” (see his You Tube channel)
Hulton Clint scrive: “Il testo è un rappezzamento di canti dei lavoratori nella ferrovia, canti d’avanspettacolo [minstrel songs], un fraintendimento di “Shule Aroon” (Cecil Sharp lo reputava una variante di quella canzone) e frasi fatte marinaresche” (vedi il suo Canale You Tube)

Cliff Haslam in Leaning the Wind 2012


I
He-bang, she-bang (1), daddy shot a bear, 
Shot him in the stern, me boys
and never turned a hair,
We’re from the railroad (2), too-ra-loo,
Oh the old moke (3) pickin’ on the banjo (4).
[CHORUS]
Hooraw! What the hell’s a row?
We’re all from the railroad, too-ra-loo,
We’re all from the railroad, too-ra-loo,
Oh the old moke pickin’ on the banjo.

II
Pat, get back, take in yer slack
Heave away, me boys;
Heave away, me bully boys,
why don’t ye make some noise?
We’re from the railroad, too-ra-loo…
III
Roll her boys, bowl her boys,
give her flamin’ gip (5)
Drag the anchor off the mud
an’ let the bastard rip (6)
We’re from the railroad, too-ra-loo….
IV
Rock-a-block, chock-a-block (7),
heave the caps’n round,
Fish the flamin’ anchor up,
for we are outward bound.
We’re from the railroad, too-ra-loo….
V
Out chocks, two blocks,
heave away or bust,
Bend yer backs, me bully boys,
kick up some flamin’ dust.
We’re from the railroad, too-ra-loo….
VI
Whisky-O, johnny-O,
the mudhook is in sight,
‘Tis a hell-of-a-way to the gals that wait,
an’ the ol’ Nantucket Light;
We’re from the railroad, too-ra-loo….
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Lui spara, lei spara, papà sparò a un orso
gli sparò nel posteriore [a poppa]
e non gli aveva torto un capello
Siamo della ferrovia too-ra-loo
Oh il vecchio Moke che suona il banjo!
CORO
Hoo-raw! Qual’è il problema ora?
Siamo tutti della ferrovia too-ra-loo,
siamo tutti della ferrovia too-ra-loo,
Oh il vecchio Moke che suona il banjo
II
Pat, torna indietro, prendi il tuo posto
issiamo, ragazzi
issiamo, miei bravi
perché non vi date da fare?
Siamo della ferrovia too-ra-loo
III
Fatela andare ragazzi, 
datele una tirata
trascinate l’ancora via dal fango
e fate filare la bastarda
Siamo della ferrovia too-ra-loo
IV
Fate filare il bozzello e bloccatelo
date un giro all’argano
portate su la dannata ancora 
perchè siamo in partenza
Siamo della ferrovia too-ra-loo
V
Via le morse, due bozzelli 
issate o morite
piegate la schiena, miei bravacci,
alzate un po’ di dannata polvere
Siamo della ferrovia too-ra-loo
VI
Whisky o marinaio o
l’approdo è in vista
è un vero inferno per le ragazze che aspettano
al vecchio faro di Nantucket
Siamo della ferrovia too-ra-loo

NOTE
1) He-bang, she-bang are nonsense vocables,  Leland’s 1890 dictionary of slang has “shebang” as American slang for a shanty (a shack) [He-bang, she-bang sono molto probabilmente parole senza senso, nel “Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant” di Leland Shebang= baracca, capanno]
2) see “Poor Paddy works on the railway.”
3) Webster’s dictionary of 1913 had not only the meanings of “mule” and “Negro”, but also “a minstrel, who plays on several instruments”. Hulton writes: A 1928 article on “Midshipman Jargon” (in American Speech, Vol. II, No. 9) has that in the American Navy man’s jargon, moke signifies “dark” or “black” and was also” for a Negro or Filipino.” A 2001 posting on the linguist listserve by Quinion has that it was originally a term for a mule, becoming first an offensive term for a Black man, then by the 1850s (around the probable time of this chantey) it was generalized to mean some foolish or contemptible person. It evolved into the form “mook.” 
[Il dizionario di Webster del 1913 traduce con “mulo” e “negro”, ma anche “un menestrello che suona diversi strumenti”. Scrive Hulton: “un articolo del 1928 su “Midshipman Jargon” (in American Speech, Vol. II, n. 9) dice che nel gergo americano della marina americana, moke significa “oscuro” o “nero” e stava per “per un negro o filippino “. Una pubblicazione del 2001 sulla lista dei linguisti di Quinion dice che in origine era un termine per mulo, diventando prima un termine offensivo per uomo nero, quindi nel 1850 (probabile periodo di questo chantey) significava in genere qualcosa di sciocco o persona spregevole.”]
4) in the railroad “pickin’ on a banjo” was a euphemism for digging with a shovel. [per gli sterratori che lavoravano nella costruzione della linea ferrovia americana “pickin’ on a banjo”= scavare con la pala]
5) Stephen Wilson writes: Give her flamin’ gip = give her hell / give her a telling off
6) let ‘er rip = espressione idiomatica, lasciarla andare a tutta birra/a tutto gas, the bastard è riferita all’ancora
7) CHOCK A BLOCK, CHOCKER Chock-a-block is an old Naval expression, meaning “Complete” or “Full up”; synonyms were “Two blocks” and “Block and block”. It derives from the use of a hauling tackle – when the two blocks of the purchase were touching each other the lower one could obviously be hoisted no further, and so the work was completed. Modern slang has corrupted the expression to “Chocker”, meaning “Fed up”. (from here)
Chok: the word is thought to have come from chock-full (or choke-full), meaning ‘full to choking’. This dates back to the 15th century This meaning was later used to give a name to the wedges of wood which are used to secure moving objects – chocks. These chocks were used on ships and are referred to in William Falconer’s, An universal dictionary of the marine, 1769: “Chock, a sort of wedge used to confine a cask or other weighty body..when the ship is in motion.  A block and tackle is a pulley system used on sailing ships to hoist the sails ‘chock-a-block’   The phrase describes what occurs the system is raised to its fullest extent – when there is no more rope free and the blocks jam tightly together. in Richard H. Dana “Hauling the reef-tackles chock-a-block.” Nautical. having the blocks drawn closetogether, as when the tackle is hauled to theutmost. (with reference to tackle having the two blocks run close together ) (from here)
“Chock a block”, talvolta anche scritto come un’unica parola “chockablock”  è l’unione di “chockfull” che significa pieno e “block and tackle” che è un tipo di paranco utilizzato sulle barche a vela; si usa colloquialmente per dire “affollato”
per sapere cosa sia un paranco e come funzioni

John Short Version

Jeff Warner in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3


I
He-back, she-back, daddy shot a bear, 
Shot him in the ass
and he never tuched the hair,
I’m just from the railroad, too-rer-loo,
Oh the old moke picking on the banjo.
II
Roll her boys, bowl her boys,
give her flaming gip
Drag the anchor off the mud
and let the bastard rip 
I’m just from the railroad..
[CHORUS]
Hoo-roo! What’s the matter now?
I’m just from the railroad, too-rer-loo,
I’m just from the railroad, too-rer-loo,
Oh the old moke picking on the banjo.
III
Rock-a-block, chock-a-block,
heave the caps’n round,
Fish the flaming anchor up,
for we are outward bound.
I’m just from the railroad..
IV
Out chocks, two blocks,
heave away or bust,
Bend yer backs, me bully boys,
kick up some flamin’ dust.
I’m just from the railroad…
V
Whisky-O, johnny-O,
the mudhook is in sight,
‘Tis a hell-of-a-way to the gals that wait,
an’ the ol’ Nantucket Light;
I’m just from the railroad..
VI
Pat, get back, take in yer slack.
Heave away, me boys;
Heave away, me bully boys,
why don’t ye make some noise?
I’m just from the railroad..
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
He-back, she-back, papà sparò a un orso
gli sparò nel posteriore
e non gli aveva torto un capello
Sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo
Oh il vecchio Moke che suona il banjo!
II
Fatela andare ragazzi, 
datele una tirata
trascinate l’ancora via dal fango
e fate filare la bastarda
sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo
CORO
Hoo-roo! Qual’è il problema ora?
Sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo,
Sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo,
Oh il vecchio Moke che suona il banjo
III
Fate filare il bozzello e bloccatelo 
date un giro all’argano
portate su la dannata ancora
perchè siamo in partenza
sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo
IV
Via le morse, due bozzelli 
issiamo o moriamo
piegate la schiena, miei bravacci,
alzate un po’ di dannata polvere
sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo
V
Whisky o marinaio o
l’approdo è in vista
è un vero inferno per le ragazze che aspettano
al vecchio faro di Nantucket
sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo
VI
Pat, torna indietro, prendi il tuo posto
issiamo, ragazzi
issiamo, miei bravi
perché non vi date da fare?
Sono solo della ferrovia too-rer-loo

LINK
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=4424,4424&SongID=4424,4424
https://mainlynorfolk.info/danny.spooner/songs/theoldmokepickingonabanjo.html
http://cliffhaslam.com/?page_id=322
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=71721
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/Be022.html

A fierce song for halyard: Bully in the Alley

Leggi in italiano

“Bully in the Alley” is a halyard shanty with origins referable to the black slaves involved in loading and unloading cotton bales in the ports (cotton screwing).
The bully here is a boozing sailor left in an alley by his still “sober” companions, who will move on to pick him up when returning to the ship.

Shinbone Alley is an alley in New York but also in Bermuda, but metaphorically speaking it is found in every “sailor town”. More generally it is an exotic indication for the Caribbean, the alley of a legendary “pirates den” , where every occasion is good for a fist fight! (first meaning for bully). Or it is the alley of an equally generic port city of the continent full of pubs and cheerful ladies, where if you get drunk, you end up waking up “enlisted” on a warship or a merchant ship (second meaning for bully). So our victim in love with Sally instead of marrying her, he goes to sea!
And finally a last interpretation: a “very good”, or “first rate” sailor (the rooster of the henhouse!)
According to Stan Hugill “Bully in the Alley” has become a seafaring expression to indicate a “stubborn” ship that wants to go in its direction in spite of the helmsman’s intention
This song is nowadays among the most popular “pirate songs”!
Take a look to these bully boys!

Assassin’s creed IV black flag

Chorus
Help me, Bob(1),
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Help me, Bob, I’m bully in the alley, Bully down in “shinbone al“!
I
Sally(2) is the girl that I love dearly,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl that I spliced dearly(3),
Bully down in “shinbone al
 II
For seven long years I courted little Sally,
But all she did was dilly and dally(4).
III
I ever get back, I’ll marry little Sally,
Have six kids and live in Shin-bone Alley.

NOTES
1)  God
2) Sally (or Sal) is the generic name of the girls of the Caribbean seas and of South America
3) also written as “Spliced nearly” means “almost married”, and yet the meaning lends itself to sexual allusions
4) to wastetime, especially by being slow, or by not being able to make a decision

Morrigan: Text version identical to the previous one but with an additional stanza before the last closing that says:
“I’ll leave Sal and I’ll become a sailor,
I’ll leave Sal and ship aboard a whaler.”

Three Pruned Men from Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys  ANTI 2006.

Text version identical to the previous one but with a closing stanza that says:


Sally got down and dirty last night,
Sally got down and she spliced (5),
The sailors left last night,
The sailors got a ball of wax (6),
NOTES
5) in slang to splice it means having sex (uniting parts of the body in sexual activity) but also uniting with marriage
6) It is an idiom that means the totality of something; a hypothesis on the origin of the term: This is a form of initiation of freemasons. The freemasons took it from the scarab beetle, which is said to roll a ball of earth, which is a microcosm of the universe. I believe it is thought to spring from the ancient mysteries of Egypt. There was much amateur Egyptology during the 19th and early 20th century. The ball of wax has transcendental meaning. It represents a mystery of human godlike creativity which a person aspiring to the mystery of masonic lore carries with him. In the initiation, the person was given a small ball of earwax or some such, which would represent the cosmos. Reference to this ball of wax was a secret symbol of brotherhood. (from here)

Paddy and the Rats

Short Sharp version

The curators of the project write: “It feels as though this version is far closer to a cotton-screwing chant than the Hugill version. (Carpenter makes a note beside the version from Edward Robinson that it also was for ‘cotton screwing’).  There is only one complete verse and a couple of phrases from Short to Sharp, so the additional words are from Hugill’s version but ignoring location aspects and reworked to fit Short’s significantly different structure” (from here)

Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 ♪ 

I=V
So help me, Bob ,
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Bully down in an alley
Chorus
So help me, Bob, 
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
(solo) Bully in Teapot alley
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
II
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Have you seen on Sally?
Chorus
(solo) I could love her cheerly
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
III
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
She is the girl in the alley
Chorus
Oh I’ll spliced to nearly
Way, hey, bully in the alley
IV
I’ll leave my Sally go a sailin’
I’ll leave my Sally go a wailin’
One day I’ll wed Sally
Chorus
Wedding bed my Sally
Way, hey, bully in the alley

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/sally-brown/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/bullyinthealley.html http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bully-in-the-alley.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31335
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=43912
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm#bully%20alley

Blow away the morning dew sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

The ballad known as The Baffled Knight is reported in many text versions both in the eighteenth-century collections and in the Broadsides, as well as orally transmitted in Great Britain and America with the titles of “Blow (Clear) (Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” or “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning “: the male protagonist from time to time, is a gentleman, or a shepherd boy / peasant.

It could not miss the sea shanty version of this popular ballad in the text version best known as “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 version D), summarized in four stanzas

Nils Brown from Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)

I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”

JOHN SHORT VERSION

Another sea shanty version comes from the testimony of John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] comments that although Short started his Blow Away the Morning Dew with a verse of The Baffled Knight, he then digresses into floating verses. In fact three of the verses recorded and published by Terry, not one derive from The Baffled Knight! Short sang only the “flock of geese” verse to Sharp. Sharp did not publish the shanty, but other authors also give Baffled Knight versions. The other predominant version in collections is the American whaling version but still using the tune associated with The Baffled Knight and the chorus remaining close to the usual words. (from here)

Jim Mageean  from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3

I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609

Rolling Sally Brown!

Leggi in italiano

In the sea shanties Sally Brown is the stereotype of the cheerful woman of the Caribbean seas, mulatta or creole, with which our sailor  tries to have a good time. Probably of Jamaican origin according to Stan Hugill, it was a popular song in the ports of the West Indies in the 1830s.
The textual and melodic variations are many.

ARCHIVE

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

 

Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!

In this version the chorus doubles in two short sentences repeated by the crew in sequence after each line of the shantyman, here the work done is the loading of the ship
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!

Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · Nils Brown from Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Oh! Sally Brown, she’s the gal for me boys
Way high, Miss Sally Brown!
 
(Oh way down South, way down South boys
Oh bound away, with a bone(1) in her mouth boys)
It’s down to Trinidad(2) to see Sally Brown boys,
She’s lovely on the foreyard, an’ she’s lovely down below boys,
She’s lovely ‘cause she loves me, that’s all I want to know boys,
Ol’ Captain Baker, how do you store yer cargo?
Some I stow for’ard (3) boys, an’ some I stow a’ter
Forty fathoms or more below boys,
There’s forty fathoms or more below boys,
Oh, way high ya, an’ up she rises,
Way high ya, and the blocks (4) is different sizes,
Oh, one more pull, don’t ya hear the mate a-bawlin?
Oh, one more pull, that’s the end of all the hawlin’
Sally Brown she’s the gal for me boys

NOTE
1) “Bone in her teeth” is the expression used for a bow wave, usually implying that the vessel in question was moving pretty fast. (see more here)
2) the southernmost of the Caribbean islands
3) the front and the back of a ship have a specific terminology
4) In sailing, a block is a single or multiple pulley

JOHN SHORT VERSION: ROLL AND GO

Not to be confused with “Spent My Money On Sally Brown”. Cecil Sharp ranks as capstan shanty.
In Short Sharp Shanties the project’s curators write”A
lthough, by Hugill’s time, ‘this shanty had only one theme – Sally and her daughter’, Short’s text is not on this ‘one theme’ – it is based around a less overtly sexual relationship.  Short gave Sharp more text than he actually published. It is always possible that Short may be self censoring – but there is no indication that this is the case, and from other textual evidence in Sharp’s field notebooks (e.g. see the notes to Hanging Johnny), rather the reverse. We have added just two floating verses at the end

Roger Watson from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2


Way, hey, roll and go

Oh Sally Brown, Oh Sally Brown
a long time ago
She promised for to marry me
Way, hey, roll and go
She promised for to marry me.
a long time ago

Oh Sally Brown is the girl for me
Oh Sally Brown has slighted me.
As I walked down one morning fair
it’s there I met her I do declare.
And I asked for to marry me
to marry me or let me be.
She spent me pay all around the town
she left me broken bad and dow.
Than I will pack me bags and go to sea
and I’ll leave my Sally on the quey

LINK
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2012/03/104-105-sally-brown-series.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html
http://www.capstanbars.com/time_ashore/taio_lyrics/roll_boys_roll.htm

Blow Boys Blow (Banks of Sacramento)

Leggi in italiano

“Blow Boys Blow” or “Hoodah Day Shanty” but also “Banks of Sacramento” is a popular sea shanty with several versions.

JOHN SHORT VERSION

With the title “Blow Boys Blow” the version of John Short mixes the verses of “Banks od Sacramento” with the minstrel song “Campton Races” written by Stephen Foster in 1850. But some scholars are inclined to believe that it is the sea shanty on Golden Rush in California, to precede the minstrel song for a few years
Tom Brown Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1  
The authors write in the project notes “Neither Sharp nor Terry published this shanty.  All the other collectors give it as a capstan song, Hugill, in particular, says it was a favourite for raising the anchor.  Short gave it as a capstan shanty, and sang Sharp one verse only – straight from Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races which was written in 1850.  Doerflinger credits the Hutchinson Family, a famous New England concert troupe with the song Ho For California!, the chorus of which ran: “Then Ho Brothers Ho! To California go, There’s plenty of gold in the world, we’re told, On the Banks of the Sacramento” and dates it to the 1849 gold rush when, between 1849 and 1852, over ninety thousand emigrants shipped ‘round the corner’ (Cape Horn) in the hopes of finding riches in the gold fields. It was Sharp’s editorial policy that made him omit this shanty from his publication: as he said in the introduction to English Folk-Chanteys, “I have omitted certain popular and undoubtedly genuine chanteys, such as ” The Banks of the Sacramento”, ”Poor Paddy works on the Railway”, “Can’t you dance the Polka,” “Good‑bye, Fare you Well,”,etc.,… on the ground that the tunes are not of folk-origin, but rather the latter‑day adaptations of popular, “composed” songs of small musical value.” Doerflinger quotes three different sets of words that have been used for this shanty: we have expanded Short’s verse with others that relate to the message of the chorus. It is another of the many shanties that ultimately derive from contemporary song-writing for the stage in concert-troupe and minstrel show – and this is reflected in our use of fiddle and banjo.”


I
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah(1), to my hoodah,
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah, hoodah day,
It’s round Cape Horn(2) in the month o’ May
now around Cape Horn
we are bound to straigh
Blow boys blow,
For California O,
There’s
plots of gold
so I’ve been told
On the banks of Sacramento (3).

II
It’s to Sacramento we ‘ll go
For we are the bullies (4) who kick ‘er through.
Round the Horn an’ up the Line
We’re the bullies for to make ‘er shine.
III
Around Cape Stiff (2) in seventy days
it’s two thousand miles or so they said
Breast yer bars (5) an’ bend yer backs,
Heave an’ make yer spare ribs (6) crack.

 NOTES
1) or Doo-dah! From  “Who da hell is dat?” Who-Da…hoodah
2) Cape Horn said by the sailors “Cape Stiff”, is often mentioned in the sea shanties, it’s the black cliff at the end of South America, where the masses of water and air from the Atlantic and the Pacific collide, causing winds that they range from 160 to 220 km / h and an almost prohibitive ascent to the west. Several factors combine to make the passage around Cape Horn one of the most hazardous shipping routes in the world (cemetery of numerous unlucky ships): strong winds, waves and wandering icebergs.
3) the Californian gold rush began in January 1848 right on the banks of the Sacramento
4) “bully” has many meanings: in a positive sense a “very good” sailor, or “first rate”, but “bully” is also the troublemaker always ready to fight.
5) Breast the bars: leaning deeply so as to push the weight of the body at the chest against the capstan bars.
6) “spare ribs” are pork ribs

LINK
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm
https://mnheritagesongbook.net/the-songs/addition-song-with-recordings/banks-of-sacramento/
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sacramento/index.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/singandh.htm
http://cazoo.org/folksongs/BanksOfSacramento.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14644
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=497

Lucy Long sea shanty

Derivata da una minstrel song in voga nel 1842, la versione sea shanty è al contrario piuttosto rara. La versione di John Short come sempre è particolare, Short sembra mettere insieme una verie di versi non correlati. Così scrivono i curatori del progetto: Indeed, Short’s text for Won’t You Go My Way, feels more like deliberate positive reworking of the Minstrels’ original than this set. It wasn’t until we started selecting shanties for each CD that we realised that Short’s tune for Lucy Long is actually closely akin to So Early in the Morning although it’s deceptive!
Ovviamente Miss Lucy è una “signorinella allegra” e l’incontro con il marinaio appena sbarcato è squisitamente carnale.

ASCOLTA Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


To my way-ay-ay ha, ha
My Johnny, boys, ha ha
Why don’t you try for to wring[1]
Miss Lucy Long?

I
When I was out one mornig fair
To view the views
and take the air.
II
‘Twas there I met Miss Lucy fair,
‘Twas there we met I do declare.
III
Oh, I raised my hat and I said “Hello”
Hitched her up and I took her in tow
IV
Well, I wrung her all night and I wrung her all day
I wrung her before she went away
V
Oh she left me there upon the quay
Left me there and went away
VI
Now Miss Lucy had a baby[2] ,
She dressed it all in green-o
VII
Was you ever on the Brumalow[3] ,
Where the Yankee boys are all the go?
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
A me ay-ay ha, ha
mio marinaio, ragazzi ha, ha perchè non provi a “corteggiare”
la signorina Lucy Long?
I
Sono uscito un bel mattino, per ammirare il panorama
e prendere il fresco
II
Ecco che t’incontro la bella signorina Lucy, fu là che c’incontrammo così dico
III
Oh sollevai il cappello e dissi “Ciao”
l’afferrai e la presi a rimorchio
IV
La corteggiai tutta la notte e la corteggiai tutto il giorno,
la corteggiai prima che se ne andasse
V
Mi lasciò là sulla banchina
mi lasciò là e andò via
VI
Ora la signorina Lucy ha avuto un bambino e lo veste tutto in verde.
VII
Sei mai stato a Broomielaw? Dove i marinai americani sono tutti a passeggio?

NOTE
1) un eufemismo molto esplicito: Hugill dice “ring” trovato anche “woo”
2) mettere incinta la ragazza con cui si è fatto sesso era un tempo sinonimo di grande virilità maschile, così nelle canzoni del mare i marinai parlano con noncuranza delle loro paternità!
3) Broomielaw è il vecchio pontile di Glasgow sulla sponda settentrionale del fiume Clyde

FONTI
http://bluegrassmessengers.com.temp.realssl.com/lucy-long–see-also-rock-the-cradle-lucy-.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com.temp.realssl.com/miss-lucy-long–version-2-stan-hugill-.aspx
https://www.paddlesteamers.org/scottish/last-paddle-steamer-at-the-broomielaw/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/miss-lucy-long.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=119975

Bulgine run

Bulgine Run (Let the Bulgine Run) è una sea shanty meno conosciuta di Eliza Lee con la quale condivide la frase “Let the bulgine run.”
Secondo Stan Hugill “bulgine” o “bullgine” e un termine gergale americano  per  “locomotiva”, su Mudcat leggiamo “Bullgine is, indeed a term applied a small steam loco- motive which runs on short tracks and is usually used to haul ships through locks and canals. A donkey engine is a stationary engine which might be used on board ship to power a winch or to run a pump; it has no tracks, tending to be portable, if not mobile. A pony engine is a similar small locomotive built to use regulation-gauge railroad rails, and used for moving cars in a railroad switchyard. The earliest entry I could find for the word in a quick search was 1846; it was in use as late as 1939.” (da qui)
Stan la classifica tra le pumping shanty per non annoiarsi durante il lungo lavoro di pompaggio dell’acqua di sentina.

JOHN BULL

Robert Stevens era il figlio del colonnello Stevens, considerato il padre delle ferrovie americane. Infatti, già nel 1815 John Stevens aveva richiesto, senza successo, l’autorizzazione di costruire una ferrovia nel New Jersey. Aveva riprovato nel 1823 nello Stato di Pennsylvania, ma con uguali risultati.
Nel 1824 il colonnello Stevens costruì a sue spese un circuito dimostrativo a Hoboken, nel New Jersey, dove fece circolare una piccola locomotiva con caldaia verticale e un solo cilindro. Questa macchina, che pesava appena 450 kg e raggiungeva i 20 km/h, fu, di fatto, la prima locomotiva americana, ma non raccolse il successo sperato.
Il figlio del colonnello, decise di seguire le orme paterne. Riuscì a farsi assumere dalla giovane compagnia Camden & Amboy, ma invece di cimentarsi in esperimenti con prototipi, consigliò saggiamente l’acquisto di locomotive in Inghilterra, presso la ben nota ditta Stephenson. Organizzò così un viaggio d’affari, durante il quale ebbe anche tutto il tempo necessario per inventare una nuova forma di binario che, disegnato successivamente dall’inglese Charles Vignoles, diventò il binario più utilizzato di tutto il mondo.
Ritornato negli Stati Uniti nel 1831 con una locomotiva smontata, Stevens cominciò a farla riassemblare dal meccanico della rete, Isaac Dripps. Sembra però che mancassero le istruzioni e, in assenza di precise indicazioni, Dripps fece di testa sua. La locomotiva venne assemblata con una forma del tutto diversa da quella prevista dal fornitore. La macchina viaggiava con una traiettoria piuttosto imprecisa a causa degli eccessivi giochi laterali degli assi, dovuti al montaggio improvvisato. Dripps pensò allora di dotare la locomotiva di un terzo asse supplementare posto in avanti, montato su un piccolo telaio articolato rispetto a quello principale, inventando così il carrello-sterzo anteriore, ma per far questo dovette smontare le bielle di collegamento tra gli assi lasciando così la macchina con un solo asse motore anziché i due previsti.
Su questo carrello-sterzo collocò anche un cacciapietre a forma di cuneo per eliminare tutto ciò che poteva depositarsi o ingombrare i binari delle linee mal custodite: pietre, rami, alberi, animali, ecc. Questo “cowcatcher” (scaccia mucche) diventò la caratteristica delle locomotive americane.
Successivamente alla locomotiva fu montata una cabina in legno per proteggere le squadre di guida dalle intemperie e anche il tender fu chiuso per avere sempre legna asciutta da ardere.


La locomotiva entrò in servizio solo nel novembre del 1833, dovendo attendere che la breve linea Camden-Bordentown, lunga 42,5 km, fosse ultimata. Rimase in funzione fino al 1866, poi venne parcheggiata in uno dei depositi della Pennsylvania Railroad che, nel frattempo, aveva acquistato la linea. Dimenticata, la locomotiva rimase intatta e, nel 1885, la Pennsy la regalò allo Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History di Washington, dove si trova tuttora. (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT: BULGINE RUN

“John Short called two of his shanties Bulgine Run – this capstan shanty is better known as Run, Let the Bulgine Run to distinguish it from Clear the Track, Let the Bulgine Run also known as Liza Lee.  Short gave this to Sharp as a capstan shanty although, given the elaborate second shantyman’s line, its structure is that of a halyards song.” (tratto da qui)
In effetti nel testo riportato nel “The Advent and Development of Chanties” richiama più un canto salpa ancora che una pumping shanty.
We’ll run from Dover to Calais.
We sailed away from Mobile Bay.
We gave three cheers and away we went.
Now up aloft this yard must go.
We’re homeward bound for Liverpool Docks.

ASCOLTA Barbara Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


We’ll run from night till morning.
O run, let the bullgine (1) run.
Way yah, oo-oo oo-oo-oo, (2)
O run, let the bullgine run.
We’ll run from here to dinnertime
We’ll run from Dover to Calais
We sailed all day to Mobile
Bay.
Pump me bullies pump
or drown
Oh we’ll run down south round the Horn
From Liverpool to Frisco
we’ll pump her dry and away we’ll go
she is a dandy clipper(3) and a bully crew
The captain (?make her hosenose clear?)*
so we’ll rock and roll her over (4)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Correremo notte e giorno
Oh correre, fai correre il motore
Way yah, oo-oo oo-oo-oo,
Oh correre, fai correre il motore.
Correremo da qui all’ora di pranzo
correremo da Dover a Calais
Navighiamo tutto il giorno per Mobile Bay
Pompate miei bravacci pompate o annegate!
Correremo verso Sud per doppiare l’Horn
da Liverpool a San Francisco
pomperemo e poi la lasceremo
è un dandy clipper e una ciurma di sbruffoni
il capitano ??
così ce la metteremo tutta

NOTE
* ho ancora delle difficoltà nella trascrizione del testo non riuscendo a individuare bene la pronuncia di alcune parole
1) scritto anche come Bull John
2) una tipica frase delle halyard shanty
3) Dandy è il nome di uno specifico modello di nave del 1825, un vascello a due alberi
4) rock and roll over  assume molti significati a seconda del contesto

FONTI
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/LETTHEBU.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16554
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/eliza-lee/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/letthebulginerun.html
http://www.kbapps.com/lyrics/sailor-shanties/OhrunlettheBullginerun.php
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/bulgine.htm

Blow Boys Blow (Banks of Sacramento)

Read the post in English

Anche con il titolo “Hoodah Day Shanty” ma anche “Banks of Sacramento” è una sea shanty che presenta svariate versioni dovute alla sua vasta popolarità.

LA VERSIONE JOHN SHORT

Con il titolo “Blow Boys Blow” la versione di John Short mescola i versi di “Banks od Sacramento” con la minstrel song “Campton Races” scritta da Stephen Foster nel 1850. Ma alcuni studiosi sono propensi a credere che sia la sea shanty sulla Golden Rush in California, a precedere di qualche anno la minstrel song
Tom Brown Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1  
Nelle note del progetto gli autori scrivono “Né Sharp né Terry hanno pubblicato questa sea shanty. Tutti gli altri collezionisti la danno come una canzone all’argano, Hugill, in particolare, dice che era per l’alzata dell’ancora. Short la classifica come capstan shanty, e ha cantato a Sharp solo un verso- direttamente dalla Campbell Races di Stephen Foster che ha scritto nel 1850. Doerflinger l’accredita alla famiglia Hutchinson, una famosa compagnia concertistica del New England con il titolo “Ho For California !”, con il coro  che recita “Then Ho Brothers Ho! To California go, There’s plenty of gold in the world, we’re told, On the Banks of the Sacramento” e la data alla corsa all’oro del 1849 quando, tra il 1849 e il 1852, oltre novantamila emigranti navigarono” round the corner “( Capo Horn) nella speranza di trovare la ricchezza. È stata la politica editoriale di Sharp a fargli omettere questa sea shanty dalla sua pubblicazione: così disse nell’introduzione ai English Folk-Chanteys “Ho omesso certi canti popolari e indubbiamente genuini, come ” The Banks of the Sacramento”,” Poor Paddy works on the Railway”, “Can’t you dance the Polka,” “Good‑bye, Fare you Well,” ecc., per il fatto che le melodie non sono di origine popolare, ma piuttosto l’adattamento dell’ultima ora di canzoni popolari, “composte” di scarso valore musicale.” Doerflinger cita tre diverse serie di parole che sono state usate per questa sea shanty: abbiamo ampliato il verso di Short con altri che si riferiscono al messaggio del coro. È un’altra delle tante sea shanty che derivano in ultima analisi dal cantautorato contemporaneo per il palcoscenico vaudeville dell’avanspettacolo – e questo si riflette nel nostro uso del violino e del banjo


I
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah(1), to my hoodah,
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah, hoodah day,
It’s round Cape Horn(2) in the month o’ May
now around Cape Horn
we are bound to straigh
Blow boys blow,
For California O,
There’s
plots of gold
so I’ve been told
On the banks of Sacramento (3).

II
It’s to Sacramento we ‘ll go
For we are the bullies (4) who kick ‘er through.
Round the Horn an’ up the Line
We’re the bullies for to make ‘er shine.
III
Around Cape Stiff (2) in seventy days
it’s two thousand miles or so they said
Breast yer bars (5) an’ bend yer backs,
Heave an’ make yer spare ribs (6) crack.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Uscivo con il mio berretto floscio
Hoodah, to my hoodah,
Uscivo con il mio berretto floscio
Hoodah, hoodah day.
A doppiare Capo Horn nel mese di Maggio
verso Capo Horn
siamo diretti
Forza ragazzi forza
per la California
c’è un sacco d’oro
così mi hanno detto

sulle rive del Sacramento
II
A Sacramento andremo
perchè siamo noi i maschioni che la fanno divertire.
A doppiare l’Horn e oltre all’Equatore
siamo i bulli che la faranno risplendere.
III
A doppiare Capo Stiff in 70 giorni
sono duemila miglia o così dicono.
Petto sulle aspe, e piegate le schiene
tirate fino a rompervi le costole

 NOTE
1) hoodah ha diversi significati gergali, anche  scritto come Doo-dah! Dall’esclamazione  “Who da hell is dat?” Who-Da…hoodah
2) detto dai marinai “Cape Stiff”, il temuto Capo Horn è spesso menzionato negli shanties, la nera scogliera all’estremità dell’America Meridionale dove si scontrano le masse d’acqua e d’aria dell’Atlantico e del Pacifico, provocando venti che vanno dai 160 ai 220 Km/h e una risalita verso Ovest quasi proibitiva. Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, per i forti venti, le grani onde e gli iceberg vaganti, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
 “Grandi Naufragi” impossibile stabilire il numero delle navi che sono andate perdute in queste estreme acque tra le onde alte anche 20 metri. Tempeste di neve, violenti uragani, nebbie e pericolosi iceberg alla deriva, fanno capire quanto sia stato difficile passare indenni per la via di Capo Horn. I pochi naufraghi dovevano affrontare oltre all’inospitalità di quelle terre anche l’avversità degli indigeni che aggredivano i superstiti per depredarli di alcool ed armi. (tratto da qui)
3) la corsa all’oro californiano ebbe inizio nel gennaio del 1848 proprio sulle rive del Sacramento
4) bully è un termine da marinai con molti significati: in senso positivo per dire che il marinaio è un tipo “very good”, o “first rate”, ma bully è anche l’attaccabrighe sempre pronto a fare a pugni.  Quando il comandante dava del bullies alla sua ciurma gli appellava come degli “sbruffoni”
5) Breast the bars: leaning deeply so as to push the weight of the body at the chest against the capstan bars.
6) spare ribs sono le costine del maiale

FONTI
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm
https://mnheritagesongbook.net/the-songs/addition-song-with-recordings/banks-of-sacramento/
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sacramento/index.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/singandh.htm
http://cazoo.org/folksongs/BanksOfSacramento.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14644
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=497

Blow away the morning dew shanty

Read the post in English

La ballata nota come The Baffled Knight è riportata in moltissime versioni testuali sia nelle raccolte settecentesche che nei Broadsides, oltrechè trasmessa oralmente in Gran Bretagna e America con i titoli di ” Blow (Clear)(Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” oppure “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning”: il protagonista maschile di volta in volta è un gentleman, o un pastorello / contadinello.

Non poteva mancare la versione sea shanty di questa popolarissima ballata nella versione testuale più nota come “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 versione D), riassunta in quattro strofe
Nils Brown in Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era un pastorello
che governava le pecore sulla collina
posò l’arco e la freccia
per dissetarsi
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Guardò in alto e guardò in basso
e di guardò intorno
e là vide una bella fanciulla
che nuotava nel ruscello
III
“Portami a casa da mio padre
prima di mettermi sotto,
poi avrai la mia verginità
e ventimila sterline”
IV
Quando arrivò al portone della casa paterna
in un guizzò lei entrò
e disse ” Puah! Sei uno scemo fuori
e io una fanciulla dentro”

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

Un’altra versione sea shanty viene dalla testimonianza di John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] commenta che sebbene Short abbia iniziato il suo Blow Away the Morning Dew con un versetto da “The Baffled Knight”, poi divaga con versi fluttuanti. In effetti dei tre dei versi registrati e pubblicati da Terry, nemmeno uno derivano da The Baffled Knight! Short cantava solo la strofa “flock of geese” di Sharp. Sharp non ha pubblicato la shanty ma anche altri autori danno delle versioni di Baffled Knight. L’altra versione predominante nelle collezioni è la versione americana della caccia alle balene, ma che usa ancora la melodia associata a The Baffled Knight con  il coro che resta simile alle solite parole. (tratto da qui)

Jim Mageean  in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3


I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
* ci sono ancora troppe parole di cui non capisco bene la pronuncia
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo un bel mattino
per ammirare i prati nei dintorni
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
in giro per la campagna
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Mio padre aveva un destriero bianco latte, è nella stalla
non mangerà nè fieno, nè grano
e non andrà affatto
III
Quando andiamo in un aia
a vedere uno stormo di oche
le fissiamo negli occhi
chiudiamo i loro occhi
e ne abbattiamo cinque o sei
IV
Mentre camminavo
lungo le rive del fiume
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
che aspettava la marea.
V
Mentre camminavo
sotto il chiaro di luna
fu là che vidi una  fanciulla bionda
?
VI
?
?
dice lei: “Giovanotto questo è il posto giusto dove un uomo può giocare”
VII
Mentre camminavo
per Paradise Street
là incontrai un fantasma
dice “
ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609