Archivi tag: Dougie MacLean

Fear a’ bhàta

Leggi in italiano

“Fear a ‘bhata” is a Scottish Gaelic song probably from the end of the 18th century and the legend (an anecdotal addition to the nineteenth century versions printed) says it was written by Sine NicFhionnlaigh (Jean Finlayson) of Tong, a small village on the Isle of Lewis (Hebrides) for a young Uig fisherman, Domhnall MacRath (Donald MacRae) who eventually married.
‘Fear’ translates as “man” and “Bhata” with “boat”: the man of the boat, or the boatman. Also written as Fear A Bhata, Fear Ah Bhata, Fhear A Bhata, Fhear Ni Bhata, Fhir A’ Bhata, Fir Na Fhata, O(h) My Boatman.

Homer Winslow
Homer Winslow

The song appears first published in The Scottish Gael byJames Logan, 1831 (with its score) in which it is classified as a slow and an iorram (the song to the oars that had the function of giving rhythm to the rowers, but at the same time it was also a funeral lament). “Fhir a bhata, or the boatmen, the music of which is annexed, is sung in the above manner, by the Highlanders with much effect. It is the song of a girl whose lover is at sea, whose safety she prays for, and whose return she anxiously expects.

The melody is a lament, sometimes played as a waltz (in instrumental versions) that lends itself to delicate and smooth arrangements

Maire Breatnach on fiddle (live at Dougie MacLean‘ s house)

There are many text versions of the song composed of about ten verses although in the most current recordings only the first three stanzas are sung mostly.

For the full text see

Scottish gaelic version

The girl is waiting for a visit of the handsome boatman who seems instead to prefer other girls! But she waits for him and frowns worried about the health of her handsome boatman.

Capercaillie from Get Out 1996

Superb and masterly recording a voice and the waves of the sea
 Talitha Mackenzie from “A Celtic Tapestry” vol. 2 1997

Alison Helzer  from Carolan’s Welcome, 2010.



English translation
Chorus:
Oh my boatman, na hóro eile
Oh my boatman, na hóro eile
Oh my boatman, na hóro eile
My farewell to you wherever you go
I
I often look from the highest hill
To try and see the boatman
Will you come today or tomorrow If you don’t come at all I will be downhearted
II
My heart is broken and bruised
With tears often flowing from my eyes
Will you come tonight or will I expect you
Or will I close the door with a sad sigh?
III
I often ask people on boats
Whether they see you or whether you are safe,
Each of them says
That I was foolish to fall in love with you.

Scottish Gaelic
Séist:
Fhir a’ bhàta, sna hóro eile
Fhir a’ bhàta, sna hóro eile
Fhir a’ bhàta, sna hóro eile
Mo shoraidh slàn leat ‘s gach àit’ an tèid thu
I
‘S tric mi sealltainn on chnoc as àirde
Dh’fheuch am faic mi fear a’ bhàta
An tig thu ‘n-diugh no ‘n tig thu màireach
‘S mur tig thu idir gur truagh a tha mi
II
Tha mo chridhe-sa briste brùite
‘S tric na deòir a’ ruith o m’ shùilean
An tig thu ‘n nochd no ‘m bi mo dhùil riut
No ‘n dùin mi ‘n doras le osna thùrsaich?
III
‘S tric mi foighneachd de luchd nam bàta
Am faic iad thu no ‘m bheil   thu sàbhailt
Ach ‘s ann a tha gach aon dhiubh ‘g ràitinn
Gur gòrach mise, ma thug mi  gràdh dhut

Irish Gaelic version

The Irish version appears for the first time in print in the Sam Henry collection entitled ‘Songs of the People‘. The songs were collected within 20 miles of Coleraine (Northern Ireland) from 1929 to 1939. It is an Irish Gaelic coming from Rathlin Island and more generally  widespread in Ulster, therefore with much resemblance to the Scottish Gaelic.

Niamh Parsons live and from Gaelic Voices 1999 (I, II, IV, V)

And why not! Let’s listen to this celtic-metal version of the German group founded by Ben Richter in 2001!
Thanateros ( I, II, V)

 

 

English translation (from here)
Chorus:
O Boatman and another “horo”! [i.e. welcome] /A hundred thousand welcomes everywhere you go
I
I went up on the highest hill
To see if I could see the boatman
Will you come tonight or will you come tomorrow?
If you do not come, I will be wretched
II
My heart is broken and crushed.
Frequent are the tears that run from my eyes. /Will you come today or when I’m longing for you, /Or shall I close the door with a tired sigh?
III
I gave you my love, and I cannot change that.
Not love for a year, and not just words of love,
But love from the beginning, when I was a child, /And I will never cease, even when my death bell tolls.
IV
My love promised me a dress of silk
He promised me that and a gray tartan
A gold ring where I’d see my reflection
But I’m afraid he has forgotten
IV
My heart is lifting
Not for the tailor or the harper
But for the navigator of the boat
If you don’t come, I’ll be very sad
Irish Gaelic (from here)
Chorus:
Fhir an bháta ‘sna hóró éile (1)
Fhir an bháta ‘sna hóró éile
Fhir an bháta ‘sna hóró éile
Ceád mile failte gach ait a te tú (2)
I
Théid mé suas ar an chnoic is airde,
Féach an bhfeic mé fear an bháta.
An dtig thú anoch nó an dtig thú amárach?
Nó muna dtig thú idir is trua atá mé.
II
Tá mo chroí-se briste brúite.
Is tric na deora a rith bho mo shúileann.
An dtig thú inniu nó am bidh mé dúil leat,
Nó an druid mé an doras le osna thuirseach?
III
Thúg mé gaol duit is chan fhéad mé ‘athrú.
Cha gaol bliana is cha gaol raithe.
Ach gaol ó thoiseacht nuair bha mé ‘mo pháiste,
Is nach seasc a choíche me ‘gus claoibh’ am bás mé.
IV
Gheall mo leanann domh gúna den tsioda
Gheall é sin, agus breacan riabhach
Fainne óir anns an bhfeicfinn íomha
Ach is eagal liom go ndearn sé dearmad
V
Tá mo croíse ag dul in airde
Chan don fidleir, chan don clairsoir
Ach do Stuirithoir an bhata
Is muna dtig tú abhaile is trua atá mé

NOTES
1) basically a non-sense phrase that some want to translate “and no one else” ie as “mine and no other”
2) or “mo shoraidh slán leat gach áit a dté tú”

My Boatman (english version)

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/foghlam/beag_air_bheag/songs/
song_03/index.shtml

http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Scottish/FearABhata.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=121195
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2463
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/compilations/fear.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/fear.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/8919
http://blueloulogan.wordpress.com/2012/10/15/songs-of-logan-6-fear-a-bhata-the-boatman/

Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie?

Leggi in italiano

From the tradition of “night visiting songs” the text is attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Tannahill and in fact various findings place the story in the woods of Paisley. ( in ‘The Poems and Songs of Robert Tannahill’ – 1874  assigned as a “Sleeping Maggie” melody.)
The heroine of this song was Margaret Pollock, a cousin of the Author by the mother’s side. She was the eldest daughter of Matthew Pollock (3rd) of Boghall, by his second marriage (mentioned in the Memoir of the Tannahills); and it is very probable the Poet beheld such an evening as he had described, in walking from Paisley over the high road to his uncle’s farm steading in Beith Parish. Margaret Pollock afterwards lived in family with William Lochhead, Ryveraes, and she and Mrs. Lochhead frequently sang that song together. Miss Pollock died unmarried (from here)

NIGHT VISITING IN DARK STYLE

The scene described is not really autobiographical (pheraps more in keeping with Robert Burns‘s temperament): the protagonist arrives at Maggy’s house in a dark and stormy night (the picture is rather gothic: an icy winter wind raging in the woods , a night of new moon without stars, the disturbing moaning of the owl, the iron gate that slams against the hinges) and he hopes that in the meantime the lover has not fallen asleep, letting come him in secret! And then no more worries or fears in the arms of Maggy every gloomy thought is dissolved!

http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/
http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/

I must mention the version collected by Hamish Henderson from the voice of Jeannie Robertson (see fragment of 1960) which shows a different melody from that later made famous by Tannahill Weavers.

The song was made known to the general public by the Tannahill Weavers, the good “weavers” of Robert Tannahill, also by Paisley,
At the moment you can find several live versions on you tube, but the best performances of the group are two: one in Mermaid’s Song 1992 (listen from Spotify) a faster version integrated with the reel “The Noose In The Ghillies” (with Roy Gullane , Phil Smillie, Iain MacInnes, Kenny Forsyth) and the first in Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976 with Roy Gullane, Phil Smillie, Hudson Swan, and Dougie MacLean (fiddle). In this first version the melody is slower and full of atmosphere (with hunder, wind and the rain effect)

Tannahill Weavers from Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976

Dougie Maclean (who collaborated with Tannahill Weavers from 1974 and until 1977 and then toured with them in 1980) in Real Estate -1988 and also in Tribute 1995


I
Mirk and rainy is the nicht,
there’s no’ a starn in a’ the carry(1)
Lichtnin’s gleam athwart the lift,
and (cauld) winds dive wi’ winter’s fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
let me in, for loud the linn
is roarin'(2) o’er the Warlock Craigie(3).
II
Fearfu’ soughs the boortree(4) bank
The rifted wood roars wild an’ dreary.
Loud the iron yett(5) does clank,
An’ cry o’ howlets mak’s me eerie.
III
Aboon my breath I daurna’ speak
For fear I rouse your waukrif’ daddie;
Cauld’s the blast upon my cheek,
O rise, rise my bonnie ladie.
IV
She op’d the door, she let him in
I cuist aside my dreepin’ plaidie(6).
‘Blaw your warst, ye rain and win’
Since, Maggie, now I’m in aside ye.
V
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
What care I for howlet’s cry,
For boortree bank or warlock craigie?
English translation
I
Dark and rainy is the night
there’s no star in all the carry
lightning flashes gleam across the sky
and cold winds drive with winters fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are you sleeping Maggie
Oh, are you sleeping Maggie
let me in, for the loud the waterfall
is roaring over the warlock crag.
II
Fearful sighs on the elder tree bank
The rifted wood roars wild and dreary
Loud the iron gate does clank,
And cry of owls makes me fearful.
III
Above my breath I dare not speak
For fear I rouse your wakeful father
Cold is the blast upon my cheek
O rise, rise my pretty lady.
IV
She opened the door, she let him in
I cast aside my dripping cloak
“Blow your worst, you rain and wind
Since, Maggie, now I’m beside you.”
V
Now, since you’re woken, Maggie
Now, since you’re woken, Maggie
What care I for owl’s cry,
For elder tree bank or warlock crag?

NOTES
1) carry is for sky, “the direction in which clouds are carried by the wind”
2) howling
3) warlock crag is the name of a waterfall at Lochwinnoch that forms a large pool or a small pond
4) elder tree in which the fairies prefer to dwell
5) yett is gett according to the ancient custom of writing the two vowels interchangeably
6) plaidie  see more

Great horned owl and chicks. Image size 5.6 by 7.9 inches @ 300 dpi. Photo credit: © Scott Copeland

SLEEPY & DROWSY MAGGY REELS

“Sleepy Maggie” is a reel in two-part and is often paired with the “Drowsy Maggie” reel, sometimes the two melodies are, mistakenly, confused. In the version of Francis O’Neill and James O’Neill (in O’Neill’s Music of Ireland) it is in 3 parts.

Sleepy Maggie as reported by Fidder’s Companion is a traditional Scottish melody whose oldest transcribed source is in Duke of Perth Manuscript or Drummond Castle Manuscript (1734)

Sleepy Maggie is also known in Ireland under different names “Lough Isle Castle,” “Seán sa Cheo” or “Tullaghan Lassies” and is the model for “Jenny’s Chickens”.

Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)
Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)

“Drowsy Maggie” is instead a traditional Irish tune in 2, 3 or 4 parts, but much more popular at least at the recording level (it will be for its appearance in the movie “Titanic”!)

Gaelic Storm  (Titanic Set) – of course there is also the Scottish version: usually slow part and then it gets faster and faster so the title between in deception because there is nothing “sleepy” in the melody that comes to a final paroxysm .

SLEEPY MAGGIE

Sleepy Maggie Alasdair Fraser on fiddle
Sleepy Maggie
Gabriele Possenti  on a Mcilroy AS 65c (C)
Tullaghan Lassies Fidil Irish Fiddle trio
Jenny’s Chickens Shanon Corr on fiddle

DROWSY MAGGIE
John Simie Doherty Donegal fiddle master
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann live

The Chieftains  

Driftwood (Joe Nunn on fiddle)
Jake Wise live

Rock versions
Dancing Willow an Irish folk band from Münster (Germany)
DNA Strings from Cape Town ( South Africa)
Lack of limits faster more and more

LINKS
http://archive.org/details/poemssongsofrobe00tannrich
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/64522/1;
jsessionid=B312B09442ED31BB18C4FDA5E2E2BB59

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59687
http://members.aol.com/tannahillweavers/
http://www.lochwinnoch.info/tales/warlock-craigie.php
http://thesession.org/tunes/787
http://thesession.org/tunes/27
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/SLA_SLE.htm#SLEEPY_MAGGY/MAGGIE

Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

Leggi in italiano

FROM  OUTLANDER SAGA

Diana Gabaldon

“Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.”
(From DRAGONFLY IN AMBER, Chapter 34, “The Postman Always Rings Twice”. Copyright© 1992 by Diana Gabaldon.)
The Scottish women have developed a particular technique for the twisting of the tweed, that woolen fabric from Scotland, warm, resistant and almost indestructible, used by fishermen and shepherds to keep warmer in a climate so cold and windy.
Cloth were “mistreated” by a group of women sitting around a table with 4 beat: first, the fabric is banged on the table in front of you, then slammed towards the center of the table, then returned to the initial position and then is passed to the next woman (clockwise). To count the time and make the work less monotonous the women sang some songs, there was the ban dhuan (or the song-woman) that directed the song, while the others followed her in the refrain. After some songs the fabric was softer, thicker, and more tightly woven.

OUTLANDER TV, season I: “Rent”

In Outlander TV serie this glimpse of life in a scottish village of eighteenth-century, is developed in the Dougal Mackenzie’s journey, as he collects rents from the tenants of Castel Leoch. Claire goes on the road with Dougal, and almost by chance, she hears some voices and sees the women as they are waulking the tweeds.

Outlander I, episode 5: Mo Nighean Donn

English transaltion*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr (1)
[Sèist:]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark
thee
At the fair of the young women.
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
And we will walk hand in hand
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
Regardless of any living elders (2).

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

NOTES
1)  The Storr is a rocky hill on the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle of Skye in Scotland
2) Similar expressions are recurrent in popular songs when a young couple “swimmed against the tide” about courtship and don’t followed the tradition.  (celtic wedding)

Clair takes part in the fulling of the tweed and sings with the village women. The ban dhuan is Fiona Mackenzie

Two are the Wool Waulking Songs  in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” and “Mo Nighean Donn” (a tribute to Claire’s brown hair)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originally from the island of Barra “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” (One day as I roamed the hills) is about a man roaming around the Highlands, who comes across a beautiful young girl gathering herbs; these accidental encounters on the moors (between the heather and the broom in bloom) are the subject of many traditional Scottish songs from ancient origins, and often man is not limited to the request for a kiss! The girl rejects him because she considers him a vagabond. As usual in the choice of musical tracks, the lyrics always have an affinity with the story told in the saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho

English translation*
One day as I was traveling a hill
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)


(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”


Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh!
A bhodachain ròmaich


(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

NOTES
1) or “Hoots toots!”
2) or ” you shaggy old man!”, a shaggy peasant

Mo Nighean Donn

“Mo Nighean Donn” (My brown-haired lass) does not have a real meaning, it seems more than the ban dhuan to report the gossip of the moment.  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
(a Celtic song with instrumental parts and male voice)

English translation*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
[choir]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
(I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.)

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

Read the post in English

DALLA SAGA OUTLANDER

Diana Gabaldon

Nel libro “”Il ritorno” (capitolo 11) della saga Outlander scritta da Diana Gabaldon Claire è invitata dalle donne di Lallybroch a prendere un tè e assiste alla follatura del tweed che si svolge in un apposito capanno “riservato” alle donne della tenuta
““Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.” continua
Le donne scozzesi hanno elaborato una tecnica particolare per la follatura del tweed, quel tessuto di lana originario dalla Scozia, caldo, resistente e pressoché indistruttibile, utilizzato dai pescatori e pastori per tenersi più al caldo in un clima così freddo e ventoso.
Per infeltrire la lana ma in modo uniforme e migliorane le prestazioni  le pezze di stoffa venivano “maltrattate” da un gruppo di donne sedute introno ad un tavolo (precedentemente immerse in grandi tinozze piene di urina); il movimento della battitura consisteva in 4 tempi: prima si sbatteva il tessuto sul tavolo davanti a sé, poi si sbatteva verso il centro del tavolo, quindi si riportava alla posizione iniziale e infine lo si passava alla donna successiva (in senso orario). Per contare il tempo e rendere meno monotono il lavoro le donne cantavano delle canzoni, c’era la  ban dhuan (ovvero la donna-canzone) che dirigeva il canto, mentre le altre la seguivano nel ritornello. Dopo qualche canzone il tessuto diventava più morbido, ma anche più compatto e resistente.

OUTLANDER TV, stagione I: “Riscossione”

Nella serie televisiva questo scorcio di vita nei villaggi della Scozia settecentesca è sviluppato nel giro di Dougal  Mackenzie di Castel Leoch presso gli affittuari per la riscossione dei tributi. Quasi per caso Clarie sentento delle voci, si avvicina alle donne mentre infeltriscono il tweed.

Outlander I episodio 5: Mo Nighean Donn

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark thee
At the fair of the young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta.
O mia brunetta, ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli (2)

NOTE
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna  (matrimonio celtico)

 

Clair partecipa alla follatura del tweed e canta insieme alle donne del villaggio. La ban dhuan è Fiona Mackenzie

Le Wool Waulking Songs sono due in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
la prima più veloce “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh“, la seconda vista nel video “Mo Nighean Donn” (un omaggio ai capelli castani di Claire)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originaria dell’isola di Barra,  la canzone parla di un uomo in giro per le Highland che s’imbatte in una bella fanciulla intenta a raccogliere delle erbe, questi incontri fortuiti nelle brughiere (tra l’erica e la ginestra in fiore) sono il soggetto di molti canti tradizionali della Scozia dalle origini antiche e spesso l’uomo non si limita alla richiesta di un bacetto! La fanciulla lo respinge perchè lo reputa un vagabondo. Come consuetudine nella scelta delle tracce musicali i testi hanno sempre un’attinenza con la storia narrata nella saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho
Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh! (1)
A bhodachain ròmaich
(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

Traduzione inglese*
One day as I was traveling a mountain
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)
(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men (3)
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Un giorno che ero in viaggio per i monti
un giorno che ero in viaggio per la brughiera incontrani una ragazza
dalle belle trecce
con un piccolo pugnale tra le mani
stava tagliando delle margherite
e raccoglieva il crescione.
Mi sono avvicinato
e le ho chiesto un bacio.
“Smamma bello
Vattene zoticone!
(Nella mia dimora di famiglia
si trovano nobili genti
una ventina di uomini con il cappello
una dozzina di donne con il mantello
bianche tovaglie
stese sui tavoli
con tazze di percellana
e bicchieri pieni di birra.)”

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) l’espressione tradotta anche come “Hoots toots!”  è un modo colloquiale per respingere una persona sgradita
2) anche tradotto come ” you shaggy old man!” letteralmente “piccolo vecchio peloso” vecchio ha un significato colloquiale che non necessariemnte indica una persione anziana, nel contesto la frase è un appellativo rivolto a un vagabondo malandato, dai capelli lunghi e la barba incolta, anche bifolco
3) indossare il cappello è d’obbligo per un gentiluomo

Mo Nighean Donn

La canzone “Mo Nighean Donn” (la mia ragazza castana) non ha un vero e proprio significato, sembra più altro che la ban dhuan  riferisca i gossip del momento. La versione in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  è più lunga rispetto alla versione nelle riprese
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
Negli anni 40-50 con il tramonto della lavorazione artigianale (in particolare dell’Harris Tweed) queste canzoni di lavoro sono diventate occasione di session dimostrative o sono passate nei repertori di alcuni gruppi di musica celtica con l’inserimento di parti strumentali e voci maschili.

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by the forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta hò gù
In questo momento sono al lago vicino alla foresta
e Effie non mi sta canzonando.
La milizia è stata ripristinata
e questo porterà via i giovani da noi.
Staranno fuori per un mese
questo  non mancherà di lasciarci pieni di tristezza.
O mia moretta , ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
La mia ragazza bruna ha vinto una scommessa
dove erano accampati i guerrieri
Sono stanco di gettare le reti
nelle parti basse di ogni baia.
Io andrò oltre la collina
dove ci sono le belle donne
giovani.
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli(2)
E la mia mano ti terrà stretta
anche se preferirei abbracciarti
E se riuscirò a raggiungerti (3)
ti metterò una corona tra le mani.
Avrai quella e ancor meglio
un bravo marinaio, giovane e forte

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna .
3) il ragazzo è partito per mare in cerca di un buon guadagno, al suo ritorno le chiederà di sposarlo

 

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

GREEN GROW THE RASHES

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787


Robert Burns
wrote “Green Grow The Rushes O” (Green Grow The Rashes O) in September 1784: a deft compliment to the lasses, and a exhortation to “carpe diem”. A song often performed during Burns Supper at the time of “Toast to the lassies“.

BAWDY VERSION

In “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” were published two bawdy lyrics collected by him, but Robbie rewrote some verses about spring time when the hours spent loving are sweeter. In Burns there is often a vein of protest towards the moralists and the puritans, a trace of anarchy that leads him to reject the conventions and everything that limits the free union of friends and lovers. So there is nothing morally wrong in enjoying the pleasures of life: the best moments are those spent loving women, the sex that nature did after man, more perfect!

in Poetry of Robert Burns Centenary Edition 1896
in Poetry of Robert Burns Centenary Edition 1896

 Deacon Blue, Glasgow  pop band live for scottish BBC “That”

Dougie MacLean: songwriter and folk singer has dedicated an album to Robert Burns titled “Tribute” released in 1995 but “Green Grow The Rushes” is published in the next album “Real Estate” (1988) to remain a song that Dougie loves to sing in public

Jim Malcolm  in Sparkling Flash 2011: lovely scottish accent, easygoing and seductive voice, interesting arrangement with the electric guitar

Altan in Another Sky -2000

Cherish The Ladies in New Day Dawning 1996

Eddie Reader in “The songs of Robert Burns” deluxe edition 2013

CHORUS
Green grow the rushes oh(1)
Green grow the rushes oh
The sweetest hours that e’re I spent
Were spent among the lassies oh
I
There’s nought but care on every hand
In every hour that passes oh
That signifies the life of man
and twere na for the lassies oh
II
The wordly race may riches chase
And riches still may fly them oh
And tho’ at last they catch them fast
Their hearts can ne’er enjoy them oh
III
But gie me a canny(2) hour at e’en
My arms about my dearie3) oh
And warly(4) cares and warly men
May a gae(5) topsy-turvy(6) oh
IV
For you sae douce you sneer at this
You’re nought but senseless asses oh
The wisest man (7) the world e’er saw
He dearly loved the lassies oh
V
Auld Nature swears, the lovely dears
Her noblest work she classes, O:
Her prentice han’ she try’d on man,
An’ then she made the lasses, O.

NOTES
read in Standard English 
1) rasches=rushes; there is also a Christmas song with the same title. Many believe that the word “green grow” is the basis of the Spanish word “gringos” with which the Mexicans called Americans during the nineteenth-century wars. According to the “Diccionario Castellano” of 1787 the term was used in Malaga to address a person who spoke ill Spanish and in particular in Madrid was synonymous with Irish. Most likely the term gringo comes from the Spanish”griego”. In English it says in fact “it’s Greek to me” while in Spanish “hablar en griego”.
2) canny=quiet
3) dearie= deary
4) war’ly=warlike.
5) gae = go
6) topsy-turvy (or “tapsalteerie”)= confused, or lackingorganization; upside down:
7) Salomon
There’s some say I’m foolish, there’s more say I’m wise,
For love of the women I’m sure ‘tis no crime;
For the son of King David had ten hundred wives
And his wisdom is highly recorded. (in The Limerick Rake see)

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Merry_Muses_of_Caledonia/Green_Grow_the_Rashes
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/pageturner.cfm?id=94624648
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/g/grngrora.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45563
https://thesession.org/tunes/1936

This love will carry by Dougie MacLean

Firmata Dougie MacLean nel 1983 This love will carry, è tra le sue canzoni più popolari che ama cantare nei suoi live. Semplici rime che parlano d’amore, della paura di amare. Una delle canzoni fatta propria da vari artisti della scena celtica e folk-rok.
ASCOLTA Dougie MacLean & Kathy Mattea live per Transatlantic Sessions

ASCOLTA Piedmont Brothers Band (non facciamoci ingannare dal nome sono italo-americani di Eden, North Carolina) una bella versione acustica con arpa, flauto e violino
ASCOLTA Solas in ANother Day 2005 (su Spotify)
ASCOLTA Frances Black


I
It’s a thin line that leads us
and keeps a man from shame
And dark clouds quickly gather
along the way he came
There’s fear out on the mountain
and death out on the plain
There’s heartbreak and heart-ache in the shadow of the flame
But this love will carry,
this love will carry me
I know this love will carry me
This love will carry,
this love will carry me
I know this love will carry me
II
The strongest web will tangle,
the sweetest bloom will fall
And somewhere in the distance
we try and catch it all
Success lasts for a moment
and failure’s always near
And you look down at your blistered hands as turns another year
III
These days are golden,
they must not waste away
Our time is like that flower
and soon it will decay
And though by storms we’re weakened, uncertainty is sure
And like the coming of the dawn
it’s ours for evermore
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
E’ stretta la via da seguire
che preserva l’uomo dal disonore
e nuvole oscure si radunano
rapide sul suo cammino
c’è la paura fuori sulla vetta
e la morte fuori in basso
c’è il crepacuore e il mal di cuore nell’ombra della fiamma
Ma quest’amore andrà avanti,
questo amore mi sosterrà

lo so che quest’amore andrà avanti, quest’amore andrà avanti,
questo amore mi sosterrà
lo so che quest’amore andrà avanti,

II
La rete più forte s’annoderà
e la fioritura più bella finirà a terra
e da qualche parte in lontananza
proveremo a catturarlo,
il successo dura un attimo
e il fallimento è sempre nei paraggi
e guardi verso le mani piene di vesciche, quando arriva un nuovo anno
III
Questi giorni sono fatti d’oro,
non si devono sprecare;
il nostro tempo è come quel fiore
e presto sfiorirà,
e per le tempeste ci siamo indeboliti,
il dubbio è certo
e come il sorgere dell’alba
è nostro per l’eternità

FONTI
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44414

From the Ends of the Earth by Dougie MacLean

L’album  “From the Ends of the Earth” di Dougie MacLean distribuito nel 2001, contiene 12 tracce live dal “The Celtic Connections Festival”( Glasgow 1998 ) -tracce da 1 a 6 e dal “The Port Fairy Folk Festival” (Australia 2000) tracce da 7 a 12: solo con la sua voce e chitarra ( a cui aggiunge l’armonica a bocca nella traccia 8 ) proprio come i cantanti folk degli anni 60/70, lo sentiamo nella sua “scottishness” interagire con il pubblico da abile performer riuscendo anche a farlo cantare con lui!

Il titolo “From the Ends of the Earth” in italiano “Dalla Fine della Terra” è un riferimento esplicito alla Scozia.

Ci troviamo Green Grow the Rashes (traccia 6), Ready for the Storm (traccia 7) e Caledonia (traccia 11) già recensite nel Blog Terre Celtiche, la popolarissima “This love will carry” e qui aggiungo “Talking with my Father”(traccia 9)
La segnalazione arriva da Roberto Caselli che mi scrive dalla pagina Terre celtiche su FB: ” Per me un vero Bardo. Sono contento che qualcuno parli di Dougie perché è un vero e puro musicista legato alla storia e alle sue radici” e ci allega la versione in studio.

La canzone viene infatti pubblicata nell’album “Who am I” del 2001 questa volta con l’arrangiamento musicale, si sentono fraseggi di violoncello (Kevin McCrae), un lieve accenno di cornamusa (Graham Mulholland)  sul riff delle chitarre e una base di percussioni soft/ tastiere in cui ci ha messo lo zampino Jamie MacLean (il figlio di Dougie)


I
I’m talking with my father,
he’s talking with his son
And I don’t need to look any further
for the one I have become
He says listen to that curlew (1)
that’s a sound I love to hear
It’s a strange reflection (2) that we look through
oh that finally finds us here
CHORUS
In this place where life’s heart thunders
In this place where time holds still
In this place of harmony and wonder
And values not of gold fulfill
II
I’m walking with my father,
across these gentle Perthshire hills
It’s timeless mysteries that we gather
that make the memories that we fill
He says don’t fix what is not broke,
no need to find what’s not been lost
It’s a heavy gate we have to open
an endless field we have to cross
III
There will always be the brave one
there’ll be the one who turns away
With all too many things left undone
oh and so much left to say
I’m talking with my father,
he’s talking with his son
I don’t need to look any further
for the one I have become
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Parlo com mio padre
e lui parla con suo figlio
e non ho bisogno di andare oltre per (vedere) quello che sono diventato
dice “Ascolta il chiurlo
è quello il suono che amo sentire”
E’ uno strano riflesso che sbirciamo
oh che finalmente ci trova qui
CORO
In questo posto dove il cuore della vita rimbomba
in questo posto dove il tempo ancora ci appartiene
in questo posto di armonia e meraviglia
e di valori non veniali che appagano
II
Cammino con mio padre
per le dolci colline del Perthshire
sono i misteri eterni che cogliamo
che fanno i ricordi che ci riempiono
Dice “Non aggiustare quello che non è rotto, non c’è bisogno di trovare quello che non si è perso.
E’ un cancello pesante che dobbiamo aprire, un campo senza fine che dobbiamo attraversare.”
III
“Ci sarà sempre il coraggioso
e ci sarà sempre quello che si allontana
con tutte le troppe cose lasciare da fare
e oh così tante cose lasciate da dire”
Parlo con mio padre
e lui parla con suo figlio
e non ho bisogno di andare oltre per (vedere) quello che sono diventato

NOTE
1) Tradisce la sua presenza con un fischio liquido molto sonoro, udibile a oltre un chilometro di distanza (una sorta di “cur-li”, da cui il nome onomatopeico). Il canto è molto vario e melodioso, descrivibile come una ripetuta frequenza di frasi gorgogliate (un crescente “curlì”) con note flautate e trilli, che accelerano in crescendo. (tratto da qui)
2)  reflection traduce il termine riflesso come un’immagine riflessa nello specchio, sono padre e figlio che si rispecchiano uno nell’altro

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85137

READY FOR THE STORM

La prima registrazione della canzone risale al 1982, Dougie MacLean la scrive per il suo primo album da solista con la sua etichetta discografica, la Dunkeld record, appena fondata. L’album s’intitola “Craigie Dhu” in omaggio al cottage in cui vive con la moglie australiana agli inizi del loro trasferimento nel piccolo borgo di Butterstone, vicino a Dunkeld nel Perthshire. In copertina il dipinto del cottage realizzato da Jennifer.

Il nome mi richiama in mente il cerchio di pietra di Craigh na Dun ambientato nel romanzo storico “Outlander” di Diana Gabaldon nei pressi di Inverness: la traduzione dal gaelico è “collina (tumulo) su cui è costruito un cerchio di pietre”, essendo dun=tumulo e Craig, Craigie =roccia.

“Ready for the Storm” non è un brano tradizionale ma arriva con immediatezza allo spirito della gente e come spesso accade alle canzoni popolari si presta a molteplici letture; anche questo brano viene registrato da molti altri artisti della scena celtica e anche dai musicisti cristiani (a partire da Rich Mullins), sicuramente nel prossimo secolo scaduti i diritti d’autore sarà considerato a tutti gli effetti un traditional scozzese, se questa parola avrà ancora un significato.

Come dicevo moltissime le versioni e gli interpreti (molte le versioni al femminile tanto per citare Celtic Woman, Aoife Ni Fhearraigh) che hanno riprodotto il brano, ma la versione nel mio cuore è quella interpretata dall’angelica voce di Mary Dillon quando era nel gruppo irlandese dei Dèanta


I
The waves crash in and the tide tide pulls out
It’s an angry sea but there is no doubt
That the lighthouse will keep shining out
To warn the lonely sailor
And the lightning strikes and the wind cuts cold
Through the sailor’s bones to the sailor’s soul
Till there’s nothing left that he can hold
Except the rolling ocean
CHORUS
But I am ready for the storm, yes sir ready
I am ready for the storm, I’m ready for the storm
II
Oh give me mercy for my dreams (1)
Cause every confrontation (2)
Seems to tell me what it really means
To be this lonely sailor
But when the sky begins to clear
And the sun it melts away my fear
I’ll cry a silent weary tear
For those that need to love me (3)
III
Distance it is no real friend
And time will take its time
And you will find that in the end
It brings you me, the lonely sailor
And when you take me by your side
You love me warm, you love me
And I should have realized
I had no reason to be frightened
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Le onde si infrangono e la marea si ritira
è un mare infuriato, ma non c’è dubbio
che il faro continuerà con le segnalazioni,
per allertare il marinaio solitario.
E il fulmine colpisce e il vento penetra freddo
nelle ossa del marinaio, fin nell’anima del marinaio, finchè non c’è più niente che possa sopportare tranne l’oceano in tempesta
CORO
Eppure io sono pronto per la tempesta sìssignore, pronto, sono pronto per la tempesta , sono pronto per la tempesta
II
Oh, dona la benedizione ai miei sogni
perchè ogni conflitto, sembra dirmi che cosa significhi davvero essere questo marinaio solitario.
Ma quando il cielo comincia a schiarirsi
e il sole discioglie la mia paura
piangerò una lacrima silenziosa e stanca per quelle che mi amano.
III
La distanza non è un vero amico
e il tempo richiede tempo
e si scopre che alla fine
ti porta a me, il marinaio solitario.
E quando mi prendi accanto
per amarmi e riscaldarmi e amarmi
avrei dovuto capire
che non avevo motivo di essere spaventato.

NOTE
1) l’invocazione è chiaramente rivolta a Dio
2) disputa, lotta ma anche ostilità, litigio
3) letteralmente “hanno bisogno d’amarmi”

Farewell To Craigie Dhu

Al cottage Dougie dedica ancora uno strumentale per violino pubblicato nell’album “Fiddle” del 1984, la famigliola si trasferisce nella ex-scuola del villaggio (dove Dougie aveva studiato da piccolo) e che diventerà il punto fermo della loro vita.
Così ricorda “When we bought the school in the 1980s, I was one of the first people in Scotland to set up my own independent record and publishing company. At that time, most musicians were encouraged to go to London or New York and I was determined to stay in this area. So my wife Jenny and I set up our own company, with a recording studio in the school building. We live in the former teachers’ house: an old, stone building. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA su Spotify la versione dei Radigun (qui)

ASCOLTA due melodie questa volta tradizionali  “Dunatholl” e “The Doo’s Nest”

FONTI
https://scotlandcorrespondent.com/celebrity/caledonia-heart-and-soul/
http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/11928750.Jennifer_gives_the_family_album_a_new_meaning/
http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/13411756.My_favourite_room__Musician_Dougie_MacLean_on_the_sitting_dining_room_of_the_old_Perthshire_school_house_where_he_lives_and_works/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=152726
https://thesession.org/tunes/13304
http://www.folktunefinder.com/tunes/32642

THE GAEL BY DOUGIE MCLEAN

LA GENESI DI THE GAEL

Nel 1990 Dougie McLean pubblica “The Search” una serie di brani strumentali commissionatigli qualche anno prima per la mostra sul mostro di Loch Ness dal Museo di Drumnadrochit. Dougie immagina di rivedere un clan celtico vivere sulle rive del Lago  che crede fermamente nell’esistenza dei kelpie.
Così leggiamo in un intervista “I wrote several songs for “The Search,” the CD that contains “The Gael” and other songs about Loch Ness, including a song about the vigils on the loch in the 1960s. At the time I got right into the whole Loch Ness monster thing. I’m fascinated by man’s search for myth, and I was inspired by thinking of the Gaels back in ancient times, waiting for the monster to appear.” (tratto da qui)

Luc Hermans © (tratta da qui)

ASCOLTA Dougie MacLean in The Search, 1990. Il Cd è da collezionare.

Inserito nel film “L’ultimo dei Moicani” del regista  Michael Mann da Trevor Johns con il titolo di “Promentory”  la melodia fa il giro del mondo! Ancora Dougie ricorda “The movie—they were looking for a contemporary Scottish piece with atmosphere to suit the movie, and they had listened to a lot of dance tunes and that. “The Gael” is an ominous sort of piece, with ominous chords, dramatic. Michael Mann (the director) tuned into the emotional feeling of the song, and he must have felt the mood I had felt when I had written it. If it comes from the right place, the music encapsulates a feeling—Michael Mann tapped into that, with the tragedy of this story of the early Native Americans and so on. You have to get into that place for the emotions, the mood, to work in a song..”  (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA la versione nel film “Last of the Mohicans” (1992) è il secondo tema musicale ricorrente in tutto il film.

Siccome la musica del film ha ottenuto un bel po’ di riconoscimenti e premiazioni facendo balzare alle cronache la paternità di Dougie McLean come autore della musica, qualcuno è andato ad indagare da quale fonte fosse mai scaturito un tale capolavoro!!

Il film tra parentesi è stato girato in buona parte sui Monti Blue Ridge. Altre info sulla guerra franco-indiana in Nord-America qui)

IL TEMA MUSICALE LA FOLLIA

Dal punto di vista musicale la melodia è un reel lento, ma il tema è definito dai musicologi  follia (o folia): una progressione con un tema semplice e ben distinto sul quale l’esecutore abbellisce le sue variazioni e improvvisazioni. Si ritiene abbia origine portoghese e le sue tracce si perdono nel Rinascimento spagnolo anche se la melodia più primitiva e antica affonda nel Medioevo (danza rurale).

La melodia è costruita su un tempo ternario ed è divisa in due parti di quattro battute ciascuna. Molti autori, ispirandosi a questo tema, hanno utilizzato lo schema musicale della Folia già noto in tutta la penisola iberica nei primi decenni del XVI secolo. Una linea di basso ripetuto sulla quale potevano essere costruiti vari contrappunti standard, mentre l’esecutore era libero di improvvisare serie di variazioni, le diferencias. Una tecnica compositiva che ha trasformato la Folia in un genere affine alla passacaglia e alla ciaccona. (tratto da qui)

folia
tema de la follia

Anche se la Follia è in 3/4 mentre The Gael in 4/4 la variazioni ritmiche della follia sono anche in 4/4, e il carattere ripetitivo della melodia è identico. Ma a me più che agli sviluppi del tema nella musica colta del Barocco (che potete leggere e ascoltare qui e qui) interessano le connessioni con la musica tradizionale scozzese ed ecco trovato
Cumh Easpuic Earra-ghaeidheal, (in inglese Lament for the Bishop of Argyll) anonimo XVI o XVII secolo
Jack Campin wrote about this tune: This tune is from the Macfarlan Manuscript of Scottish fiddle and flute tunes (National Library of Scotland MS.2084/5), compiled by David Young in Scotland around 1740 for the antiquarian Walter Macfarlan (book III #34 p20). It’s obviously much older, but there is no earlier source for it. The structure is like a piobaireachd (bagpipe variation set) but the range is too wide for the pipes. Some people think it was originally for the harp. The tune might just possibly be indigenous Gaelic, but the basic rhythm is so Folia-like that a foreign influence seems more likely. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Luce Brera / Extrait de l’album Scotland’s Fiddle Piobaireach

Sempre sul tema de La Follia i Jordi Savall Hespèrion XXI ci regalano 10 brani dal Rinascimento ( e da Rodrigo Martinez musico di Corte in Portogallo che ci lascia testimonianza della prima trascrizione della Follia) attraverso il Barocco fino a Vangelis

ASCOLTA Faronell’s Division on a Ground ~ La Folia | John Playford

FONTI
http://www.mohicanpress.com/mo11103.html
http://associazionecamoes.blogspot.it/2011/04/la-follia-un-antico-tema-musicale.html
http://www.baroque.it/arte-barocca/musica-barocca/il-tema-de-la-folia-un-armonia-lunga-cinque-secoli.html
http://www.folias.nl/htmlsimilar.html

Tannahill Weavers, la tradizione che vive

Una band tra le più longeve della scena folk targata Scozia che ha portato la musica tradizionale scozzese in tutto il mondo.
I Tannahill Weavers nascono a Paisley nel 1966 e con il nome “I Tessitori di Tannahill” omaggiano il suo poeta-tessitore più illustre  Robert Tannahill; un nome così lungo viene inevitabilmente storpiato e accorciato e i fans li chiamano affettuosamente “the Tannies”.

(da sinistra: Phil Smillie, Roy Gullane, John Martin, Lorne MacDougall)

Nella line up degli esordi mancano per la verità i componenti che saranno lo zoccolo duro del gruppo, ma arrivano giusto qualche anno dopo la fondazione: Roy Gullane frontman del gruppo (1969) e il giovanissimo flautista-bodranista Phil Smillie (1968) -già rodie della band.
Il primo album del 1976 “Are Ye Sleeping Maggie” li vede oramai usciti dai circuiti amatoriali e in concerto sul Continente in particolare la Germania. Ci troviamo il violino e la chitarra (mandolino e banjo) di Dougie MacLean che era stato reclutato qualche anno prima al Kinross Festival (e che si trovò a sostituire per qualche tempo Mike Ward, rimpiazzati poi nel 1989 da John Martin -già ex-Ossian) . Così racconta la storia Dougie “I was just kind of standing at the side of the road. I had a nice wee job as a gardener up in Aberdeen and had a nice wee flat, and we were just going round the festivals, and we went to Kinross. But I remember standing on the pavement and the white Tannahill van just pulling up in front and basically Roy just got out the van and said, “Dougie, d’you want to join a band, we’re going to Germany in three days’ time,” or something like that. So I said, “well can I have five minutes to think about that!” So I went back to the campsite to the tent where I was staying with all my friends from Aberdeen and I said, “Roy Gullane’s just asked me to join his band, and they’re going to Germany in three days, what do you think I should do?” And they’re all saying, “go for it!” And actually, if I hadn’t made that decision my life would have been completely different.” (tratto da qui)

LA GREAT HIGHLAND BAGPIPE

(1978 dal basso a sinistra: Roy Gullane e Alan MacLeod, dall’alto a sinistra Phil Smillie, Mike Ward, Hudson Swan

La cornamusa entra nell’inconfondibile sound del gruppo con il pipaiolo Alan MacLeod (i pipaioli cambiano quasi ad ogni stagione, ma sono un punto fermo che contraddistinguerà la sonorità dei Tannies, una delle prime band trad scozzesi ad aver incorporato il suono della Great Highland Bagpipe con gli altri strumenti folk, oggi supportato da un giovanissimo ma prodigioso Lorne MacDougall) e il secondo album “The Old Woman’s Dance” (1978) è un’esplosione di vitalità ed energia, speziata da molto humor.

(1987 da sinistra: Stuart Morison, Iain MacInnes, Phil Smillie, Ross Kennedy, Roy Gullane)

Il gruppo tuttavia sembra un po’ arrancare negli anni 80, e si guadagna la nomea di scapestrati bevitori (ecco una simpatica cronaca del loro concerto in quel di Santa Croce- Firenze del 1982 scritta da Riccardo Venturi continua), botte di vita della gioventù, lasciate alle spalle negli anni 90.
Con “Capernaum” uscito nel 1994 pubblicato  dall’etichetta discografica Green Linnet Records si aggiudicano un Indie Award come migliore album di musica celtica dell’anno. Accanto a Roy e Phil  suonano il già citato John Martin (violino, viola, violoncello), Les Wilson (bouzouki e tastiere) e Kenny Forsyth con l’highlands bagpipes, la scottish small pipes e i whistles.
Ancora un cambio di formazione con l’uscita del Cd “Leaving St. Kilda” è la volta del pipaiolo Duncan J. Nicholson.
I “Tessitori” si  sono esibiti molte volte in Italia ospiti dei principali festival celtici in primis Trigallia (spesso presenti nelle compilation della rivista Celtica delle Edizioni 3ntini&C): nel 2000 esce il loro cd “Alchemy” (con copertina di Luca Tarlazzi) e ancora un cd nel 2003 “Arnish Light” sempre con la copertina di Luca Tarlazzi e con un nuovo pipaiolo Colin Melville.
L’ultimo cd (per ora) è “Live and In Session” registrato principalmente durante l’US Tour del 2005 (metà sono live e metà tracce studio): la prima traccia è un set strumentale live “THE GEESE IN THE BOG/THE JIG OF SLURS” già inciso nel Cd “The Tannahill Weavers” (1979) che è rimasto nel tempo la loro firma anche se le melodie non sono dei tradizionali scozzesi bensì due jigs irlandesi!

ASCOLTA la travolgente accoppiata di Atholl Highlander con la canzone giacobita Johnnie Cope.

Nel loro repertorio non mancano drinking songs, ballate, canzoni nostalgiche e malinconiche slow air, ripetuti omaggi ai due poeti Robert Burns e Robert Tannahill: un genuino (istintivo, immediato) spirito scozzese.
Nel blog ho spesso inserito le loro versioni dei brani tradizionali scozzesi seguite il tag Tannahill Weavers

FONTI
http://www.theballadeers.com/scots/tw_01.htm
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/biography.htm
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/records.htm
https://tannahillweavers.bandcamp.com/