Archivi categoria: questione giacobita/ Jacobite rising

E la barca va: The Prince & the Ballerina

Leggi in italiano

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met Charles Stuart. After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) the then twenty-six-year-old Bonnie Prince managed to escape and remain hidden for several months, protected by his loyalists, despite the British patrols and the price on his head!
Charles found many hiding places and support in the Hebrides but it was a dangerous game of hide-and-seek.

THE PRINCE & THE BALLERINA

The prince had managed to get to the Island of Banbecula of the Outer Hebrides, but the surveillance was very tight and had no way to escape. And here comes the girl, Flora MacDonald.
The MacDonalds as loyal to the king and Presbyterian confession, but they were sympathizers of the Jacobite cause and so Flora who lived in Milton (South Uist island) went on visiting her friend, wife of the clan’s Lady Margareth of Clanranald , and she was presented to Charles Stuart.

In another version of the story the prince was hiding at the Loch Boisdale on the Isle of South Uist, hoping to meet Alexander MacDonald, who had recently been arrested. Warned that a patrol would inspect the area, Charles fled with two jacobites to hide in a small farm near Ormaclette where the meeting with Flora MacDonald had been arranged. The moment was immortalized in many paintings like this by Alexander Johnston.

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

In the anecdotal version of the story, Flora devised a trick to take away Charlie from the island : on the pretext of visiting her mother (who lived in Armadale after remarried), she obtained the safe-conduct for herself and her two servants; under the name and clothes of the Irish maid Betty Burke, however, there was the Bonny Prince! (see more)

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e floraThe boat with four (or six) sailors to the oars left Benbecula on 27 June 1746 for the Isle of Skye in the Inner Hebrides. They arrived to Portée and on July 1st they left, the prince gave Flora a medallion with his portrait and the promise that they would meet one day

FLORA MACDONALD’S FANCY

Among the Scottish dances is still commemorated the dance with which Flora performed in front of the Prince. It ‘a very graceful dance, inevitable in the program of Highland dance competitions: it is a courtship dance, in which girl shows all her skills while maintaining a proud attitude and composure.
It is performed with the Aboyne dress, dress prescribed for the dancers in the national Scottish dances, as disciplined by the dance commission in the Aboyne Highland Gathering of 1970 (with pleated skirt doll effect, in tartan or the much more vaporous white cloth) .
Melody is a strathspey, which is a slower reel, typical of Scotland often associated with commemorations and funerals.

FLORA MACDONALD’S REEL

Many other musical tributes were dedicated to the beautiful Flora. The melody of this reel appears with many titles, the first printed version is found in Robert Bremer “Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances”, 1757 and also in Repository Complete of the Dance Music of Scotland by Niel Gow (Vol I). The reel is in two parts

Tonynara from “Sham Rock” – 1994

The Virginia Company

RUSTY NAIL: CLAN MACKINNON COCKTAIL

Rusty-NailTo repay the help given by Clan MacKinnon during the months when he had to hide from the English, Prince Stuart revealed to John MacKinnon the recipe for his secret elixir, a special drink created by his personal pharmacist. The MacKinnon clan accepted the custody of the recipe, until at the beginning of the ‘900, a descendant of the family decided that it was time to commercially exploit the recipe calling it “Drambuie”

4.5 cl Scotch whisky
2.5 cl Drambuie

Procedure: directly prepare an old fashioned glass with ice. Stir gently and garnish with a twist of lemon.

A double-scottish cocktali: Scotch Whiskey and Drambuie which is a liqueur whose recipe is a mix of whiskey, honey … secrets and legends. Even today the company is managed by the same family and keeps the contents of the recipe secret. (Taken from here)

At this point many will ask “But the Skye boat song, where did it end?” (here  is)

LINK
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755
http://thesession.org

Twa Bonnie Maidens, a jacobite song

Leggi in italiano

“Twa Bonnie Maidens” is a jacobite song published by James Hogg in “Jacobite Relics”, Volume II (1819). It refers to the occasion when Bonnie Prince Charlie sailed with Flora MacDonald from the Outer Hebrides to Skye, dressed as Flora’s maid. The event described here took place during Bonnie Prince Charlie’s months in hiding after his defeat at the Battle of Culloden (April 16, 1746). By late July, the Hannoverians thought they had Charlie pinned down in the outer Hebrides.

IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA

The prince had managed to get to the Island of Banbecula of the Outer Hebrides, but the surveillance was very tight and had no way to escape. And here comes Flora MacDonald.
In the anecdotal version of the story, Flora devised a trick to take away Charlie from the island : on the pretext of visiting her mother (who lived in Armadale after remarried), she obtained the safe-conduct for herself and her two servants; under the name and clothes of the Irish maid Betty Burke, however, it was hidden the Bonny Prince!: Il Principe e la Ballerina

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
“Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie” di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

TWA BONNIE MAIDENS

Hogg took the Gaelic words down from a Mrs. Betty Cameron from Lochaber.
Was copied verbatim from the mouth of Mrs Betty Cameron from Lochaber ; a well-known character over a great part of the Lowlands, especially for her great store of Jacobite songs, and her attachment to Prince Charles, and the chiefs that suffered for him, of whom she never spoke without bursting out a-crying. She said it was from the Gaelic ; but if it is, I think it is likely to have been translated by herself. There is scarcely any song or air that I love better.”
Quadriga Consort from “Ships Ahoy ! – Songs of Wind, Water & Tide” 2011
Marais & Miranda from A European Folk Song Festival 2012 (I, III)
Archie Fisher from “The Man with a Rhyme” 1976


I
There were twa bonnie maidens,
and three bonnie maidens,
Cam’ ower the Minc (1),
and cam’ ower the main,
Wi’ the wind for their way
and the corrie (2) for their hame,
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
Chorus
Come alang, come alang,
wi’ your boatie and your song,

Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!

The nicht, it is dark,
and the redcoat is gane,

And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.

II
There is Flora (3), my honey,
sae neat and sae bonnie,
And ane that is tall,
and handsome withall.
Put the ane for my Queen
and the ither for my King (4)
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
III (5)
There’s a wind on the tree,
and a ship on the sea,
Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!
By the sea mullet’s nest (6)
I will watch o’er the main,
And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
There were two pretty maidens,
and three pretty maidens,
Came over the Minch ,
and came over the main,
With the wind for their way
and the mountains for their hame,
And they’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.
Chorus
Come along, come along,
wi’ your boat and your song,
To my hey! pretty maidens,
my two pretty girls!
The night, it is dark,
and the redcoat is gone,
And you’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.
II
There is Flora, my honey,
so neat and so pretty,
And one that is tall,
and handsome withall.
Put the one for my Queen
and the other for my King
And they’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.
III
There’s a wind on the tree,
and a ship on the sea,
To my hey! pretty maidens,
my two pretty girls!
By the sea mullet’s nest
I will watch over the main,
And you’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.

NOTES
1) Minch=channel between the Outer and Inner Hebrides
2) corry=a hollow space or excavation in a hillside
3) Flora MacDonald
4) Bonnie Prince Charlie
5) the stanza is a synthesis between the III and the IV of the version reported by Hogg
6) The Nest Point is another striking view on the western tip of the Isle of Skye (on the opposite side of Portree), an excellent spot to watch the Minch the stretch of sea that separates the Highlands of the north west and the north of Skye from the Harris Islands and Lewis, told by the ancient Norse “Fjord of Scotland”
At the time of the Jacobite uprising there was still no Lighthouse designed and built by Alan Stevenson in the early 1900s.

TUNE: Planxty George Brabazon or Prince Charlie’s Welcome To The Isle Of Skye?

The Irish harpist Turlough O’Carolan (the last of the great itinerant irish harper-composers) wrote some arias in homage to his guests and patrons, whom he called “planxty”, whose text in Irish Gaelic (not received) praised the nobleman on duty or commemorated an event; the melodies are free and lively with different measures (not necessarily in triplets). With the title of George Brabazon two distinct melodies attributed to Carolan are known.
“George Brabazon” was retitled in Scotland “Prince Charlie’s Welcome to the Island of Skye” in honor of the Pretender as the vehicle for the song “Twa Bonnie Maidens.” It also appears in the Gow’s Complete Repository, Part Second (1802) under the title “Isle of Sky” (sic), set as a Scots Measure and with some melodic differences in the second part. This is significant, for it predates the earliest Irish source (O’Neill) by a century.
Source “The Fiddler’s Companion” (cf. Liens).
J.J. Sheridan
Siobhan Mcdonnell

The Chieftains  in Water From the Well 2000

“Over the Sea to Skye”

Link
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/twabonny.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25774
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_maidens.htm
https://www.thebards.net/music/lyrics/Twa_Bonnie_Maidens.shtml
https://www.visitouterhebrides.co.uk/see-and-do/location-a-coilleag-a-phrionnsa-bonnie-prince-charlie-trail-p538071

https://thesession.org/tunes/1609
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46578
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19657
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6422
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9152

Twa Bonnie Maidens

Read the post in English  

“Twa Bonnie Maidens” (in italiano “Due graziose fanciulle”) è una canzone giacobita pubblicata da James Hogg in “Jacobite Relics”, Volume II (1819) che celebra l’arrivo nell’isola di Skye di una barchetta con due belle fanciulle, senonchè l’ancella di Flora Macdonald è il nostro Bel Carletto travestito, nella sua fuga dalla Scozia, dopo la disfatta della rivolta giacobita nella rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746).

IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA

Il principe era riuscito ad arrivare nell’isola di Banbecula delle Ebridi Esterne, ma la sorveglianza era strettissima e non aveva modo di fuggire. Ed ecco che entra in scena la fanciulla, Flora MacDonald.
Nella versione anedottica della storia, Flora escogitò un trucco per portare via dall’isola Charlie: con il pretesto di andare a trovare la madre (che viveva ad Armadale dopo essersi risposata), ottenne per sè e per i due suoi domestici il salvacondotto; sotto il nome e gli abiti della cameriera irlandese Betty Burke però si celava il Bonny Prince!: Il Principe e la Ballerina

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
“Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie” di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

TWA BONNIE MAIDENS

Hogg trascrisse il testo dalla testimonianza della signora Betty Cameron di Lochaber, la quale affermava che originariamente la canzone fosse in gaelico scozzese. Così scrive Hogg
È stato copiato letteralmente dalla bocca della signora Betty Cameron di Lochaber; un personaggio ben noto in gran parte delle Lowlands, specialmente per la sua grande quantità di canzoni giacobite, e il suo attaccamento al principe Carlo, e ai capi che soffrirono per lui, dei quali non parlò mai senza scoppiare a piangere. Disse che la canzone era dal gaelico; ma se lo è, penso che probabilmente l’ha tradotta lei stessa. Non c’è quasi nessuna canzone o aria che amo di più”
Quadriga Consort in “Ships Ahoy ! – Songs of Wind, Water & Tide” 2011
Marais & Miranda in A European Folk Song Festival 2012 (strofe I, III)
Archie Fisher in “The Man with a Rhyme” 1976


I
There were twa bonnie maidens,
and three bonnie maidens,
Cam’ ower the Minc (1),
and cam’ ower the main,
Wi’ the wind for their way
and the corrie (2) for their hame,
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
Chorus
Come alang, come alang,
wi’ your boatie and your song,

Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!

The nicht, it is dark,
and the redcoat is gane,

And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.

II
There is Flora (3), my honey,
sae neat and sae bonnie,
And ane that is tall,
and handsome withall.
Put the ane for my Queen
and the ither for my King (4)
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
III (5)
There’s a wind on the tree,
and a ship on the sea,
Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!
By the sea mullet’s nest (6)
I will watch o’er the main,
And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’erano due graziose fanciulle
e tre fanciulle belle
che attraversarono il Minch
oltre il mare
sospinte dal vento a favore
e accolte dalle nostre montagne
sono sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye
Coro
Venite, venite
con la vostra barchetta e la vostra canzone, belle fanciulle,
mie due fanciulle belle!
La notte è buia
e le giubbe rosse sono partite,
voi siete sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye.
II
C’è Flora, la mia diletta;
così forte e bella
e uno che è alto
e anche bello.
Metti l’una come Regina
e l’altro come Re
sono sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye
III
C’è il vento all’albero
e una barca nel mare
belle fanciulle,
mie due fanciulle belle!
Dal nido di triglie
sorveglierò il mare
voi siete sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye.

NOTE
1) Minch=canale tra le Ebridi esterne e le Ebridi interne
2) corry=una nicchia o uno scavo nella collina
3) 3) Flora MacDonald
4) Bonnie Prince Charlie
5) la strofa è una sintesi  tra la III e la IV della versione riportata da Hogg
6) i due sbarcarono nel villaggio di Portree. Il Nest Point è invece un altro suggestivo panorama  sulla punta occidentale dell’isola di Skye (sul lato opposto di Portree), ottimo punto per guardare il Minch il tratto di mare che separa le Highlands do nord ovest e il nord di Skye dalle isole Harris e Lewis, detto dagli antichi Norreni “Fiordo della Scozia”
Ai tempi della rivolta giacobita non esisteva ancora il Faro progettato e costruito da Alan Stevenson nei primi anni del 900.

LA MELODIA: Planxty George Brabazon o Prince Charlie’s Welcome To The Isle Of Skye?

L’arpista irlandese Turlough O’Carolan (ricordato come l’ultimo dei bardi-arpisti itineranti) scrisse alcune arie in omaggio ai suoi ospiti e mecenati, che chiamava “planxty”, il cui testo in gaelico irlandese (non pervenuto) elogiava il nobile di turno o ne commemorava un evento; le melodie sono libere e vivaci con tempi diversi (non necessariamente in terzine). Con il titolo di George Brabazon si conoscono due distinte melodie attribuite a Carolan.
“George Brabazon”è stato rititolato in Scozia “Prince Charlie’s Welcome to the Island of Skye” in onore del Pretendente come veicolo per la canzone “Twa Bonnie Maidens”. Appare anche nel Complete Repository di Gow, Parte Seconda (1802) con il titolo “Isle di Sky “(sic), suonato come una Scots Measure e con alcune differenze melodiche nella seconda parte. Questo è significativo, perché precede la prima fonte irlandese (O’Neill) di un secolo.
Fonte “The Fiddler’s Companion” (cf. Liens).

J.J. Sheridan
Siobhan Mcdonnell

The Chieftains  in Water From the Well 2000

“Over the Sea to Skye”

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/twabonny.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25774
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_maidens.htm
https://www.thebards.net/music/lyrics/Twa_Bonnie_Maidens.shtml
https://www.visitouterhebrides.co.uk/see-and-do/location-a-coilleag-a-phrionnsa-bonnie-prince-charlie-trail-p538071

https://thesession.org/tunes/1609
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46578
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19657
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6422
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9152

There grows a bonie brier-bush

Leggi in italiano

“There grows a bonie brier-bush” is a traditional Scottish song modified by Robert Burns for editorial purpose and published in 1796 in the “Scots Musical Museum”; the double meaning concerned both the allusion to the relationship between a Jacobite rebel “Highland laddie” and a “Lowland lassie” follower of King George that the erotic context of the relationship (as we find it in the variant”The Cuckoo’s nest“)

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 3 & 4 1996
Junkman’s Choir in The Burns Sessions – Footage of recordings from inside Robert Burns’ Cottage, Alloway, Scotland (January 2018)

I
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush (1) in our kail-yard (2),
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush in our kail-yard;
And below the bonnie brier-bush
there’s a lassie and a lad,
And they’re busy, busy
courting in our kail-yard.
II
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard,
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard;
We’ll awa to Athole’s green (3),
and there we’ll no be seen,
Whare the trees and the branches
will be our safe-guard.
III
‘ Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ (4)?
Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ ?
Where Sandy (5) and Nancy
I’m sure will ding (6) them a’?’
‘ I winna gang to the dance
in Carlyle ha.’
IV
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa?
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa ?
I will awa to Edinburgh,
and win a penny fee (7),
And see an onie bonnie lad
will fancy me.
V
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me,
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me ;
A feather in his bonnet
and a ribbon at his knee (8),
He ‘s a bonnie, bonnie laddie,
and yon be he !

NOTES
Enghish translation *
1) in the ballads the rose is not only “a rose” but it is the symbol of love, symbolizes here the loss of virginity, the thorns are also a memento to the dangers of a sexuality outside of marriage
2) kail-yard is the garden in front of the door of the cottage, it has become synonymous with a group of storytellers of the end of the 19th century who often described Scottish rural life, often using dialectal forms.
3) Athole: Atholl is located in the heart of the Scottish Highlands and derives its name from the Gaelic “ath Fodla” or New Ireland following the invasions in the island of the Irish tribes in the seventh century, Athole is the old name for the area of Perthshire

4) “Carlisle Castle is situated in Carlisle, in the English county of Cumbria, near the ruins of Hadrian’s Wall. Given the proximity of Carlisle to the border between England and Scotland, it has been the centre of many wars and invasions. The most important battles for the city of Carlisle and its castle were during the Jacobite rising of 1745 against George II of Great Britain” (da Wiki)
5) Sandy is short for Alexander
6) to ding= overcome; wear out, weary; to beat, excel, get the better of.
7) panny fee= wages
8) in the eighteenth century there were no stretch fabrics so as to support the socks to the calves of the man (and the thighs of women) were used garters or ribbons turned several times around the leg and knotted (among which we must hide a small dagger) , even those who wore pants (adhering a bit like a tights) used to tie ribbons under the knee

LINK
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/kailyard.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/cuckoosnest.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/533.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=86781
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/90262457
https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14959

There grows a bonie brier-bush

Read the post in English  

“There grows a bonie brier-bush” è una canzone tradizionale scozzese modificata da Robert Burns per esigenze editoriali e pubblicata nel 1796 nello “Scots Musical Museum“; il doppio senso riguardava sia l’allusione alla relazione tra un ribelle giacobita “Highland laddie”  e una “Lowland lassie” seguace di re Giorgio che il contesto erotico della relazione (così come lo ritroviamo nella variante “The Cuckoo’s nest“)

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 3 & 4 1996
Junkman’s Choir in The Burns Sessions – Footage of recordings from inside Robert Burns’ Cottage, Alloway, Scotland (January 2018)


I
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush (1) in our kail-yard (2),
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush in our kail-yard;
And below the bonnie brier-bush
there’s a lassie and a lad,
And they’re busy, busy
courting in our kail-yard.
II
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard,
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard;
We’ll awa to Athole’s green (3),
and there we’ll no be seen,
Whare the trees and the branches
will be our safe-guard.
III
‘ Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ (4)?
Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ ?
Where Sandy (5) and Nancy (6)
I’m sure will ding (7) them a’?’
‘ I winna gang to the dance
in Carlyle ha.’
IV
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa?
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa ?
I will awa to Edinburgh,
and win a penny fee (8),
And see an onie bonnie lad
will fancy me.
V
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me,
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me ;
A feather in his bonnet
and a ribbon at his knee (9),
He ‘s a bonnie, bonnie laddie,
and yon be he !
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Nel nostro orto in cortile
cresce una bella rosa selvatica,
nel nostro orto in cortile
cresce una bella rosa selvatica
e sotto al bel rovo
ci sono una ragazza e un ragazzo
molti affaccendati
ad amoreggiare nel nostro orto
II
Non amoreggeremo più sotto
al cespuglio di rose nel nostro orto
non amoreggeremo più sotto
al cespuglio di rose nel nostro orto
partiremo per le praterie di Atholl,
e là non saremo più spiati
dove gli alberi e i rami
ci faranno da riparo
III
“Andrai al ballo
nel salone di Carlyle?
Andrai al ballo
Nel salone di Carlyle?
Dove Sandro e Agnese
di certo li batteranno tutti”
“Non andrò al ballo
nel salone di Carlyle”
IV
Come troverò un ragazzo
se Sandro se ne andrà?
Come troverò un ragazzo
se Sandro se ne andrà?
Andrò a Edimburgo
a guadagnarmi un salario
e vedere se un bel ragazzo
mi vorrà bene
V
Viene dal Nord
colui che mi sposerà
Viene dal Nord
colui che mi sposerà
Una piuma sul berretto
e un nastro alle ginocchia
E’ un bel, bel ragazzo
e da làggiù lui viene!

NOTE
1) nelle ballate la rosa non è solo “una rosa” ma è il simbolo della passione amorosa, simboleggia qui la perdita della verginità, le spine sono anche un memento ai pericoli di una sessualità fuori dal matrimonio
2) kail-yard è l’orticello davanti alla porta del cottage, è diventato sinonimo di gruppo di narratori di fine ’800 che descrissero, spesso servendosi di forme dialettali, la vita rurale scozzese.
3) Athole: Atholl si trova nel cuore delle Highlands scozzesi e deriva il nome dal gaelico “ath Fodla” ovvero Nuova Irlanda conseguente alle invasioni nell’isola delle tribù irlandesi nel VII sec, Athole è l’antico nome per l’area del Perthshire
4) “Il Castello di Carlisle  è un castello medievale inglese che si trova nella città di Carlisle, in Cumbria. Il castello ha oltre novecento anni ed è stato scenario di molti importanti episodi militari della storia inglese. Data la sua vicinanza ai confini fra Inghilterra e Scozia, fu per tutto il medioevo luogo di scontri e di invasioni. Le più importanti battaglie vissute però dalla città e dal castello di Carlisle furono durante le rivolte giacobite contro Giorgio I e Giorgio II, rispettivamente nel 1715 e nel 1745.” (da Wiki)
5) Sandy diminutivo di Alessandro
6) Nancy nel Settecento veniva usato come diminutivo di Anne ma anche più anticamente era il diminutivo di Annis (la forma medievale di Agnese)
7) to ding è un verbo scossese usato nel senso di eccellere, avere la meglio, superare, nel contesto vuole indicare la bravura della coppia di danzatori al gran ball di Carlisle
8) panny fee= wages
9) nel Settecento non esistevano i tessuti elasticizzati così per reggere le calze ai polpacci dell’uomo ( e alle cosce delle donne) si usavano delle giarrettiere o dei nastri girati più volte intorno alla gamba e annodati (tra cui alla bisogna si nascondeva un piccolo pugnale), anche chi portava i pantaloni (aderenti un po’ come una calzamaglia) usava annodare dei nastri sotto al ginocchio

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/kailyard.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/cuckoosnest.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/533.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=86781
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/90262457
https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14959

Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch

Stemma del clan Cameron di Lochiel, il motto originario era: Mo Righ ‘s Mo Dhuchaich (For King and Country)

Read the post in English

“Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch” (In the Heather’s My Bed) è un canto giacobita risalente al 1747 attribuito ad un guerriero highlander sostenitore della causa giacobita tale Dougal Roy Cameron.
La storia legata alla canzone è oltremodo avvincente: Dougal Roy Cameron (MacGillonie/MacOllonie) (oppure Dughall Ruadh Camaran) era un soldato nel reggimento di Donald Cameron di Lochiel, preso prigioniero nella battaglia di Culloden (o in qualche conflitto appena precedente) e poi liberato il 15 luglio 1747.
Poco prima della cattura aveva appreso della morte del fratello, giustiziato per ordine di uno spietato ufficiale di nome Grant di Knockando, mentre era in procinto di arrendersi insieme ai suoi comagni. Alcuni Cameron, che avevano assistito da vicino all’esecuzione, assicurarono che il capo plotone era un ufficiale che indossava una redingote blu e cavalcava un cavallo bianco. Al suo rilascio Dougal andò alla ricerca di quell’ufficiale per ucciderlo e lo trovò nei pressi del Loch Arkaig, ma ci fu uno scambio di persona  e uccise Munro di Culchairn che indossava la stessa giubba. Ecco perchè il nostro fuorilegge trascorre le notti insonni, nascosto in qualche buio e umido anfratto tra le forre, pentendosi di non essere riuscito nell’intento di vendicare il sangue del fratello .
Alla storia personale del guerriero s’intreccia la delusione per l’amara sconfitta della causa giacobita (attribuita come da copione al volta faccia di alcuni tra i maggiori capi clan) e la speranza di un ritorno trionfale del Bel Carletto.

ASCOLTA The Lochies riassumono il testo in otto strofe, per la versione integrale qui

I
Tha mo leabaidh ‘san fhraoch
Fo shileadh nan craobh,
‘S ged tha mi ‘sa choille
Cha do thoill mi na taoid.
II
Tha mo leab’ air an làr
‘S tha mo bhreacan gun sgàil,
‘S cha d’fhuair mi lochd cadail
O’n a spaid mi Cùl Chàirn.
III
Tha mo dhùil ann an Dia
Ged a dhìobradh Loch Iall,
Fhaicinn fhathast na chòirneal
An Inbhir Lòchaidh seo shìos.
IV
Bha thu dìleas do’n Phrionns’
Is d’a shinnsre o thùs,
‘S ged nach tug thu dha t’fhacal
Bha thu ceart air a chùl.
V
Cha b’ionnan ‘s MacLeòid
A tha ‘n-dràsd’ aig Rìgh Deòrs’,
Na fhògarrach soilleir
Fo choibhreadh ‘n dà chleòc.
VI
Cha b’ionnan ‘s an laoch
O Cheapaich nan craobh
Chaidh e sìos le chuid ghaisgeach,
‘S nach robh tais air an raon.
VII
Ach nuair a thig am Prionns’ òg
Is na Frangaich ‘ga chòir,
Théid sgapadh gun taing
Ann an campa Rìgh Deòrs’.
VIII
‘S ged tha mis’ ann am fròig
Tha am botal ‘nam dhorn,
‘S gun òl mi ‘s chan àicheadh
Deoch-slàint a’ Phrionns’ òg.
Traduzione inglese*
I
In the heather ‘s my bed
‘Neath the dew-laden trees,
And though I’m in the green-wood
I deserved not the ropes.
II
My bed’s on the ground
And uncovered’s my plaid,
Sleep has not come upon me
Since I murdered Culchairn.
III
My hope rests in God,
Though Lochiel has gone,
I’ll yet see him a colonel
In Inverlochy down here.
IV
Thou wast true to the Prince
And his race, from the first,
Though thou hadst never promised
Thou didst give him true aid.
V
Not so did MacLeod,
Who is now for King George,
A manifest outcast
‘Neath the shade of two cloaks.
VI
Not so the warrior brave
From Keppoch of the trees,
Who charged down with his heroes,
Unafraid on the field.
VII
But when comes the young Prince
With the Frenchmen to aid,
Unthanked will be scattered
The camp of King George.
VIII
And though I’m in a den,
There’s a glass in my hand,
And I’ll drink, and refuse not,
A health to Prince Charles.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
L’edera è il mio giaciglio
sotto gli alberi carichi di rugiada
e sono (nascosto) nel folto del bosco
perchè non meritavo l’impiccagione
II
Il mio giaciglio è la terra
e mi corpo con il mantello (1)
ma il sonno non viene
da quando ho ucciso Culchairn (2)
III
La mia speranza affido a Dio
anche se Lochiel (3) è partito
lo vedrò ancora colonnello
laggiù a Fort William (4).
IV
Tu eri un seguace del Principe
e alla sua causa, dal principio
e senza aver prestato giuramento,
gli desti il tuo aiuto sincero
V
Non così fece MacLeod (5),
che ora parteggia per Re Giorgio
un palese reietto
colui che serve due padroni (6)
VI
Non così il guerriero coraggioso
da Keppoch degli alberi (7)
che andò all’assalto con i suoi eroi
senza paura sul campo di battaglia
VII
Ma quando ritornerà il giovane Principe
aiutato dai Francesi (8)
in un amen sarà disperso
l’esercito (9) di Re Giorgio
VII
Anche in questo nascondiglio (10)
alzo il bicchiere
e non mi rifiuterò di bere
alla salute del Principe Carlo

NOTE
* John Lorne Campbell in “Highland Songs of the ’45” (1932)
1) è il pratico kilt del montanaro scozzese: Il vero kilt (in gaelico philabeg) è in effetti una lunga coperta (plaid) cioè un unico, lunghissimo, pezzo di stoffa (il tartan) delle dimensioni di 65-75 cm di altezza per una lunghezza di 5 metri circa, pieghettato e drappeggiato intorno ai fianchi e poi riportato sulle spalle come un mantello (che funzionava bene anche come grande tasca dove infilare gli oggetti da trasportare o le armi).  Era indubbiamente un capo pratico, senza troppe pretese di eleganza che teneva al caldo e al riparo, e perciò prevalentemente un abito “rustico”abbinato per lo più allo stivale ad altezza ginocchio (cuaron) ma più spesso portato a piede nudo (e dovevano avere dei fisici ben temprati questi scozzesi che se ne stavano al vento, pioggia e neve così conciati!) Ai rudi scozzesi di montagna  serviva come coperta per coprirsi durante il giorno e come giaciglio in cui dormire durante le notti passate nella brughiera. (continua)
2) il capitano Murno di Culcairn che aveva preso in prestito il mantello (o la giubba) di Grant
3) Donald Cameron di Lochiel (c.1700 – Ottobre 1748) soprannonimato semplicemente “Gentle Lochiel” per i suoi atti di magnanimità nei confronti  dei prigioneri,  fu tra i più influenti capoclan tradizionalmente fedele alla Casa Stuart. Si unì al Principe Carlo nel 1745 e dopo Culloden fuggì in Francia dove morì in esilio. La sua famiglia fu riabilitata e reintegrata nel titolo con l’amnistia del 1748.
4) Fort William a Inverlochy: uno dei forti che faceva parte della catena di fortificazioni (insieme a Fort Augustus e Fort George) utilizzata per tenere sotto controllo le possibili rivolte giacobite. E’ rimasto come presidio militare fino al 1855. Fort William è il centro più importante della Scozia, snodo ferroviario e stradale (qui si dipartono la West Highland Way e la Great Glen Way).
5) McLeod di McLeod ha promesso il suo sostegno al Principe per rimangiarsi la parola quando l’ha visto arrivare senza soldi e senza uomini. La sua defezione ha pesato pesantemente nel fallimento della rivolta.
6) Nel Medioevo il servizio feudale al proprio sire era tributato simbolicamente mettendosi “sotto al suo mantello”, così anche alla sposa durante la celebrazione del Matrimonio veniva appoggiato il mantello del futuro marito sulle spalle, in segno di sottomissione
7) Alexander McDonald di Keppoch morì alla testa del suo clan a Culloden mentre il resto dei McDonalds ripiegava
8) il Bel Carletto non ritornerà più in Scozia vedi
9) letterlamente l’accampamento
10) dopo Culloden molti guerrieri cercarono rifugio in grotte e anfratti per sfuggire ai rastrellamenti delle truppe inglesi:  nei mesi e anni successivi a Culloden fu caccia all’uomo per coloro che erano riusciti a fuggire dal campo della battaglia e per i loro sostenitori, anche le famiglie e i simpatizzanti vennero incarcerati e coloro che offrivano ospitalità ai fuggiaschi erano espropriati e processati per alto tradimento. Le Highlands furono militarizzate e tenute sotto stretto controllo inglese, senza parlare delle leggi volte a spezzare “l’highlander pride”

continua

APPROFONDIMENTO
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/war-songs-anti-war-songs/you-jacobites-by-name/

https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/

FONTI
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Cameron
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hamoleab.htm

An Fhìdeag Airgid

“Cò Sheinneas an Fhìdeag Airgid” o più semplicemente  “an Fhìdeag Airgid” è una waulking song probabilmente ricavata da un frammento di una jacobite song presumibilmente composta nel 1745 per esortare a seguire in battaglia il Principe Charles Edward Stuart. Un canto risalente allo sbarco del giovane pretendente nelle isole Ebridi, certo di trovare sostenitori disposti a prendere le armi in suo nome.
Il venticinquenne Charles sbarcò insieme a sette compagni sull’isola di Eriskay e una manciata di spade, poi si spostò verso Glenfinnan e restò in attesa che i clan arrivassero! E così nel canto ci si domanda quali saranno i clan a imbracciare il loro “fhideag airigid” (silver whistle) ossia gli spadoni degli Highlanders per rimettere il giovane pretendente sul trono (d’Inghilterra, Irlanda e Scozia).
E’ la versione di Flora MacNeil dell’isola di Barra ad essere la più completa  (in Peter Kennedy, Folk Songs of Britain and Ireland, Cassell, 1975) – (vedi qui)
ASCOLTA http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/22363/1

Karen Matheson in An Fhideag Airgid 2013 gia con i Capercaille in Glenfinnan 1995

The Moors

ASCOLTA Gillebrìde MacMillan Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

La versione waulking song

ancora il canto dagli archivi della tradizione
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/93660/1 (Captain Donald Joseph MacKinnon)
http: //www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/30346/1 (Nan MacKinnon)

Versione gaelico Karen Matheson
Co a sheinneas an fhideag airigid
Ho ro hu a hu il o
Hi ri hu o, hi ri hu o
Mac mo righ air tighinn a dh’Alba
Air lang mhar nar tri chrann airgid
Air long riomhach nam ball airgid
Tearlach og nan gorm shuil mealach
Failte, failte mian is clui dhuit
Fidhleireachd is ragha a’uil dhuit
Co a sheinneadh? Nach seinninn fhin i?
Co a sheinneas an fhideag airigid

traduzione inglese (da qui)
Who will play the silver whistle?
the son of my King is coming to Scotland
On a great ship with three masts of silver
On the handsome vessel with the silver rigging
Young Charles with the blue bewitching eyes
Welcome, Welcome, may you be desired and famous
May there be fiddling the choicest music before you
Who will play the silver whistle?
Who’d say that I’d not play it myself?
Who will play the silver whistle?
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento[1]
mentre il figlio del mio re sta ritornando in Scozia?
Su un grande vascello con tre alberi d’argento
su un bel vascello con sartiame d’argento
il giovane Carlo dagli azzurri occhi seducenti!
Ben venuto, benvenuto che tu sia desiderato e rinomato,
che per te sia suonata la musica di violino più raffinata![2]
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento?
Chi ha detto che non lo farei io stesso?
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento?

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: Silver whistle

ASCOLTA Silly Sisters 1976 , June Tabor e Maddy Prior cantano la versione da Flora MacNeil di Barra versificata in inglese


I
O who will play the silver whistle
When my king’s son to sea is going?
To Scotland prepares, prepares his coming
Upon a large ship o’er the ocean
II
The ship it has three masts of silver
With ropes so light of french silk woven
Upon each end are fixed golden pulleys
To bring my king’s son ashore and landed.
III
When my king’s son he comes back home
No girdle scones will food be for him
But loaves of bread, bread will be baking
For Charles with blue eyes so enticing.
IV
O welcome to you, fame and honour
Fiddles and choice tunes attend you
I will be dancing, I will be singing
And I will play the silver whistle.
Traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento
mentre il figlio del mio re è per mare?
In Scozia si prepari, si prepari il suo arrivo, su di un grande vascello attraverso l’oceano (1).
II
La nave ha tre alberi d’argento,
con sartiame  intessuto di seta francese così fine, ad ogni estremità sono fissate pulegge dorate,
per portare il figlio del mio re a riva e sbarcare
III
Quando il figlio del mio re ritorna a casa
nessun pane in padella (2) sarà il suo cibo, ma filoncini di pane saranno cotto nel forno
per Carlo dagli azzurri occhi seducenti
IV
Ben venuto a te, fama e onore
violini e le melodie più raffinate ti attendono, ballerò e canterò
e suonerò la canna d’argento

NOTE
1) sembrerebbe chissa quale traversata ma si tratta semplicemente del viaggio in mare dalla Francia alle Ebridi scozzesi
1) girdle scones: è il pane cotto su una piastra di ghisa riscaldata direttamente sul fuoco, in irlanda questa piastra-padella si chiama griddle, in Scozia girdle in Galles bake stone.
E’ lo spartano pane preparato nei bivacchi  chiamato più comunemente bannock: la preparazione di questa alternativa del pane cotto in forno è antichissima, perchè per ottenere il primo pane probabilmente si schiacciarono tra due pietre i chicchi dei primi cereali coltivati,  e con l’aggiunta di acqua si cossero in strati sottili su delle pietre piatte poste sul fuoco (o tra la cenere). L’ulteriore variante fu poi la cottura nella padella in ghisa dei traveiller e dei primi pionieri d’oltreoceano. Le farine d’un tempo erano quelle d’avena o d’orzo che meglio si adattano ai climi estremi del Nord, un pane preparato in fretta e senza lasciarlo lievitare continua

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/matheson/anfhideag.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/fhideag.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/silverwhistle.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20712
http://carmichaelwatson.blogspot.it/2011/08/jacobite-song-silver-whistle.html

CHARLIE, HE’S MY DARLING

Bannocks of Barley

The Bonny Moorhen

Ennesima jacobite song made in Scozia, scritta in codice e in cui l’uccello invocato non è un “moorhen” ma il Bel Carletto.
La melodia è quantomeno seicentesca (in Henry Atkinson MS, 1694, dal titolo “Take tent to the rippells good Man”).
C’è anche una versione goliardica di Robert Burns riportata nelle “Merry Muses of Caledonia” uscito postumo dal titolo “The Bonie Moo-hen” a hunting song”: nella versione di Robert Burns si tratta di una battuta di caccia alla gallinella d’acqua (vedi). Il poemetto è un linguaggio cifrato tra lui e la bella Nancy McLehose con cui il bardo intratteneva una relazione adulterina, ennesima prova di una loro relazione molto più carnale di quanto sia stato lecito supporre nei salotti edimburghesi del tempo.

Bear McCreary ne ha fatto un personale arrangiamento strumentale per la serie Outlander (stagione 1) con il titolo “Tracking Jamie” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

LA VERSIONE TRADIZIONALE

La bella gallinella d’acqua (Gallinula chloropus) –  il maschio e la femmina hanno una livrea identica con colorazione prevalentemente marrone scuro-grigio e nera – porta i colori del vecchio tartan Stuart: becco rosso acceso, zampe verdi, piumaggio nero e grigio con una spruzzata di bianco, e molto probabilmente proprio per questo è stata presa come avatar del  “giovane” e ultimo pretendente Stuart al trono di Scozia, tuttavia alcuni ritengono offensivo paragonare il bel principe a una gallinella (moor-hen) e preferiscono considerare il termine come un ulteriore allusione al moor-cock!
Già in “The mountain streams where the moorcocks crow” mi sono soffermata sul Moorcock, perchè ben due uccelli si condendono il nome: il gallo cedrone ma anche la pernice di Scozia, entrambi della famiglia dei fagiani. (continua)

La versione testuale proviene da “The Jacobite Relics of Scotland, being the Songs, Airs and Legends of the Adherents to the House of Stuart”( James Hogg, 1818)
ASCOLTA The Corries


I
My bonnie moorhen,
my bonnie moorhen,
Up in the grey hills,
and doon in the glen,
It’s when ye gang butt the hoose,
when ye gang ben
I’ll drink a health tae
my bonnie moorhen.
II
My bonnie moorhen’s gane
o’er the main,
And it will be summer
till she comes again,
But when she comes back again
some folk will ken,
Oh, joy be with you
my bonnie moorhen.
III
My bonnie moorhen
has feathers anew,
And she’s a’ fine colours,
but nane o’ them blue,
She’s red an’ she’s white,
an’ she’s green an’ she’s grey
My bonnie moorhen come hither way.
IV
Come up by Glen Duich,
and doon by Glen Shee
An’ roun’ past Kinclaven
and hither by me,
For Ranald and Donald
lie low in the fen,
Tae brak the wing o’
my bonnie moorhen.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
La mia bella gallinella d’acqua,
la mia bella gallinella
su per le grige colline
e giù nelle valli
è quando uscirai di casa
per venire qui [1]
berrò alla salute della mia bella gallinella d’acqua
II
La mia bella gallinella d’acqua
è andata oltre il mare
ma quando sarà estate
ritornerà di nuovo
e quando ritornerà,
e lo sapete bene
che la gioia sia con te [2]
mia bella gallinella
III
La mia bella gallinella
ha un nuovo piumaggio,
ha tanti bei colori,
ma tra di essi non c’è l’azzurro.[3]
Rosso e bianco
e verde e grigio[4]
la mia bella gallinella verrà quaggiù
IV
Vieni su per Glenduich
e giù per Glendee
e superato Kinclaven[5]
e poi da me
perchè Ranald e Donald[6]
sono acquattati nel fango
per spezzare le ali
alla mia bella gallinella

NOTE
1) “when ye gang but the house, when ye gang ben…” =when you go out of the house and when you come in. Il Bonny Prince si trova esule in Francia
2) frase tipica di un brindisi benaugurale
3) blu significa anche triste
4) sono i colori del tartan stuart
5) a detta di James Hogg un itinerario non corretto
6) i soldati inglesi, anche se Ranald e Donald sono nomi tipicamente scozzesi, si vuole forse alludere ai traditori

LA VERSIONE DELLA FAMIGLIA CARTHY

E’ una versione testuale completamente diversa anche se cantata sulla stessa melodia (vedi)

FONTI
http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/linnut/moorhen
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/bonnymoorhen.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=10726
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/moorhen.htm
http://www.robertburns.org/works/157.shtml
https://nslmblog.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/the-bonie-moorhen-1788/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=50450&lang=en

Bannocks of Barley

IL BANNOCK SCOZZESE

La preparazione di questa alternativa del pane cotto in forno è antichissima, perchè per ottenere il primo pane nella storia probabilmente si schiacciarono tra due pietre i chicchi dei primi cereali coltivati,  e con l’aggiunta di acqua si cossero in strati sottili su delle pietre piatte poste sul fuoco (o tra la cenere). L’ulteriore variante fu poi la cottura nella padella in ghisa dei traveiller e dei primi pionieri d’oltreoceano.
Il bannock scozzese ha uno spessore maggiore rispetto alle varianti tipo piadina o gallette (come di chiamano in Bretagna) o alle miacce della Valsesia perchè si stende un po’ spesso, circa alto uno o due dita; storicamente è stato il pane dei pionieri americani e canadesi, che però aveva già il suo equivalente tra i popoli nativi i quali lo preparavano con la farina di mais (o con il grano integrale). Le farine d’un tempo erano quelle d’avena o d’orzo che meglio si adattano ai climi estremi del Nord, un pane preparato in fretta e senza lasciarlo lievitare, anche se nel tempo con l’aggiunta di un po’ di lievito, si trasforma in focaccia e con una manciata di uvetta diventa addirittura un dolce. Una cottura ancora alternativa è quello della frittura.
Il problema della cottura sulla fiamma viva di un fuoco da campo è la distribuzione del calore perchè se il fuoco è troppo vivo, si rischia di bruciare la crosta e di lasciare l’interno poco cotto (il mio consiglio è d’imparare direttamente da chi ha già esperienza). In mancanza di padella l’impasto un po’ più denso viene avvolto intorno a un bastoncino di legno e cotto sopra le fiamme.

LA RICETTA DELLE ISOLE ORCADI

I Bannock d’orzo hanno un sapore caratteristico un po’ dolciastro e sono cotti sulla piastra/padella invece che nel forno, perfetti per la vita da campo dei rudi montanari scozzesi (e del rancio dei guerrieri scozzesi).
La ricetta presa da Elizabeth’s kitchen diary è molto semplice: 2 tazze di farina d’orzo, 1 tazza di farina di grano, 1 cucchiaino di bicarbonato di sodio e 1 di crema di tartaro (ok oggi possiamo usare tranquillamente lo lievito in polvere), un pizzico di sale. L’aggiunta dello lievito rende più appetibile ai palati moderni questo tipo di pane, ma un tempo si doveva trattare di una semplice miscela di farina e acqua, io uso il lievito istantaneo in polvere sciolto nel latticello, ma fate un po’ come vi pare, anche il bicarbonato può andare. Come per tutti gli impasti che devono restare morbidi si devono maneggiare il meno possibile.
Fare una fontanella con tutti gli ingredienti secchi, aggiungere tanto latticello quanto basta per ricavare una palla, (usando la stessa tazza dosare 3/4 di latticello, l’aggiunta della parte liquida è da fare però a occhio, in base alla consistenza da dare all’impasto) spianare la pasta con un po’ di farina dando la forma rotonda -si può fare un unico “pane tondo” (con il segno della croce impresso con il manico di legno) o tagliarlo in quarti.
Scaldare una padella di ghisa (senza ungerla, ma c’è chi la unge)  fino a farla diventare ben calda. Cuocere per circa 5/10 minuti su ogni lato senza scordare i bordi.
Per gustarlo al meglio tagliate il bannock ancora caldo aprendolo in due e spalmateci sopra il burro. Servire caldo con formaggio tipo fontina o asiago (che non è la stessa cosa del formaggio delle Orcadi, ma .. è da provare con i formaggi italiani a pasta semi molle anche quelli erborinati)

LA RICETTA STORICA

Un’altra versione (qui) aggiunge invece le due farine d’orzo e d’avena, sale, un po’ di burro e del latte e suggerisce un curioso procedimento per amalgamare gli ingredienti: sbriciolare il burro nelle farine come quando si prepara la pasta frolla (burro freddo che si consiglia di grattugiare per amalgamare più velocemente) e poi mettere a mollo nel latte in modo che risulti ben bagnato ma non troppo e lasciare riposare 15 minuti. Presumo che questo tipo di preparazione sia dovuta al fatto che si macinino “in casa” i chicchi (usando un frullatore, o il vecchio macinino del caffè) e che quindi non si ottenga una vera e propria farina. Come sia dopo l’ammollo si impasta con della farina d’avena e si procede spianando in forma tonda. Per la cottura in padella indica 15 minuti per lato

IL BANNOCK BISCOTTINO

Diciamolo francamente, la cottura in forno è migliore, l’impasto si cuoce bene anche all’interno, senza rischio di bruciacchiature e mezze cotture come in padella. Così elaborando appena un poco la ricetta precedente si ottengono dei gustosi (per il palato scozzese) biscottini (oatcake) da abbinare a un accostamento agrodolce, tipo formaggio e marmellata (o a burro/formaggio e miele).
La ricetta (qui) una miscela farina di grano (2 tazze) e d’avena (1 tazza), poco zucchero  e lievito, il solito pizzico di sale, burro a temperatura frigo, latte e yogurt (o il latticello se avete appena preparato il burro fresco). Procedere come al solito per la preparazione della pasta frolla (parte secca + burro  grattugiato) poi quando il burro è tutto sbriciolato aggiungere la parte liquida e mescolare con un cucchiaio di legno e poi continuare a impastare aggiungendo della farina fino a quando l’impasto non è più appiccicoso. Invece di usare gli stampini, modellare la pasta come un salame e tagliare a fette spesse 1 cm circa, se invece vogliamo fare dei biscottini rettangolari modellare un salamino più lungo e sottile (come per gli gnocchi). Cuocere a 200° per 10-15 min

IL BANNOCK LIEVITATO

Ed eccoci arrivare alla versione pane dolce lievitato, nella ricetta del Selkirk Bannock (qui e qui) si usa una farina forte (500 gr), lievito di birra, acqua o latte tiepido per attivare la lievitazione, un etto abbondante di burro (100-150 gr), 50/100 gr di zucchero e  uvetta a piacere.
Un tempo era preparato con la farina d’orzo, ma per farlo lievitare bene è preferibile la farina di grano; questo dolce più ricco è probabilmente il Bride bannock (bonnach Bride) descritto da Alexander Carmichael, che le donne sposate preparavano per la festa di Imbolc.

E mentre stiamo ai fornelli ascoltiamoci un po’ di musica tradizionale scozzese

Bannocks o’ bear meal

Sulla melodia tradizionale The Killogie nel 1688 Lord Newbottle scrisse una poesiola satirica, con il titolo di “Cakes o’ Croudy” (Crowdie è una densa pastella di farina e acqua preparata per la cottura sulla piastra). In Scozia questo tipo di satira si dice Pasquil proprio come le nostre “pasquinate” in cui il popolo sfoga il suo malumore verso i potenti. Trasformata da Robert Burns in una canzone giacobita per la raccolta dello “Scots Musical Museum” (1796). Anche James Hogg ha pubblicato un testo simile a quello di Burns con il titolo  “Cakes o’ Croudy”  (“Jacobite Relics”, 1819) che prende anche il titolo di Bannocks o Barley: nella canzone si rende omaggio ai guerrieri dei clan scozzesi (i Montanari della Scozia alta e delle Isole) che combatterono per cercare di rimettere sul trono l’ultimo pretendente della casa Stuart
lads wi the bannocks o’ barley (i ragazzi che mangiano panini d’orzo)

Non posso fare a meno di notare che anche i ribelli irlandesi del 1798 furono associati all’orzo “L’orzo che si muove nel vento”:  pare che sulle fosse comuni dove venivano seppelliti i “croppy boys“, crescesse l’orzo, germogliato dalle razioni di cibo che si portavano in tasca; così lo spirito del nazionalismo irlandese non poteva essere distrutto e tornava a rinasce.

Al momento in rete di Bannocks o Barley si trovano le versioni classiche nelle variazioni di Haydn, oppure nel The Complete Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 6 (qui)

ASCOLTA Daniela Bechly su Spotify la versione classica su arrangiamento di F.J. Haydn; il testo è però “Argyle is my name” (testo qui)
ASCOLTA in verisone marcia del Gloucester Regiment detta anche “Kinnegad Slashers” (una variante di Brian O’Linn e per questo viene archiviata talvolta come melodia irlandese)

The Kinnegad Slashers
Bannocks o’ Barley Meal

LA VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS
Bannocks o’ bear meal (1),
Bannocks o’ barley,
Here’s to the Highlandman’s
Bannocks o’ barley!
I
Wha in a brulyie
Will first cry ‘ a parley’?
Never the lads
Wi the bannocks o’ barley!
II
Wha, in his wae days,
Were loyal to Charlie (2)?
Wha but the lads
Wi the bannocks o’ barley!


LA VERSIONE DI JAMES HOGGS
I
Bannocks o’ bear meal,
Bannocks o’ barley,
Here’s to the Highlandman’s
Bannocks o’ barley!
Wha in a bruilzie
will first cry ” a parley ?”
Never the lads
wi’ the bannocks o’ barley !
II
Wha was it drew
the gude claymore for Charlie ?
Wha was it cowed
the English lowns rarely ?
An’ clawed their backs
at Falkirk (3) fairly ?
Wha but the lads
wi’ the bannocks o’ barley !
III
Wha was’t when hope
was blasted fairly,
Stood in ruin (4)
wi’ bonny Prince Charlie?
An’ ‘neath the Duke’s (5)
bluidy paw dreed fu’ sairly ?
Wha but the lads
wi’ the bannocks o’ barley !
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Panini (tortino) di farina d’orzo (1),
panini d’orzo
per gli Highlanders
panini d’orzo!
I
Chi nella lotta
griderà per primo “tregua”?
Nessuno dei ragazzi
che mangia panini d’orzo!
II
Chi nei giorni del dolore
fu fedele a Carletto (2)?
Chi se non i ragazzi
che mangiano panini d’orzo?!


Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Panini (tortino) di farina d’orzo,
panini d’orzo
per gli Highlanders
panini d’orzo!
Chi nella lotta
griderà per primo “tregua”?
Nessuno dei ragazzi
che mangia panini d’orzo!
II
Chi ha sferrato il colpo con il suo valoroso spadone per Carletto?
Chi ha intimidito
le canaglie inglesi?
E artigliato finalmente
le loro schiene a Falkirk (3)?
Chi se non i ragazzi
che mangiano panini d’orzo?!
III
Chi fu, quando la speranza
venne spazzata via,
ad ergesi tra le rovine (4)
con il bel Carletto?
E sotto la zampa insanguinata
del Duca (5) tremò pieno di rimpianto?
Chi se non i ragazzi
che mangiano panini d’orzo?!

NOTE
1) bear (che si pronuncia proprio come la parola inglese per “orso” è un tipo particolare d’orzo coltivato nell’antichità nelle isole Orcadi, usato sia per la panificazione che per la birra. Gli storici presumono che sia arrivato nelle isole (Orcadi e Shetland) insieme ai vichinghi, è seminato in primavera e raccolto in estate ( per la sua rapida crescita è detto anche l’orzo dei 90 giorni).
2) il nostro Bonny Prince
3) la battaglia di Falkirk fu la più grande battaglia della Rivolta giacobita combattuta il 17 gennaio 1746 tra gli Inglesi e i sostenitori di Charles Edward Stuart  (vedi) già nel 1298 si era dispitata un’altra battaglia tra gli Inglesi e i ribelli scozzesi di William Wallace, vinta da Edoardo I a caro prezzo. Purtroppo, però, anziché riprendere l’avanzata verso sud,  il principe Carlo Edoardo preferì fermarsi a Inverness con l’intenzione di svernarvi.
4) Christian Souchon nella sua traduzione suggerisce ” si sacrificò fino alla morte”
5) il Duca di Cumberland chiamato dagli amici “il macellaio”, e paragonato ad un orso sanguinario:  gli scozzesi furono sconfitti pochi mesi dopo la vittoria di Falkirk nella battaglia di Culloden, anche quel giorno pioveva era il 16 aprile 1746 continua

FONTI
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/bannocks_o_bear_meal.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bannock.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/croudy.htm
http://abcnotation.com/tunePage?a=www.campin.me.uk/Flute/Webrelease/Flute/09Duet/09Duet/0002

RICETTE
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alimentazione.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/cereali.htm
http://outlanderkitchen.com/2014/08/13/bannocks-castle-leoch/
https://www.elizabethskitchendiary.co.uk/2013/04/orkney-beremeal-bannocks.html/
https://honey-guide.com/2013/11/24/bere-and-beremeal-bannocks/

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1129665/selkirk-bannock
https://foodanddrink.scotsman.com/food/a-history-of-the-selkirk-bannock-including-recipe-for-making-your-own/

LOVELY MOLLY

Non è ben chiaro dove si sia originata la canzone, che peraltro si inserisce in una nutrita serie di Farewell risalenti al 700 tra un giovane bracciante agricolo arruolatosi come soldato/marinaio per andare in guerra e l’altrettanto giovane fidanzatina.

La prima versione testuale scritta risale a Sam Henry che aveva raccolto il canto nella contea di Antrim tra il 1923-29, e gli studiosi ritengono che le successive versioni  di Jeannie Robertson e di Lizzie Higgins siano un adattamento in chiave scozzese di questa versione irlandese.
Ma ovviamente gli scozzesi non concordano e rivendicano la canzone al tempi della prima rivolta giacobita.

Prendiamo atto della bellezza di questa slow air che trasmette tutta la precarietà di una giovane vita privata del suo futuro (lavorare dignitosamente e invecchiare insieme alla propria sposa) e che molto probabilmente mai più ritornerà a seminare  la terra in Primavera .

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Fade in time, 2015 (Arthur Jeffes & Roundhouse Choir) il suo mentore Stanley Robertson era il nipote di Jeannie Robertson (figura storica della tradizione musicale scozzese) e in questa versione Sam da prova di tutte le sue corde espressive

ASCOLTA Lindsay Straw


I
I once was a ploughboy (1),
but a soldier I’m now,
I courted lovely Molly,
as I followed the plough;
I courted lovely Molly,
from the age of sixteen,
But now I must leave her,
and serve James, my king.
Chorus
Oh Molly, lovely Molly,
I delight in your charms,
there is many’s the long night
you hae laid in my arms.
But if ever I return again,
it will be in the Spring
Where the mavis and the turtle dove
and the nightingale sing.
II
You can go to the market,
you can go to the fair;
You can go to the church on Sunday,
and meet your new love there.
But if anybody loved you
as much as I do,
I won’t stop your marriage,
and farewell, adieu
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Un tempo ero un bracciante agricolo
ma ora sono un soldato,
corteggiai la bella Molly
quando seguivo l’aratro,
corteggiai la bella Molly
dall’età di 16 anni
ma ora la devo lasciare
per servire Giacomo, il mio re
Coro
Oh Molly bella Molly
deliziato dal tuo fascino
per più di una lunga notte
sei stata tra le mie braccia,
ma se mai ritornerò ancora
sarà in Primavera
quando il tordo e la tortora
e l’usignolo cantano
II
Tu puoi andare mercato
e puoi andare alla fiera
puoi andare in chiesa la domenica
per incontrare un nuovo innamorato.
Ma se qualcuno ti amerà
tanto quanto io ti amo
non impedirò il tuo matrimonio
e addio, addio

NOTE
1) un bracciante stagionale o un mezzadro, in Scozia un bothy boy, in Irlanda uno spailpin

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/arthur-mcbride.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34875
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/lovelymolly.html