Archivi tag: Eliza Carthy

Reaphook and Sickle

Leggi in italiano

The time of the wheat harvest varies according to the latitudes: in the South as for example in southern Italy it starts to harvest already in June, while in Piedmont in July and in the Northern countries as for the Islands of Great Britain, in August.
Once the harvest season could last about a month with the laborers that moved on foot, from farm to farm with tools for their work on their shoulders and a little bundle with their few things: they went in groups for little family, men and women, and for many girls that was the occasion to make new friends and maybe find the lover.

George Hemming Mason - The Harvest Moon

Harvest songs are common throughout Europe and are mostly religious-ritualistic, but the songs have disappeared because with the mechanization (and the chemistry) of agriculture the peasant world has thinned out: today in the countryside it is no longer sung!

JOLLY COUNTRY

The song of the harvest I have chosen today, titled “Reaphook and Sickle“, comes from the English tradition: it is a “jolly” song that paints in exciting tones and describes what was actually a hard work as if it were a dance tour. Other times and resources, other mentality, but in my opinion it is important to restore dignity to the work of the earth, as a true vocation, in which one lives in close contact with nature and its times.

coltivazione sinergicaNo longer isolated and bounded in its own field as in the past, taking advantage of traditional methods or natural “philosophies” such as what is now called synergistic agriculture, that anyone with a little land available can experiment to make a synergetic vegetable garden ( it seems a paradox of terms to talk about natural agriculture but it works great) .. and find a bit of “jollyness” ..

Eliza Carthy from Holy Heathens and the Old Green Man 2007


I
Come you lads and lasses,
together we will go
All in the golden cornfield
our courage for to show.
With the reaping hook and sickle
so well we clear the land,
And the farmer says,
“Hoorah, me boys,
here’s liquor at your command.”
II
It’s in the time of haying
our partners we do take,
Along with lads and lasses
the hay timing to make.
There’s joining round in harmony
and roundness to be seen,
And when it’s gone
we’ll take your girls
to dance Jack on the green(1).
III
It’s in the time of harvest
so cheerfully we’ll go,
Then some we’ll reap
and some we’ll sickle
and some we’ll size to mow.
But now at end
we’re free for home,
we haven’t far to go,
We’re on our way to Robin Hood’s Bay (2) to welcome harvest home.
IV
Now harvest’s done and ended
and the corn all safe from harm,
And all that’s left to do, me boys,
is thresh it in the barn.
Here’s a health to all the farmers, likewise the women and men,
And we wish you health and happiness till harvest comes again.
NOTES
1)
Jack in the Green was a popular mask of the English May, from the Middle Ages and until the Victorian era, which fell into disuse at the end of the nineteenth century.
2) Robin Hood’s Bay is a county in North Yorkshire, England.

 

Albion Country Band from Battle of the Field 1976

I
Now come all you lads and lasses
and together let us go
Into some pleasant cornfield
our courage for to show.
CHORUS
With the good old leathern bottle

and the beer it shall be brown.
We’ll reap and scrape together
until Bright Phoebus does go down.
II
With the reaphook and the sickle,
oh so well we clear the land,
And the farmer cries,
“Well done, my lads,
here’s liquor at your command.”
III
Now by daybreak in the morning
when the larks begin to sing
And the echo of the harmony
make all the crows to ring
IV
Then in comes lovely Nancy
the corn all for to lay,
She is a charming creature
and I must begin her praise:
For she gathers it, she binds it,
and she rolls it in her arms,
She carries it to the waggoners
to fill the farmer’s barns.
V
Well now harvest’s done and ended
and the corn secure from harm,
Before it goes to market, lads,
we must thresh it in the barn.
VI
Now here’s a health to all you farmers
and likewise to all you men,
I wish you health and happiness
till harvest comes again.

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/guvnor/songs/reaphookandsickle.html

Blow away the morning dew

Leggi in italiano

In the older version of the ballad known as The Baffled Knight, a young and inexperienced knight meets a girl in the fields and asks her to have sex, but the lady makes fun of her love inexperience and tricks him into a ploy.

BLOW AWAY THE MORNING DEW (Blow the winds)

Child ballad #112 D

This ballad is reported in many text versions both in the eighteenth-century collections and in the Broadsides, as well as transmitted orally in Great Britain and America with the titles of “Blow (Clear) (Stroll) Away The Morning Dew”; the male protagonist from time to time is a gentleman, or a shepherd boy / peasant. The novelty compared to the versions A and B already seen (here and here) is the refrain that, declined in a couple of variations, recalls an allusive morning breeze that sweeps away the night’s dew.
The Renaissance courtly ballad of the “Baffled Knight” is now transposed into a popular setting, linking it to an ancient Celtic auspicious and healthy ritual, still practiced by the peasants, that of the Bath in the dew of Beltane.(see more).

CECIL SHARP VERSION

Geoff Woolfewrites “Cecil Sharp noted several versions of this song in his travels around Somerset in the early 1900s, and in 1916 published what became the ‘standard’ version later sung by many schoolchildren and choirs. Vaughan Williams used the tune for his folk song suite for military band in the 1920s. The text in Mrs Nation [Elisabeth Nation of Bathpool, Somerset]’s version is similar to most others; its meaning may have been lost on collectors and schoolchildren in more innocent times” (from here)

Oscar Brand & Joni Mitchell 1965: a still unknown Joni Anderson, but already refulgent. This video is part of the television series “Let’s Sing Out” conducted by Oscar Brand, which was recorded on various Canadian university campuses and aired on Canadian television from 1963 to 1966. The textual version of the ballad has been slightly retouched and reduced in the form of humorous song.

I
There was a young farmer(1)
Kept sheep all on the hill;
And he walk’d out one May morning(2)
To see what he could kill.(3)
Chorus
And sing blow away the morning dew
The dew, and the dew.
Blow away the morning dew,
How sweet the birds they sing(4)
II
He looked high, he looked low,
He cast an under look;
And there he saw a pretty maid
that swimming in a brook.
III
“If you take to my father’s castle(6)
Which is walled all around,
And, you may have a kiss from me
And twenty thousand pound”(7).
IV
When they got to her father’s gate,
quicly she ride in:
There is a fool without
And here’s a maid within.
V
There is a flower in the garden,
they call it Marigold(8):
And if you do not
when you’re young(9),
then you may not when you’re olde.

NOTE
1) or “shepherd boy” in  Phyllis Marshall (which collected 26 popular songs between 1916 and 1917 from Bathpool and West Monkton, Somerset). In the Somerset Scrapbook, Bob and Jackie Patten write: “in 1916 and 1917 Miss Phyllis Marshall was collecting songs around West Monkton. Although only a small collection, her note books contain some choice material. This collection only came to light in the 1970s when it was found in a second-hand book shop and bought for a few pence“. Both the Oscar Brand and Phyllis Marshall versions are attributable to the “standard” one published by Cecil Sharp in 1916.
2) the verse is significant and clarifies the refrain: it is the May Day, when the sun of Beltane gives more power to the dew (vedi).
3) here the young man goes hunting for necessity, but initially he was a gentleman hunting for pleasure: it is evident the allusion to the woman as prey
4)the verse has been changed to make it more “winking”, The refrain reported by Cecil Sharp says:
And sing blow away the morning dew,
The dew, and the dew.
Blow away the morning dew,
How sweet the winds do blow.
5)in this version are missing a couple of verses as reported by Phyllis Marshall
“The dew’s all on the grass, it’ll spoil my wedding gown
Which cost my father out of his purse as many pounds as crowns”
“I’ll take off my riding coat and wrap it round and round
There is a wind come from the west which soon will blow it down”
The woman tries to dissuade the man with a pretext (and who sings does not seem to have doubts about the incongruity of the two just out of the stream where they were supposedly naked swimming), that of the dress that is rubbing (it is here is even a wedding dress , a Bride of May?) is a staple of the story that already in its seventeenth-century versions warned the inexperienced (in love) young men  “Spare not for her gay clothing, But lay her body flat on the ground”
6) normally it is a gate, I assume that Oscar Brand used the word “castle” to confirm the “ancient” origin of the ballad, (making a little effort to make it stand in the metric)
7) the girl boasts a rich dowry that could tempt the man not to go immediately to rape, but to aim at obtaining the consent of the parents (he can have money only in exchange for the marriage of course) the stanza collected by Phyllis Marshall, that it could be misunderstood if not included in the context, it says “And you shall see what I can do for fifty thousand pounds”
8) flower that already in the second half of 1600 was brought to America by the first settlers. The flower takes up the solar symbolism and was considered a protective plant. In this context it symbolizes the virtue of the girl
9) the maximum is softened

Eliza Carthy – Blow the winds from Red Rice 1998 (following The Game of Draughts)

I
There was a shepherd’s son,
He kept sheep on the hill.
He laid his pipe and his crook aside
And there he slept his fill.
Chorus
And blow the winds high-o, high-o
Sing blow the winds high-o
II
Well he looked east and he looked west,
He took another look
And there he saw a lady gay
Was dipping in a brook.
III
She said: “Sir, don’t touch my mantle,
Come let my clothes alone.
I will give you as much bright money
As you can carry home.”
IV
“I will not touch your mantle,
I’ll let your clothes alone,
But I’ll take you out of the water clear
My dear to be my own.”
V
He mounted her on a milk white steed,
Himself upon another,
And there they rode along the road
Like sister and like brother.
VI
And as they rode along the road
He spied some cocks of hay,
“Oh look!” he says, “there’s a lovely place
For men and maids to play (1).”
VII
And when they came to her father’s house
They rang long at the ring,
And who is there but her brother
To let the young girl in.
VIII
When the gates were opened
This young girl she jumped in,
“Oh, look!” she says, “you’re a fool without
And I’m a maid within!
IX (2)
“There is a horse in my father’s stable,
He stands behind the thorn,
He shakes himself above the trough
But dares not pry the corn.
X
“There is cock in my father’s yard,
A double comb (3) he wears,
He shakes his wings and he crows full loud
But a capon’s crest he bears.
XI
“And there is a flower in my father’s garden,
It’s called the marigold,
The fool that will not when he can,
He shall not when he would.”
XII
Says the shepherd’s son as he doffed his shoes,
“My feet they shall run bare
And if I ever meet another girl
I’ll have that girl, beware.”

NOTE
1) curious inversion of roles now it is the girl to tease the boy that does not react
2) the two strophes are “veiled” insults, the girl insinuates that the boy is a powerless
3) review of cock’s crests (see more)

Clear Away the Morning Dew

Ian Robb from “Ian Robb and hang the Piper” 1979
In the notes Ian writes ” the bulk of the text and the tune coming from ‘This Singing Island’, MacColl and Seeger


I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To see what I could shoot,
I there espied a pretty fair maid
Come a-tripping by the road.
CHORUS
And sing, Hail the dewy morning’
Blow all the winds high-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
How sweet the winds do blow.
II
We both jogged on together
‘Till we came to some pooks of hay.
She said’ “Young man, there is a place,
Where you and I can lay”.
III
I put me arms around her waist
And I tried to throw her down.
She said “Young man, the dewy grass
Will rumple my silk gown. (1) “
IV
“But if you come to me father ‘s house
There you can lay me down.
You can take away me maidenhead,
Likewise a thousand pounds.”
V
So I took her to her father’s house,
But there she locked me out.
She said’ “Young man, I’m a maid within,
And you’re a fool without! ”
VI
So it’s if you come to a pretty maid,
A mile outside of town,
Don’t you take no heed
of the dewy grass
Or the rumpling of her gown.

NOTE
1) very curious the attitude of the girl who first teases him by proposing to lie down between the hay (with an obvious double meaning) and then complains when he hugs her

Dew Is on the Grass

From the field recording of Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1907 from the testimony of Jake Willisof Hadleigh, Suffolk, in Folk Songs Collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams (Roy Palmer 1983 )
Lisa Knapp from Wild & Undaunted 2007


I
As I walked out one midsummer’s morn
All in in the month of May, sir,
O there I beheld a fair pretty maid
Making of the hay, sir.
Chorus
Fol de lie de lay
II
I boldly stepped up to her
Asked her to lay down, sir.
The answer that she gave to me
Was, “The dew is on the ground, sir.”
III
“O but if you come to my father’s house
You may lay in my bed, sir;
You can have my maidenhead
All on a bed of down, sir.”
IV
But when we got to her father’s house,
It was walled in all around, sir.
And she ran in and shut the gate,
Shut the young man out, sir.

V
“O when you met with me at first
You did not meet a fool, sir;
Take your Bible under your arm,
Go a little more to school, sir.
VI
“And if you meet a pretty girl
A little below the town, sir;
You must not mind her squalling
Or the rumpling of your gown, sir.
VII
“There is a cock in my father’s garden
Will not tread the hen (1), sir;
And I do think in my very heart
That you are one of them, sir.
VIII
“There is a flower in my father’s garden
Called a marigold, sir,
And if you will not when you may
You shall not when you would, sir.”
NOTE
1) now the insult is explicit: the boy is an impotent, in the Irish versions the most recurring phrase is:” when they got to bed upstairs, sure the bay he wasn’t able
ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Dew is on the grass, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

LINK
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/163.html
http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11204
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/phyllism.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64609

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=23532
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=149112
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/week-39-stroll-away-the-morning-dew/ http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=717 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1207 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5962 http://www.rosaleengregory.ca/the-baffled-knight.html http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/43791/

(Mer)Maid on the Shore

Leggi in italiano

A fertile vein of the European balladry tradition that has its roots in the Middle Ages, is the so-called “girl on the beach”; Riccardo Venturi summarizes the commonplace “solitary girl who walks on the shores of the sea – coming ship – commander or sailor who calls her on board – girl who embarks on her own will – rethinking and remorse – thoughts at the maternal / conjugal house – drama that takes place (in various ways)
In the “warning ballads” the good girls are warned not to fantasise, to stay in their place (next to the fireplace to crank out delicious treats and children) and not to venture into “male roles”, otherwise they will end dishonored or raped or killed. Better then the more or less golden cage that is already known, rather than free flight.
Every now and then, however, the girl manages to triumph with cunning, over the male cravings, so in the “(Fair) Maid on the Shore” she turns herself into a predator!

Mermaid
Rebecca Guay: Mermaid

MAIDEN IN THE SHORE

It is a mermaid, which the captain sees on a moonlit night, who is walking along the beach (it is well known that selkies and sirens can walk with human feet on full moon nights). Immediately he falls in love and sends a boat to carry her on his ship (by hook or by crook), but as soon as she sings, she casts a spell on the whole crew.
And here the fantastic and magical theme ends: the girl takes all gold and silver and returns to her beach, far from being a fragile and helpless creature, so also her looting the treasures recalls the topos of the siren that collects the glistening things from ships (after having caused shipwreck and death) to “furnish” his cave!
(mer)maid on the shoreBertrand Bronson in his “Tunes of the Child Ballads” classifies “Fair Maid on the Shore” as a variant of Broomfield Hill (Child # 43), the ballad was found more rarely in Ireland (where it is assumed to be original) and more widely in America (and in particular in Canada). Thus reports Ewan MacCall (The Long Harvest, Volume 3) “More commonly found in the North-eastern United States, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland is a curious marine adaptation of the story in which the knight of the Broomfield Hill is transformed into an amorous sea-captain. The young woman on whom he has designs succeeds in preserving her chastity by singing her would-be lover to sleep.”

A.L. Lloyd sang The Maid on the Shore in his album The Foggy Dew and Other Traditional English Love Songs (1956) and commented in the notes “As the song comes to us, it is the bouncing ballad of a girl too smart for a lecherous sea captain. But a scrap of the ballad as sung in Ireland hints at something sinister behind the gay recital. For there, the girl is a mermaid or siren.

I
It’s of a sea captain that sailed the salt sea
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o (1)
And a beautiful damsel he changed for to spy
walking alone on the shore, shore
walking alone on the shore
II
What I’ll give to you me sailors boys
and …  costly ware-o (2).
if you’ll fleach me that girl aboard of my ship
who walks all alone on the shore, shore
walks all alone on the shore
III
So the sailors they got them a very long boat
And off for the shore they did steer-o,
Saying, “Ma’am if you please will you enter on board
To view a fine cargo of ware (3), ware
To view a fine cargo of ware.”
IV
With much persuasion they got her on board
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
she sat herself down in the stern of the boat
off for the ship they did steer, steer
off for the ship they did steer.
V
And when they’ve arrived alongside of the ship
the captain he order his chew-o,
Saying, “First you should lie in my arms all this night
and may be I’ll marry you dear, dear
may be I’ll marry you dear(4)
VI (5)
She sat herself down in the stern of the ship
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
She sang so neat, so sweet and complete,
She sang sailors and captain to sleep, sleep
sang sailors and captain to sleep.
VII
She’s robbed them of silver, she’s robbed them of gold,
she’s robbed their costly ware-o.
And the captain’s bright sword she’s took for an oar
And she’s paddled away for the shore, shore/ paddled away for the shore.
VIII
And when he awaken he find she was gone
he would like a man in despair-o
… she deluded both captain and crew
“I’m a maid once more on the shore, shore
I’m a maid once more on the shore”

NOTES
having transcribed the text directly from listening, there are some words that escape me (and that for a mother-tongue are very clear!) Any additions are welcome !
1)  the verse is used as a refrain on the call and response scheme typical of the sea shanty
2) the captain promises a substantial reward to his sailors
3) in other more explicit versions the cabin boy is sent to show rings and other precious jewels, asking her to get on board to admiring ones more beautiful
4) in a more cruel version the captain threatens to give the girl to his crew, if she will not be nice to him
First you will lie in my arms all this night
And then I’ll give you to me jolly young crew,
5) It is missing
“Oh thank you, oh thank you,” this young girl she cried,
“It’s just what I’ve been waiting for-o:
For I’ve grown so weary of my maidenhead
As I walked all alone on the shore.”

In the Scandinavian versions of the story the girl is first enticed with flattery on board the ship and then kidnapped, in the French version L ‘Epee Liberatrice she is a princess who gets on the ship because she wants to learn the song sung by the young cabin boy: she falls asleep and when she wakes up she discovers to be on the high seas, she asks a sailor for a sword and kills herself, the Italian version (Il corsaro -Costantino Nigra) follows a similar story, but it is only the Irish version that dwells on the magic song of the siren.

The ballad has many interpreters mostly in the folk or folk-rock field.

Stan Rogers from Fogarty’s Cove (1976)
John Renbourn group from The Enchanted Garden, 1980 (strofe I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII)

Eliza Carthy from Rough Music, 2005

The Once from The Once 2009

I (1)
There is a young maiden,
she lives all a-lone
She lived all a-lone on the shore-o
There’s nothing she can find
to comfort her mind
But to roam all a-lone on the shore, shore, shore
But to roam all a-lone on the shore
II
‘Twas of the young (2) Captain
who sailed the salt sea
Let the wind blow high, blow low
I will die, I will die,
the young Captain did cry
If I don’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
III (3)
I have lots of silver,
I have lots of gold
I have lots of costly ware-o
I’ll divide, I’ll divide,
with my jolly ship’s cres
If they row me that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
IV (4)
After much persuasion,
they got her aboard
Let the wind blow high, blow low
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Here’s adieu (5) to all sorrow and care, care, care…
V  (6)
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Let the wind blow high, blow low
She’s so pretty and neat,
she’s so sweet and complete
She’s sung Captain and sailors to sleep, sleep, sleep…
VI (7)
Then she robbed him of silver,
she robbed him of gold
She robbed him of costly ware-o
Then took his broadsword
instead of an oar
And paddled her way to the shore, shore, shore…
VII
Me men must be crazy,
me men must be mad
Me men must be deep in despair-o
For to let you away from my cabin so gay
And to paddle your way to the shore, shore, shore…
VIII (8)
Your men was not crazy,
your men was not mad
Your men was not deep in despair-o
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself
I’m a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore

NOTES
The textual version of the John Renbourn group differs slightly from Stan’s version
1) There was a young maiden, who lives by the shore
Let the wind blow high, blow low
no one could she find to comfort her mind
and she set all a-lone on the shore,
she set all a-lone on the shore
2) or Sea
3) The captain had silver, the captain had gold
And captain had costly ware-o
All these he’ll give to his jolly ship crew
to bring him that maid on the shore
4) And slowly slowly she came upon board
the captain gave her a chair-o
he sited her down in the cabin below
adieu to all sorrow and care
5) in the version of Renbourn the sentence is clearer, it is the pains of love that the captain tries to alleviate by rape the girl!
6) She sited herself in the bow of the ship
she sang so loud and sweet-o
She sang so sweet, gentle and complete
She sang all the seamen to sleep
7) She part took of his silver, part took of his gold
part took of his costly ware-o
she took his broadsword to make an oar
to paddle her back to the shore,
8) Your men must be crazy, your men must be mad
your men must be deep in despair-o
I deluded at them all as has yourself
again I’m a maiden on the shore,

 Solas from “Sunny Spells And Scattered Showers” (1997)

I
There was a fair maid
and she lived all alone
She lived all alone on the shore
No one could she find for to calm her sweet mind (1)
But to wander alone on the shore, shore, shore
To wander alond on the shore
II
There was a brave captain
who sailed a fine ship
And the weather being steady and fair (2)/”I shall die, I shall die,”
this dear captain did cry
“If I can’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore
If I can’t have that maid on the shore”
III
After many persuasions
they brought her on board
He seated her down on his chair
He invited her down to his cabin below
Farewell to all sorrow and care
Farewell to all sorrow and care (3).
IV
“I’ll sing you a song,”
this fair maid did cry
This captain was weeping for joy
She sang it so sweetly, so soft and completely
She sang the captain and sailors to sleep
Captain and sailors to sleep
V
She robbed them of jewels,
she robbed them of wealth (4)
She robbed them of costly fine fare
The captain’s broadsword she used as an oar
She rowed her way back to the shore, shore, shore
She rowed her way back to the shore
VI
Oh the men, they were mad and the men, they were sad
They were deeply sunk down in despair
To see her go away with her booty so gay
The rings and her things and her fine fare
The rings and her things and her fine fare
VII
“Well, don’t be so sad and sunk down in despair
And you should have known me before
I sang you to sleep and I robbed you of wealth
Well, again I’m a maid on the shore, shore, shore
Again I’m a maid on the shore”

NOTES
1) the sentence would make more sense if it were instead “to calm his restless mind”
2) the reference to the good weather is not accidental, in fact the sighting of a siren was synonymous with the approach of a storm
3) that is having a good time with a presumably virgin
4) the woman is not just a thief but a fairy creature that steals the health of the sailors

LINK
Folk Songs of the Catskills (Norman Cazden, Herbert Haufrecht, Norman Studer)
http://home.olemiss.edu/~mudws/reviews/catskill.html
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung24.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=50848
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/stan_rogers/the_maid_on_the_shore.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/themaidontheshore.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35649
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51828 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/maid.htm http://www.8notes.com/scores/5463.asp

THE FISHER BOY BEATS THEM ALL

“The fisher boy” è una canzone tradizionale dei pescatori del Northumberland (il nord dell’Inghilterra). Si inserisce nelle canzoncine spensierate in cui
una giovane fanciulla dichiara la propria preferenza amorosa verso il giovane pescatore.. (in altre invece si tratta del soldato o del bracciante agricolo).
I due si sono conosciuti quando lei andava a raccogliere le vongole lungo il litorale e lui ha avuto modo di osservarla a lungo.

Hacker, Arthur; Cockle Gatherers; Worcester City Museums; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/cockle-gatherers-52813
Hacker, Arthur; Cockle Gatherers; Worcester City Museums; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/cockle-gatherers-52813

ASCOLTA Eliza Carthy

ASCOLTA Anne Wylie


CHORUS
Oh the bonny fisher boy
That brings the fishes from the sea
Oh the bonny fisher boy
The fisher boy got hold of me
I
On Bamboroughshire(2)’s rocky shore
Just as you enter Boulmer Raw(32)
There lives the bonny fisher boy
The fisher boy that beats them all
II
My mother sent me out one day
To gather cockles (4) from the sea
Before I had been long away
The fisher boy fell in with me
III
A sailor I will never marry
Nor soldier for he’s got no brass (5)
But I will have a fisher boy
Because I am a fisher’s lass
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
O il bel giovane pescatore
che porta i pesci dal mare
o il bel giovane pescatore
il giovane pescatore mi ha ripescato (1)
I
Sulla rocciosa spiaggia del Bamboroughshire (2)
appena arrivi a Boulmer Raw (3)
là vive il bel giovane pescatore,
il  pescatore che li batte tutti
II
Mia madre mi mandò un giorno,
a raccogliere molluschi (4) dal mare
sono stata fuori a lungo e il giovane pescatore si è innamorato di me
III
Non sposerò mai un marinaio
e nemmeno un soldato perché prende solo spiccioli (5) ma avrò un giovane pescatore, perché sono la ragazza del pescatore

NOTE
1) la frase ha due significati, il primo nel sensodo di tenere saldamente, agguntare; il secondo nel senso più lato di comprendere, capire
2) Bamburgh è un grande villaggio della costa del Northumberland. È una località nota per il suo castello, che domina la spiaggia, che fu sede dei sovrani della Northumbria di cui il Bamboroughshire è una sottoparte
3) piccolo villaggio di pescatori
4) Ma cosa è una “cockle“? In Italiano si traduce indifferentemente come conchiglia, vongola, tellina,  eppure c’è una bella differenza. Conchiglia è un temine generico che si adatta a tanti tipi di gusci del mare. Vongola e tellina sono  molluschi bivalvolari che appartengono però a due distinte famiglie pur essendo molto imparentate e dall’aspetto simile: le vongole vivono un po’ meno in profondità nella sabbia del litorale e sono quindi più facili da raccogliere. Raccogliere le vongole è un lavoro (per lo più femminile) che segue la luna e le maree in cui si raschia il fango del litorale con un apposito rastrello, e lo si passa al setaccio. continua
5) monetine di scarso valore perciò in ottone

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/fisherboy.html

THE GALLANT HUSSAR

Alla parola Ussaro il pensiero corre verso il soldato a cavallo, dalla divisa impeccabile e romantica -alla “Viennese”- infatti, indipendentemente dall’esercito di appartenenza, le uniformi degli ussari erano tutte simili: una blusa corta e attillata, piena zeppa di passamaneria, e con un numero sproporzionato di alamari, bordata di pelliccia d’inverno, un buffo cappello dalla forma di cilindro allungato e rivestito da pelo di gatto centrifugato, (oppure senza pelo, ma con un altrettanto vistoso pennacchio), pantaloni aderenti infilati in stivali tirati a lucido e alti quasi al ginocchio.
Se ci aggiungi la giovane età, il fisico agile ed allenato dello sportivo, il portamento marziale e i modi da gentiluomo, l’effetto doveva essere devastante sul cuore e le menti delle giovani fanciulle! Ah si e non dimentichiamoci i baffetti a manubrio, che ai tempi erano considerati molto “virili”.

Gli ussari erano infatti una cavalleria d’élite nelle guerre napoleonicheussar-jane-austen: lasciata l’armatura e la lunga lancia che lo aveva caratterizzato nel XV secolo il nostro ussaro è rimasto con la sciabola e il cavallo, oltre non mi addentro in merito alle differenze tra ussaro, dragone, e armamentari vari..

Per aiutarmi nella traduzione della ballata “The Gallant Ussar” ho preso un soldato a caso … Mr Wickham di Orgoglio & Pregiudizio di Jane Austen -ovviamente dalla versione del film di Joe Wright- (credo che tra i due personaggi ci sia molto più di una semplice uniforme in comune!)

MEGLIO SPOSARSI CHE ANDARE IN GUERRA

La ballata è nota con il titolo di “Young Edward, the Gallant Hussar” diffusa a metà Ottocento in una serie di broadside, il tema è quello solito della separazione tra i due innamorati, lui giovane soldato di belle speranze, ma con poche sostanze, e lei giovane fanciulla che aspira al matrimonio. In questa ballata la ragazza riesce a coronare il suo sogno grazie a una piccola rendita lasciatale in eredità  dallo zio. Qui la guerra è uno sfondo lontano, l’ussaro è pronto a combattere, non appena la tromba squillerà per l’adunata, ma nello stesso tempo (valutate le sostanze della fanciulla) pronto a sposarsi e a dimenticare la “guerra crudele”.  Non so se la ballata avesse intenti umoristici ma in effetti la parola “gallant” è un po’ ambivalente.

La ballata è stata registrata recentemente da Eliza Carthy in un’ottima versione. Così scrive Eliza nelle note “This version of the song comes from Still Growing, English Traditional Songs & Singers from the Cecil Sharp Collection, a book of songs collected by Cecil Sharp with fascinating pictures and stories of the people he learned from, published by the EFDSS…”

ASCOLTA Eliza Carthy in Rough Music 2005

Bella anche la versione dei Solas che al momento è ascoltabile su Spotify ASCOLTA in For Love and Laughter 2008

I
A damsel possessed of great beauty,
She stood by her own father’s gate,
The gallant hussars were on duty,
To view them this maiden did wait;
Their horses were capering and prancing,
Their accoutrements shone like a star,
From the plain they were nearest advancing,
She espied her young gallant hussar.
II
Their pellisses were slung on their shoulders,
So careless they seemed for to ride,
So warlike appeared these young soldiers,
With glittering swords by each side.
To the barracks next morning so early,
This damsel she went in her car,
Because she loved him sincerely-
Young Edward, the gallant Hussar.
III
It was there she conversed with her soldier,
These words he was heard for to say,
Said Jane, I’ve heard none more bolder,
To follow my laddie away.
O fie! said young Edward, be steady,
And think of the dangers of war,
When the trumpet sounds I must be ready,
So wed not your gallant Hussar.
IV
For twelve months on bread and cold water,
My parents confined me for you,
O hard-hearted friends to their daughter,
Whose heart it is loyal and true;
Unless they confine me for ever,
Or banish me from you afar,
I will follow my soldier so clever,
To wed with my gallant Hussar.
V
Said Edward, Your friends you must mind them,
Or else you are for ever undone,
They will leave you no portion behind them,
So pray do my company shun.
She said, If you will be true-hearted,
I have gold of my uncle in store,
From this time no more we’ll be parted,
I will wed with my gallant Hussar.
VI
As he gazed on each elegant feature,
The tears they did fall from each eye,
I will wed with this beautiful creature,
And forsake cruel war, he did cry.
So they were united together,
Friends think of them now they’re afar,
Crying: Heaven bless them now and for ever,
Young Jane and her gallant Hussar.
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I
Una donzella di gran beltà
stava ai cancelli di casa
gli ussari galanti erano in marcia
e per vederli questa fanciulla attendeva;
i loro cavalli erano impetuosi e imponenti,
il loro equipaggiamento scintillava come una stella,
dalla pianura si avvicinavano dappresso
e lei scrutava il suo giovane ussaro galante.
II
Le loro giubbe (1) pendevano dalle spalle, così noncuranti in sella,
così amanti della guerra apparivano questi giovani soldati
con sciabole lucenti al fianco.
Alla caserma di buon mattino
questa donzella andò con la sua carrozza,
perché amava sinceramente
il giovane Edward, l’ussaro galante.
III
Mentre conversava con il suo soldato
queste parole sentì dire
da Jane “Non ho sentito di altri più audaci,
e seguirò il mio ragazzo”.
“Ovvia- disse il giovane Edward- resta qui
e pensa ai pericoli della guerra
quando le trombe suonano, devo essere pronto,
così non sposare il tuo ussaro galante.”
IV
“A 12 mesi di pane e acqua fredda
i miei genitori mi hanno confinata a causa tua.
O amici duri di cuore verso la loro figlia
dal cuore leale e sincero;
a meno che non mi confinino per sempre,
o mi bandiscano da te lontano,
seguirò il mio soldato così dotato,
e mi sposerò con il mio ussaro galante.”
V
Disse Edward “Ai tuoi amici devi dare retta,
oppure non avrai più scampo, loro ti leveranno la terra da sotto ai piedi,
così ti prego di evitare la mia compagnia”
Lei disse “ Se tu sarai un cuor sincero
ho dell’oro di mio zio da parte,
da ora non ci separeremo più
e mi sposerò con il mio ussaro galante”.
VI
Mentre lui guardava fattezze tanto eleganti (2)
le lacrime gli caddero dagli occhi
“Mi voglio sposar con questa bellissima creatura,
e dimenticare la guerra crudele” lui gridò.
Così furono maritati,
gli amici che pensano a loro, ora che sono lontani
gridano: “il Cielo li benedica ora e per sempre,
la giovane Jane e il suo ussaro galante”.

NOTE
1) l’ussar pelisse è la giubba che si portava con nonchalance di traverso su una spalla. In effetti quello che contraddistingue gli ussari è lo shakò, (il cappello) di foggia e colori differenti per ciascun reggimento.
2) chissà perchè alla parola “oro di mio zio” il giovane ussaro si è commosso…

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/hussar.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82384
https://mainlynorfolk.info/guvnor/songs/thegallanthussar.html

ARRANE NY NIEE

In mannese si sono preservate alcune ninne-nanne, melodie fatate tramandate da madre in figlia, che sono degli spaccati di vita del tempo che fu. (vedi prima parte)

“THE WASHING SONG”

Le fate dell’Isola  di Man cantano questa ninnananna dal titolo “Arrane Ny Niee” mentre fanno il bagnetto ai loro bambini, così le donne del’isola l’hanno imparata e la cantano ai loro figli proprio come uno spell, affinchè crescano in bellezza e forza

James Kelly said that this was the song the women always used to sing when washing their babies. He maintained that they learned it first from the fairies, who had been heard singing it as they washed their own babies in the early morning in the Awin Ruy, a small river near this farm. The words seem to be a kind of incantation for the child to grow in beauty and strength.(Mona Douglas)

La melodia è conosciuta in Irlanda con il titolo Gol Na MBan San Ar (The Women’s Lament In Battle) o più comunemente come Eagle’s Whistle March e si ritiene essere The O’Donovan Clan March (P.W. Joyce (1909) e tuttavia è una melodia talmente popolare tra i violinisti e i piper che si presenta in molte varianti e come base di moltissime altre canzoni.

ASCOLTA William Coulter versione strumentale per chitarra e flauto

ASCOLTA Naomi Hughes  arpa
ASCOLTA Cairistiona Dougherty

GAELICO MANNESE
Bee dty host, my villish,
Bee dty host, my villish,
Niee mish dty laueyn,
Niee mish dty cassan (cassyn),
Aalin t’ou, my lhiannoo,
Bane as rea dty challin,
Sheidey dty coamrey meein.
Dagh laa cur aalid ort,
Vyrneem lhiam ny folt cas(s)agagh;
Ree ny rollagyn cur bannaght ort,
O my chree, my stoyr!(1)
Chooid nagh gaase ’sy voghrey,
Ligh eh gaase ’syn keeiraght,
Niee mish dty laueyn,
Niee mish dty cassan,
Chooid nagh gaase ec munlaa,
Lhig as gaase ’syn oie,
Cur ort dy chooilley grayse.
Dagh laa cur aalid ort,
Vyrneen lhiam ny folt cassagagh;
Ree ny rollagyn cur bannaght ort,
O my chree, my story(1)!

NOTE
1) espressione presa dal gaelico irlandese

TRADUZIONE  MONA DOUGLAS
I
Bee dty host,  my darling,
Bee dty host,  my darling,
hands now I wash your feet
beautiful you are, my child,
fair and smooth
your body silk your fine clothing
II
Every day putting beauty on you
O my wee girl of curly hair
the king of the stars blessing you
O my heart, my treasure
That which does not grow
in the morning
let it grow in the twilight
III
I will wash your hands, I will wash your feet
That which will not grow at night
let it grow at midday
bestowing on you every grace
Every day giving you strength
my wee girl of the curly hair
the king of the stars blessing you
TRADUZIONE  Cattia Salto
I
Taci mio biscottino,
Taci mio biscottino,
ti sto per lavare le mani,
ti sto per lavare i piedi,
la mia bellissima bambina
dalla pelle bella e liscia
vestita con seta preziosa.
II
Ogni giorno ti mando bellezza,
mia piccolina dai capelli ricci,
che il re delle stelle ti benedica
cuore mio, mio tesoro.
Ciò che non cresce
di mattina,
che cresca al crepuscolo,
III
Ti sto lavando le mani,
i piedi ti sto lavando,
quello che non cresce a mezzogiorno,
che cresca di notte.
Ti mando ogni grazia,
che ogni giorno accresca la tua bellezza, mia piccolina dai capelli ricci.
Il re delle stelle ti benedica .

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Una versione testuale in inglese di Eliza Carthy (della serie quando il sangue non è acqua)

ASCOLTA Eliza Carthy & Saul Rose

(il testo per il momento è preso da quanto sentito ad orecchio, ma alcune parole non sono corrette..)
I
Hush, my darling,
Hush, my darling
hands now I wash your feet
now I wash them
And sing you my only one
fair and smooth
your body blows
and it looks so fine
Chorus (x2)
Each day put strength
(beauty) upon you
my darling sweet, with your hair curly ,
king of stars blessing on you

O my heart, my joy.
III
Good Morning
that which grows on
by the nightime growing
hands now I wash your feet
now I wash them
At noon I which all grows on
by night time it’s growing
and puts on you every grace

FONTI
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/~stephen/chiollaghbooksfirstseries/CBPOD02S.pdf
http://www.ceolas.org/Regions/Manx-article.html
http://www.culturevannin.im/http://www.manxheritagemusic.org/home.aspx
http://www.barbarygrant.com/Lyrics/Kids/arrane%20ny%20niee.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/9853
https://thesession.org/tunes/419
2

THE SAILOR LADDIE / ROLLING SEA

seashantyL’immagine ottocentesca del marinaio è piuttosto stereotipata: è Jack Tar, un ubriacone e donnaiolo, forse lavativo.
Nelle canzoni del mare dal punto di vista femminile il marinaio è spesso un bugiardo infedele che ha una ragazza in ogni porto anche se  tiene moglie e figli a casa. Ridicolizzato e respinto da alcune (vedi Saucy sailor boy), è invece ricercato da altre che preferiscono in assoluto l’amore di un marinaio!

QUELLO CHE LE DONNE VOGLIONO

Come in questa  sea song  dal titolo “The sailor laddie” che era cantata già nella seconda metà del 1700 dalle ragazze di Gosport, una cittadina portuale dell’Hampshire (Inghilterra) sulla Manica: è il marinaio l’uomo che le donne vogliono!!

ASCOLTA Eliza Carthy in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

I
Don’t you see the ships a-coming?
Don’t you see them in full sail?
Don’t you see the ships a-coming
With the prizes at their tail?
Chorus 
Oh my little rolling sailor,
Oh my little rolling he;
How I love my rolling sailor
When he’s on a rolling sea
II
Sailors they get all the money,
Soldiers they get none but brass.
How I love my rolling sailor,
Soldiers they can kiss my arse
III
How can I be blithe and merry
With my true love far from me?
All those pretty little sailors,
They’ve been pressed and taken to sea.
IV
How I wish the press were over
And the wars were at an end.
Then every sailor laddie
Would be happy with his friend.
V
Some delight in jolly farmers,
Some delight in soldiers free;
But my delight’s in a sailor laddie,
Blithe and merry may he be.
VI
When the wars they are all over
Peace and plenty come again;
Every bonny sailor laddie
Will come sailing on the main.
VII
Oh, the wars will soon be over
And the sailors once come home;
Every lass will get a lad,
She won’t have to sleep alone.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non vedi arrivare le navi?
Non le vedi con tutte le vele al vento?
Non vedi arrivare le navi
con le prede a rimorchio (1)?
CORO
Oh mio piccolo marinaio dal passo dondolante(2), come amo il mio marinaio con il passo dondolante
quando è in mare in tempesta
II
I marinai prendono tutti il soldo
i soldati solo delle monetine di rame,
come amo il mio marinaio dal passo dondolante, soldati potete baciarmi il culo (3)
III
Come posso essere felice e contenta
con il mio vero amore lontano da me?
Tutti quei bei giovani marinai
che sono stati arruolati e che hanno preso il mare.
IV
Vorrei che la ferma fosse terminata
e che le guerre fossero alla fine
allora tutti i marinai
sarebbero felici con la loro ragazza
V
Alcune preferiscono i contadini allegri
alcune preferiscono i soldati
ma a me piace che il giovane marinaio
che possa essere felice e contento
VI
Quando le guerre saranno tutte finite
pace e abbondanza verranno di nuovo
ogni bel giovane marinaio
verrà a navigare nella Manica
VII
Oh presto le guerre saranno finite
e i marinai allora ritorneranno a casa
ogni ragazza avrà un ragazzo
e non dovrà dormire da sola.

NOTE
1) at their tail/di poppa
2) il termine ha un duplice significato: in genere è sinonimo di“sailing” ma può anche derivare da “rollikins” un vecchio temine inglese per “ubriaco”; oppure come suggerisce Italo Ottonello è proprio in senso letterale “dondolante” dalla tipica andatura dei lupi di mare
3)una donnina proprio fine!

L’altra versione è quella registrata da Frankie Armstrong nel 1973 in “The Valiant Sailor – Songs & Ballads of Nelson’s Navy” Nelle note di copertina si commenta “Our text comes from John Aston’s Real Sailor Songs (1891) and the tune from Stokoe and Reay, who give it in their Songs and Ballads of Northern England, under the title of  O the Bonny Fisher Lad.

Quindi la versione del folk revival è la più recente variante abbinata alla melodia di “The bonny fisher lad” (una canzone che tratta di un argomento simile, solo che i preferiti dalle donne sono i pescatori)

ASCOLTA Corinne

>
CHORUS

Oh, me bonny sailor laddie,
oh, me bonny sailor he,
Oh, me bonny sailor laddie,
blythe and merry may he be,
I
Sailor lads have gold and silver,
fisher lads have nought but brass;
Well I love my sailor laddie
because I am a sailor’s lass.
Some delight in jolly farmers,
some delight in soldiers free;
My delight’s in a sailor laddie,
blythe and merry may he be.
II
How I wish the press was over
and all wars were at an end,
Then every bonny sailor laddie
would be merry with his friends;
How can I be blythe and merry
with my love so far from me,
When so many pretty sailors
they are pressed and ta’en to sea?
III
Oh, I wish the wars were over,
peace and plenty come again,
Then every bonny sailor laddie
would come sailing o’er the main
Don’t you see his ship a-coming,
don’t you see she’s in full sail?
Don’t you see the Britannia
coming with the prizes at her tail?
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO

Oh mio bel giovane marinaio
lui è il mio bel marinaio,
Oh mio bel giovane marinaio
che possa essere felice e contento
I
I marinai hanno monete d’oro e argento
i pescatori solo monetine di rame
io amo il mio giovane marinaio
perchè sono una ragazza da marinaio.
Alcune preferiscono i contadini allegri
alcune preferiscono i soldati
ma a me piace il giovane marinaio, che possa essere felice e contento
II
Come vorrei che la ferma fosse terminata
e tutte le guerre fossero alla fine
allora tutti i bei giovani marinai
sarebbero felici con la loro ragazze;
come posso essere felice e contenta
con il mio vero amore così lontano da me?
Quando così tanti bei giovani marinai
sono stati arruolati e hanno preso il mare?
III
Oh vorrei che le guerre fossero finite
pace e abbondanza verranno di nuovo
allora ogni bel giovane marinaio
verrà a navigare nella Manica
Non vedi arrivare la sua nave?
non vedi che è a vele spiegate?
Non vedi la Britannia
arrivare con  le prede a rimorchio?

THE SAILOR LADDIE, LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

sailor-picLa versione della canzone originaria di Dundee, Scozia richiama un’altrettanto popolare canzone “The Hieland laddie“. In quella chi canta chiede “Sei mai stato …” (la prima strofa dice: Was you ever in Quebec?) e in questa la ragazza risponde “Sono stata a Dundee”

Nigel Gatherer, editor of Songs and Ballads of Dundee, says that the first of these, consisting of two verses with a refrain, was collected by Aberdeenshire folksong collector Gavin Greig (1856 –1914) from the Rev. John Calder and that it is “related to a family of folksongs which include ‘The Ploughboy Laddie’, ‘The Collier Laddie’ and ‘the Gypsy Laddies’. The tune is somewhat reminiscent of ‘A Man’s a Man for A’ That’.” (tratto da qui)

Su Spotify la versione di Christine Kydd

I
I’ve been East and I’ve been West
And I’ve been in Dundee
But the bonniest lad that ever I saw
He ploughs the raging sea
Chorus:
Awa’ with the sailor laddie,
awa’ with him I’ll go
Awa’ with the sailor laddie,
awa’ with him I’ll go
II
I’ve been east and I’ve been west
And I’ve been in Montrose
But the bonniest lad that e’er I saw
He wears the tarry clothes
III
He skips upon the plainsteens
And he sails upon the sea
And he’s the bonny sailor lad
The lad that I gang wi’
IV
His jacket’s o’ the bonny blue
His jersey’s of the white
And he’s a curly kep(4) with a tinsel(5) band
That sailor’s my delight
V
I saw me lad, he gang aboot
I saw me lad set sail
I saw him turn his ship aboot
Awa’ to catch the whale
VI
He bade me, aye, keep up me heart
He bade me may be dull
He bade me, aye, keep up me heart
Till he tak me tae himself
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono stata ad Est sono stata ad Ovest
e sono stata a Dundee
ma il più bel ragazzo che io abbia mai visto naviga sul mare mosso
CORO
Via con il giovane marinaio
via con lui andò
via con il giovane marinaio
via con lui andrò
II
Sono stata ad Est e sono stata ad Ovest e sono stata a Montrose (1)
ma il più bel ragazzo che abbia mai visto, indossa i vestiti da marinaio (2)
III
Con un balzo da terra (3)
s’imbarca per il mare
ed è il bel giovane marinaio
il ragazzo con cui io andrò
IV
La giacchetta di un bel blu
e i pantaloni bianchi
ha un berretto sui riccioli con una fascia metallica
quel marinaio è la mia delizia
V
Ho visto il mio ragazzo salire bordo
ho visto il mio ragazzo salpare
l’ho visto far virare la nave
per andare a caccia di balena
VI
Mi disse di farmi forza
mi disse di non essere noiosa
mi disse di farmi forza
fino a quando mi avrebbe presa con sè

NOTE
1) Montrose è una cittadina costiera della Scozia, ad una sessantina di kilometri di Dundee, un importante centro commerciale con il suo porto naturale
2) Tarry clothes: sono i vestiti di tela cerata, impermeabilizzata ‘Tarpaulin’ era sinonimo nel Seicento di marinaio e il diminutivo era “tar” (catrame) ; ‘tar’ era anche il cappello da marinaio
3) Plainsteens: flat stones used for paving; paved area surrounding the mercat cross. Non è molto chiaro il senso della frase letteralmente si traduce con “saltella sul selciato”
4) Kep: cap
5) Tinsel: interwoven with metallic thread

SAILOR LADDIE &THE SAILOR LASSIE

Una melodia da danza riportata nel Settecento in alcune collezioni scozzesi di musica  “John Glen (1891) finds the earliest appearance of the tune in print in Neil Stewart’s 1761 collection (pg. 15). Stewart’s collection, printed in Edinburgh and entitled Collection of the Newest and Best Reels and Country Dances, is dated to 1775 by the Kellers et al. The jig next appears in James Aird’s Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, vol. II, published in Glasgow in 1785 (Aird prints different “Sailor Laddie’s” in his vol. 3). Scottish fiddler John Fife included “Sailor Laddie” in his manuscript collection begun in 1780 in Perthshire, and probably continued at sea. It is one of the “missing tunes” from William Vickers’ 1770 Northumbrian dance tune manuscript” (tratto da qui)

VIDEO nella serie televisiva “The Tudors” con la versione dei Toronto Consort da 3:07 la melodia viene fatta risalire al rinascimento inglese ovvero all’epoca Tudor.

ASCOLTA Quadriga Consort

COUNTRY DANCE

“Sailor laddie” è una country dance  descritta nel manoscritto di Thomas Straight “24 Favourite Dances for the Year” 1783, 

LO SCHEMA DELLA DANZA qui

FONTI
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/fisherbk.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/frankie.armstrong/songs/thesailorladdie.html
http://www.capstanbars.com/boldly_westward/bftw_lyrics/ka14laddie.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/sailorladdie.htm

http://www.nls.uk/collections/music/songindex/fullrecord.cfm?searcher=%AC&idnum=287
http://folktunefinder.com/tunes/186894
http://regencydances.org/index.php?wL=357

BROTHER’S REVENGE: THE ROSE AND THE LILY

Child ballad #11
ALTRI TITOLI: The Bride’s Testament, Ther waur three ladies, The Three Knights and Fine Flowers in the Valley, Brother’s Revenge, The Rose and the Lily.

Una ballata di stampo cavalleresco in cui il fratello uccide, apparentemente per un futile motivo, la sorella che si è appena sposata. La ballata inizia sempre con un corteggiamento: un cavaliere o tre cavalieri venuti da lontano chiedono la mano alle figlie (o alla figlia) del re. La più giovane acconsente al matrimonio, ma solo dopo che il cavaliere avrà ottenuto il permesso da tutta la famiglia di lei, tuttavia al fratello non viene richiesto il consenso delle nozze (senza chiarire per quale motivo, fosse anche una fatale dimenticanza) e tanto basta per scatenarne l’ira.  (prima parte qui)

VERSIONE CORNICA: THE THREE KNIGHTS

Child #11 versione F

Mentre in altre versioni sono le tre sorelle ad essere identificate con i tre diversi colori qui sono i tre cavalieri a indossare tre livree con tre diversi colori: il bianco, il verde e il rosso. I cavalieri nei racconti medievali erano spesso contrassegnati da un colore che li classificavano secondo un codice condiviso: i Cavalieri Rossi erano spesso animati di cattive intenzioni,  quelli neri non necessariamente erano eroi negativi, ma volevano nascondere la propria identità; i cavalieri bianchi erano per lo più personaggi anziani e saggi, mentre i verdi erano cavalieri giovani ed inesperti.
Bertrand Harris Bronson “The Traditional Tunes of the Child Ballads” Davies Gilbert nel suo “Ancient Christmas Carols”, (seconda edizione 1823, p. 68-71) riporta testo e melodia così come diffusi in Cornovaglia e più in generale nella parte ovest dell’Inghilterra (qui) “Both [The Three Sisters and The Three Knights] are taken from the 1823 edition of Davies Gilbert’s Some Ancient Christmas Carols where they appear as part of a secular “appendix”. Although Gilbert does not definitely state they are from Cornwall he gives them from his own recollection, and as he was a native of St. Erth we can assume they are Cornish versions of these two ancient ballads. […] Cecil Sharp found two versions with texts resembling this Cornish one in Hot Springs, North Carolina.” (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Eliza Carthy & Norma Waterson in Gift 2010. Nella bellisima versione di Eliza Carthy viene introdotto un ritornello.
La morte della fanciulla appena diventata sposa è preceduta dal suo testamento in cui accusa il fratello di averla uccisa.


I
There were three men come from over the way,
O the rose and the lily-o(1),
And these three men came after one lady
As the rose was so sweetly grown.
The first man came, he was all in white(2)
He asked her if she’d be his delight.
The next man came and he was all in green,
Asked her if she would be his queen.
Chorus:
O the rose and the lily
O the rose and the lily
As the rose is so sweetly grown
So the lily, so sweetly sown
II
The first man came, he was all in white
Asked her if she’d be his delight.
The last man came and he was dressed in red
Asked her nicely if she would wed.(3)
“As I have asked your father dear
And also her that did you bear.
And I have asked your sister Anne
Though I never met your brother John.”
III
On the road as they rode alone
There they met her brother John;
Oh she stood low to give him kisses sweet,
Into her heart did a dagger meet.
“I wish I were on yonder stile,
There I’d sit and I’d bleed awhile.
I wish I were upon yonder hill
For there I’d sit and I’d make my will(4)”
IV
“What would you give to your father dear?”
“This gallant horse that does me bear.”
“What would you give to your mother dear?”
“This wedding dress that I do wear.”
Though she must wash it very, very clean
For my heart’s blood sticks in every seam.”
“What would you give to your sister Anne?”
“My good gold ring and my feathered fan.”
“What would you give to your brother John?”
“A tall, tall tree to hang him on.”
“What would you give to your brother John?”
“A rope and gallows to hang him on.”
“What would you give to your brother’s wife?”
“A widow’s weeds and a peaceful life.”
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre uomini venuti
da lontano
O la rosa e il giglio (1)
e questi tre uomini vennero davanti ad una dama
come la rosa sboccia soavemente
Venne il primo uomo tutto vestito di bianco (2)
a chiederle se avesse voluto essere la sua compagna
l’uomo successivo era tutto in verde
a chiederla come sua regina
CORO
O la rosa e il giglio
O la rosa e il giglio
come la rosa sboccia soavemente
così è soave il giglio piantato
II
Venne il primo uomo tutto vestito di bianco
a chiederla come sua compagna
venne il terzo uomo ed era vestito di rosso
a chiederla gentilmente in sposa (3)
“L’ho domandato al vostro caro padre
e anche a colei che vi ha partorito.
L’ho domandato a vostra sorella Anne
ma non ho mai incontrato vostro fratello John”
III
Sulla via cavalcavano  soli
e incontrarono il fratello John;
e mentre lei si abbassava per dargli un bacio
lui la trafiggeva al cuore con un pugnale!
“Vorrei essere su quella collinetta
per potermi sedere e sanguinare un po’,
vorrei essere su quella collinetta
per sedermi e fare
testamento (4)”
IV
“Che cosa lasci al tuo caro
padre?”
“Il bel cavallo che qui m’ha portato.”
“E che cosa lasci alla tua cara
madre?”
“La veste da sposa che indosso.
Sebbene la debba lavare molto
bene
perchè macchiata dal mio sangue  in ogni ricamo”
“E che cosa lasci a tua sorella
Anne?”
“Il bell’anello d’oro e il ventaglio con le piume”
“E che cosa lasci a tuo fratello
John?”
“Un alberto alto, alto per impiccarlo.”
“E che cosa lasci a tuo fratello
John?”
“una corda e la forca per impiccarlo.”
“E cosa lasci alla moglie di tuo
fratello?”
“Il nero del lutto e una vita in pace”

NOTE
1) qui la rosa e il giglio sono le due rappresentazioni della sorella e del fratello: non dimentichiamo che nella ballate celtiche la rosa è un fiore infausto e il giglio è la prefigurazione della morte; vien da pensare la sorella fosse rimasta incinta (dal rapporto con il fratello).
2) in altre versioni è il cavaliere vestito di bianco a chiedere la dama in moglie, ma come già ricordato anticamente era il rosso il colore indossato dagli sposi
3) il cavaliere chiede alla donna il suo parere in merito, eppure il consenso al matrimonio passa attraverso la mediazione dei genitori, e contrariamente alla consuetudini, risulta vincolante anche il consenso dei fratelli e delle sorelle della futura sposa.
4) il lascito testamentario è tipico nelle ballate del genere la morte occultata


ASCOLTA
The Shee in “Murmurations” 2015 con il titolo “Three Knights”

There were three knights came from the West,
With the high and the lily-o,
And these three knights courted one lady,
As the rose was so sweetly blown.
The first knight came was all in green,
And asked of her if she’d be his queen.
The next knight came was all in white,
And asked of her if she’d be his delight,
The third knight came was all in red,
And asked of her if she would wed,
“Then you must ask of my Father dear,
Likewise of her that did me bear?
“And you must ask of my brother John?
And also of my sister Anne.”
So he did ask of her father dear,
Likewise of her that did she bear.
And he did ask of her sister Anne,
But did not ask of her brother John.
‘Twas on the road as they rode along,
There they did meet with her brother John.
She stooped low to kiss him sweet,
He to her heart did a dagger meet.
“Ride on, ride on,” cried the serving man,
“Methinks your bride she looks wond’rous wan.”
“I wish I was on yonder stile,
There I would site and I’d bleed awhile.
“I wish I were on yonder hill,
There I’d alight and I’d make my will.”
“What would you give to your Father dear?”
“The gallant steed that doth me bear.”
“What would you give to your mother dear?”
“My wedding gown that I do wear.
“But she must wash it very clean,
For my heart’s blood sticks in ev’ry seam.”
“What would you give to your sister?”
“My gay gold ring and my feathered fan.”
“What would you give to your brother?”
“A rope and gallows to hang him on.”

VERSIONE AMERICANA DI CRUEL BROTHER

Dalla collezione di ballate di Helen Hartness Flanders (1890-1972), di Springfield, Vermont. Fiandre raccolse sul campo ben 4.800 registrazioni di canti popolari e ballate del New England

ASCOLTA Debra Cowan 2005 con accompagnamento di chitarra barocca e violoncello


I
Three ladies played at cup and ball
With a hey and a lady gay(1)
Three knights there came among them all
The rose it smells so sweetly
And one of them was dressed in red
He asked me with him to wed
And one of them was dressed in yellow
He asked me to be his fellow
And one of them was dressed in green
He asked me to be his queen
II
O You must ask my father the king
And you must ask my mother the queen
You must ask my sister Ann
And you must ask my brother John
O I have asked your father the King
And I have asked your mother the Queen
And I have asked your sister Ann
And I have asked your her brother John
III
Her father the king led her down the hall
Her mother the queen led down the stair
Her sister Ann led her down the path
Her brother John set her on her horse
And as she bent to give him a kiss
He stuck his penknife into her breast
IV
Now up and ride my foremost man
My lady fair looks pale and wan
And what will you leave to your father the king
The golden chair that I sit in
And what will you leave to your mother the queen
The golden coach that I ride in
And what will you leave to your sister Ann
My silver broach and ivory fan
And what will you leave to your brother John
A pair of gallows to hang him on
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
C’eran tre dame che giocavano a palla
Hey, con la rosa e il bel giglio (1)
vennero tre cavalieri  per corteggiarle tutte
la rosa profuma così soavemente
Uno di loro era vestito di rosso
e mi chiese di sposarlo
e uno di loro era vestito
di giallo (2)
e mi chiese di essere la sua compagna
e uno di loro era vestito di verde
e mi chiese di essere la sua regina
II
“Dovete domandare a mio padre il re,
dovete domandare a mia madre la regina
e dovete domandare a mia sorella Ann
e dovete domandare  a mio fratello John”
“Ho chiesto a vostro padre il re,
ho chiesto a vostra madre,
la regina
ho chiesto a vostra sorella Ann
e ho chiesto a vostro fratello
John”
III
Il padre il re l’accompagnò per attraversare il salone
La madre la regina l’accompagnò giù per le scale
la sorella Ann attraversò con lei il giardino
e suo fratello John la mise a cavallo.
e mentre si chinò per dargli un bacio
le  ficcò il  pugnale in petto (3)
IV
“In sella mio vassallo, la mia bella dama sembra pallida e smorta”
“E cosa lascia tuo padre
il re?
“La sedia dorata sulla quale sono seduta”
“E cosa lasci a tua madre la regina?”
“La carrozza d’oro che mi ha portato”
“E cosa lasci a tua sorella Ann?”
“La mia spilla d’argento e il ventaglio d’avorio”
“E che cosa lasci a tuo fratello John?”
“La forca, perché ci rimanga appeso.”

NOTE
1) probabile  corruzione di lillie gay nel Brown Manuscript è scritto come “With a hey ho and a lillie gay
2) il giallo ha spesso una valenza negativa
3) la scena ha un che di furtivo, il fratello pugnala con uno stilietto la sorella senza ucciderla sul colpo, ma ferendola mortalmente senza farsi notare dagli altri. Così gli sposi arrivano al castello e solo allora la donna fa testamento denunciando il suo assassino

FONTI http://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/thethreeknights.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=33567 http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_11 http://www.contemplator.com/child/revenge.html http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/c/cruelbro.html http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/three_knights.htm http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/lib/libcollections/collections/special/flanders/node/107781 http://www.jstor.org/stable/534425?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

I canti di lavoro nella tradizione inglese: la Jolly Country

Read the post in English

Il tempo del raccolto del grano varia a seconda delle latitudini: a Sud come ad esempio nell’Italia meridionale si inizia a mietere già a giugno, mentre in Piemonte a luglio e nei paesi del Nord come per le Isole della Gran Bretagna, ad agosto.
Un tempo la stagione della mietitura poteva durare circa un mese con i braccianti (i mietitori migranti) che si spostavano a piedi, di fattoria in fattoria con in spalla gli attrezzi per il loro lavoro (i falcetti per le donne, la grande falce per gli uomini) e un fagottino con le loro poche cose: andavano in gruppi per famigliole,  uomini e donne (anche se in alcune regioni erano solo uomini a spostarsi), e per molte ragazze quella era l’occasione di fare nuove amicizie e magari di trovare l’innamorato.

George Hemming Mason - The Harvest Moon

I canti della mietitura sono comuni per tutta l’Europa e per lo più sono a sfondo religioso-rituale, e sotto a volte scorre il canto di protesta delle classi subalterne . Ma i canti sono scomparsi perchè con la meccanizzazione (e la chimica) dell’agricoltura il mondo contadino si è diradato; con l’avvento della televisione, alla cultura del territorio si è sostituita quella omologata e massificata, così oggi nelle campagne non si canta più! Le classi sociali ovviamente sono rimaste, per dirla come Gualdo Anselmi “è scomparsa la cultura delle classi”.

JOLLY COUNTRY

Il canto della mietitura che ho scelto oggi si intitola “Reaphook and Sickle” e proviene dalla tradizione inglese: è un canto “jolly” che dipinge in toni entusiasmanti e descrive quello che in realtà è stato un duro lavoro come se si trattasse di un giro di danza. Altri tempi e risorse, altre mentalità, però a mio avviso è importante ridare dignità al lavoro della terra, come una vera e propria vocazione, in cui si vive a stretto contatto con la natura e i suoi tempi.

coltivazione sinergicaNon più isolati e delimitati nel proprio campicello come nel passato, facendo tesoro dei metodi tradizionali o delle “filosofie” naturali come quella che oggi viene detta agricoltura sinergica, che chiunque abbia un po’ di terra a disposizione può sperimentare per farci un orto sinergico  (si sembra un paradosso di termini parlare di agricoltura naturale ma funziona alla grande) .. e trovare un po’ di “jollytudine“..

Eliza Carthy in Holy Heathens and the Old Green Man 2007


I
Come you lads and lasses,
together we will go
All in the golden cornfield
our courage for to show.
With the reaping hook and sickle
so well we clear the land,
And the farmer says,
“Hoorah, me boys,
here’s liquor at your command.”
II
It’s in the time of haying
our partners we do take,
Along with lads and lasses
the hay timing to make.
There’s joining round in harmony
and roundness to be seen,
And when it’s gone
we’ll take your girls
to dance Jack on the green(1).
III
It’s in the time of harvest
so cheerfully we’ll go,
Then some we’ll reap
and some we’ll sickle
and some we’ll size to mow.
But now at end
we’re free for home,
we haven’t far to go,
We’re on our way to Robin Hood’s Bay (2) to welcome harvest home.
IV
Now harvest’s done and ended
and the corn all safe from harm,
And all that’s left to do, me boys,
is thresh it in the barn.
Here’s a health to all the farmers, likewise the women and men,
And we wish you health and happiness till harvest comes again.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Venite voi, ragazzi e ragazze
e andiamo tutti insieme
nei dorati campi di grano
a mostrare la nostra forza.
Con il falcetto e la falce,
così bene ripuliremo il campo
e il fattore grida
“ben fatto ragazzi,
c’è da bere a volontà”
II
E’ il tempo della mietitura
e di prendere i nostri compagni
insieme ragazzi e ragazze
è il tempo di fare il fieno.
C’è da unirsi in tondo in armonia
e da formare il cerchio
e quando sarà fatto
prenderemo le nostre ragazze
per danzare “Jack on the Green”
III
E’ il tempo del raccolto
così con gioia andremo
e chi mieterà con il falcetto
e chi con la grande falce
e chi formerà i covoni.
E adesso infine
siamo liberi di tornare,
non dobbiamo andare molto lontano
stiamo andando a Robin Hood’s Bay
per portare a casa il raccolto.
IV
Ora che il raccolto è fatto e finito
e tutto il grano al sicuro
tutto quello che ci resta da fare, miei ragazzi, è di trebbiarlo nel fienile.
Ecco alla salute di tutti gli agricoltori, siano uomini e donne,
e vi auguriamo salute e felicità finchè non verrà ancora il tempo della mietitura.

NOTE
1) Jack il verde è stata una popolare maschera del Maggio inglese, dal medioevo e fino in epoca vittoriana, caduta in disuso alla fine dell’Ottocento. vedi
2) Robin Hood’s Bay è un paese della contea del North Yorkshire, in Inghilterra.

Albion Country Band in Battle of the Field 1976


I
Now come all you lads and lasses
and together let us go
Into some pleasant cornfield
our courage for to show.
CHORUS
With the good old leathern bottle

and the beer it shall be brown.
We’ll reap and scrape together
until Bright Phoebus does go down.
II
With the reaphook and the sickle,
oh so well we clear the land,
And the farmer cries,
“Well done, my lads,
here’s liquor at your command.”
III
Now by daybreak in the morning
when the larks begin to sing
And the echo of the harmony
make all the crows to ring
IV
Then in comes lovely Nancy
the corn all for to lay,
She is a charming creature
and I must begin her praise:
For she gathers it, she binds it,
and she rolls it in her arms,
She carries it to the waggoners
to fill the farmer’s barns.
V
Well now harvest’s done and ended
and the corn secure from harm,
Before it goes to market, lads,
we must thresh it in the barn.
VI
Now here’s a health to all you farmers
and likewise to all you men,
I wish you health and happiness
till harvest comes again.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Venite voi, ragazzi e ragazze
e andiamo tutti insieme
nei bei campi di grano
a mostrare la nostra forza.
CORO
Con la cara vecchia fiaschetta di pelle

e la birra sarà scura
taglieremo e raccoglieremo insieme
finchè Febo Luminoso tramonterà
II
Con il falcetto e la falce,
così bene ripuliremo il campo
e il fattore grida
“ben fatto ragazzi,
c’è da bere a volontà”
III
Ora di primo mattino
quando l’allodola comincia a cantare
e il suono della melodia
fa tutti i corvi fischiare
IV
Allora arriva la bella Nancy
il grano tutto da riporre
lei è una creatura affascinante
e devo innalzare le sue lodi:
perché lei lo raccoglie e lo lega
e lo avvolge tra le braccia
e lo porta ai carri
per riempire il granaio del contadino
V
Ora che il raccolto è fatto e finito
e tutto il grano al sicuro
tutto quello che ci resta da fare, miei ragazzi, è di trebbiarlo nel fienile.
VI
Ecco alla salute di tutti
gli agricoltori,
e di voi braccianti tutti,
vi auguro salute e felicità
finchè non verrà ancora il tempo della mietitura.

IL CANTO DEI MIETITORI

Nel Vercellese la produzione cerealicola era ed è quella risicola e quindi sono i canti delle mondine a fare da padrone. Non che non ci fosse il grano da mietere, ma si trattava di produzioni meno vaste, che i contadini della zona gestivano facendo ricorso alla manodopera locale e aiutandosi l’uno con l’altro per parentele o prossimità di campi o per amicizie di lunga data. Così propongo un ascolto meno tradizionale, ma non meno coerente con l’argomento dell’articolo: una versione blues della poesia “Il canto dei mietitori” di Mario Rapisardi (musica di Joe Fallisi)

Chitarra: Pasquale Ambrosino, Luigi Consolo, Roberto Ruberti, Ruggero Ruggeri – Pisa, 29/10/1993 –

I
La falange noi siam dei mietitori
e falciamo le messi a lor signori.
Ben venga il Sol cocente, il Sol di giugno
che ci arde il sangue e ci annerisce il grugno
e ci arroventa la falce nel pugno,
quando falciam le messi a lor signori.
II
Noi siam venuti di molto lontano,
scalzi, cenciosi, con la canna in mano,
ammalati dall’aria del pantano,
per falciare le messi a lor signori.
III
I nostri figlioletti non han pane
e, chi sa?, forse moriran domane,
invidiando il pranzo al vostro cane…
E noi falciam le messi a lor signori.
IV
Ebbro di sole, ognun di noi barcolla
acqua ed aceto, un tozzo e una cipolla
ci disseta, ci allena, ci satolla,
Falciam, falciam le messi a quei signori.
V
Il sol cuoce, il sudore ci bagna,
suona la cornamusa e ci accompagna,
finché cadiamo all’aperta campagna.
Falciam, falciam le messi a quei signori.
VI
Allegri o mietitori, o mietitrici:
noi siamo, è vero, laceri e mendici,
ma quei signori son tanto felici!
Falciam, falciam le messi a quei signori.
VII
Che volete? Noi siam povera plebe,
noi siamo nati a viver come zebre
ed a morir per ingrassar le glebe.
Falciam, falciam le messi a quei signori.
VIII
O benigni signori, o pingui eroi,
vengano un po’ dove falciamo noi:
balleremo il trescon, la ridda e poi…
poi falcerem le teste a lor signori.

« Ho creduto e crederò sino all’ultimo istante che flagellare i malvagi e smascherare gli ipocriti sia opera generosa e dovere massimo di scrittore civile. » (Mario Rapisardi)

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/guvnor/songs/reaphookandsickle.html

THE MAID ON THE SHORE IS IT A MERMAID?

Read the post in English

Un filone fecondo della tradizione ballatistica europea che affonda le sue radici nel medioevo, è quello cosiddetto della “fanciulla sulla spiaggia”;  Riccardo Venturi riassume il commonplace in modo puntuale  “fanciulla solitaria che passeggia sulle rive del mare – nave che arriva – comandante o marinaio che la richiama a bordo – fanciulla che s’imbarca di spontanea volontà – ripensamento e rimorso – pensieri alla casa materna / coniugale – dramma che si compie (in vari modi)
Nelle “warning ballads” si ammoniscono le brave fanciulle a non mettersi grilli per il capo,  a stare al loro posto (accanto al focolare a sfornare manicaretti e bambini) e a non avventurarsi in “ruoli maschili”, altrimenti finiranno disonorate o stuprate o uccise. Meglio quindi la gabbia più o meno dorata che già si conosce piuttosto che il volo libero.
Ogni tanto però la fanciulla riesce a trionfare con l’astuzia, sulle prepotenti voglie maschili, cosi nella “(Fair) Maid on the Shore” si trasforma lei stessa in predatrice!

Mermaid
Rebecca Guay: Mermaid

LA SIRENA SULLA SPIAGGIA

E’ una sirena, che il capitano vede in una notte di luna, camminare lungo la spiaggia (è risaputo che selkie e sirene possono camminare con piedi umani nelle notti di luna piena). Subito s’invaghisce e manda una scialuppa per portare la fanciulla sulla sua nave (con le buone o con le cattive), ma appena lei canta, getta un incantesimo su tutto l’equipaggio.
E qui finisce il tema fantastico e magico: la fanciulla si prende tutti gli oggetti di valore e l’oro e l’argento e ritorna alla sua spiaggia, ben lungi dall’essere una creatura fragile e indifesa, così anche il suo depredare i tesori richiama il topos della sirena che raccoglie le cose luccicose dalle navi (dopo averne causato naufragio e  morte) per “arredare” la sua grotta!(mer)maid on the shoreBertrand Bronson nel suo “Tunes of the Child Ballads” classifica “Fair Maid on the Shore” come una variante di Broomfield Hill (Child #43), la ballata è stata trovata più raramente in Irlanda (dove si presume sia originaria) e più diffusamente in America (e in particolare in Canada). Così riporta Ewan MacCall (The Long Harvest, Volume 3): “Più comunemente trovato negli Stati Uniti nord-orientali, Nuova Scozia e Terranova è un curioso adattamento marino della storia in cui il cavaliere di Broomfield Hill viene trasformato in un galante capitano di mare. La giovane donna su cui si è fatto un pensierino, riesce a preservare la sua castità cantando al suo aspirante amante e addormentandolo”

A.L. Lloyd canta The Maid on the Shore nell’album The Foggy Dew and Other Traditional English Love Songs (1956) e commenta “Così come la canzone arriva a noi, è la ballata  di una ragazza troppo intelligente per un capitano di mare vizioso. Ma una versione della ballata come cantata in Irlanda suggerisce qualcosa di sinistro dietro al racconto scanzonato. Perchè la ragazza è una Sirena o una donna del Mare.”


I
It’s of a sea captain that sailed the salt sea
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o (1)
And a beautiful damsel he changed for to spy
walking alone on the shore, shore
walking alone on the shore
II
What I’ll give to you me sailors boys
and …  costly ware-o (2).
if you’ll fleach me that girl aboard of my ship
who walks all alone on the shore, shore
walks all alone on the shore
III
So the sailors they got them a very long boat
And off for the shore they did steer-o,
Saying, “Ma’am if you please will you enter on board
To view a fine cargo of ware (3), ware
To view a fine cargo of ware.”
IV
With much persuasion they got her on board
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
she sat herself down in the stern of the boat
off for the ship they did steer, steer
off for the ship they did steer.
V
And when they’ve arrived alongside of the ship
the captain he order his chew-o,
Saying, “First you should lie in my arms all this night
and may be I’ll marry you dear, dear
may be I’ll marry you dear(4)
VI (5)
She sat herself down in the stern of the ship
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
She sang so neat, so sweet and complete,
She sang sailors and captain to sleep, sleep
sang sailors and captain to sleep.
VII
She’s robbed them of silver, she’s robbed them of gold,
she’s robbed their costly ware-o.
And the captain’s bright sword she’s took for an oar
And she’s paddled away for the shore, shore/ paddled away for the shore.
VIII
And when he awaken he find she was gone
he would like a man in despair-o
… she deluded both captain and crew
“I’m a maid once more on the shore, shore
I’m a maid once more on the shore”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Si narra di un capitano che navigava in alto mare
e i mari erano sereni, calmi e chiari-o
e una bellissima fanciulla gli capitò di vedere
mentre camminava sola sulla spiaggia, spiaggia
mentre camminava sola sulla spiaggia
II
Quello che vi darò miei marinai
..
se mi porterete quella ragazza a bordo della nave
che cammina tutta sola sulla spiaggia, cammina tutta sola sulla spiaggia.
III
Così i marinai presero la loro
scialuppa
e verso riva manovrarono-o
dicono “Madama, vi preghiamo di salire a bordo per ammirare un carico di bella merce,
ammirare un carico di bella merce
IV
Con molte chiacchiere la presero a bordo,
i mari erano sereni, calmi e
chiari-o
lei si sedette a  poppa della scialuppa
e indietro verso la nave loro manovrarono,
indietro verso la nave manovrarono.
V
E quando arrivarono al fianco della nave
il capitano ordina il suo tabacco da masticare e dice “Per prima cosa dormirai con me tutta la notte
e forse ti sposerò, cara
forse ti sposerò”
VI
Lei si sedette a  poppa della
nave
i mari erano sereni, calmi e chiari-o
lei cantò in modo puro, dolce e perfetto;
cantò per far addormentare  i marinai e il capitano
cantò per far addormentare  i marinai e il capitano.
VII
Li derubò dell’argento, li derubò dell’oro,
li derubò della loro preziosa mercanzia
e la luccicante spada del capitano prese come remo
e remò via verso la terra,
remò via verso la terra.
VIII
E quando si svegliò e scoprì che lei se n’era andata
sembrava un uomo disperato
..
“Sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia, sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
avendo trascritto il testo direttamente dall’ascolto, ci sono alcune parole che mi sfuggono (e che per un madre-lingua sono invece chiarissime! sono benvenute le integrazioni)
1) il verso è utilizzato come un ritornello sullo schema botta e risposta tipico delle sea shanty
2) il capitano promette una sostanziosa ricompensa ai marinai, ma non capisco la pronuncia
3) in altre versioni più esplicite si manda il giovane mozzo a mostrare alla ragazza anelli e altri gioielli preziosi, chiedendole di salire a bordo per poter ammirarne di ancora più belli
4) in una versione più crudele il capitano minaccia di dare la ragazza in pasto alla sua ciurma, se non sarà carina con lui
First you will lie in my arms all this night
And then I’ll give you to me jolly young crew,
5) Manca la strofa in cui la fanciulla tira fuori la sua spavalderia
“Oh thank you, oh thank you,” this young girl she cried,
“It’s just what I’ve been waiting for-o:
For I’ve grown so weary of my maidenhead
As I walked all alone on the shore.”

Nelle versioni scandinave della storia la fanciulla viene prima allettata con lusinghe a bordo della nave e quindi rapita, nella versione francese L’ Epee Liberatrice è una principessa che sale sulla nave perchè vuole imparare la canzone cantata dal giovane mozzo: si addormenta e quando si sveglia scopre di essere in alto mare, chiede a un marinaio una spada e si uccide, la versione italiana (Il corsaro -Costantino Nigra) segue una storia simile, ma è la versione irlandese che si sofferma sul canto magico della sirena.

La ballata  ha molti interpreti per lo più di ambito folk o folk-rock

Stan Rogers in Fogarty’s Cove (1976)
John Renbourn group in The Enchanted Garden, 1980 (strofe I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII)

Eliza Carthy in Rough Music, 2005 che la restituisce come una sea shanty per sole voci a “chiamata e risposta”

The Once in The Once 2009


I (1)
There is a young maiden,
she lives all a-lone
She lived all a-lone on the shore-o
There’s nothing she can find
to comfort her mind
But to roam all a-lone on the shore, shore, shore
But to roam all a-lone on the shore
II
‘Twas of the young (2) Captain
who sailed the salt sea
Let the wind blow high, blow low
I will die, I will die,
the young Captain did cry
If I don’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
III (3)
I have lots of silver,
I have lots of gold
I have lots of costly ware-o
I’ll divide, I’ll divide,
with my jolly ship’s cres
If they row me that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
IV (4)
After much persuasion,
they got her aboard
Let the wind blow high, blow low
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Here’s adieu (5) to all sorrow and care, care, care…
V  (6)
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Let the wind blow high, blow low
She’s so pretty and neat,
she’s so sweet and complete
She’s sung Captain and sailors to sleep, sleep, sleep…
VI (7)
Then she robbed him of silver,
she robbed him of gold
She robbed him of costly ware-o
Then took his broadsword
instead of an oar
And paddled her way to the shore, shore, shore…
VII
Me men must be crazy,
me men must be mad
Me men must be deep in despair-o
For to let you away from my cabin so gay
And to paddle your way to the shore, shore, shore…
VIII (8)
Your men was not crazy,
your men was not mad
Your men was not deep in despair-o
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself
I’m a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una giovane fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia- o
e non trovava niente con cui confortare il suo animo,
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia
II
C’era un giovane capitano
che salpò sull’oceano,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire
– gridava il giovane capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
III
Ho tanto argento
ho tanto oro,
ho tante cose preziose
che dividerò, dividerò
con la mia ciurma
se mi porteranno quella fanciulla
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …”
IV
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portarono a bordo
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
la sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
per fargli dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni.
V
La sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
Era così bella e pura,
dolce e ben fatta e
cantò per far addormentare il capitano e i marinai.
VI
Allora lo derubò dell’argento
lo derubò dell’oro
lo derubò delle cose preziose,
usò il suo spadone
come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
VII
“Oh i miei uomini sono furiosi
i miei uomini sono arrabbiati
i miei uomini sono sprofondati nella disperazione più cupa
perchè sei fuggita da una cabina così allegra e hai vogato per ritornare alla spiaggia”.
VIII
“I tuoi uomini han poco da essere furiosi e arrabbiati
I tuoi uomini han poco da essere disperati, ho beffato i tuoi marinai e anche te
e sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
La versione testuale del John Renbourn group differisce di poco dalla versione di Stan
1) There was a young maiden, who lives by the shore
Let the wind blow high, blow low
no one could she find to comfort her mind
and she set all a-lone on the shore,
she set all a-lone on the shore
2) oppure Sea
3) The captain had silver, the captain had gold
And captain had costly ware-o
All these he’ll give to his jolly ship crew
to bring him that maid on the shore
4) And slowly slowly she came upon board
the captain gave her a chair-o
he sited her down in the cabin below
adieu to all sorrow and care
5) nella versione di Renbourn la frase è più chiara, sono le pene d’amore che il capitano cerca di alleviare stuprando la fanciulla!
6) She sited herself in the bow of the ship
she sang so loud and sweet-o
She sang so sweet, gentle and complete
She sang all the seamen to sleep
7) She part took of his silver, part took of his gold
part took of his costly ware-o
she took his broadsword to make an oar
to paddle her back to the shore,
8) Your men must be crazy, your men must be mad
your men must be deep in despair-o
I deluded at them all as has yourself
again I’m a maiden on the shore,

 Solas in “Sunny Spells And Scattered Showers” (1997) (la recensione dell’album qui)


I
There was a fair maid
and she lived all alone
She lived all alone on the shore
No one could she find for to calm her sweet mind (1)
But to wander alone on the shore, shore, shore
To wander alond on the shore
II
There was a brave captain
who sailed a fine ship
And the weather being steady and fair (2)/”I shall die, I shall die,”
this dear captain did cry
“If I can’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore
If I can’t have that maid on the shore”
III
After many persuasions
they brought her on board
He seated her down on his chair
He invited her down to his cabin below
Farewell to all sorrow and care
Farewell to all sorrow and care (3).
IV
“I’ll sing you a song,”
this fair maid did cry
This captain was weeping for joy
She sang it so sweetly, so soft and completely
She sang the captain and sailors to sleep
Captain and sailors to sleep
V
She robbed them of jewels,
she robbed them of wealth (4)
She robbed them of costly fine fare
The captain’s broadsword she used as an oar
She rowed her way back to the shore, shore, shore
She rowed her way back to the shore
VI
Oh the men, they were mad and the men, they were sad
They were deeply sunk down in despair
To see her go away with her booty so gay
The rings and her things and her fine fare
The rings and her things and her fine fare
VII
“Well, don’t be so sad and sunk down in despair
And you should have known me before
I sang you to sleep and I robbed you of wealth
Well, again I’m a maid on the shore, shore, shore
Again I’m a maid on the shore”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una bella fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia
e non trovava nessuno con cui placare il suo animo sereno
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia.
II
C’era un coraggioso capitano
che salpò su una bella nave,
e il tempo era stabile e bello
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire* – gridava questo egregio capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia spiaggia,
se non posso avere quella fanciulla ”
III
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portano a bordo,
la fece sedere accanto alla propria sedia e la invitò nella sua cabina,
per dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni
IV
“Ti canterò una canzone ”
– gridò questa bella fanciulla.
Il capitano stava piangendo per la gioia, lei cantò così amabilmente, così dolcemente,
cantò per addormentare il capitano e i marinai, per addormentare il capitano e i marinai
V
Li derubò dei gioielli,
li derubò della salute ,
li derubò del cibo raffinato e costoso, usò lo spadone del capitano come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
e vogò per ritornare sulla spiaggia.
VI
Oh gli uomini divennero pazzi
e gli uomini divennero tristi, sprofondarono nella disperazione più cupa
nel vederla andarsene tutta contenta con la refurtiva,
gli anelli e le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato,
gli anelli le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato.
VII
“Non siate così tristi e affranti dalla disperazione,
avreste dovuto riconoscermi prima, cantai per farvi addormentare e vi rubai la salute
e adesso sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia, spiaggia
di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
1) la frase avrebbe più senso se fosse invece “per placare il suo animo inquieto”
2) il riferimento al bel tempo non è casuale, infatti l’avvistamento di una sirena era sinonimo dell’avvicinarsi di una tempesta
3) ovvero per sollazzarsi con la fanciulla (presumibilmente vergine)
4) la donna non è solo una ladra ma una creatura fatata che ruba la salute dei marinai

FONTI
Folk Songs of the Catskills (Norman Cazden, Herbert Haufrecht, Norman Studer)
http://home.olemiss.edu/~mudws/reviews/catskill.html
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung24.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=50848
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/stan_rogers/the_maid_on_the_shore.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/themaidontheshore.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35649
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51828 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/maid.htm http://www.8notes.com/scores/5463.asp