Little Sally Racket

“Little Sally Racket” (“Haul her away”) is a sea shanty with peppery jokes about the women of the ports and in particular from Liverpool, the subject lends itself to naughty versions and a lot of variants. The rhythm is related to the Cheerly man shanty, revisited in rap style in the Son of Rogues Gallery compilation.
“Little Sally Racket” ma anche “Haul her away” è una sea shanthy con pepate battute sulle donnine dei porti e in particolare di quelle che bazzicavano per i moli di Liverpool, il soggetto si presta a versioni più “spinte”  e chilometriche varianti.
Il ritmo è imparentato con la Cheerly man shanty, rivisitato in stile rap nella compilation Son of Rogues Gallery.

Shanty Crew Kreuzberg (I, VI, II, V, VII)

Haul Her Away · Maddy Prior & The Girls in Bib & Tuck 2002


I

Little Nancy Dawson, haul ‘er away
She’s got flannel drawers on, haul ‘er away
So says our old bosun, haul ‘er away
With me hauley-high-O! Haul ‘er away!
II
Little Betty Picker (Baker),
Ran off with a Quaker,
Guess her mom couldn’t shake her
III
Little Suzie Skinner
She said she’s a beginner
And she prefers it to her dinner
IV
Little Kitty Carson
Got off with the parson
Now she’s got a little barson
V
Little Dolly Docket,
Washes in a bucket,
She’s a tart but doesn’t look it,
VI
Little Sally Racket
She pawned my new jacket
And she never did regret it
VII
Up my fightin’ cocks boys
Up and split her blocks now
And we’ll stretch her luff, boys
And that’ll be enough, boys
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
La piccola Nancy Dawson ala e vira
si è messa i mutandoni di flanella ala e vira
così dice il nostro nostromo, ala e vira
con me tira su! ala e vira
II
Piccola Betty Picker (Baker)
scappata con un quacchero/ credo che la mamma non riesca a dimenticarla
III
La piccola Susy Skinner
diceva di essere una principiante
e lo preferisce alla cena
IV
La piccola Kitty Carson
è scappata con il parroco
e adesso ha un pargoletto
V
La piccola Dolly Docker
si lava in un secchio
è una mignotta ma non lo sembra
VI
La piccola Sally Racket
si è impegnata la mia nuova giubba
e non se n’è mai pentita
VII
Su miei galletti da combattimento
su e ??  i suoi bozzelli
 e orziamo ragazzi
e basta così, ragazzi

Sissy Bounce

The rappers Freedia and Katey have integrated the text of the sea shanty rambling with rhymes and adding a hint of sissy bounce, in New Orleans style.
I rappers Freedia e Katey hanno integrato il testo della sea shanty andando a ruota libera con le rime e aggiungendo un pizzico di sissy bounce, in stile New Orleans.

Katey Red & Big Freedia with Akron Family in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/sallyracket.html
http://www.cobbersbushband.com/haul_em_away.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72326
http://www.wareham-whalers.org.uk/words/CD_words_pdf/Haul_Er_Away.pdf
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/cheerily.htm

Boney was a warrior

Leggi in italiano

A sea shanty  originally born as a street ballad on the Napoleonic wars: Napoleon embodied the hopes for independence and the revolutionary demands of the European populations and the American colonies (Ireland in the lead); loved by the poorer layers as well as by intellectuals, it is the romantic hero par excellence, in its greatness and its fall. Nowadays, no one siding with Napoleon, but two centuries before, the spirits flared up for him!

Napoleone Bonaparte

SEA SHANTY VERSION

AL Lloyd wrote “A short drag shanty. These simple shanties were uses when only a few strong pulls were needed, as in boarding tacks and sheets and bunting up a sail in furling, etc. Boney was popular both in British and American vessels and in one American version Bonaparte is made to cross the Rocky Mountains.”: there are many text versions that all portray the victories and defeats of Napoleon in a few lines. The melody recalls the Breton maritime song “Jean François de Nantes” (with text in French)
C’est Jean François de Nantes OUE, OUE, OUE
Gabier sur la fringante Oh mes bouées Jean François
(here)
The adventure “Asterix in Corsica” pays homage to the shanty giving the name Boneywasawarriorwayayix to the chief of the resistance in Corsica

Paul Clayton


Boney(1) was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A warrior, a tarrier(2),
John François (3)
Boney fought the Prussians,
Boney fought the Russians.
Boney went to Moscow,
across the ocean across the storm
Moscow was a-blazing
And Boney was a-raging.
Boney went to Elba
Boney he came back again.
Boney went to Waterloo
There he got his overthrow.
Boney he was sent away
Away in Saint Helena
Boney broke his heart and died
Away in Saint Helena

NOTES
1) Boney diminutive for Napoleon. The origin of the name is uncertain may mean “the Lion of Naples”, the first illustrious name was that of Cardinal Napoleone Orsini (at the time of Pope Boniface VIII)
2) terrier = mastiff
3) or Jonny Franswor! quote from the Breton maritime song Jean-François de Nantes

.. the punk-rock version with irony
Jack Shit in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006

I
Boney(1) was a warrior
A warrior a terrier(2)
Boney beat the Prussians
The Austrians, the Russians
Boney went to school in France
He learned to make the Russians dance
Boney marched to Moscow
Across the Alps through ice and snow.
II
Boney was a Frenchy man
But Boney had to turn again
So he retreated back again
Moscow was in ruins then
He beat the Prussians squarely
He whacked the English nearly
He licked them in Trafalgar’s Bay(1)
Carried his main topm’st away
III
Boney went a cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian(2)
Boney went to Saint Helen’s
He never came back again
They sent him into exile
He died on Saint Helena’s Isle
Boney broke his heart and died
In Corsica he wished he stayed

NOTES
1) The battle of Trafalgar saw the British outnumbered but Nelson’s unconventional maneuver (a position called in military jargon to T) displaced the enemy line up arranged in a long line (the excellent study in see), the only blow inflicted by the French was the death of Nelson. England was an unequaled naval power for the French and the Spanish, so Napoleon renounced the invasion of Great Britain who became the mistress of the seas until the First World War
2) the ship that brought Napoleon into exile on Saint Helena was Bellerephon but the name was crippled in Billy Ruffian or Billy Ruff’n by his sailors not sufficiently well-known to appreciate the references to Greek mythology.

JOHN SHORT VERSION


The authors write in the short Sharp Shanties project notes “Short’s words were few—a mere two and a half verses—but sufficient to indicate that his, like every other version of the shanty, essentially followed Napoleon Bonaparte’s life story to a greater or lesser extent depending on the length of the job in hand (although, as Colcord points out, some versions introduced inventive variations on his life). We have simply borrowed some (of the true) verses from other versions—but by no means all that were available!.. Perhaps, we are again dealing with a shanty that changed its purpose—Jackie has chosen a slower rendition which may be more appropriate to the time. Sharp noted: “Mr. Short sang ‘Bonny’ not ’Boney’, which is the more usual pronunciation; while his rendering of ’John’ was something between the French ’Jean’ and the English ’John’.” (tratto da qui)

Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2

Boney was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A bulling fighting tarrier,
John François
First he fought the Russians
then he fought the Prussians.
Boney went to Moscow,
Moscow was on fire oh.
We licked him in Trafalgar’s
Billy ??
Boney went to Elba
he came back to make another show
Boney went to Waterloo
and than he maked his overthrow.
Boney went to a-cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian.
Boney went to Saint Helena
Boney he didn’t get back
Boney broke his heart and died
in Corsica he should stay
Boney was a general
A ruddy, snotty general.

An interesting version in the folk environment comes from Maddy Prior who sings it like a nursery rhyme with the cannon shots and the drum roll in the background
Maddy Prior from Ravenchild 1999


Boney was a warrior
Wey, hey, ah
A warrior, a terrier
John François
He planned a distant enterprise
A great and distant enterprise.
He is off to fight the Russian bear
He plans to drive him from his lair.
They left with banners all ablaze
The heads of Europe stood amazed.
He thinks he’ll beat the Russkies
And the bonny bunch of roses. (1)

NOTES
1) english soldiers

FRENCH SHANTY: Jean-François de Nantes

Les Naufragés live

C’est Jean-François de Nantes
Oué, oué, oué,
Gabier de la Fringante
Oh ! mes bouées, Jean-François
Débarque de la campagne
Fier comme un roi d’Espagne
En vrac dedans sa bourse
Il a vingt mois de course
Une montre, une chaîne
Qui vaut une baleine
Branl’bas chez son hôtesse
Carambole et largesses
La plus belle servante
L’emmène dans la soupente
En vida la bouteille
Tout son or appareille
Montre et chaîne s’envolent
Attrape la vérole
A l’hôpital de Nantes
Jean-François se lamente
Et les draps de sa couche
Déchire avec sa bouche
Il ferait de la peine
Même à son capitaine
Pauvr’ Jean-François de Nantes
Gabier de la Fringante.

LINK
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/boney-was-a-warrior/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/boney.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boney.html http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/boneywas.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=84540 https://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=1560890
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/french.htm

Lark in the Morning

Leggi in italiano

The irish song “The Lark in the Morning” is mainly found in the county of Fermanagh (Northern Ireland): the image is rural, portrayed by an idyllic vision of healthy and simple country life; a young farmer who plows the fields to prepare them for spring sowing, is the paradigm of youthful exaltation, its exuberance and joie de vivre, is compared to the lark as it sails flying high in the sky in the morning. Like many songs from Northern Ireland it is equally popular also in Scotland.
The point of view is masculine, with a final toast to the health of all the “plowmen” (or of the horsebacks, a task that in a large farm more generally indicated those who took care of the horses) that they have fun rolling around in the hay with some beautiful girls, and so they demonstrate their virility with the ability to reproduce.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners

Alex Beaton with a lovely Scottish accent

The Quilty (Swedes with an Irish heart)

CHORUS
The lark in the morning, she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy, she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy, he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing, over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,, she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing, then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home, from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green, and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble, all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”,  this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks, they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice, how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble, all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy as a prince or a king
NOTES
1) The lark is a melodious sparrow that sings from the first days of spring and already at the first light of dawn; it is a terrestrial bird which, however, once safely in flight, rises almost vertically into the sky, launching a cascade of sounds similar to a musical crescendo.
Then, closed the wings, he lets himself fall like a dead body until he touches the ground and immediately rises again, starting to sing again . see more
2) blade= boy, term used in ancient ballads to indicate a skilled swordsman
3) The story’s backgroung is that of the season of haymaking, starting in May, when farmers went to make hay, that is to cut the tall grass, with the scythe, putting it aside as fodder for livestock and courtyard’s animals . While hay cutting was a mostly masculine task, women and children used the rake to collect grass in large piles, which were then loaded onto the cart through the use of pitchforks.. see more

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, from Paddy Tunney (only I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), the most extensive version comes from the Sussex Copper family, but Lisa further changes some verses.

I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may

 

THE ENGLISH VERSION

This version was collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1904 as heard by Ms. Harriet Verrall of Monk’s Gate, Horsham in Sussex, but already circulated in the nineteenth-century broadsides and then reported in Roy Palmer’s book “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Became into the English folk music circuit in the 60s the song was recorded in 1971 by the English folk rock group Steeleye Span with the voice of Maddy Prior.

The refrain is similar to that of the previous irish version, but here the situation is even more pastoral and almost Shakespearean with the shepherdess and the plowman who are surprised by the morning song of the lark, but with the reversed parts: he who tells her to stay in his arms, because there is still the evening dew, but she who replies that the sun is now shining and even the lark has risen in flight. The name of the peasant is Floro and derives from the Latin Fiore.

Steeleye Span from Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior  from Arthur The King – 2001

I
“Lay still my fond shepherd and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro, it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows where the grass is all cut down.

NOTES
1)plow the field but also plow a complacent girl

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

“Lark in the morning” is a jig mostly performed with banjo or bouzouki or mandolin or guitar, but also with pipes, whistles or flutes, fiddles ..
An anecdote reported by Peter Cooper says that two violinists had challenged one evening to see who was the best, only at dawn when they heard the song of the lark, they agreed that the sweetest music was that of the morning lark. Same story told by the piper Seamus Ennis but with the The Lark’s March tune

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely uilleann pipes with Alan Murray guitar

Peter Browne uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

LINK
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62

Sailor’s farewell: on the sailor’s side!

Leggi in italiano

A further variant of “Sailor’s Farewell” is titled “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy” (aka “Swansea Town,” and “The Holy Ground”) found in England, Ireland, Australia, Canada, and the United States. It’s developed on twice directions, on the one hand it’s the typical and cheerful sea shanty, sometimes rough and with a lot of drink, and on the other it becomes a more intimate and fragile vein, which reflects on the solitude and danger of the sea. In these versions the sailor is enlisted in the Royal Navy.

Copper Family: Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy

Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy is one of the best-known songs from the repertoire of the Copper Family. It was published in the first issue of the Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol. 1, No. 1, in 1899, a version also released in Australia and entitled “Lovely Nancy”, in which it is only the handsome sailor who speaks during the separation on the shore.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 from Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger from a free session in front of the pub for “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”

ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) In the part of dialogue ometted Nancy wants to dress up as a sailor to go with him.
3) the reference is always to broadside ballad version in which our johnny (slang term for sailor) has enlisted in the Royal Navy and wants Nancy to stay home waiting for him.

AMERICAN/ IRISH VERSION: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan from American Stranger 1997 “I learned this version from the Max Hunter Collection. Hunter was a traveling salesman and amateur folksong collector from Springfield, Missouri, who amassed an impressive number of field recordings from the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks. When I was a teenager I learned many songs from the cassette tapes of his collection that were housed in the Springfield Public Library.
Hunter recorded this song in 1959 from Bertha Lauderdale, of Fayetteville, Arkansas. She had learned the song from her grandfather, who, in turn, had learned it from his grandmother, when “he was a young child in Ireland.” Since I recorded the song on American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, and Pete Coe have all added it to their repertoires.”

Altan from Local Ground, 2005

ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) hearts of oak rerefers to the wood from which British warships were generally made during the age of sail. The “Heart of oak” is the strongest central wood of the tree.

000brgcf
Sailor’s farewell

Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

Fair Annie and Gregory

La ballata tradizionale conosciuta comunemente con il titolo di Lord Gregory appartiene ad una family songs cioè un gruppo di canzoni dalla matrice comune in cui il tema si svolge sfaccettandosi in varie angolature.
Nella tragica ballata si narra di un amore abbandonato con tre protagonisti e alcuni risvolti magici: lei (Anna, a volte figlia di re), lui (Lord Gregory) e la madre di lui, con Anna o la madre di Lord Gregory nel ruolo di una fata-strega incantatrice.  La ballata riprende un racconto popolare di origine medievale detto “accused queen” (vedi parte introduttiva)

VERSIONE SCOZZESE: THE LASS OF ROCH ROYAL

Il gruppo principale riporta il titolo “The Lass of Roch Royal” ma anche i titoli alternativi “Lord Gregory”, “Fair Annie and Gregory”, “Love Gregor”, “Anne Gregory”.
La versione più antica (Child # 71 versione A, Libro di canzoni manoscritto di Elizabeth Cochrane), ha una storia preliminare in cui Isabella di Rochroyal in sogno vede il luogo dove si trova Lord Gregory, al mattino fa sellare il suo cavallo e galoppa fino al castello del suo amante. Durante il tragitto incontra una comitiva con la quale scambia una conversazione apparentemente enigmatica
VI
‘O whether is this the first young may,
That lighted and gaed in;
Or is this the second young may,
That neer the sun shined on?
Or is this Fair Isabell of Roch Royall,
Banisht from kyth and kin.’
VII
‘O I am not the first young may,
That lighted and gaed in;
Nor neither am I the second young may,
That neer the sun shone on;
VIII
‘But I’m Fair Isabell of Roch Royall
Banisht from kyth and kin;
I’m seeking my true-love Gregory,
And I woud I had him in.’

Secondo David C. Fowler nel suo “An Accused Queen in “The Lass of Roch Royal”” in The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 71, No. 282 (Oct. – Dec., 1958)
“Are you the young maid,” they ask, “that visits Gregory openly during the day? Or are you the one that slips in to see him at night? Or are you the one [i.e., Isabell of Rochroyall] that he got into trouble?” Understanding the questions in this way, it is immediately apparent 1) that Gregory is (at least allegedly) a ladies’ man, 2) that the three maids represent steps up (or down) the ladder to his affections, and 3) that Isabell’s plight is well known. But what motivates the company to ask such questions? On the assumption that they recognize her as Isabell, which seems likely in context, the most that can be said is that they do not appear to be favorably disposed toward the girl.

Sempre nella Versione A della storia la madre vuole allontanare la fanciulla con l’inganno
“Love Gregory, he is not at home
But he is to the sea;
If you have any word to him,
I pray you leave ‘t with me.”

Appena viene a sapere dalla ragazza che è incinta afferma di volere prendersene cura solo se lei non rivelerà a nessun il nome del padre fino al ritorno di Lord Gregory, ma la fanciulla risponde
“I’ll set my foot on the ship-board,
God send me wind and more!
For there’s never a woman shall bear a son
Shall make my heart so sore.”

La versione in ‘The Bonny Lass of Lochroyan, or Lochroyen,’ Manuscripts e Scottish Songs di Herd 1776 (Child # 71 versione B) è abbastanza simile alla Versione D (Jamieson-Brown Manuscript, fol. 27; Jamieson’s Popular Ballads, I, 36), quella più diffusa ovvero la versione standard.

Nella versione più estesa della ballata veniamo a sapere già dalle prime strofe che a rispondere alle richieste di Anna è la madre (chiamata false mother). Eppure Anna risponde come se avesse parlato Lord Gregory e quindi è presumibile che la madre abbia impersonato Lord Gregory (un’imitazione? Un incantesimo?)

Gericault-shipwreck

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl in The English and Scottish Popular Ballads Vol. 2 Child Ballads

La versione originale (vedi) è di 32 strofe ridotte da Ewan a 18 (vedi).


I
“Oh wha will lace my shoes sae sma’(1)
And wha will glove my hand?
And wha will lace my middle sae jimp
Wi’ my new-made linen band?
II
“Wha will kaim my yellow hair
Wi’ my new siller kaim
And wha will faither my young son
Till Lord Gregory come hame?
III
“But I will get a bonnie boat
And I will sail the sea
For I maun gang to Lord Gregory
Since he canna come hame to me
IV
“Oh row ye boat, my mariners
And bring me to dry land
For yonder I see my love’s castel
Close by the saut sea strand
V
“Oh open the door, Lord Gregory
Open and let me in
For the wind blows through my yellow hair
And I am shivering to the chin”
VI
“Awa’, awa’ ye wile woman
Some ill death may ye dee
Ye’re but a witch or a wild warlock
Or mermaid o’ the sea”
VII
“I’m neither a witch nor a wild warlock
Nor mermaid o’ the sea
But I’m fair Annie o’ Roch Royal
then, open the door to me
VIII
“Oh dinna ye mind, Lord Gregory(2)
When ye sat at the wine
We changed the rings frae our fingers
And I can show thee thine
IX
“Oh, dinna ye mind, Lord Gregory
When in my faither’s ha’
‘Twas there ye got your will o’ me
And that was worst o’ a’(3)”
X
“Awa’, awa’, ye wile woman
For here ye sanna win in
Gae droon ye in the saut sea
Or hang on the gallow’s pin”
XI
When the cock did craw and the day did daw’
And the sun began to peep
Then up did rise Lord Gregory
And sair, sair did he weep
XII
“I dreamt a dream, my mither dear
The thocht o’t gars me greet
I dreamed fair Annie o’ Roch Royal
Lay cauld deid at my feet”
XIII
“Gin it be Annie o’ Roch Royal(4)
That gars ye mak’ this din
She stood a’ nicht at our ha’ door
But I didna let her in”
XIV
“Oh wae betide ye, ill woman
Some ill death may ye dee
That ye wadna be letten poor Annie in
Or else hae waukened me”
XV
He’s gane doon tae yon sea shore
As fast as he could fare
he saw fair Annie in her boat
And the wind it tossed her sair
XVI
The wind blew loud and the sea grew rough
And the boat was dashed on shore
Fair Annie floated upon the sea
But her young son rose no more
XVII
Lord Gregory tore his yellow hair
And made his heavy moan
Fair Annie lay deid at his feet
But his bonnie young son was gane
XVIII
“Oh wae betide ye, cruel mither
and ill death may ye dee
That ye couldna hae letten fair Annie in
When she came sae far tae me”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Oh chi allaccerà le mie scarpine (1)
e chi mi metterà i guanti?
Chi mi allaccerà bene il busto
con nuove fasce di lino?
II
Chi mi pettinerà i biondi capelli
con il mio nuovo pettine d’argento
e chi sarà il padre di mio figlio
finchè Lord Gregory ritornerà a casa?”
III
“Ma io preparerò una bella barca
e salperò per il mare
per andare da Lord Gregory
poichè  lui non può venire da me”
IV
“Oh vogate, miei marinai
e portatemi sulla terra ferma
che laggiù vedo il castello del mio amore, avvicinatevi alla battigia”
V
“Oh apri la porta, Lord Gregory
apri e fammi entrare
che il vento soffia tra i miei
biondi capelli
e io sbatto i denti”
VI
“Via, via o donna incantatrice
che puoi fare ammalare fino alla morte,
sei una strega del mare o una maga oscura, o una sirena del mare”
VII
“Non sono una strega del mare o una maga oscura, nè una sirena del mare,
io sono la bella Annie di Roch Royal
così aprimi la porta”
VIII
“Ti ricordi, Lord Gregory (2)
quando eri seduto a bere vino
ci siamo scambiati gli anelli
alle dita e posso mostrarti il tuo”
IX
“Ti ricordi, Lord Gregory
quando nella sala di mio padre
hai fatto ciò che hai voluto di me e quella fu la cosa peggiore tra tutte (3)”
X
“Via vattene donna incantatrice
che tu non vincerai qui,
vai ad annegarti nel mare
o ad appenderti sulla forca”
XI
Quando il gallo cantò
spuntò l’alba
e il sole fece capolino
allora si alzò Lord Gregory
e triste si mise a piangere
XII
“Ho fatto un sogno, cara madre,
e al solo pensiero piango
ho sognato la bella Annie di Roch Royal
che giaceva morta ai miei piedi”
XIII
“Se è Annie di Roch Royal (4)
che ti ha dato questo dolore
è stata tutta la notte fuori dalla porta
ma io non l’ho fatta entrare”
XIV
“Oh guai a te, donna pazza
che tu possa ammalarti fino alla morte
che non hai lasciato entrare la povera Annie e nemmeno mi hai svegliato”
XV
Egli andò fino alla riva del mare
più velocemente che potè
e vide la bella Annie sulla sua barca
e il vento che scuoteva le sue vele
XVI
Il vento soffiava forte e il mare s’ingrossò
e la barca naufragò sulla riva
la bella Annie galleggiava sul mare
ma il suo bambino non riemerse più.
XVII
Lord Gregory si strappava i biondi capelli e gridava il suo triste lamento
la bella Annie era morta ai suoi piedi e il suo bel bambino era scomparso.
XVIII
“Oh guai a te, madre crudele
che ti possa ammalare fino alla morte
perchè non hai lasciato entrare la bella Annie
quando è venuta da me”

NOTE
1) Anna si chiede “Chi si prenderà cura di me?” ma il montaggio di questa parte è alterato rispetto alle prime versioni della ballata (e in particolare in The lass of Ocram), in cui la fanciulla prima si reca al castello, poi chiede di entrare e alla richiesta di dimostrare la sua identità cita i tre pegni scambiati con Lord Gregory. Quando la madre viene a sapere che la ragazza è incinta (o che ha partorito un bambino) la scaccia in malo modo. Allora Anna chiede chi si prenderà cura di lei e del bambino e ottiene come risposta che saranno i suoi parenti ad occuparsi di lei mentre per il figlio:
And let God be father of your child,
For Lord Gregory is none
2) in questa versione siamo portati a credere che sia Lord Gregory a rispondere ad Anne e invece apprendiamo che è stata la madre solo nella XI strofa
3) la frase può essere più compiutamente compresa alla luce di quanto riportato nella The Lass of Ocram” (vedi) in cui la fanciulla ricorda a Lord Gregory dei tre “pegni” (three tokens) che si sono scambiati: il primo una camicia di preziosa tela Olandese contro quella di tela scozzese donata da lui; il secondo gli anelli quello di lei di oro fino, quello di lui di stagno; il terzo la verginità
One night in my fathers hall,
Where you stole my maidenhead,
Which was the worst of all.
Si tratta simbolicamente di una contrapposizione tra vero e falso amore
4) nella versione la madre risponde al figlio per giustificare il suo comportamento
XXIII
‘O there was a woman stood at the door,
Wi a bairn intill her arms,
But I woud na lat her within the bowr,
For fear she had done you harm.’

Dalle registrazioni sul campo: ASCOLTA

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: LORD GREGORY

In questa versione della ballata, diffusa anche in diverse versioni testuali da Maddy Prior, Anna diventa la figlia del re di Cappoquin o Capelkin (Irlanda sud contea di Waterford). All’ingresso del castello, le viene detto che Lord Gregory non c’è, perchè è andato in Scozia a portare a casa la sua nuova sposa.
ASCOLTA Fiona Kelleher (strofe I, II, VI e ripete I) intensa e sussurrata l’interpretazione di Fiona intrecciata con ossessive note di pianoforte e le cupe ombre del  contrabbasso suonato con l’archetto


I
I am a King’s daughter come
straight from Cappoquin(1),
In search of Lord Gregory,
pray God I’ll find him.
The rain beats at my yellow locks,
the dew wets me still,
The babe is cold in my arms, love,
Lord Gregory let me in.
II
Lord Gregory is not here
and he henceforth can’t be seen,
For he’s gone to bonny Scotland
to bring home his new queen.
Leave now these windows
and likewise this hall,
For it’s deep in the sea
you will find your downfall.
III
“Who’ll shoe my babe’s little feet?
Who’ll put gloves on her hand?
Who will tie my babe’s middle
With a long linen band?
Who’ll comb my babe’s yellow hair
With an ivory comb?
Who will be my babe’s father
Till Lord Gregory comes home?
IV
Do you remember, love Gregory,
That night in Callander
Where we changed pocket handkerchiefs,
And me against my will?
For yours was pure linen, love,
And mine but coarse cloth;
For yours cost a guinea, love,
And mine but one groat(2).
V
Do you remember, love Gregory,
That night in Callander
Where we changed rings on our fingers,
And me against my will?
For yours was pure silver, love,
And mine was but tin;
For yours cost a guinea, love,
And mine but one cent.”
VI
Do you remember, love Gregory,
that night in Cappoquin?
You stole away my maidenhead
and sore against my will.
And I’ll leave now these windows
and likewise this hall,
For it’s deep in the sea
I will find my downfall.
VII
“And my curse on you, Mother,
My curse being sore!
Sure, I dreamed the girl I love
came a-knocking at my door.”
“Sleep down you foolish son,
Sleep down and sleep on:
For it’s long ago that weary girl
Lies drownin’ in the sea.”
VIII
“Well go saddle me the black horse,
The brown, and the gray;
Go saddle me the best horse
In my stable to-day!
And I’ll range over mountains,
Over valleys so wide,
Till I find the girl I love
And I’ll lay by her side.”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Sono la figlia del re arrivata direttamente da Cappoquin (1)
a cercare Lord Gregory
e per Dio lo troverò.
La pioggia cade sui miei riccioli biondi
e anche la rugiada mi bagna,
il bambino ha freddo tra le mie braccia,
Lord Gregory, fammi entrare.
II
Lord Gregory non è qui
e non può ricevere visite,
perchè è andato nella bella Scozia
per portare a casa la sua nuova sposa.
Allontanati adesso dalle finestre
e anche da questo castello
perchè nel fondo del mare
troverai la tua rovina.
III
“Chi allaccerà le scarpe alla mia bimba?
Chi le metterà i guanti?
Chi fascerà bene il busto della bimba
con lunghe fasce di lino?
Chi pettinerà i biondi capelli della bimba con un pettine d’avorio?
Chi sarà il padre di mia figlia
finchè Lord Gregory ritornerà a casa?
IV
Ti ricordi Lord Gregory
quella notte a Callander
quando ci siamo scambiati
i fazzoletti da taschino
contro la mia volontà?
Perchè il tuo era di puro lino, amore
e il mio solo di tela grossolana,
però  il tuo costava una ghinea, amore
e il mio solo pochi penny (2)
V
Ti ricordi, Gregory caro,
quella notte a Callander
quando ci siamo scambiati gli anelli al dito
contro la mia volontà?
Il tuo era di argento puro, caro
e il mio solo di latta,
il tuo costava una ghinea
e il mio solo un centesimo.
VI
Ti ricordi, Gregory caro,
quella notte a Cappoquin?
Hai preso la mia verginità
e contro la mia volontà
e mi allontanerò adesso dalle finestre
come pure da questo castello
perchè nel fondo del mare
troverò la mia rovina.”
VII
“Ti maledico, madre,
ti maledico con dolore!
Ho sognato la donna che amo
che veniva a bussare alla mia porta.”
“Dormi figlio, sogni pazzie,
rimettiti a dormire
è da un pezzo che quella ragazza sventurata è annegata in fondo al mare”
VII
“sellatemi il cavallo nero
quello baio e il grigio
sellatemi il cavallo migliore
che c’è oggi nella stalla
e io cercherò per i monti
e le ampie vallate
finchè troverò la donna che amo
e mi stenderò al suo fianco”

NOTE
1) anche Callander
2) goat= moneta inglese d’argento dal valore di quattro penny.
FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/lordgregory.html

BRING US IN GOOD ALE

Bring Us in Good Ale è un wassail song di origine medievale.
Trascrizioni del brano risalgono al 1460 (fonte Bodleian Library di Oxford), il canto era nel repertorio medievale dei menestrelli girovaghi che intrattenevano il pubblico dei villaggi durante le feste e i matrimoni, ed è stato incluso in una raccolta di canti e carols di Natale al tempo di re Enrico VI stampato nel 1847dalla Percy Society di Londra “Songs and Carols”  a cura di Thomas Wright.

E’ un’evidente parodia di The Salutation Carol (carol dell’Annunciazione) i menestrelli infatti  iniziavano in tono serio con “Nowell, Nowell, Nowell this is the salutation of the Angel Gabriel” (eventualmente con qualche strofa del carol) e poi proseguivano con l’invocazione “Portaci della buona birra per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!“, una dimostrazione delle licenziosità che si prendevano i questuanti dopo aver bevuto troppa buona birra, ma anche del clima festoso e godereccio delle più antiche feste del Solstizio d’Inverno (Midwinter o Yule e i Saturnalia). I questuanti non vogliono carne, pane, uova o dolci, ma chiamano a gran voce della buona birra, indirettamente così facendo rendono grazie alla Madonna per l’abbondanza di cibo della stagione.

Ascoltiamo la versione medievale dei Night Watch con “The Salutation Carol” come incipit (continua)

Maddy Prior ha registrato diverse verioni del brano sia con Tim Hart  che con la Carnival Band

Green Matthews (Chris Green & Sophie Matthews) in A Medieval Christmas 2012 (vedi)Maddy Prior & Tim Hart in Summer Solstice 1996 e in Haydays 2003 con la sola voce di Maddy in una versione più lenta e con diversi versi saltati

Young Tradition in The Holly Bears the Crown 1995


Bring us in good ale (1),
and bring us in good ale;
For our Blessed Lady’s sake,
bring us in good ale.
I
Bring us in no brown bread,
for that is made of bran,
Nor bring us in no white bread,
for therein is no game(2);
Bring us in no roastbeef,
for there are many bones(3),
But bring us in good ale,
for that goes down at once
II
Bring us in no bacon,
for that is passing fat,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us enough of that;
Bring us in no mutton,
for that is often lean,
Nor bring us in no tripes,
for they be seldom clean
III
Bring us in no eggs,
for there are many shells,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us nothing else;
Bring us in no butter,
for therein are many hairs;
Nor bring us in no pig’s flesh,
for that will make us boars
IV
Bring us in no puddings,
for therein is all God’s good;
Nor bring us in no venison,
for that is not for our blood(4);
Bring us in no capon’s flesh,
for that is often dear(5);
Nor bring us in no duck’s flesh,
for they slobber in the mere
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Portaci della buona birra,
portaci della buona birra
per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!
I
Non portarci del pane nero
perché è fatto di crusca,
non portarci del pane bianco
perché non è dei nostri.
Non portarci del manzo
perché ci sono troppe ossa,
ma portaci della buona birra,
che vada giù d’un fiato.
II
Non portarci della pancetta,
perché contiene molto grasso,
ma portaci della buona birra
e daccene abbastanza.
Non portarci del montone,
perché è spesso magro,
non portarci la trippa
perché raramente è pulita bene.
III
Non portarci uova
perché ci sono troppi gusci,
ma portaci della buona birra
e non darci altro.
Non portarci il burro
perché ci sono troppi peli,
non portarci carne di maiale
per quello che ci rendono i cinghiali.
IV
Non portarci dolci,
perché sono un bene di Dio,
non ci portare del cervo,
perché non è per la gente comune. Non portarci carne di cappone
per quello che ci è più caro,
non portarci carne di anatra
perché sguazza nel fango

NOTE
1) Nelle Isole Britanniche  si producevano birre non luppolate dette ALE; erano infatti le birre provenienti dal “continente” a contenere luppolo e quindi distinte con una parola diversa BEER! continua
2) trovato scritto anche come gain o grain, nella versione manoscritta invece come game: oltre a gioco, partita in senso colloquiale il termine si usa per dire “essere dei nostri” qui da intendersi come cibo che non si trova alla mensa della gente comune.
3) la carne di manzo non era consumata abitualmente nel Medioevo perché i bovini erano utilizzati nel lavoro dei campi e non allevati per la carne, quindi l’animale era ucciso e macellato solo una volta diventato molto vecchio e ossuto con la carne dura
4) our blood: letteralmente “nostro sangue”, la caccia al cervo era riservata al re e quindi la carne di cervo era mangiata solo dalla gente di sangue nobile.
5) il cappone è un gallo castrato per renderlo più grasso e più tenero

FONTI
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/bring_us_in_good_ale.htm
https://www.traditioninaction.org/Cultural/Music_P_files/P036_Ale.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/goodale.html

HIND HORN FROM EDINBURGH TOWN

Hind Horn è un’antica ballata che nasce dal romance “King Horn”  scritto alla fine del XIII secolo in proto-inglese in cui si narra dell’eroico re Horn, originariamente un feroce e sanguinario incursore vichingo, trasformato in un tipico cavaliere medievale, imbevuto di virtù cavalleresche.
Nella ballata invece prevale il tema amoroso, il quale inaugurerà uno specifico filone delle ballate popolari detto “broken token ballad“: l’uomo andato in guerra, ritorna dopo molti anni e incontra (sotto mentite spoglie) la fidanzata o la moglie, e la sottopone ad un test per avere la prova della sua fedeltà. Il modello archetipo è probabilmente quello di Ulisse e Penelope. (vedi prima parte)

L’ANELLO MAGICO

Un giovane uomo, spesso uno scozzese, Hind Horn, ha servito il re andando per mare per sette anni, nel frattempo si innamora di Jean, la figlia del re. Il re ad un certo punto e per motivi non chiariti, allontana da corte Hind Horn mandandolo a combattere oltremare per altri sette anni. Prima della separazione l’innamorata gli dona un anello che contiene una pietra magica, la quale diventa opaca in caso d’infedeltà. Quando la pietra perde la sua brillantezza il giovane corre a corte e scopre che Jane si è sposata con un altro; travestendosi e camuffandosi da mendicante con la scusa di brindare per la sposa getta nel bicchiere l’anello avuto in dono. Subito Jean lo riconosce e  scappa via con Hind Horn.
La ballata, nota anche sotto i titoli di “The Pale Ring” o “The Jeweled Ring”, è stata preservata nelle versioni più complete in Scozia e Irlanda ma, grazie agli emigranti irlandesi, è approdata anche nel New Brunswick (Canada).
Le versioni sono molte come pure le melodie associate, non si trovano tuttavia molte registrazioni in merito.

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

In Dan Milner and Paul Kaplan Songs of England, Ireland and Scotland, 1983 Oak, New York è così riportato: “Source: Text collated from various sources; tune from G. Greig and and A. Keith, Last Leaves of the Traditional Ballad and Ballad Airs.
Questa versione ambientata in Scozia è contraddistinta dall’intercalare delle frasi nonsense e dal ritornello And the birk and the broom blooms bonnie-O

ASCOLTA Rosaleen Gregory (da qui)
ASCOLTA
 su Spotify Ewan MacColl  in Ballads 1956


Near Edinburgh town was a young child born
(With a high loo low and a high loo  land)
His name was called young Hind Horn
(And the birk and the broom(1) blooms bonnie-O)
Seven years he served the King,
All for the sake of his daughter Jean.
The King an angry man was he
And he sent young Hind Horn to the sea,
She’s given to him a golden ring
With seven diamonds set therein.
“When this ring grows pale and wan
You may know that my love is gone”.
One day he looked his ring upon
And he knew she loved another man.
He’s left the sea and come to land
And there he’s met an old beggar man.
“What’s news, what news doth thee betide?”
“No news but the Princess Jean’s a bride.”
“Will you give me thy begging tweed
And I’ll give you my riding steed?”
The beggar he was bound for to ride
And Hind Horn he was bound for the bride.
When he came to the King’s own gate
He sought a drink for Hind Horn’s sake(2).
He drank the wine and dropped the ring
And bade them take it to the Lady Jean.
“Got you this ring by sea or land
Or got you this from a dead man’s hand?”
“Not from sea and not from land
But I got it from thy milk-white hand.”
“I’ll cast off my gown of brown
And I’ll follow you from town to town.”
“You needn’t cast off your gowns of brown,
For I’ll make you the lady of many a town.”
“I’ll cast off my dress of red(3)
And I’ll follow you and beg my bread.”
“You needn’t cast off your dress of red,
For I’ll maintain you with wine and bread.”
The bridgegroom had the bride first wed
But young Hind Horn took her first to bed.(4)
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
Vicino a Edimburgo nacque un bambino
(With a high loo low and a high loo  land)
che venne chiamato giovane Hind Horn. (e la betulla e la ginestra (1) fioriscono belle)
Servì il Re per sette anni
per amore verso la figlia Jean.
Il re si arrabbiò
e mandò il giovane Hind Horn per mare,
lei gli diede un anello d’oro
con sette diamanti incastonati.
“Quando l’anello è pallido e opaco,
tu saprai che il mio amore è svanito.»
Un giorno egli guardò l’anello
e seppe che lei amava un altro uomo.
Riprese il mare e approdò a terra
dove incontrò un vecchio mendicante.
«Che notizie, quali sono le notizie di oggi?»
«Solo che la Principessa Jean si è sposata.»
«Mi darai il tuo vestito da mendicante e io ti darò il mio destriero?»
Il mendicante era pronto per cavalcare
e Hind Horn era pronto per
la sposa.
Quando arrivò al cancello del Re
cercò da bere alla salute di Hind Horn (2),
bevve il vino e lasciò cadere l’anello
e ordinò che venisse portato a Lady Jean
«Lo hai trovato navigando o viaggiando per terre?
O lo hai preso dalla mano di un uomo morto?»
«Non lo presi né per mare né per terra,
ma lo ottenni dalla tua bianca mano»
«Metterò l’abito marrone
e ti seguirò di porta in porta.»
«Non c’è bisogno che ti metta l’abito marrone
perchè ti renderò la signora di molte città.»
«Metterò l’abito rosso (3)
e ti seguirò a mendicare il pane.»
«Non c’è bisogno che tu ti metta l’abito rosso
perchè ti manterrò con pane e vino.»
Lo sposo sposò per primo la sposa,
ma il giovane Hind Horn se la portò per primo a letto (4).

NOTE
1) la ginestra con la sua rigogliosa fioritura dorata ha spesso una precisa allusione sessuale nelle ballate. Forse per la forma del fiore che richiama la vulva femminile. Con la ginestra si facevano le scope nel Medioevo così con il termine inglese “broom” si indica entrambi: sulle scope volavano le streghe e la ginestra allude a una sessualità diabolica o quantomeno selvaggia, libera da regole. In genere nelle ballate quanto l’argomento è di natura sessuale vengono utilizzati nomi di erbe e fiori nel ritornello, proprio per avvertire l’ascoltatore. La brughiera è come il “greenwood” è un luogo “fuori legge” fuori dalla società civile dove accadono incontri fatati e illeciti, ma vissuti con una primitiva o primordiale innocenza. Una leggenda, di origine scozzese racconta di un uomo che richiese la “prova d’amore” prima di sposarsi. La ragazza su consiglio di una vecchia saggia, accettò la prova, ma solo se avesse avuto luogo tra i cespugli di ginestra. Accadde che il ragazzo stordito dal profumo dei fiori, cadde ben presto in un sogno profondo. Al risveglio, convinto di aver posseduto la ragazza come voleva, acconsentì alle nozze.
2) in altre versioni (come quella dei Bandoggs) più coerentemente è scritto: He’s sought there a drink for the bridegroom’s sake: al mendicante veniva offerto da bere per brindare alla salute della sposa
3) la principessa è convinta che il suo cavaliere sia caduto in disgrazia e viva come un mendicante. Così dichiara di voler indossare gli abiti del popolo per andare in giro a mendicare con lui. Nelle ballate il marrone e il rosso vengono considerati colori adatti ai mendicanti.  Nei tempi antichi però il rosso era il colore nunziale degli sposi, indossato per evocare la fertilità, poi il Cristianesimo ha voluto che la donna si vestisse di blu, colore che simboleggia la verità e la purezza, e solo a partire dalle nozze della Regina Vittoria nel 1840 iniziò a consolidarsi la tradizione dell’abito bianco per la sposa.
4) Hind Horne è arrivato durante il banchetto nunziale i due si erano già sposati ma non avevano ancora consumato..

Un’ulteriore variante testuale riporta ancora meno strofe e il ritornello è completamente senza senzo con mera funzione d’intercalare:  Hey lililo and a ho lo la seguito da  Hey down and a hey diddle downy
ASCOLTA Bandoggs in Bandoggs 1978

ASCOLTA Maddy Prior in Flesh an Blood 1998 (per il testo qui)

ASCOLTA The Furrow Collective in At Our Next Meeting 2014 (i quali modificano ulteriormente il testo)


Young Hind Horn to the King is gone,
Hey lililo and a ho lo la,
And he’s fell in love with his daughter Jean, Hey down and a hey diddle downy.
She gave to him a golden ring
With three bright diamonds set therein.
“When this ring grows pale and wan
It’s then that you’ll know my love is gone.”
Now the king has sent him o’er the sea
For seven long years in a far country.
One day his ring grew pale and wan
And he knew that she’d loved another man.
So he’s left the sea for his own land
And it’s there that he’s met with a beggar man.
“What news, what news old man doth befall?”
“It’s none save the wedding in the king’s own hall.”
“Cast off, cast off your beggar’s weeds
And I’ll give you my good grey steed.”
Oh it’s when he came to the king’s own gate
He’s sought there a drink for the bridegroom’s sake.
And the bride gave him a glass of wine
And when he’s drunk he’s dropped in the ring.
“Oh got ye this by the sea or the land
Or took ye this from a dead man’s hand?”
“I got it neither by sea nor land
For you gave it to me with your own hand.”
“Oh, I’ll cast off my gown of red
And along with thee I’ll beg my bread.”
“Oh, you need not leave your bridal gown
For I’ll make you the lady of many’s the town.”
Her own bridegroom had her first wed
But young Hind Horn had her first to bed.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
Il giovane Hind Horn è andato dal Re
Hey lililo and a ho lo la,
e si è innamorato di Jean sua figlia.
Hey down and a hey diddle downy.
Lei gli diede un anello d’oro con tre diamanti incastonati.
“Quando l’anello è pallido e opaco,
tu saprai che il mio amore è svanito.”
Il re lo mandò per mare per sette lunghi anni in un paese lontano.
Un giorno il suo anello divenne pallido e opaco
e lui seppe che lei amava un altro uomo.
Riprese il mare e approdò a terra
dove incontrò un vecchio mendicante. «Che notizie, quali sono le notizie di oggi?»
«Solo il matrimonio nel castello del re.» «Togliti il vestito da mendicante e io ti darò il mio valente destriero grigio»
Quando arrivò al cancello del Re
cercò da bere alla salute della sposa,
e la sposa gli diede una coppa di vino
e mentre bevve lui lasciò cadere l’anello.
«Lo hai trovato navigando o viaggiando per terre?
O lo hai preso dalla mano di un uomo morto?»
«Non lo presi né per mare né per terra ma lo ottenni dalla tua bianca mano»
«Mi leverò l’abito rosso
e ti seguirò a mendicare il pane.»
«Non c’è bisogno che ti levi l’abito da sposa
perchè ti farò signora di molte città»
Lo sposo la sposò per primo,
ma il giovane Hind Horn se la portò per primo a letto.

continua la versione irlandese

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/tony.rose/songs/hindhorn.html
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/17-hind-horn.aspx
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=58972
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20082
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/301.html
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/english-and-other-versions-17-hind-horn-.aspx

Bay of Biscay -Willie O

“Willie the Waterboy” (Willie-O) but also “The bay of Biscay” is considered an Irish variant of the ballad “Sweet William and Lady Margaret” (Child Ballad # 77) particularly widespread in Northern Ireland (Donegal)
Little else is there to say being a version handed down mostly orally
“Willie the Waterboy” (Willie-O) ma anche “The bay of Biscay” è considerata una variante irlandese della ballata “Sweet William and Lady Margaret” (Child Ballad # 77) diffusa in particolare nell’Irlanda del Nord (Donegal)
Poco altro c’è da dire essendo una versione tramandata per lo più oralmente 

Sean Cannon

Tim Hart $ Maddy Prior in Folk Songs of Old England Vol 2. , 1969
The album’s sleeve notes commented: An Irish song of the night visiting variety collected by Geoff Woods from James McKinley of Tra-Narossen, Donegal. Like so many of these songs the drowned sailor, after a seven year absence, appears to his girlfriend in the middle of the night; presumably an extension of the belief that unless a body received Christian burial the soul could not rest in peace.

Karan Casey & John Doyle in Exiles Return 2010


I
My William sails
on board the Tender
And where he is I do not know
For seven long years
I’ve been constantly waiting
Since he crossed
the bay of Biscay-O (1).
II
One night as Mary
lay a sleeping
A knock came
to her bedroom door
Crying “Arise, arise,
oh my dearest Mary,
For to earn one glance
of your William-O.”
III
Young Mary rose,
put on her clothing
And to the bedroom door did go
And there she saw
her William standing
His two pale cheeks
as white as snow.
IV
“Oh William dear,
where are those blushes?
Those blushes I knew
long years ago.”
“Oh Mary dear,
the cold clay has them.
I am only the ghost
of your William-O.”
V
“Oh Mary dear,
the dawn is breaking,
Don’t you think
it’s time for me to go?
I’m leaving you quite broken-hearted
For to cross the Bay of Biscay-O.”
VI
“Had I the gold and all the silver,
And all the money in Mexico,
I would grant it all to the king of Erin
Just to bring me back my William-O.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il mio William salpò
a bordo del Tender
e dove sia non lo so
per sette lunghi anni
l’ho atteso continuamente
da quando attraversò
la baia di Biscaglia -oh 
II
Una notte che Mary
giaceva addormentata,
venne a bussare
alla porta della camera dicendo
“Svegliati, svegliati,
mia carissima Mary,
per dare un’occhiata
al tuo William- oh”
III
La giovane Mary si alzò,
si mise le vesti
e alla porta della camera andò
e là vide il suo
William in piedi
con le guance pallide
bianche come la neve
IV
“Oh caro William,
dove sono le tue guance rosa?
Quelle guance che conoscevo
tanti anni fa?”
“Oh cara Mary,
la fredda terra le ha prese,
sono solo il fantasma
del tuo William – oh”
V
“Oh cara Mary,
l’alba si avvicina
non credi che
sia ora per me di andare?
Ti lascerò a malincuore
per attraversare la Baia di Biscaglia”
VI
“Ho oro e argento
e tutto l’oro del Messico
lo darei per intero al Re d’Irlanda 
solo per avere indietro il mio William”

NOTE
1) il luogo in cui si presume sia affogato il bel William

https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/bayofbiscay.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13440

Sailor’s farewell: dalla parte del marinaio!

Read the post in English  

Un’ulteriore variante del “Sailor’s Farewell” è intitolata “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy”ma anche “Swansea Town,” e “The Holy Ground”, ed è diffusa  in Inghilterra, Irlanda, Australia, Canada e Stati Uniti.
Si sviluppa su un duplice registro, da una parte è la tipica e allegra canzone marinaresca, a volte sguaiata e inneggiante alle colossali bevute, e dall’altra assume una vena più intimista e fragile, che riflette sulla solitudine e il pericolo del vita in mare. In queste versioni il marinaio è al servizio della Royal Navy.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY

Dal repertorio tradizionale della Famiglia Copper del Sussex la ballata è stata trascritta nel primo numero del Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol.1, No.1, nel 1899. Una versione diffusa anche in Australia e intitolata “Lovely Nancy”, in cui è solo il bel marinaio a parlare durante la separazione.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 in Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger in una session davanti al pub per la serie “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”


I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
vado in giro per l’oceano, amore
a cercare l’avventura.
Vieni a scambiare l’anello
con me mia cara ragazza,
scambia l’anello con me,
perchè sarà un pegno di vero amore mentre sarò per mare.
II
Quando sarò lontano sul mare
e non saprai dove sono,
dolci lettere ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera,
i segreti del tuo cuore, cara ragazza
sono in cima ai miei pensieri,
perciò resta al sicuro dove
il mio cuore potrà stare di nuovo con te.
III
C’è una forte tempesta in arrivo,
vedi come si raduna tutt’intorno,
mentre noi povere anime sul vasto oceano combattiamo per la corona.
Non ci sarà nulla a proteggerci, amore
o a tenerci lontani dal freddo, nel vasto oceano che dobbiamo affrontare da allegri e coraggiosi marinai.
IV
Ci sono calderai, sarti e calzolai
che dormono russando,
mentre noi povere anime
sul vasto oceano solchiamo
gli abissi.
I nostri ufficiali ci comandano
e perciò dobbiamo ubbidire
aspettandoci in ogni momento
di essere spazzati via.
V
Ma quando le guerre saranno finite
ci sarà la pace in ogni terra
torneremo dalle nostre mogli e famiglie e dalle ragazze che amiamo,
ordineremo da bere allegamente
e spensieratamente  spenderemo i nostri soldi, e quando i soldi saranno finiti riprenderemo il mare con coraggio.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) letteralmente ” tieni il tuo corpo dove il mio cuore potrà stare con te ancora”; manca la parte di dialogo in cui lei dice di voler travestirsi da marinaio per poter andare con lui. Ma il bel Johnny la dissuade dicendole di restare a casa dove lui la saprà al sicuro
3) il rimando è sempre alla versione della broadside ballad il cui il nostro johnny (termine gergale per marinaio) si  si è arruolato nella Royal Navy e vuole che Nancy resti a casa ad aspettarlo.

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA/ IRLANDESE: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan in American Stranger 1997leggiamo nelle note “Ho imparato questa versione dalla raccolta di Max Hunter. Hunter era un venditore ambulante e un collezionista amatoriale di canzoni folk da Springfield, Missouri, che ha raccolto un numero impressionante di registrazioni sul campo dal  Missouri all’ Arkansas Ozarks. Da ragazza ho imparato molte canzoni dalle cassette delle sue registrazioni catalogate nella Biblioteca pubblica di Springfield.
Hunter ha registrato questa canzone nel 1959 da Bertha Lauderdale, di Fayetteville, Arkansas. Aveva imparato la canzone dal nonno che a sua volta l’aveva appresa dalla nonna quando “era un bambino in Irlanda.” Da quando ho registrato la canzone in American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, e Pete Coel’hanno aggiunta nel loro repertorio.”

Altan in Local Ground, 2005


I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
penserò al mio vero amore,
penserò mia cara, a te
II
Scambierai l’anello
con me, amore mio
scambierai l’anello con me?
Sarà un pegno del nostro amore
mentre starò lontano per mare.
III
Quando sarò lontano da casa
e non saprai dove sono,
lettere d’amore ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera.
IV
Quando i contadini
ritornano a casa la sera
racconteranno alle loro ragazze delle belle storie di ciò che hanno fatto
tutto il giorno nei campi
V
Del grano e del fieno
che hanno tagliato
certo, è tutto quello che sanno fare,
mentre noi poveri allegri,
allegri cuori di quercia
dobbiamo navigare  per tutti i mari
VI
E quando ritorneremo di nuovo, amore mio, alla nostra cara terra natia
delle belle storie vi racconteremo
su come abbiamo navigato per gli oceani
VII
E faremo risuonare le birrerie
e rimbombare le taverne
e quando i soldi saranno tutto finiti
torneremo di nuovo per mare.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) hearts of oak espressione marinaresca per le navi costruite nell’età della vela con il legno più forte nella parte più interna dell’albero

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

Napo era un mastino (Boney was a warrior sea shanty)

Read the post in English

Una sea shanty nata inizialmente come street ballad sulle guerre napoleoniche: Napoleone incarnò le speranze d’indipendenza e le istanze rivoluzionarie delle popolazioni europee e delle Colonie americane (Irlanda in testa); amato dagli strati più poveri come dagli intellettuali è l’eroe romantico per eccellenza, nella sua grandezza e nella sua caduta. Oggi più nessuno parteggia per Napoleone ma due secoli prima gli animi si infiammavano per lui !!

Napoleone Bonaparte

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

Scrive AL Lloyd “A short drag shanty. These simple shanties were uses when only a few strong pulls were needed, as in boarding tacks and sheets and bunting up a sail in furling, etc. Boney was popular both in British and American vessels and in one American version Bonaparte is made to cross the Rocky Mountains.” Così ci sono moltissime versioni testuali che tutte tratteggiano le vittorie e le sconfitte di Napoleone in pochi versi. La melodia riprende il canto marinaresco bretone “Jean François de Nantes” (con testo in francese)
C’est Jean François de Nantes OUE, OUE, OUE
Gabier sur la fringante Oh mes bouées Jean François
(continua qui)
L’avventura “Asterix in Corsica” omaggia la shanty dando il nome Boneywasawarriorwayayix al capo della resistenza sulla Corsica

Paul Clayton


Boney(1) was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A warrior, a tarrier(2),
John François (3)
Boney fought the Prussians,
Boney fought the Russians.
Boney went to Moscow,
across the ocean across the storm
Moscow was a-blazing
And Boney was a-raging.
Boney went to Elba
Boney he came back again.
Boney went to Waterloo
There he got his overthrow.
Boney he was sent away
Away in Saint Helena
Boney broke his heart and died
Away in Saint Helena
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Napo era un guerriero,
Wey, hay, yah
un guerriero, un mastino
John François
Napo ha combattuto i prussiani
Napo ha combattuto i russi,
Napo è andato a Mosca attraverso l’oceano e la tempesta,
Mosca bruciava
e Napo era infuriato.
Napo è andato all’Elba
e poi è ritornato di nuovo:
Napo è andato a Waterloo
ed è stato rovesciato,
Napo è stato mandato via,
lontano a Sant’Elena
a Napo si è spezzato il cuore ed è morto, lontano a Sant’Elena

NOTE
1) Boney equivalente al nostro diminutivo Napo per Napoleone. L’origine del nome è incerta potrebbe voler dire “il Leone di Napoli”, il primo nome illustre fu quello del Cardinale Napoleone Orsini (ai tempi di papa Bonifacio VIII)
2) terrier = mastino (e richiama il termine francese terrien nella sea shanty “Jean-François de Nantes”)
3) storpiato anche in Jonny Franswor! citazione del canto marinaresco bretone Jean-François de Nantes

.. la versione punk-rock con ironia
Jack Shit in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006


I
Boney(1) was a warrior
A warrior a terrier(2)
Boney beat the Prussians
The Austrians, the Russians
Boney went to school in France
He learned to make the Russians dance
Boney marched to Moscow
Across the Alps through ice and snow.
II
Boney was a Frenchy man
But Boney had to turn again
So he retreated back again
Moscow was in ruins then
He beat the Prussians squarely
He whacked the English nearly
He licked them in Trafalgar’s Bay(1)
Carried his main topm’st away
III
Boney went a cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian(2)
Boney went to Saint Helen’s
He never came back again
They sent him into exile
He died on Saint Helena’s Isle
Boney broke his heart and died
In Corsica he wished he stayed
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Boney era un guerriero
un guerriero, un mastino
Boney sconfisse i Prussiani
gli Austriaci e i Russi
Boney andò a scuola in Francia
e imparò a fare il ballo russo
Boney marciò su Mosca
attraversò le Alpi in mezzo al ghiaccio e alla neve
II
Boeny era un francese
eppure Boney dovette di nuovo rigirarsi
così si ritirò ancora
Mosca era in rovina allora
egli vinse i Prussiani in un sol colpo
e quasi sconfisse gli Inglesi
li bastonò nella Baia di Trafalgar
e portò via l’albero di maestra-
III
Boney andò in crociera
a bordo del Billy Ruffian
Boney andò a Sant’Elena
e non è mai più tornato.
Lo mandarono in esilio
e morì nell’isola di Sant’Elena
a Boney gli si spezzò il cuore e morì
in Corsica avrebbe preferito restare

NOTE
1) La battaglia di Trafalgar vedeva gli Inglesi in inferiorità numerica ma la manovra anticonvenzionale di Nelson (una posizione detta in gergo militare a T) spiazzò lo schieramento nemico disposto su una lunga fila (l’ottimo approfondimento in vedi), l’unico colpo inferto dai francesi fu la morte di Nelson.  l’Inghilterra era una potenza navale ineguagliabile per i Francesi e gli Spagnoli, così Napoleone rinunciò all’invasione della Gran Bretagna che diventò la padrona dei mari fino alla prima guerra mondiale
2) la nave che portò Napoleone in esilio su Sant’Elena era Bellerephon ma il nome veniva storpiato in Billy Ruffian o Billy Ruff’n dai suoi marinai non abbastanza colti da apprezzare i riferimenti alla mitologia greca.

 

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT


Nelle note del progetto Soirt Sharp Shanties gli autori scrivono “Short’s words were few—a mere two and a half verses—but sufficient to indicate that his, like every other version of the shanty, essentially followed Napoleon Bonaparte’s life story to a greater or lesser extent depending on the length of the job in hand (although, as Colcord points out, some versions introduced inventive variations on his life). We have simply borrowed some (of the true) verses from other versions—but by no means all that were available!.. Perhaps, we are again dealing with a shanty that changed its purpose—Jackie has chosen a slower rendition which may be more appropriate to the time. Sharp noted: “Mr. Short sang ‘Bonny’ not ’Boney’, which is the more usual pronunciation; while his rendering of ’John’ was something between the French ’Jean’ and the English ’John’.” (tratto da qui)

Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2


Boney was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A bulling fighting tarrier,
John François
First he fought the Russians
then he fought the Prussians.
Boney went to Moscow,
Moscow was on fire oh.
We licked him in Trafalgar’s
Billy ??
Boney went to Elba
he came back to make another show
Boney went to Waterloo
and than he maked his overthrow.
Boney went to a-cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian.
Boney went to Saint Helena
Boney he didn’t get back
Boney broke his heart and died
in Corsica he should stay
Boney was a general
A ruddy, snotty general.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Napo era un guerriero,
Wey, hay, yah
un fottuto mastino litigioso
John François
Prima ha combattuto i russi,
poi ha combattuto i prussiani
Napo è andato a Mosca
Mosca bruciava.
Lo bastonammo nella Baia di Trafalgar
??
Napo è andato all’Elba
e poi è ritornato per un altro giro.
Napo è andato a Waterloo
ed è stato rovesciato.
Napo è andato in crociera
a bordo del Billy Ruffian
Napo è andato a Sant’Elena
Mapo non è mai più tornato.
a Napo gli si spezzò il cuore e morì
in Corsica avrebbe preferito restare
Napo era un generale,
un dannato generale arrogante

Una interessante versione nell’ambiente folk viene da Maddy Prior che la canta come una filastrocca con i colpi di cannone e il rullo dei tamburi sullo sfondo
Maddy Prior in Ravenchild 1999


Boney was a warrior
Wey, hey, ah
A warrior, a terrier
John François
He planned a distant enterprise
A great and distant enterprise.
He is off to fight the Russian bear
He plans to drive him from his lair.
They left with banners all ablaze
The heads of Europe stood amazed.
He thinks he’ll beat the Russkies
And the bonny bunch of roses. (1)
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Napo era un guerriero
Wey, hey, ah
un guerriero, un mastino
ohn François
Progettò una impresa lontana
una grande e lontana impresa
andò a combattere l’Orso russo
progettò di cacciarlo dalla tana .
ritornarono con gli stendardi in fiamme. I capi d’europa fecero meraviglia!
Credeva di sconfiggere i Russi
e il bel mazzo di rose

NOTE
1) gli inglesi

LA VERSIONE FRANCESE

Les Naufragés live

C’est Jean-François de Nantes
Oué, oué, oué,
Gabier de la Fringante
Oh ! mes bouées, Jean-François
Débarque de la campagne
Fier comme un roi d’Espagne
En vrac dedans sa bourse
Il a vingt mois de course
Une montre, une chaîne
Qui vaut une baleine
Branl’bas chez son hôtesse
Carambole et largesses
La plus belle servante
L’emmène dans la soupente
En vida la bouteille
Tout son or appareille
Montre et chaîne s’envolent
Attrape la vérole
A l’hôpital de Nantes
Jean-François se lamente
Et les draps de sa couche
Déchire avec sa bouche
Il ferait de la peine
Même à son capitaine
Pauvr’ Jean-François de Nantes
Gabier de la Fringante.

FONTI
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/boney-was-a-warrior/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/boney.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boney.html http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/boneywas.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=84540 https://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=1560890
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/french.htm