Archivi tag: Martin Carthy

Brigg Fair to meet love

Leggi in italiano

The Lammas Fairs as they say in the British Isles or the Country fairs as they are more commonly called in America are the big fairs that take place after the wheat harvest: a livestock market (especially horses) where farmers gathered to sell and buy summer products, but also an important socialization event for isolated farms.
In the season of abundance, the earth was thanked for its fruits, and joy was shared with music, dance and games. In the Celtic tradition it was Lughnasad, a fair dedicated to courtship and combining marriages (under the good offices of the god Lugh).
So in the ballads when it’s time for the fair the lovers meet to exchange their marriage vows

Donnybrook Fair 1859 by Erskine Nicol 1825-1904

BRIGG FAIR

The song Brigg Fair belongs to the English folk tradition and was reported on wax cylinder in the early 1900s by Percy Grainger who picked it up from Joseph Taylor(first two verses here); Grainger himself made an arrangement for a chorus of 5 voices adding further verses. The song also boasts a classic arrangement having been inspired by the “English raphsody” always composed in those years by Frederick Delius (here)

First of all, the instrumental version of The Full English, supergroup that starts with the wax recording of the early 1900s

The Queen’s six (arrangement by Percy Grainger)

La versione di  Percy Grainger
I
It was on the fifth of August-
er’ the weather fine and fair,
Unto Brigg Fair(1) I did repair,
for love I was inclined.
II
I rose up with the lark in the morning,
with my heart so full of glee(2),
Of thinking there to meet my dear,
long time I’d wished to see.
III
I took hold of her lily-white hand, O
and merrily was her heart:
“And now we’re met together,
I hope we ne’er shall part”.
IV
For it’s meeting is a pleasure,
and parting is a grief,
But an unconstant lover is worse
than any thief.
V
The green leaves they shall wither
and the branches they shall die
If ever I prove false to her,
to the girl that loves me.
NOTES
1)  Glanford Brigg in Lincolnshire at the ford of the river Ancholme: already the name is symptomatic of a traditional place of gatherings where cattle fairs and sporting competitions are held
2)”mirth, joy, rejoicing; a lively feeling of delight caused by special circumstances and finding expression in appropriate gestures and looks”. In Old and Middle English it’s chiefly a poetic word, meaning primarily ‘entertainment, pleasure, sport’, and especially ‘musical entertainment, music, melody’ (this is how we get musical glees and glee clubs and a current popular television series). Anglo-Saxon poets sang ‘glees’ (gleow) with their harps, and a common Middle English word for ‘minstrel’ is gleeman.

FOLK VERSION

Martin Carthy  writes” When Percy Grainger first went up to Lincolnshire in the early days of field recording (he was one of the first in England to use recording techniques in the collection of folksong) one of the men he recorded was a beautiful singer by the name of Joseph Taylor. Among the many songs taken down on the wax cylinders was Brigg Fair, slightly pensive but very happy. Mr Taylor subsequently became one of the first of the traditional (or “field”) singers to have recordings issued by a commercial recording company; he has great subtlety, beautiful timing, and, despite of his old age, a fine clear voice. (from here)

Martin Carthy from Byker Hill; 1967

Jackie Oates 2011

Shirley Collins 1964

June Tabor “Quercus” (2013)  Spotify 

I
It was on the fifth of August
The weather fair(hot) and mild
Unto Brigg Fair I did repair
For love I was inclined
II
I got(rose) up with the lark in the morning/with my heart full of glee(1)
Expecting there to meet(see) my dear(love)/Long time I’d wished to see
III
I looked over my left shoulder
To see what I might see
And there I spied(saw) my own true love/ Come a-tripping down to me
IV
I took hold of his(her) lily-white hand
And I merrily sang my heart
For now we are together
We never more shall part
V
For the green leaves, they will wither
And the roots, they’ll all decay
Before that I prove false to him(her)
The man(lass) that loves me well(true)

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lugnasad.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/joseph.taylor/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/joseph.taylor/songs/briggfair.html
http://aclerkofoxford.blogspot.it/2012/05/brigg-fair-and-history-of-glee.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpM_JQNBVYs
https://thesession.org/tunes/6799

Staines Morris to the Maypole haste away

Leggi in italiano
In the TV series “The Tudors” an outdoor May Day has been set up, with the picturesque dancers of the Morris Dance, their rattles and handkerchiefs, the archery, the fight of the roosters, the dances with the ribbons around the May pole, performed by graceful maidens with flower crowns in their hair. The background music is titled “Stanes Morris”, in the video follow two reproductions, the first of  Les Witches group, the second a little slower of The Broadside Band.

The May poles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were very tall and decorated with green garlands, ribbons or two-color striped paintings: the tradition is rooted in England, Italy, Germany and France, a real focal point of the rousing activities at his feet , symbolic fulcrum of the group of dancers.

john-cousen-dancing-round-the-maypole-on-the-village-green-in-elizabethan-times
John Cousen: Ballando intorno al palo del Maggio in epoca elisabettiana

TO THE MAYPOLE HASTE AWAY (Staine Morris )

The melody is a dance reported in “The English Dancing Master” by John Playford, first edition of 1651, but already danced at the court of Henry VIII or in the Elizabethan era. In the video it is a Morris Dance while Playford describes it as a country dance (for instructions see)
Morris Dance version
It was William Chappell in his “Popular Music of the Old Time” of (1855-56) to combine the Tudor melody with the text “Maypole song” written in 1655 by Robert Cox for the comedy “Actaeon and Diana” . So Chappell writes “This tune is taken from the first edition of The Dancing Master. It is also in William Ballet’s Lute Book (time of Elizabeth); and was printed as late as about 1760, in a Collection of Country Dances, by Wright.
The Maypole Song, in Actæon and Diana, seems so exactly fitted to the air, that, having no guide as to the one intended, I have, on conjecture, printed it with this tune.

The text invites young people in following Love to dance and sing around the May Pole.
Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from ‘Prince Heathen.’ 1969 (simply perfect!)

Shirley Collins from Morris On, 1972, the folk rock experiment of a group of excellent trad musicians John Kirkpatrick, Richard Thompson, Barry Dransfield, Ashley Hutchings  and Dave Mattacks.

Lisa Knapp & David Tibet from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017  (amazing version with a further step ahead of the 70s rock rework)

MAYPOLE SONG
I
Come, ye young men, come along
with your music, dance and song;
bring your lasses in your hands,
for ‘tis that which love commands.
Refrein:
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday,
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday
II
‘Tis the choice time of the year,
For the violets now appear:
Now the rose receives its birth,
And pretty primrose decks the earth.
III
Here each bachelor may choose
One that will not faith abuse
Nor repay, with coy disdain
Love that should be loved again
IV
And when you are reckoned now
For kisses you your sweetheart gave
Take them all again and more
It will never make them poor
V
When you thus have spent your time,
Till the day be past its prime,
To your beds repair at night,
And dream there of your day’s delight.

second part: JOAN TO THE MAYPOLE

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html 
Traditional Music (con spartito)
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/stainesmorris.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60673

Bedfordshire May Day carols

Leggi in italiano

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]
The Lord and the Lady and the Moggers
On 1st May several customs were observed. Children would go garlanding, a garland being, typically, a wooden hoop over which a white cloth was stretched. A looser piece of cloth was fastened at the top which was used to cover the finished garland. Two dolls were fastened in the middle, one large and one small. Ribbons were sewn around the front edge and the rest of the space was filled with flowers. The dolls were supposed to represent the Virgin Mary and the Christ child. The children would stop at each house and ask for money to view the garland.

Another custom, prevalent throughout the county if not the country, was maying. It was done regularly until the outbreak of the First World War and, sporadically, afterwards. Young men would go around at night with may bushes singing May carols. In the morning a may bush was attached to the school flag pole, another would decorate the inn sign at the Crown and others rested against doors, designed to fall in when they were opened. Those maying included a Lord and a Lady, the latter the smallest of the young men with a veil and bonnet. The party also included Moggers or Moggies, a man and a woman with black faces, ragged clothes and carrying besom brushes. (from here)

VIDEO Here is a very significant testimony of Margery “Mum” Johnstone from  Bedforshide collected by Pete Caslte, with two May songs

Maypole dancers dance during May Day celebrations in the village of Elstow, Bedfordshire, in 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

From the testimony of Mrs Margery Johnstone this May Garland or “This Morning Is The 1st of May” was transcribed by Fred Hamer in his “Gay Garners”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017


MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

The carol is known as “The May Day Carol” or “Bedford May Carol” but also “The Kentucky May Carol” (as preserved in the May tradition in the Appalachian Mountains) and was collected in Bedfordshire.
A first version comes from  Hinwick as collected by Lucy Broadwood  (1858 – 1929) and transcribed into “English Traditional Songs and Carols” (London: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton from “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL
I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady, as in Cambridgshire, the contaminations with the creed of the dominant religion are inevitable
2) this sweet and fresh cream in a glass is a typically Elizabethan vintage-style drink-dessert still popular in the Victorian era, the Syllabub. The Mayers once offered “a syllabub of hot milk directly from the cow, sweet cakes and wine” (The James Frazer Gold Branch). And so I went to browse to find the historical recipe: it is a milk shake, wine (or cider or beer) sweetened and perfumed with lemon juice. The lemon juice served to curdle the milk so that it would form a cream on the surface, over time the recipe has become more solid, ie a cream with the whipped cream flavored with liqueur or sweet wine (see recipes) 

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste: in the background a tray full of syllabus glasses

3) the reference to the dew is not accidental, the tradition of May provides a bath in the dew and in the wild waters full of rain. The night is the magic of April 30 and the dew was collected by the girls and kept as a panacea able to awaken the beauty of women!! (see Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002, same tune of Cambridgeshire May Carol (not completely transcribed)

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY CAROL
I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady..
2) Syllabub (see above)
3) the stanza derives from “The Moon Shine Bright” version published by William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) see

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane from “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 ( I, II, III e IX) with The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
The song is reproposed in the Blog “A Folk song a Week”   edited by Andy Turner himself in which Andy tells us he had learned the song from the collection of Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred collected it from “Chris Marsom and others” – Mr Marsom had by that time emigrated to Canada, but Fred met him on a visit to his native Northill, Bedfordshire. Fred’s notes say “The Day Song is much too long for inclusion here and the Night Song has the same tune. It was used by Vaughan Williams as the tune for No. 638 of the English Hymnal, but he gave it the name of “Southill” because it was sent to him by a Southill man. Chris Marsom who sang this to me had many tales to tell of the reception the Mayers had from some of the ladies who were strangers to the village and became apprehensive at the approach of a body of men to their cottage after midnight on May Eve.”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (track 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy writes in the sleeve notes “May Song came from a Cynthia Gooding record which I lost 16 years ago, words stuck in my head.” (from II to VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) according to the previous religion, water received more power from the Beltane sun. Celts made pilgrimages to the sacred springs and with the spring water they sprinkled the fields to favor the rain.

Kerfuffle from “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

RAMBLING SAILOR OR TRIM RIGGED DOXY?

Il galante soldato (o marinaio) che gira per mari e monti alla ricerca di fanciulle da corteggiare è un topico delle ballate del 700-800, questa in particolare ampiamente diffusa nei broadsides.
Durante il folk revival e la contestazione giovanile degli anni 60-70 questa tipologia di canti popolari era molto diffusa nei folk-club, ma in origine  il canto doveva trattarsi di una parodia ovvero erano le vanterie di un borioso sergente reclutatore convinto di essere un grande seduttore! (vedi prima parte)

La versione marinaresca della ballata prende una piega un po’ più esplicita e sboccata. Il testo si differenzia su due filoni principali uno più simile alla versione “rambling soldier” l’altro con il titolo di “Trim Rigged Doxy”

TRIM RIGGED DOXY

Si tratta di una forebitter song ammiccante e in chiave umoristica, la versione divulgata da Martin Carthy alla fine degli anni 60 racconta più nel dettaglio l’incontro amoroso tra l’ardito e bollente marinaio e una “trim-rigged doxy”; ma il finale non è per niente lieto: marinaio derubato e lasciato con il “bompresso” (per dirla come il marinaio) in fiamme!!

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick 1966


I
Oh, I am a sailor brisk and bold,
Long time I’ve sailed the ocean.
Oh, I’ve fought for king and the country too,
For honour and promotion.
So now, my brother shipmates, I bid you all adieu,
No more will I go to sea with you;
But I’ll ramble the country through and through
And I’ll be a rambling sailor.
II
Oh, it’s off to a village then I went
Where I saw lassies plenty;
Oh, I boldly stepped up to one of them
To court her for her beauty.
Oh, her cheeks, they were like the rubies red;
She’d a feathered bonnet a-covering her head.
Oh, I put the hard word on her(1) but she said she was a maid,
The saucy little trim-rigged doxy (2).
III
“Oh, I can’t and I won’t go along with you (3),
You saucy rambling sailor.
Oh, my parents, they would never agree
For I’m promised to a tailor.”
But I was hot shot eager to rifle her charms.
“A guinea,” says I, “for a roll in your arms.”
The deal was done and upstairs we went,
Myself and the trim-rigged doxy.
IV
Oh, it was haul on the bowline (4), let your stays’ls fall (5),
We was yardarm to yardarm (6) bumpin’.
My shot locker empty, asleep I fell
And then she fell into robbin’;
Oh, she robbed all my pockets of everything I had,
She even stole my new boots from underneath the bed,
And she even stole my gold watch from underneath my head,
The saucy little trim-rigged doxy.
V
And it’s when I awoke in the morning bright,
Oh, I started to roar like thunder.
My gold watch and my money too
She bore away for plunder.
But it wasn’t for my watch nor my money too,
For them I don’t value but I tell you true,
I think her little fire-bucket burned my bobstay(7), through
That saucy little trim-rigged doxy.
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un marinaio vispo e ardito
a lungo ho navigato per mare,
ho combattuto per il re e anche per il paese
per l’onore e la carriera.
Così adesso, miei fratelli di mare, dico a tutti addio,
non andrò più per mare con voi:
ma viaggerò per il paese
in lungo e in largo
e sarò un marinaio vagabondo
II
Oh così andai in un villaggio
dove vidi ragazze a volontà;
mi avvicinai con coraggio a una di loro,
a corteggiarla per la sua beltà.
Oh le sue guance erano come rossi rubini,
portava un cappellino con la piuma per ricoprirle il capo.
Oh cercai di sedurla (1) ma lei disse di essere una fanciulla
-la donnina navigata con un bell’armamentario! (2)
III
“Oh non posso e non voglio essere d’accordo (3) con te
tu impertinente marinaio vagabondo.
Oh i miei genitori non acconsentiranno mai
perché io sono promessa a un sarto
Ma io ero un pezzo grosso desideroso di darci dentro
Una ghinea – dissi – per un giro tra le tue braccia
L’accordo fu preso e di sopra andammo,
me stesso e la donnina ben equipaggiata
IV
E fu un alare la bolina (4), e un issare fiocchi e controfiocchi (5),
sbattemmo pennone contro pennone (6)
e diedi fuoco alle polveri, poi caddi addormentato e allora lei mi derubò:
oh mi ripulì le tasche
di ogni avere
rubò persino i miei nuovi stivali da sotto il letto,
e rubò anche il mio orologio d’oro da sotto il cuscino,
la donnina navigata ben equipaggiata
V
E quando mi svegliai alla luce
del sole
oh iniziai a gridare forte come il tuono
il mio orologio d’oro e anche i miei soldi
mi ha derubato
Ma non era per l’orologio e neanche per i soldi
che a loro non do peso, ma a dire il vero
temo mi abbia attaccato lo scolo (7)
quella donnina navigata ben equipaggiata!

NOTE
1) tipica espressione australiana “Chiedere un favore, fare una proposta (indecente)”
2) per il significato di doxy vedi mudcat , nella traduzione ho voluto mantenere un termine “nautico”
3) la ragazza prima si professa fanciulla (maid nel senso di vergine) dichiarando di non voler concludere nessun affare con il marinaio, mentre in realtà cerca di alzare il prezzo della sua prestazione
4) Alare è un termine nautico che si dice per tirare con forza una cima (per i terricoli un cavo) orizzontalmente o verticalmente “alare la bolina”   è quando si tira verso prora il lato verticale sopra vento delle vele quadre, in modo che prendano il vento il meglio possibile, così l’andatura di bolina, nella navigazione a vela, è la rotta di una nave che naviga stringendo al massimo possibile il vento.
5) Staysail sono un tipo di velatura di forma triangolare che si usano per sfruttare al meglio il vento ovvero i fiocchi e controfiocchi; equivalente all’espressione italiana coi fiocchi e controfiocchi, eccellente, di gran soddisfazione, ma anche nel senso di fatto alla perfezione, completo di ogni cosa.
6) yardarm to yardarm letteralmente “pennone contro pennone” significa gomito a gomito, nel senso di molto vicini, nel contesto potrebbe evocare un arrembaggio.
7) ho tradotto in modo più libero la frase che letteralmente dice “il suo piccolo braciere (secchio per il fuoco) bruciò tutto il mio bompresso”. bobstay qui ha il significato di bowsprit anche se tecnicamente è uno strallo. Un’altra malattia venerea diffusa e ben più letale era al tempo la sifilide, ed è più probabile che proprio quella si sia beccato il nostro audace marinaio!

continua terza parte

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ramblingsailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108324
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/week-31-the-rambling-sailor/
https://www.8notes.com/scores/6023.asp?ftype=gif
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61414
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44919
https://thesession.org/tunes/12050
https://thesession.org/tunes/2696

SEVEN GYPSIES

Una ballata originaria della Scozia sugli zingari e il fascino dell'”esotico”: una bella lady è rapita da uno zingaro o abbandona il marito di sua spontanea volontà, e sebbene inseguita e richiamata alle sue responsabilità, si rifiuta di tornare a casa. .
Come sempre nel caso di ballate molto popolari ampiamente diffuse dalla tradizione orale, si hanno molte varianti del testo anche con diversi finali.

LE VERSIONI INGLESI: SEVEN GYPSIES

Le varianti di questa versione sono moltissime, man mano che la ballata si sposta in Irlanda e Inghilterra, così dopo averle raggruppate a seconda delle melodie, ne evidenzio solo alcune per l’ascolto. (prima parte qui)
Gli zingari sono più spesso tre ma in alcune versioni diventano sette essendo un numero simbolico che preannuncia agli ascoltatori l’approssimarsi della sventura e della morte.

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane in “There was a Maid” 1978


I
There was seven yellow gypsies all in a gang
There was none of them lame or lazy-O
Sure the fairest one is among them all
She is going with the dark-eye gypsy-O
II
Oh will you come with me, me pretty fair maid?
Will you come with me, me honey-O?
Sure I wouldn’t give a kiss of the gypsy laddie’s lips
Not for all of Cashill’s money-O
III
Oh saddle for me me pretty white steed
Saddle him up so bonny-O
So that I may go and find me own wedded wife
That she’s going with the dark-eye gypsy-O
IV
Oh she rode west but he rode best
Until he came to Strathberry
When who shall he find but his own wedded wife
She is going with the dark-eye gypsy-O
V
Oh will you come with me, me pretty fair maid?
Will you come with me, me honey-O?
Sure I wouldn’t give a kiss of the gypsy laddie’s lips
Not for all of Cashill’s money-O
VI
Oh what will you do to your house and your land?
What will you do to money-O?
Oh what will you do with your two fine beds
Now you’re going with the dark eye gyspsy-O?
VII
Oh what will you do to your fine feather bed
With the sheets turned down so bonny-O?
Oh what will you do with your own wedded lord
Now you’re going with the dark eye gyspsy-O?
VIII
Oh what do I care for me house and me land?
What do I care for me money-O?
And what do I care for me to fine beds
Now I’m going with the dark eye gyspsy-O?
IX
Last night I lay on a fine feather bed
With the sheets turned down so bonny-O
But tonight I lay on a cold barn floor
With seven yellow gypsies to annoy me-O
X
Oh will you come with me, me pretty fair maid?
Will you come with me, me honey-O?
Sure I want to get a kiss of the gypsy laddie’s lips
Than you and all your money-O
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
C’erano sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra (1) in comitiva
e nessuno di loro era zoppo o pigro
e di certo il più bello è tra tutti loro,
lei sta scappando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri
II
“Verrai con me, mia bella fanciulla?
Verrai con me mia cara?”
“Preferisco dare un bacio alle labbra del ragazzo zingaro
piuttosto di tutto il denaro di Cashill
III
Sellatemi il mio destriero bianco
sellatelo così grazioso
così che possa andare a cercare mia moglie appena sposata
che è scappata con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri
IV
Lei cavalcò a Ovest ma lui cavalcò meglio
finche arrivò allo Strathberry
e chi ti trova se non la sua mogliettina appena sposata
che se n’è andata con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?
V
“Verrai con me, mia bella fanciulla?
Verrai con me mia cara?”
“Preferisco dare un bacio alle labbra del ragazzo zingaro
piuttosto di tutto il denaro di Cashill”
VI
“Cosa intendi fare della tua casa
e della terra,
cosa intendi fare dei soldi?
Cosa intendi fare dei tuoi due bei letti
ora che stai andando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?
VII
Cosa intendi fare del tuo bel letto di piume
con le coperte ben rimboccate?
Cosa intendi fare con il tuo Lord appena sposato
ora che stai andando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?”
VIII
“Che cosa mi interessa della casa e
della terra
cosa m’interessa del denaro?
E cosa m’importa dei letti ben fatti
ora che sto andando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?
IX
L’altra notte dormivo in un letto di piume,
con le lenzuola rimboccate così bene
e stanotte dormirò in un fienile freddo
insieme con sette zingari dalla pelle olivasta che mi infastidiscono”
X
“Verrai con me, mia bella fanciulla?
Verrai con me mia cara?”
“Preferisco avere un bacio dalle labbra del ragazzo zingaro
piuttosto di te e di tutto il tuo denaro”

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy

[prima parte]
I
There were seven yellow (1) gypsies and all in a row
And none of them lame nor lazy-O,
And they sang so sweet and so complete
That they stole the heart of the lady-O.
II
And they sang sweet and they sang shrill
That fast her tears began to flow,
And she lay down her silken gown,
Her golden rings and all her show.
III
She plucked off all her highheeled shoen,
All made of the Spanish leather-O,
And she would in the street in her bare bare feet
To run away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
[seconda parte]
IV
They rode north and they rode south,
And they rode it late and early-O
Until they come to the river side
And oh but she was weary-O.
V
Says, Last night I rode by the river side
With me servants all around me-O,
And tonight I must go with me bare bare feet
All along with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
[terza parte]
VI
It was late last night when the lord come home
And his servants they stood ready-O.
And the one took his boots and the other took his horse,
But away was his own dear lady-O.
VII
And when he come to the servants’ door
Enquiring for his lady-O,
The one she sighed and the other one cried,
She’s away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
VIII
For I met with a boy and a bonny, bonny boy,
And they were strange stories he told me-O,
Of the moon that rose by the river side
For pack with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
IX
Go saddle to me my bonny, bonny mare,
For the brown’s not so speedy-O.
And I will ride for to seek my bride
Who’s run away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
X
Oh he rode north and he rode south,
And he rode it late and early-O
Until he come to the river side
And it was there that he spied his lady-O.
[quarta parte]
XI
What makes you leave all your house and your land,
All your gold and your treasure for to go?
And what makes you leave your new-wedded lord
To run away with the seven yellow gypsies-O?
XII
What care I for me house and me land?
What care I for me treasure-O?
And what care I for me new-wedded lord,
For I’m away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
XIII
Last night you slept in a goose feather bed
With the sheet turned down so bravely-O.
And tonight you will sleep in the cold barren shed
All along with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
XIV
What care I for me goose feather bed
With the sheet turned down so bravely-O?
For tonight I will sleep in the cold barren shed
All along with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
XV
There were seven yellow gypsies and all in a row,
None of them lame nor lazy-O.
And I wouldn’t give a kiss from the gypsies’ lips
For all of your land or your money-O.
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
[prima parte]
I
C’erano sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra tutti in fila
e nessuno di loro era zoppo o pigro
e cantavano in modo così armonioso
da rubare il cuore della Lady
II
Cantavano alto e cantavano basso
che presto le sue lacrime iniziarono a sgorgare
e lei si tolse gli abiti di seta,
gli anelli d’oro e tutti i suoi orpelli.
III
Si tolse le sue scarpette
con il tacco alto,
fatte di cuoio spagnolo (2)
e lei fu in strada
a piedi nudi
per scappare con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra
[seconda parte]
IV
Cavalcarono verso Nord
e cavalcarono verso Sud
andarono  in fretta
finchè arrivarono
sulla sponda del fiume e lei era tanto stanca.
V
“L’ultima notte che attraversai il fiume avevo i servitori mi assistevano,
ma questa notte
devo andare a piedi nudi
per seguire i sette
zingari dalla pelle olivastra”.
[terza parte]
VI
Era notte fonda
la scorsa notte
quando il Lord ritornò a casa
e i servitori erano tutti pronti
uno preso gli stivali
e l’altro il cavallo
ma via era la sua cara signora.
VII
E quando venne
alla porta della servitù
in cerca della sua Lady
uno sospirava e l’altro singhiozzava
“E’ scappata
con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
VIII
“Ho incontrato un ragazzo, un bel ragazzo
e lui mi raccontò
delle strane storie
della luna che sorge dalla sponda del fiume
del carico con i sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra
IX
Sellate la mia bella giumenta
perchè il baio non è altrettanto veloce
e io cavalcherò
in cerca della mia sposa
che è scappata via
con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra
X
Cavalcò a nord e cavalcò a sud
andò  in fretta
finchè arrivò
sulla sponda del fiume
e fu là che vide la sua Lady
[quarta parte]
XI
“Come hai potuto lasciare la tua casa
e la tua terra,
tutto l’oro e il tesoro,
per andare via?
Come hai potuto lasciare il tuo novello sposo,
per scappare via con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra?”

XII
“Che cosa mi interessa della casa e
della terra
cosa m’interessa del denaro?
E cosa m’importa del mio sposo novello
perchè sono scappata con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
XIII
L’altra notte dormivi in un letto di piume,
con le lenzuola rimboccate così bene
e stanotte dormirai in un fienile freddo
insieme con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
XIV
“Che cosa mi interessa del letto di piume
con le lenzuola rimboccate così bene?
Perchè stanotte dormirò in un fienile freddo
insieme con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
XV
C’erano sette zingari olivastri tutti in fila
e nessuno di loro era zoppo o pigro
“preferirei baciare le labbra degli zingari
piuttosto che avere tutta la tua terra e i tuoi soldi”

NOTE
1) il termine yellow è usato più in senso dispregiativo che per definire il colore della pelle: fina dal medioevo il giallo è stato il colore dei giullari ad indicare infamia e sentimenti malevoli
2) il cuoio spagnolo era molto apprezzato, decorato con rilievi su fondi d’oro, cesellato e dipinto

ASCOLTA  Nic Jones

I
There were seven gypsies all of a row
And they sang neat and bonny-O;
Sang so neat and they’re so complete,
They stole the heart of a lady.
II
She’s kicked off her high heel shoes
Made of the Spanish leather,
And she’s put on an old pair of brogues
To follow the gypsy laddie.
III
Late at night her lord come home
And he’s enquiring for his lady.
And his servant’s down on his knees and said,
“She’s away with the seven gypsies.”
IV
He’s ridden o’er the high, high hills
Till he come to the morning,
And there he’s found his own dear wife
And she’s in the arms of the seven gypsies.
V
“Well, last night I slept in a feather bed
And the sheets and the blankets around me;
Tonight I slept in the cold open fields
In the arms of my seven gypsies.”
VI(2)
Seven gypsies all of a row
And they sang neat and bonny-O;
Sang so neat that they all were hanged
For the stealing of a famous lady.
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
C’erano sette zingari tutti in fila
e cantavano
così bene
cantavano così
armoniosamente
che rubarono il cuore di una Signora
II
Lei si tolse le sue scarpe d
ai tacchi alti
fatte con cuoio spagnolo
e si mise un paio di vecchi
zoccoli
per seguire il giovane zingaro.
IV
La sera tardi il Signore ritornò a casa,
cercando la sua Lady
e la cameriera si gettò sulle ginocchia e disse
“Se n’è andata con sette
zingari”.
IV
Così lui cavalcò per le alte colline
finchè venne il mattino
e là lui trovò la sua propria amata moglie
tra le braccia di sette zingari..
V
“La notte scorsa ho dormito in un letto di piume
con lenzuola e coperte introno
Stanotte ho dormito al freddo in un campo aperto
tra le braccia dei miei sette zingari.”
VI
Sette zingari tutti in fila
e cantavano così armoniosamente
cantavano così armoniosamente e furono impiccati
perchè rapirono una famosa Signora

VERSIONE Jim Moray

I
Three gypsies stood at the castle gates,
They sang so high and they sang so low,
And the lady sits in her chamber late
and her heart it melted away like snow.
II
Well they sang so high and they sang so clear,
Fast her tears began to flow.
So she’s laid aside her silken gown
to follow the raggle taggle gypsies.
III
Well she’s kicked off her high heeled shoes,
made of Spanish leather
And over her shoulders a blanket she’s threw,
to follow the raggle taggle gypsies.
IV
Well it’s late at night her lord comes home
inquiring for his lady.
Well the servant girl gave this reply,
“Oh, She’s gone with the raggle taggle gypsies.”
V
“So saddle to me my milk white steed.
Bridle me my pony,
that I may ride to seek my bride
who’s gone with the raggle taggle gypsies.”
VI
So he’s ridden o’er yon high high hill.
He’s rode through woods and copses,
Until he’s came to the broad open stream,
and there he spied his lady.
VII
He says “What makes you leave your houses and land?
What makes you leave your money?
And what makes you leave your unwedded lord?
To go with the raggle taggle gypsies.”
VIII
She says “What care I for my goose-feather bed,
with the sheets turned down so bravely?
For tonight I will sleep in the cold open field,
with the love of me raggle taggle gypsies.”
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
Tre zingari stavano ai cancelli del castello
cantavano sia forte
sia piano
e la Signora sedeva nella sua camera privata e il suo cuore si scioglieva come neve.
II
Cantarono così armoniosamente
che rapide le lacrime iniziarono a sgorgare
così lei si tolse l’abito di seta per seguire gli zingari (1)
III
Lei si tolse le sue scarpe dai tacchi alti
fatte con cuoio spagnolo
e si gettò sulle spalle una coperta
per seguire gli zingari.
IV
Era sera tardi che il Signore
ritornò a casa,
cercando la sua Lady
e la cameriera diede questa risposta
“Se n’è andata con dei volgari
zingari”.
V
“Sellatemi il destriero bianco
mettete le briglie al mio cavallino
e cavalcherò per cercare la mia sposa, che se n’è andata con dei volgari
zingari”.
VI
Così lui cavalcò per le alte colline
e cavalcò per foreste e boschi,
finchè venne a un ampio torrente
dove vide la sua signora.
VII
“Come hai potuto lasciare la tua casa e la tua terra,
come hai potuto lasciare il tuo denaro, come hai potuto lasciare il tuo Lord in procinto delle nozze, per andare con dei rozzi e volgari zingari?”
VIII
“Che cosa mi interessa del letto di piume
con le lenzuola bel rimboccate?
Stanotte dormirò al freddo in un campo aperto
con l’amore dei miei zingari.”

NOTE
1)raggle-taggle: arruffato, scarmigliato, rude o rozzo

continua

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/sevenyellowgipsies.html

Brigg Fair per incontrare l’innamorato

Read the post in English

Le Lammas Fairs (come si dice nelle isole britanniche o le country  fairs come sono più comunemente chiamate in America) si svolgono dopo il raccolto del grano: sono un mercato del bestiame (in particolare cavalli) dove gli agricoltori si ritrovano per vendere e comprare i prodotti dell’estate, ma anche un importante evento di socializzazione per le fattorie isolate.
Nella stagione dell’abbondanza si ringrazia la terra per i suoi frutti, e si condivide la gioia con musica, danze, giochi. Nella tradizione celtica era Lughnasad, una festa dedicata al corteggiamento e a combinare i matrimoni (sotto i buoni uffici del dio Lugh).
Così nelle ballate quando è tempo di fiera gli innamorati si incontrano per scambiarsi le promesse matrimoniali

Donnybrook Fair 1859 by Erskine Nicol 1825-1904

BRIGG FAIR

Questa canzone appartiene alla tradizione folk inglese ed è stata riportata su cilindro di cera agli inizi del 900 da Percy Grainger che la raccolse da Joseph Taylor (primi due versi ascolta); lo stesso Grainger ne fece un arrangiamento per coro a 5 voci aggiungendo ulteriori versi. Il brano vanta anche un arrangiamento classico essendo stato d’ispirazione alla “English raphsody” composta sempre in quegli anni da Frederick Delius (ASCOLTA)

Prima di tutto la versione strumentale del supergruppo The Full English che prendono le mosse proprio dalla registrazione su cera degli inizi 900

The Queen’s six l’arrangiamento per corale di Percy Grainger

La versione di  Percy Grainger
I
It was on the fifth of August-
er’ the weather fine and fair,
Unto Brigg Fair(1) I did repair,
for love I was inclined.
II
I rose up with the lark in the morning,
with my heart so full of glee(2),
Of thinking there to meet my dear,
long time I’d wished to see.
III
I took hold of her lily-white hand, O
and merrily was her heart:
“And now we’re met together,
I hope we ne’er shall part”.
IV
For it’s meeting is a pleasure,
and parting is a grief,
But an unconstant lover is worse
than any thief.
V
The green leaves they shall wither
and the branches they shall die
If ever I prove false to her,
to the girl that loves me.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Era il 5 di agosto
il tempo bello e mite
alla fiera di Brigg mi recavo
perchè dall’amore ero attratto
II
Mi alzai con l’allodola al mattino
e il mio cuore era pieno di allegria
al pensiero di incontrare là il mio amore
che da tanto tempo desideravo vedere
III
Le presi in mano la sua mano bianco giglio e allegro era il suo cuore
“Adesso che ci siamo incontrati
spero che non ci separeremo più”
IV
Perchè incontrarsi è un piacere
e separarsi è un dolore
ma un amore insincero è peggiore
di un ladro
V
Le foglie verdi appassiranno
e le radici marciranno
se mai io mi dimostrassi falso con lei
la ragazza che mi ama.

NOTE
1)  Glanford Brigg nel Lincolnshire al guado del fiume Ancholme : già il nome è sintomatico di un posto per tradizione luogo di raduni dove si tengono fiere di bestiame e competizioni sportive
2)”mirth, joy, rejoicing; una vivace sensazione di gioia causata da circostanze particolari e che trova espressioni con gesti e sguardi appropriati. “Nel vecchio e medio inglese è principalmente una parola poetica, che significa ” intrattenimento, piacere, sport “e in particolare” intrattenimento musicale, musica, melodia ” . I poeti anglosassoni hanno cantato “glees” (gleow) con le loro arpe, e una parola comune in lingua inglese per il menestrello è “gleeman”

LA VERSIONE FOLK

Martin Carthy  definisce la melodia “un po’ meditabonda ma molto allegra“: ” Quando Percy Grainger andò per la prima volta nel Lincolnshire nei primi giorni della registrazione sul campo (fu uno dei primi in Inghilterra a utilizzare le tecniche di registrazione nella raccolta di canzoni popolari) uno degli uomini che registrò fu un bellissimo cantante dal nome di Joseph Taylor . Tra le tante canzoni prese sui cilindri di cera c’era Brigg Fair, un po’ meditabonda ma molto allegra. Successivamente Taylor divenne uno dei primi cantanti tradizionali (o “sul campo”) ad avere incisioni discografiche da una società di registrazione commerciale; ha una grande delicaterzza, un tempismo bellissimo e, nonostante la sua vecchiaia, una bella voce chiara. (tradotto da qui)

Martin Carthy in Byker Hill; 1967

Jackie Oates 2011

Shirley Collins 1964

June Tabor “Quercus” (2013) anche su Spotify 


I
It was on the fifth of August
The weather fair(hot) and mild
Unto Brigg Fair I did repair
For love I was inclined
II
I got(rose) up with the lark in the morning/with my heart full of glee(1)
Expecting there to meet(see) my dear(love)/Long time I’d wished to see
III
I looked over my left shoulder
To see what I might see
And there I spied(saw) my own true love/ Come a-tripping down to me
IV
I took hold of his(her) lily-white hand
And I merrily sang my heart
For now we are together
We never more shall part
V
For the green leaves, they will wither
And the roots, they’ll all decay
Before that I prove false to him(her)
The man(lass) that loves me well(true)
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Era il 5 di agosto
il tempo bello e mite
alla fiera di Brigg mi recavo
perchè dall’amore ero attratta
II
Mi alzai con l’allodola al mattino
con il cuore pieno di allegrezza
nell’attesa di incontrare il mio amore
che da tanto tempo desideravo vedere
III
Guardai oltre la mia spalla sinistra
per vedere colui che avrei rivisto
e là vidi il mio vero amore
che veniva verso di me
IV
Gli presi la mano bianco giglio
e allegramente cantava il mio cure, perchè adesso eravamo insieme
e non ci saremmo più separati
V
Perchè le foglie verdi appassiranno
e le radici marciranno
prima che io mi mostri falsa con lui
l’uomo che mi ama veramente (sinceramente)

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/shemoved.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lugnasad.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/joseph.taylor/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/joseph.taylor/songs/briggfair.html
http://aclerkofoxford.blogspot.it/2012/05/brigg-fair-and-history-of-glee.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpM_JQNBVYs
https://thesession.org/tunes/6799

WILLIE’S LADY

Child ballad # 6
Melodia bretone

La ballata scozzese “Willie’s Lady” è riportata dal professor Child al numero 6 in solo due versioni, accompagnata da una melodia riportata anche in Bronson. La versione A proviene da “Miss Mary Fraser Tytler, of a transcript made by her grandfather from William Tytler’s manuscript. b. Jamieson-Brown MS., No 15, p. 33. b. Ritson-Tytler-Brown MS., pp. 1–5. Sung by Mrs Brown, Falkland, (ex) Aberdeenshire; copied by Joseph Ritson, c. 1792–1794
La ballata però non è sopravvissuta attraverso la trasmissione popolare ed è stata piuttosto ripescata dal folk revival degli anni 70.

IL MALEFICIO E LE PAURE DEL PARTO

La madre gelosa (prototipo della Regina- strega cattiva delle fiabe ) vuole impedire il parto della nuora – essendosi il figlio sposato senza ottenere il consenso della sua famiglia. Vani sono i ricchi doni che la partoriente promette alla suocera, solo l’intervento di un servitore cieco porta un buon consiglio: anch’egli sapiente o edotto nelle pratiche magiche, istruisce il marito su come spezzare il maleficio. Il bambino nasce così senza più problemi e ogni benedizione è richiamata sulla famigliola.
Dietro alla ballata tutte le paure della partoriente: tappa obbligatoria della vita della donna antica, il parto si accompagnava alla paura del dolore e della morte, tra scarsa igiene, ignoranza e malattie sessuali la donna era abbandonata al caso o al destino.
Si partoriva però in modo più naturale in posizione verticale camminando durante il travaglio e accucciandosi nella fase espulsiva. Le più ricche partorivano sulla sedia per il parto (con la seduta a ferro di cavallo o dotata di un buco) fu solo alla fine del Medioevo che ebbero la balzana idea di restare distese nel letto!!
E tuttavia la levatrice medievale era molto più esperta di quanto si creda: palpazioni interne ed esterne le permettevano di capire la posizione del bambino e praticare dei massaggi per farlo girare nella giusta posizione. Con delle erbe adatte (le stesso che procuravano l’aborto) preparava un decotto per stimolare le contrazioni uterine e se il bambino ero morto era pronta a farlo a pezzi per estrarlo senza causare ulteriori affaticamenti o pericoli per la donna. Cose da strega si dirà e in effetti la maggioranza delle presunte streghe erano proprio levatrici e guaritrici..
In questa ballata però la strega è una nobildonna che desidera la morte della nuora e mette in atto un triplice sortilegio: i capelli annodati con nove nodi e  fermagli, un capretto sotto il letto e la scarpa sinistra allacciata. Il primo e l’ultimo si basano sul principio che il nodo è un legame ma come sempre nella magia i significati sono antitetici, da una parte nodo e intreccio sono a scopo protettivo (vedasi i portali  delle chiese) contro le energie negative e le forze del male, che vengono lasciate fuori o intrappolate nel disegno,  oppure sono nodi malefici ad impedimento dell’azione (in questo caso impediscono al bambino di nascere).

Child_006_willie_s_lady
Negli anni 70 Ray Fisher ebbe la bella pensata di utilizzare la melodia bretone “Son Ar Chistr per la ballata  e Martin Carthy che aveva collaborato con lei sul suo album da solista “The Bonny Birdy” colse al volo l’idea e registrò la ballata nel suo album “Crown of Horn” del 1976 e così commenta nelle note di copertina “It was a particularly happy stroke of genius on Ray Fisher’s part to marry the song Willie’s Lady to the tune of the Breton song Son Ar Chistr (The Song of Cider), and it is with her permission that I have recorded it. I was informed by a young Breton that the tune was written in 1930 by a piper who became a tramp on the streets of Paris.”
Peccato che lo abbiano male informato sul piper parigino, e da allora la storia continua a girare tra i “si dice che”, vedasi ad esempio “some sources claim this song was written by an unknown Breton piper in the late 1920s” tratto da qui). Da allora la melodia si è incollata alla ballata per diventare lo standard suonato da tutti i successivi artisti

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy

ASCOLTA Anaïs Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer in Child Ballads 2013

ASCOLTA Lady Maisery


I
Oh Willie he’s crossed over the foam,
He’s wooed a wife and he’s brought her home.
He wooed her for her golden hair,
His mother thought her mighty care.
II
So wicked spells she’s cast on her,
So from her babe she’d not be free.
But in her bower she sits in pain
Whilst Willy mourns o’er her in vain.
III
So to his mother he has gone,
That vilest witch of the rankest kind.
And says, “My lady has a cup
With gold and silver set about.
IV
“This goodly gift shall be your own
If your relieve her of her bairn.”
“Oh of her babe she’ll not be free
And she shall never lighter be.
V
“But she will die and turn to clay,
And you shall wed with another maid.”
So Willy sighed and turned away,
“I wish my life,
I wish my life were at an end.”
VI
“Oh go you to your mother again,
That vilest witch of the rankest kind.
And say your lady has a steed
The like of which has ne’er been seen.
VII
“For he has golden hooves before,
And he has golden hooves behind.
“And just below that horse’s mane
There hangs a bell on a golden chain.
VIII
“This goodly gift shall be your own
If your relieve her of her bairn.”
“Oh of her babe she’ll not be free
And she shall never lighter be.
IX
“But she will die and turn to clay,
And you shall wed with another maid.”
So Willy sighed and turned away,
“I wish my life,
I wish my life were at an end.”
X
“Oh go you to your mother again,
That vilest witch of the rankest kind.
“And say your lady has a gown
With rubies red all woven round.
XI
“And every stitches made from gold
The like of which is rarely seen.
“And at every golden hem
Hangs fifty silver bells and ten.
XII
“This goodly gift shall be your own
If your relieve her of her bairn.”
“Oh of her babe she’ll not be free
And she shall never lighter be.
XIII
“But she will die and turn to clay,
And you shall wed with another maid.”
So Willy sighed and turned away,
“I wish my life,
I wish my life were at an end.”
XIV
Then up and spoke old Billy the Blind
And he has spoken just in time,
Then up and spoke old Billy the Blind
And he has spoken just in time:
XV
“Oh go you down to the market place
And there you’ll buy a loaf of wax.
“And shape a babe that is to nurse,
An in it place two eyes of glass.
XVI
“And bid you mother to his christening day
And you stand close by her right side.
“And never stray too far away
But listen well to what she says.”
XVII
“Oh who has loosed the nine witch knots/That were among this lady’s locks?/“And who has take the combs of care/ That hung among this lady’s hair?
XVIII
“And who has killed the master kid
That ran beneath this lady’s bed?
“And who has loosened her left shoe
And let this lady lighter be?”
XIX
So Willie’s loosed the nine witch knots
That were among this lady’s locks.
And Willie’s taken the combs of care
That hung among this lady’s hair.
XX
And Willie’s killed the master kid
That ran beneath this lady’s bed.
And Willie’s loosened her left shoe
And let this lady lighter be.
XXI
They from this witch’s curse be free
And now they have their son so bonny.
And many blessings, many blessings,
Many blessings on all three.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Oh Willie andò per mare
a corteggiare una moglie e la portò a casa, la corteggiò per il biondo crine
ma sua madre ritenne di dover intervenire
II
Incantesimi malvagi lanciò su di lei così che non potesse avere figli (1).  Nella sua stanza stava in doloroso travaglio e Willy le piangeva accanto  invano.
III
Così dalla madre è andato
quella strega vile della peggior specie (2) e dice ” La mia dama ha una tazza
decorata d’oro e d’argento.
IV
Questo dono prezioso sarà tuo
se l’aiuterai a partorire”
“Oh non riuscirà a sgravarsi del bambino, non sarà mai più sgravata.
V
Ma morirà e tornerà alla terra
e potrai sposare un’altra fanciulla”
Così Willy sospirò e se ne andò
“Vorrei che la mia vita
vorrei che la mia vita fosse alla fine”
VI
“Oh ritorna da tua madre, quella strega vile della peggior specie, e dille che la tua dama ha un destriero di cui uno simile non è mai stato visto
VII
che ha zoccoli d’oro davanti
e ha zoccoli d’oro dietro
e proprio sotto alla criniera pende una campana su una catena d’oro”
VIII
“questo dono prezioso sarà tuo
se l’aiuterai a partorire”
“Oh non riuscirà a sgravarsi del bambino non sarà mai più sgravata
IX
Ma morirà e tornerà alla terra
e potrai sposare un’altra fanciulla”
Così Willy sospirò e se ne andò
“Vorrei che la mia vita
vorrei che la mia vita fosse alla fine”
X
“Oh ritorna da tua madre, la strega vile della peggior specie e dille che la tua dama ha un vestito tutto intessuto con rossi rubini e ogni ricamo è d’oro
XI
che uno simile è raro a vedersi,
e lungo tutto il bordo dorato
sono appese sessanta campanelle d’argento.”
XII
“questo dono prezioso sarà tuo
se l’aiuterai a partorire”
“Oh non riuscirà a sgravarsi del bambino, non sarà mai più sgravata
XIII
ma morirà e tornerà alla terra
e tu potrai sposare un’altra fanciulla”
Così Willy sospirò e se ne andò
“Vorrei che la mia vita
vorrei che la mia vita fosse alla fine”
XIV
Poi parlò il vecchio Billy, il cieco (2)
e parlò appena in tempo
Poi parlò il vecchio Billy, il cieco
e parlò appena in tempo:
XV
“Oh andate al mercato
a comprare un pezzo di cera (3),
e modellate un bambino in fasce
e su di esso due occhi di vetro
XVI
e ordinate a vostra madre di andare al battesimo
e voi statele accanto sul lato destro
e non allontanatevi mai troppo
ma ascoltate bene quello che dice”
XVII
” E chi ha perso i nove nodi di strega
che erano nei ricci (4) di questa dama?
E chi ha preso i pettinini (5)
sistemati tra i capelli di questa dama?
XVIII
E chi ha ucciso il capretto (6) che correva sotto al letto di questa dama?
E chi ha slacciato la sua scarpa sinistra (7) per far partorire questa dama?”
XIX
Così Willie sciolse i nove nodi della strega che erano tra i ricci della dama
e Willie prese i pettinini
sistemati tra i capelli della dama
XX
e Willie uccise il capretto
che correva sotto al letto della dama,
e Willie slacciò la scarpa sinistra
per far partorire questa dama.
XXI
Dalla maledizione di questa strega furono liberi
e ora hanno il loro figlio così grazioso
e molte benedizioni
molte benedizioni su tutti e tre.

NOTE
1) la strega non rende sterile la coppia bensì impedisce alla partoriente di sgravarsi, il bambino le morirà nel grembo e la donna sarà così provata dal travaglio da morirne.
2) il vecchio servitore cieco rappresenta il saggio, poteva trattarsi di un servitore con qualche disabilità che restava comunque a servizio di una famiglia ricca e potente perchè si credeva che possedesse qualche dono delle fate a compensare la sua disabilità; era quindi un talismano contro il male
3) le figurine di cera trasferiscono a sé l’essenza della persona raffigurata e quello che accade a loro accade anche alla persona che rappresentano: così erano sciolte sul fuoco o “annegate” nell’acqua per invocare una lenta consunzione; oppure erano trafitte con aghi o chiodi per provocare malattie alle varie parti del corpo. In questo contesto il simulacro del bambino vuole trarre in inganno la strega che in una stizza di rabbia rivela i malefici perpetrati ai danni della partoriente


4) I nodi nei capelli della ragazza sono impedimenti che trattengono la nascita del bambino. Era consuetudine che alle partorienti fossero disciolti i capelli e ben pettinati per districarli e slacciate o sbottonate tutte le vesti, proprio per questa credenza! Nei dipinti medievali però la donna è sempre raffigurata con il velo sul capo
5) i capelli lunghi non erano lasciati sciolti nelle acconciature di una donna sposata, la quale proprio per contraddistinguere il suo status raccoglieva i capelli intrecciandoli e facendoli girare più volte su se stessi a conocchia. Facendo tale operazione la strega intrecciava la sua maledizione e la teneva ferma fissandola con il pettinino. I capelli del resto sono sempre presenti nei rituali d’incantesimo come
potente succedaneo della persona che li porta.
6) il capretto (letteralmente il capretto del padrone) è quello che viene detto un famiglio della strega, servitore e collegamento tra le forze del male e la strega. Un animale non certo domestico come il gatto ma che richiama più direttamente il diavolo (capro infernale)
7) la scarpa sinistra è indossata dal piede funesto: è risaputo che scendere dal letto posando prima il piede sinistro porti sfortuna. Allacciare in modo stretto con dei nodi ben tirati la scarpa del lato negativo del corpo è un rinforzo della maledizione. Viene da presumere che la scarpa allacciata si trovasse nella stanza della partoriente non al suo piede.

FONTI
http://ilmondodiaura.altervista.org/MEDIOEVO/FAMIGLIA2gravidanza.htm
http://viverecomedonnenelmedioevo.blogspot.it/2009/09/quando-la-vita-nasceva-dal-giusto.html
http://psicologanapoli.altervista.org/madri-e-matrigne/
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ballads/balladtexts/06_Willie’sLady.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/willieslady.html
https://tachesterton.wordpress.com/2014/07/08/lady-maisery-willies-lady/

LUCY WAN

Child Ballad #51

Una murder ballad che si presta ad essere la chiave di lettura di altre due ballate, meno esplicite  di questa nel trattare di un tema tabù come l’incesto, e tuttavia  simili (The Two brothers e Edward).

Lucy (o più colloquialmente Lizie) rivela al fratello di portare il loro bambino nel suo grembo e viene subito uccisa a colpi di spada, in modo splatter, (decisamente un evergreen) prima decapitata e poi fatta a pezzi!!. Il sangue sulla lama lo tradisce davanti alla madre. Più espliciti di così..

loha_21

Il professor Child la classifica al numero 51 riportando due versioni, (la più antica in stampa è quella di Herd, 1776) mentre  Bertrand H. Bronson ne raccoglie otto versioni. Si può semplificare le varianti suddividendole in due modelli, uno prevalente in America, l’altro più british come riportato nel Penguin Book Of English Folk Songs di R. Vaughan Williams e A.L. Llyod, 1959) (vedi)

Purtroppo non ci sono molte registrazioni su You Tube

ASCOLTA su Spotify Martin Carthy in Byker Hill, 1967, la versione è ripresa da A.L. Lloyd, la cui fonte proviene da Ella Bull e W. Percy Merrick così come raccolta nel 1904 dalla voce della signora Charlotte Dann di Cottenham, Cambridgeshire.


I
Fair Lucy she sits at her father’s door
Weeping and making moan,
Byen come her brother dear,
“What ails thee, Lucy Wan?”
II
“Oh I ail and I ail, dear brother-she cries-/And I’ll tell you the reason why:
For there is a child between my two sides/That’s from you, dear brother, and I.”
III
And he’s drawn out his good broadsword/That hung low down by his knee,/And he has cutted off poor Lucy Wan’s head/ And her fair body in three.
IV
And outen then come her thick heart’s blood/And outen then come the thin,
And he is away to his mother’s house,
“What ails thee, Geordie Wan?”
V
“Oh what is that blood on the point of your sword?
My son come tell to me.”
“Oh that is the blood of my greyhound,
He would not run for me.”
VI
“But your greyhound’s blood it was ne’er so red,
My son come tell to me.”
“Oh that is the blood of my grey mare,
She would not ride with me.”
VII
“But your grey mare’s blood it was ne’er so clear,
My son come tell to me.”
“Oh that not the blood of my grey mare
But ‘tis the blood of my sister, Lucy.”
VIII
“Oh what will you do when you father comes to know?
Son come tell on to me.”
“Oh I will set forth in the bottomless boat/And I will sail the sea.”
IX
“And when will you come back again?
My son come tell to me.”
“When the sun and the moon dance on yonder hill
And that may never be.”
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
La bella Lucy è seduta all’uscio di casa
che piange e sospira
e vicino viene il suo caro fratello
“Cosa ti addolora Lucy Wan?”
II
“Oh soffro, caro fratello – grida-
e ti dirò il motivo:
c’è un bambino dentro di me
che è tuo e mio, caro fratello”
III
E lui sfodera il suo bravo spadone
che gli pende lungo il fianco
e ha tagliato via la testa della povera Lucy e in tre parti
e il suo bel corpo
IV
Prima fuoriesce il sangue denso del suo cuore
e poi quello fluido
e lui è fuggito alla casa della madre
“Che cosa ti addolora Geordie Wan?
V
Qual’è il sangue sulla punta della tua spada,
figlio mio dimmi?”
“E’ il sangue del mio levriero
che non voleva correre per me”
VI
“Ma il sangue del tuo levriero non è mai stato così rosso.  figlio mio dimmi”
“Oh è il sangue della mia giumenta bianca
non voleva lasciarsi cavalcare”
VII
” Ma il sangue della tua giumenta bianca non è mai stato così pallido, figlio mio dimmi” “Oh non è il sangue della mia giumenta bianca, ma il sangue di mia sorella Lucy!”
VIII
“E cosa farai quando tuo padre verrà a saperlo?
figlio mio dimmi”
“Salirò su una barca sfondata
e me ne andrò verso il mare.”
IX
“E quando tornerai
figlio mio, dimmi?”
“Quando il sole e la luna danzeranno sulla collina,
e che non accadrà mai”

In America la ballata è diffusa nel New England, Monti Appalachiani e Florida ed è più simile alla versione di Edward, la melodia ha un sapore più bluegrass

ASCOLTA Alan Moores

FONTI
http://www.harbourtownrecords.com/peterslyricslucy.htm
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-LizieWan.html
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C051.html
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch051.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/lucywan.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?ThreadID=19418
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?ThreadID=11518
http://www.contemplator.com/child/lucywan.html

HOG’S EYE MAN: RAVANANDO NEGLI SHANTY

shanty_balladATTENZIONE: il  contenuto potrebbe risultare offensivo!
Una canzone mainaresca (Sea shanty) diffusa come capstan chanty, ma più probabilmente uno shanty d’alaggio, popolare presso le navi americane.
Nel già citato “Vecchie canzoni” di Italo Ottonello (qui) è un caso “da manuale” per gli shanty: “strampalati, sguaiati, scurrili; trattasi pertanto di improvvisazioni in rima.

Letteralmente “hog’s eye” è l’occhio di porco, ma in senso lato può  indicare sia l’organo genitale femminile che quello maschile. Senonchè la maggior parte dei collezionisti dei canti marinareschi sono concordi nell’indicare un tipo di chiatta fluviale, una sorta di barcaccia o bacone. Come sempre ci sono diverse versioni testuali.

ASCOLTA  Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


The hog-eyed man is the man for me,
He brought me down from Tennessee.
And a hog-eye! Steady on a jig
And a hog-eye! Steady on a jig
And all she wants is her hog-eye man!
Oh the hog-eye men are all the go
When they come down to San Francisco.
Oh, he came to the place where Sally did dwell,
He knocked on the door and he rung a bell.
Oh Sally is in the garden picking peas
And the hair of her head hanging down to her knees.
Oh Sally is in the pad sitting on her knees
and all she wanted is young hog-eye
Oh, the hog-eye man is the man for me,
for he send me home with the big belly.
“O who’s been here since I’ve been gone?”
“Some yankee jacket with his sea-boots on.”
Oh, a hog-eye ship and a hog-eye crew,
A hog-eye mate and a skipper too.
Mary Ann and Sara Jane
(is too big of thirteen and one more lane)*
* non comprendo bene il suono delle parole di quest’ultimo verso!
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il barcaiolo è l’uomo che fa per me,
mi porta per il Tennessee.
Una chiatta fluviale! Saldo al comando
Una chiatta fluviale! Saldo al comando

e quello che lei vuole è il suo barcaiolo! 
Oh i barcaioli fanno furore
quando vengono
a San Francisco
Oh venne nel posto dove viveva
Sally
bussò alla porta e suonò
il campanello.
Oh Sally è nel giardino a raccogliere piselli con i capelli che le arrivano fino alle ginocchia.
Oh Sally è nell’appartamento seduta sulle ginocchia e tutto quello che voleva è il giovane barcaiolo.
Il barcaiolo è l’uomo che fa per me,
perchè mi manda a casa con una gande pancia.
“Chi è stato qui dopo che sono andato via?”
“Una blusa yankee con i suoi stivali”
Oh una chiatta e la sua ciurma, il primo ufficiale e anche il comandante.
Mary Ann e Sara Jane
??

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy & Family in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.


Oh, hand me down my riding cane,
I’m off to meet my darlin’ Jane.
And a hog-eye!
Railroad navvy with his hog-eye,
Steady on a jig with a hog-eye, oh,
She wants the hog-eye man!

Oh, the hog-eye man is the man for me,
Sailin’ down from o’er the sea.
Oh, he came to the shack where Sally did dwell,
He knocked on the door, he rung a bell.
“Oh, who’s been here since I been gone?”
“Railroad navvy with his sea-boots on”.
If I catch him here with Sally once more,
I’ll sling me hook, go to sea once more.
Oh, Sally’s in the garden sifting sand,
Her hog-eye man sittin’ hand in hand.
Oh, Sally’s in the garden, punchin’ dough,(6)
The cheeks of her arse go chuff, chuff, chuff!
Oh, I won’t wear a hog-eye, damned if I do,
Got jiggers in his feet and he can’t wear shoes.
Oh, the hog-eye man is the man for me,
He is blind and he cannot see.
Oh, a hog-eye ship and a hog-eye crew,
A hog-eye mate and a skipper too.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Passami il frustino (1)
esco per incontrare la mia cara Jane.
Una chiatta fluviale (2),
un marinaio (3) con la sua chiatta,
saldo al comando sulla chiatta (4)
lei vuole il barcaiolo (5) 
Il barcaiolo è l’uomo che fa per me,
che se la spassa in mare (6).
Oh venne alla baracca dove
viveva Sally
bussò alla porta e suonò il campanello.
“Chi è stato qui dopo che sono andato via?”
“Il marinaio con i suoi stivali (7)”
Se lo trovo qui con Sally ancora una volta, gli tirerò un pugno per fargli prendere il mare ancora una volta. Oh Sally è in giardino a vagliare la sabbia(8), seduta con il suo il barcaiolo mano nella mano,
Oh Sally è in giardino a prendere a pugni l’impasto(9), le chiappe del suo culo che fanno ciuf ciuf,
Oh non voglio portare una chiatta, dannazione se lo farò.
Ha le pulci nei piedi(10) e non può portare le scarpe.
Oh il il barcaiolo è l’uomo
che fa per me,
è orbo e non riesce a vedere(11)
Oh una chiatta e la sua ciurma,
il primo ufficiale e anche il comandante

NOTE
1) tipica frusta per incitare i cavalli messi al traino di un calessino
2) hog-eye la traduzione letterale è “occhio di porco” ma si riferisce a una barcaccia. Nelle note in Rogues Gallery: “A hog-eye was apparently a type of barge used in the canals and rivers of America from the 1850’s on ward. Thus, “hog-eye man” was used in derogation by the deep water sailors who used this chantey at the capstan.” Su Mudcat leggiamo: The tow-path driver responsible for the draft animals which towed barges and canal boats on the old canal systems was known as the HOGGY; that possibly might be the basis for the term hog-eye, through folk etymology.(qui)
E ancora: ” hog-eyes were boats in San Francisco that used to bring ashore passengers and crew from larger sailing ships. During the ’49 gold rush ships crews used to leave the ships to go prospecting, leaving behind many rotten old hulks. These people were apparantly known as the hogeye men“.
Il termine ha una connotazione sessuale ‘hog’s-eye’ and ‘pig’s eye’, the vagina or its split “upright diamond” symbol. (Not to be confused with the nautical slang, ‘dead-eye’, the anus, or a Turk’s-head knot in rope). ‘Hog’s-eye man, an inveterate wencher or ‘cunt-hound’, a man obsessed with women or sex, also called ‘Jody‘.”
3) navvy è il manovale sterratore che lavorava per la costruzione dei canali navigabili per il sistema delle acque interne in tutte le isole britanniche ‘inland navigations’ e successivamente delle ferrovie inglesi e anche americane. Per estensione è diventato il manovale che lavora nelle grandi infrastrutture come le autostrade.
Stan Hugill riporta invece “railroad nigger” per sottolineare che il manovale in questione è un afro-americano, ma questa “angolazione” della storia è più recente. Qui avendo aggiunto il termine railroad ha chiaramente il significato di manovale “sterratore”  (approfondimento qui)
4) Una lettura a doppio senso potrebbe anche essere: “pronto per il ballo con una fica”
5)  scritto anche “hawk eye man” or ox eyed man”. Riassumendo il termine hog-eye man ha tre significati: il capitano o più in generale il marinaio di una chiatta fluviale (inteso in senso dispregiativo rispetto ai marinai delle acque profonde); un “donnaiolo”; un uomo strabico o con gli occhi all’infuori ( sailors were called ‘hogeyes’ because they squinted in the sun (like pigs, and like Popeye!)
6) ho mantenuto il doppio senso
7) Ai nostri giorni viene da tradurre come stivali impermeabili (ossia in plastica) ma nell’Ottocento erano degli stivali in cuoio opportunamente trattati per essere a tenuta-acqua. Nelle foto degli sterratori che lavorarono per la costruzione della rete ferroviaria si vedono ai loro piedi i più comuni scarponi un po’ alti sulla caviglia chiusi con i lacci
8) l’allusione è esplicita in quanto le prostitute dei marinai esercitavano il loro mestiere dietro alle dune di sabbia
9) anche scritto come “Sally`s in the kitchen, mixing duff” che avrebbe più senso con il verso successivo
10) credo si riferisca alle pulci “jigger” un tipo di parassita dei climi tropicali (centro e sud america, caraibi, africa e india) il cui termine scientifico è Tunga penetrans il tipo di infestazione è particolarmente fastidiosa, la pulce penetra nella pelle e ci resta nutrendosi del sangue dell’ospite (per l’approfondimento qui) anche se non capisco cosa ci azzecchi con il resto delle strofe
11) anche scritto come “He’s blind in one eye & cannot see”

La versione di The McCalmans è sostanzialmente la stessa


The hogs-eye man is the man for me
He came a-sailing from the sea
CHORUS
With a hogs-eye
Row the boat ashore for the hogs-eye
Steady on the jig with the hogs-eye oh She wants the hogs-eye man
He came to the shack where his Sally did dwell
And he knocked on the door and he rang her bell
Oh Sally’s in the garden picking peas
And the hair of her head hanging down to her knees
The hogs-eye ship and the hogs-eye crew
With the hogs-eye mate and the skipper too
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il barcaiolo è l’uomo che fa per me
viene navigando per il mare.
CORO
Con una chiatta fluviale,
porta la barca al largo con la sua chiatta
saldo al comando sulla chiatta,
lei vuole il barcaiolo
Venne alla baracca dove
viveva Sally
bussò alla porta e suonò
il campanello.

Sally è in giardino a raccogliere
le pere, con i capelli dalla testa lunghi fino alle ginocchia
oh una chiatta fluviale
e la sua ciurma,
con il primo ufficiale e anche il comandante

LA VERSIONE STRUMENTALE: SALLY IN THE GARDEN

E’ una vecchia melodia per violino – musica appalacchiana (per gli spartiti qui). Al momento ho trovato solo la linea di canto interpretata da J. D. Cornett in Classic Old-Time Fiddle from Smithsonian Folkways

traccia 103
Sally’s in the garden, sifting, sifting
Sally’s in the garden sifting sand
Sally’s in the garden sifting, sifting
Sally’s upstairs with the hogeye man

mentre alla traccia 104 la versione strumentale, e anche:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdSSdceUhVM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbigUQOpPoI

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/hogeyeman.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#The_Hogs-eye_Man
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/h/hogeyema.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/oxeyed.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=11353
http://www.folkways.si.edu/j-d-cornett/sally-in-the-garden/old-time/music/track/smithsonian
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2014/06/sally-in-garden-siftin-sand-lyrics.html
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2014/06/various-somewhat-discreetly-worded.html
https://thesession.org/tunes/9984

Carole di Primavera nel Bedforshide

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow may day songs 
Helston Furry Dance

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]Il Primo Maggio si seguivano alcune tradizioni. I bambini portavano la ghirlanda del Maggio ossia un cerchio formato con rami decorati con nastri e fiori, nel centro erano appese due bamboline, una grande che rappresentava la Vergine Maria e una più piccola che rappresentava Cristo bambino, un panno bianco era fissato sulla sommità per coprire tutta la ghirlanda. I bambini si fermavano ad ogni casa e chiedevano dei soldi per mostrare la ghirlanda sollevando il panno.
Un’altra tradizione diffusa in tutta la contea era il Maying, si faceva regolarmente fino allo scoppio della prima guerra mondiale e dopo solo sporadicamente: i giovani andavano in giro la notte con i rami del Maggio e cantavano i canti del Maggio, al mattino un ramo del maggio era attaccato al palo portabandiera della scuola, un altro decorava l’insegna della locanda “at the Crown” e altri erano appoggiati contro le porte in modo che finissero in casa quando si aprivano. Questi maggianti includevano un Signore e una Signora (il più giovane dei ragazzi con un velo sul volto e una cuffietta), tra i mummers anche i Moggers o Moggies un uomo e una donna con le facce annerite vestiti di stracci e con le scope 
(tradotto da qui)

VIDEO Ecco una testimonianza molto significativa di Margery “Mum” Johnstone dal Bedforshide raccolta da Pete Caslte, con due canzoni del Maggio

La danza del Palo durante  la festa del Maggio a Elstow, Bedfordshire, nel 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

Ancora dalla testimonianza della signora Margery Johnstone questa May Garland ovvero “This Morning Is The 1st of May” trascritta da Fred Hamer  nel suo  “Garners Gay”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Stamattina è il Primo di Maggio
il momento più importante dell’anno
e se vivrò e resterò qui
vi visiterò un altro anno
II
I campi e i prati
sono così verdi
come il tenero porro
il nostro Padre del Cielo li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
III
L’uomo tuttavia è solo un uomo, la sua vita è breve, è molto simile a un fiore
è qui oggi e domani non c’è più,
così tutto finisce nel giro di un ora.
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, devo andare
non posso restare più a lungo
vieni e — la mia bambola del Maggio
e guarda il mio ramo del Maggio
V
Ho una borsa in tasca
che è legata con un nastro di seta
e tutto ciò che le manca
è un po’ del tuo denaro
da infilare dentro

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

La carol è conosciuta con il nome più generico di “The May Day Carol” o “Bedford May Carol” ma anche come “The Kentucky May Carol” (come preservata nella tradizione del maggio nei Monti Appalachi) ed è stata raccolta nel Bedfordshire.
Una prima versione ci viene dalla tradizione di Hinwick come collezionata da Lucy Broadwood  (1858 –  1929)  e trascritta in “English Traditional Songs and Carols” ( Londra: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton in “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017


I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ho vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e  ora  ritorno ancora qui
per portarvi il ramo del maggio
II
Lo spino del Maggio mia cara, dico,
è davanti alla tua porta
non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
III
Vai nella dispensa e portami una coppa,
una coppa della tua dolce crema,
e se dovessi restare in città
ritornerò da voi un altro anno.
IV
Le siepi e i campi sono così verdi
e ogni foglia è rifiorita
il Nostro Padre dei Cieli li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
V
E quando sarò morto e nella tomba
e ricoperto dalla fredda terra
l’usignolo si fermerà a cantare
e il tempo trascorrerà via
VI
Prendi la Bibbia in mano
e leggi un capitolo
e quando il giorno del giudizio verrà
il Signore penserà a te
VII
Ho una borsa sul braccio destro
stretta con un nastro di seta
non vuole altro che un po’ d’argento
da infilare dentro
VIII
E ora che la canzone è quasi finita
non posso restare più a lungo
Dio vi benedica, grandi e piccini
e vi auguro un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna, come nella versione del Cambridgshire, inevitabili le contaminazioni con il credo della religione dominante
2) questa crema dolce e fresca in bicchiere è una bevanda-dessert tipicamente inglese d’epoca elisabettiana ancora popolare in epoca vittoriana, il Syllabub. Un tempo ai Mayers si offriva “una syllabub di latte caldo direttamente dalla mucca, torte dolci e vino” (Il ramo d’Oro James Frazer). E così sono andata a curiosare per ritrovare la ricetta storica: si tratta di un  frappè di latte, vino (o sidro o birra) zuccherato e profumato con succo di limone. Il succo di limone serviva a far cagliare il latte in modo che si formasse una crema in superficie,  nel tempo la ricetta è diventata più solida, cioè una crema con la panna montanta aromatizzata con del liquore o vino dolce (vedi ricette)

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste sullo sfondo un vassoio pieno di bicchieri di syllabubs

3) il riferimento alla rugiada non è casuale , la tradizione del maggio prevede il bagno nella rugiada e nelle acque selvatiche ricche di pioggia. La notte è quella magica del 30 aprile e la rugiada veniva raccolta dalle fanciulle e conservata come un toccasana in grado di risvegliare la bellezza femminile! (vedi Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002 la melodia è la stessa della Cambridgeshire May Carol (purtroppo il mio orecchio non riesce a distinguere bene alcune frasi.. lasciate in punteggiatura)


I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Un ramo del Maggio, così bello e allegro, sta davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio, ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
II
Alzati, bella fanciulla e fai entrare il Maggio perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino, potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
III
?
?
IV
Se non una coppa di crema fredda  (dateci) un boccale di birra scura
e se continueremo a  restare in città
ritorneremo da voi un altro anno.
V
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
siamo qui oggi e domani non ci saremo più
saremo tutti morti nel giro di un ora
VI
La luna brilla luminosa, le stelle si accendono
tra poco sarà giorno
così ricordatevi ..
e vi auguriamo un gioioso Maggio

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna.
2) il Syllabub (vedi sopra)
3) la strofa deriva da “The Moon Shine Bright” versione pubblicata da William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) vedi

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane in “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 (strofe I, II, III e IX) e a seguire The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
La canzone viene riproposta nel Blog “A Folk song a Week”   curato dallo stesso Andy Turner  in cui Andy ci dice di aver appreso la canzone dalla raccolta di Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred la collezionò da “Chris Marsom e altri” – Mr Marsom era già emigrato in Canada,ma Fred lo incontrò in visita a Northill, il suo paese natale nel Bedfordshire. Le note di Fred dicono “The Day Song è troppo lunga per essere inclusa qui e la Night Song ha la stessa melodia. E’ stata usata da Vaughan Williams come la melodia No. 638 nell’ English Hymnal, ma con il nome di “Southill” perchè gli era stata mandata da un uomo di Southill. Chris Marsom che me la cantò aveva molte storielle sull’accoglienza delle signore forestiere che vivevano da poco nel villaggio perchè si spaventavano quando i Maggianti si avvicinavano alla loro casa nel cuore della notte alla vigilia del 1° Maggio”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick in “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (traccia 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy scrive nelle note dell’album “May Song viene dalla registrazione di Cynthia Gooding che ho perso circa 16 anni fa, ma le parole mi sono rimaste in testa.” (strofe da II a VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati mia graziosa fanciulla
e prendi il nostro spino del Maggio
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti una allegra ghirlanda (il ramo del maggio)
III
Lo spino del Maggio portiamo in giro (porta l’allegria)
e sta davanti alla tua porta non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato per il lavoro di nostro Signore
IV
Alzati bella fanciulla per far entrare il Maggio, perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
V
Le porte del paradiso sono spalancate
per far fuggire la rugiada
è qui oggi, puntuale
e cade su di me e te
VI
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
non ci sono proroghe oggi c’è
e poi svanisce nel giro di un’ora
VII
E quando sarai morto
e nella tomba
sarai ricoperto dalla fredda terra
i vermi mangeranno la tua carne, buonuomo
e le tue ossa si consumeranno.
VIII
La canzone è finita ed è tempo di andare, non posso restare più a lungo. Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!
IX
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) secondo la precedente religione l’acqua riceveva maggior potere dal sole di Beltane. Si facevano pellegrinaggio alle sorgenti sacre e con l’acqua della sorgente si aspergevano i campi per favorire la pioggia.

Kerfuffle in “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati, dolce fanciulla,
a prendere lo Spino del Maggio,
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce
e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte del giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti il ramo del maggio
III
Un ramo del Maggio ti abbiamo portato, ed è davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio,
ma è ben sbocciato
per mano di Nostro Signore
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/