Bidh clann Ulaidh versus Song of the Exile (We will go home)

Leggi in italiano

Bidh clann Ulaidh (in English “The Clan of Ulster”) is a lullaby from the Hebrides, where the mother sleeps the baby (I imagine the baby is a female), telling her about the great wedding her family will organize when she arrives in the marriageable age. She mention the names of important Clans and also of the illustrious Irish relatives who will go to the wedding to celebrate the couple and honor the family .
Weddings between upper class families were famous events that people talked about and remembered for years, on which they wrote songs (here), in which the clan chiefs displayed their liberality and magnificence. Marriages allowed for alliances (though not always lasting) between clans and were contracts that involved the exchange of livestock, money and property, called tochers for the bride and dowry for the groom.

THE MELODY

The melody is something magical, there is a version that outclasses – in my opinion – all the others, that of the virtuoso (as well as Scottish) Tony McManus, the “Celtic fingerstyle guitar legend”

Tony McManus live

(I suppose the melody brings something to your mind … who has not seen King Arthur’s film?)
and if we add the violin too?
Alasdair Fraser & Tony McManus

and now we add the song..

Catherine-Ann MacPhee 2014

Can Cala 2014

English translation
I
My love, my darling child
The Clan of Ulster(2) will be at your wedding
My love, my darling child
The Clan of Ulster will dance at your wedding
Chorus:
The king’s clans, the king’s clans
The king’s clans will be at your wedding
The king’s clans playing the pipes
Wine will be drunk at your wedding
II
Clan MacAulay(3), a lively crowd
Clan MacAulay will be at your wedding
Clan MacAulay, a lively crowd
Will dance at your wedding
III
Clan Donald(4), who are so special(5)
Clan Donald will be at your wedding
Clan Donald, who are so special
Will dance at your wedding
IV
Clan MacKenzie(6) of the shining armor(7)
Clan MacKenzie will be at your wedding
Clan MacKenzie of the shining armor
Will dance at your wedding

I
Bidh clann(1) Ulaidh luaidh ‘s a lurain
Bidh clann Ulaidh air do bhanais
Bidh clann Ulaidh luaidh ‘s a lurain
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
Sèist:
Bidh clann a’ rìgh, bidh clann a’ rìgh
Bidh clann a’ rìgh air do bhanais
Bidh clann a’ rìgh seinn air a’ phìob
Òlar am fìon air do bhanais
II
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh nam feachd greannmhor
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh nam feachd greannmhor
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
III
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill tha cho neònach(5)
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill tha cho neònach
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
IV
Bidh Clann Choinnich nam feachd soilleir(7)
Bidh Clann Choinnich air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Choinnich nam feachd soilleir
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais

NOTES
1) the word “clan” derives from the Scottish Gaelic “clann” = “child” to underline the strong bond of blood between the chief and the families (descendants). The clans are territorial extensions controlled by the chief who lives in an ancient castle or fortified house. Not all members of the clan are also descendants of blood, because they could also have “affiliated” to the clan in exchange for protection. At Hogmany or at the time of the election of the new chief all the respective heads of the family swore loyalty to the clan leader. The leader is a Laird, a clan leader and a legal representative of the community
2 ) in Ireland the Ard Ri, the king of kings comes from the North, from the Ulaidh, the land of the warriors and the Clan of the O’Neils always remained a prestigious clan even after the English conquest.
3) Clan MacAulay is a Scottish clan of Argyll, among the oldest in Scotland that boasted its descendants from the king of the Picts: they are located on the border between Lowland and Highland
4) the Clan Donald is one of the most numerous Scottish clans and divided into numerous subdivisions. The Lord of the Islands is traditionally a MacDonald (Hebrides)
5) also written “tha cha neonach” = “it’s no wonder”
6 )Clan MacKenzie is a Highlands clan whose coat of arms reproduces a mountain in flame and the motto says “Luceo non uro”
7) also translated as “bright clothing”

VANORA – WE WILL GO HOME (ACROSS THE MOUNTAINS) -KING ARTHUR (2004)

The song titled “The song of Exile” is sung by Vanora (wife of Bors) to the men of Arthur – of the people of the Sàrmati, (but in reality it is addressed to the child in his arms and therefore it is to him, but also to the warrior-husband, who sings a lullaby -anna) in the imminence of the departure for a “suicide” mission; men want to return home, they have the safe conduct that frees them from servitude in Rome, but choose to stay alongside their commander, the Roman-Briton Artorius (the plot here).

This is how Caitlin Matthews writes“I am the arranger/translator of “Song of the Exile” which appeared in the film and wasn’t recorded on the CD. Disney won’t allow me to sing or record it as they now own the copyright

These are the words sung in the film:

I
Land of bear and land of eagle
Land that gave us birth and blessing
Land that called us ever homewards
We will go home across the mountains
We will go home, we will go home…
II
When the land is there before us
We have gone home across the mountains
We have gone home, we have gone home
We have gone home singing our songs


A whispered lullaby, sweet-sad together, short but with an intense emotional charge, not included in the soundtrack CD “King Artur.” As an author there are those who thought to credit (wrongly) Hans Zimmer who actually signed the soundtrack of the film and we have seen a lot of complaints from the fans for the exclusion of the song. Hans Zimmer (here) writes “Song of the Exile” is composed and performed by Caitlin Matthews” (see more)

ADDITIONAL STANZAS

III
Land of freedom land of heroes
Land that gave us hope and memories
Hear our singing hear our longing
We will go home across the mountains
IV
Land of sun and land of moonlight
Land that gave us joy and sorrow
Land that gave us love and laughter
We will go home across the mountains

So there’s a song (Bidh clann Ulaidh?) in Scottish Gaelic at the beginning, arranged / translated by Caitlin Matthews and an avalanche of super-charged versions have come out (and keep going out) on YouTube!

ShaDoWCa7

Leah

Maria van Selm

Karliene

Anna Cefalo

Stephanie Hill  Norse version (here)
LINK
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/macaskill/bidh.htm
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/clannulaidh.php http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/gaelicsongs/bidhclannulaidh.asp
http://www.hallowquest.org.uk/
http://www.terrediconfine.eu/king-arthur/

My Boatman (“Fear a’ bhàta”)

Leggi in italiano

“Fear a’ bhàta” is a Scottish Gaelic song probably from the end of the 18th century which was also poured into English under the title “O Boatman” (My Boatman) while maintaining the chorus in Gaelic.
Of all the versions in English (see), the most precious from the point of view of writing is certainly that of 1849 with the words translated from Gaelic by Thomas Pattison and the melodic arrangement of Malcolm Lawson (published in “Songs of the North “, MacLeod and Harold Boulton, 1895)

The girl is waiting for a visit of the handsome boatman who seems instead to prefer other girls!
Silly Wizard from Caledonia’s Hardy Sons 1978, Andy Stewart – voice, Bob Thomas – guitar; Johnny Cunningham – mandola, Phil Cunningham – synthesizer


Sandy Denny 

North Sea Gas from The Fire and the Passion of Scotland 2013


Thomas Pattison version
I
How often haunting the highest hilltop
I scan the ocean I sail tae sea/wilt come tonight love wilt come tomorrow?
Wilt ever come, love, to comfort me?
CHORUS
Fhir a bhata no horo eil’e(1)
Fhir a bhata no horo eil’e
Fhir a bhata no horo eil’e
o fare ye well(2), love, where e’er ye be
II
They call thee fickle, they call thee false one,
and seek tae change me, but all in vain;
no, thou art my dream yet throughout the dark night
and every morn yet I watch the main

III
There’s not a hamlet -too well I know it-
where you go wandering or stay(3) awhile
but all its old folks you win wi’ talking
and charm its maidens with song and smile
IV
Dost thou remember the promise made me
the tartan plaidie, the silken gown,
the ring of gold with thy hair and portrait(4)?
That gown and ring I will never own

NOTES
1) basically a non-sense phrase that some want to translate “and no one else” ie as “mine and no other”
2) it is both a greeting and a wish for good luck: My greeting to you wherever you go
3) or “sits”
4) It is a small medallion with the lid inside which there was a lover’s miniature and a lock of his/her hair

gaelic version
LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4

E la barca va: The Prince & the Ballerina

Leggi in italiano

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met Charles Stuart. After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) the then twenty-six-year-old Bonnie Prince managed to escape and remain hidden for several months, protected by his loyalists, despite the British patrols and the price on his head!
Charles found many hiding places and support in the Hebrides but it was a dangerous game of hide-and-seek.

THE PRINCE & THE BALLERINA

The prince had managed to get to the Island of Banbecula of the Outer Hebrides, but the surveillance was very tight and had no way to escape. And here comes the girl, Flora MacDonald.
The MacDonalds as loyal to the king and Presbyterian confession, but they were sympathizers of the Jacobite cause and so Flora who lived in Milton (South Uist island) went on visiting her friend, wife of the clan’s Lady Margareth of Clanranald , and she was presented to Charles Stuart.

In another version of the story the prince was hiding at the Loch Boisdale on the Isle of South Uist, hoping to meet Alexander MacDonald, who had recently been arrested. Warned that a patrol would inspect the area, Charles fled with two jacobites to hide in a small farm near Ormaclette where the meeting with Flora MacDonald had been arranged. The moment was immortalized in many paintings like this by Alexander Johnston.

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

In the anecdotal version of the story, Flora devised a trick to take away Charlie from the island : on the pretext of visiting her mother (who lived in Armadale after remarried), she obtained the safe-conduct for herself and her two servants; under the name and clothes of the Irish maid Betty Burke, however, there was the Bonny Prince! (see more)

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e floraThe boat with four (or six) sailors to the oars left Benbecula on 27 June 1746 for the Isle of Skye in the Inner Hebrides. They arrived to Portée and on July 1st they left, the prince gave Flora a medallion with his portrait and the promise that they would meet one day

FLORA MACDONALD’S FANCY

Among the Scottish dances is still commemorated the dance with which Flora performed in front of the Prince. It ‘a very graceful dance, inevitable in the program of Highland dance competitions: it is a courtship dance, in which girl shows all her skills while maintaining a proud attitude and composure.
It is performed with the Aboyne dress, dress prescribed for the dancers in the national Scottish dances, as disciplined by the dance commission in the Aboyne Highland Gathering of 1970 (with pleated skirt doll effect, in tartan or the much more vaporous white cloth) .
Melody is a strathspey, which is a slower reel, typical of Scotland often associated with commemorations and funerals.

FLORA MACDONALD’S REEL

Many other musical tributes were dedicated to the beautiful Flora. The melody of this reel appears with many titles, the first printed version is found in Robert Bremer “Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances”, 1757 and also in Repository Complete of the Dance Music of Scotland by Niel Gow (Vol I). The reel is in two parts

Tonynara from “Sham Rock” – 1994

The Virginia Company

RUSTY NAIL: CLAN MACKINNON COCKTAIL

Rusty-NailTo repay the help given by Clan MacKinnon during the months when he had to hide from the English, Prince Stuart revealed to John MacKinnon the recipe for his secret elixir, a special drink created by his personal pharmacist. The MacKinnon clan accepted the custody of the recipe, until at the beginning of the ‘900, a descendant of the family decided that it was time to commercially exploit the recipe calling it “Drambuie”

4.5 cl Scotch whisky
2.5 cl Drambuie

Procedure: directly prepare an old fashioned glass with ice. Stir gently and garnish with a twist of lemon.

A double-scottish cocktali: Scotch Whiskey and Drambuie which is a liqueur whose recipe is a mix of whiskey, honey … secrets and legends. Even today the company is managed by the same family and keeps the contents of the recipe secret. (Taken from here)

At this point many will ask “But the Skye boat song, where did it end?” (here  is)

LINK
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755
http://thesession.org

Outlander: i regali dello sposo

Read the post in English  

DAL LIBRO LA STRANIERA

Diana Gabaldon

Nel primo libro della saga Outlander scritto da Diana Gabaldon il capitolo 16 Jamie recita,  il giorno dopo il loro matrimonio, una vecchia canzone d’amore a Claire, dandole una trota appena pescata con le mani.
“E una vecchia canzone d’amore, viene dalle Isole. Vuoi sentirla?”
“Si, certo. Ehm in inglese, se puoi” aggiunsi.
“Oh, aye. Non sono granchè intonato, ma posso dirti le parole” E, togliendosi le ciocche dei capelli dagli occhi, recitò:
Tu, figlia del re dei castelli illuminati a giorno,
la sera del nostro matrimonio,
se ancora uomo vivo sarò a Duntulm,
a grandi balzi verrò da te pieno di doni.
Avrai cento tassi, che dimorano in riva ai fiumi,
cento lontre brune, native dei torrenti..

A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis

Alexander Carmichael nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” Vol II, riporta il frammento di questa vecchia scottish song in gaelico scozzese, facendone la traduzione in inglese, supponendo che l’autore sia stato un Macdonalds delle Isole (clan rinomato per la fama poetica dei suoi esponenti di spicco) dell’isola di Skye.
Skye è probabilmente  l’isola delle Ebridi più simile alla terra di Avalon, location privilegiata di molti film fantasy e non, e più recentemente meta inflazionata del turismo di massa (con tutti gli aspetti negativi dei prezzi gonfiati, le strade sovraffollate dai bus turistici e anche alle mete più impervie rischiate di trovarvi in numerosa compagnia)

I
A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis (1),
An oidhche bhios oirnne do bhanais,
Ma ’s fear beo mi an Duntuilm (2)
Theid mi toirleum (3)  da d’earrais.
II
Gheobh tu ciad bruicean tadhal bruach,
Ciad dobhran donn, dualach alit,
Gheobh tu ciad damh alluidh nach tig
Gu innis ard ghleannaidh.
III
Gheobh to ciad steud stadach, luath,
Ciad bràc (5) bruaill an t-samhraidh,
’S gheobh tu ciad maoilseach (6) maol, ruadh,
Nach teid am buabhall am Faoileach (7) geamhraidh

traduzione inglese *
I
Thou daughter of the king of bright-lit mansions (1),
On the night that our wedding is on us,/If living man I be in Duntulm (2)
I will go bounding to thee with gifts.
II (4)
Thou wilt get an hundred badgers dwellers in banks,
An hundred brown otters native of streams,
Thou wilt get an hundred wild stags that will not come/ To the green pastures of the high glens.
III
Thou wilt get an hundred steeds stately and swift,
An hundred reindeer intractable in summer,
And thou wilt get an hundred hummelled red hinds,
That will not go in stall in the Wolfmonth of winter
Traduzione italiana**
[Tu, figlia del re dei castelli illuminati a giorno,
la sera del nostro matrimonio
se ancora uomo vivo sarò a Duntulm, a grandi balzi verrò da te pieno di doni.
II
Avrai cento tassi, che dimorano in riva ai fiumi,
cento lontre brune, native dei torrenti]
Avrai cento cervi
che non andranno
sui verdi pascoli degli altopiani.
III
Avrai cento destrieri maestosi e dal piè veloce,
cento renne difficili da trattare in estate
Avrai cento cervi rossi senza corna
che non andranno nella stalla nel mese invernale di Gennaio.

NOTE
* Alexander Carmicheal
** Cattia Salto fuori dalle [ ]
1) letteralmente roiseal soluis= fine bright light or display of light, se fosse una fiaba verrebbe voglia di tradurre come “re della schiera luminosa” e prosegue “la notte del nostro matrimonio è alle porte
2) Duntulm Castle è un castello diroccato su uno spuntone di roccia sulla costa settentrionale di Trotternish , nell’isola di Skye. Sede del clan Mac Donald di Sleat a partire dal Seicento è stato abbandonato  nell’anno del 1730.
3) tòirleum: leum bras
4) Diana Gabaldon conclude il poema aggiungendo un verso che richiama la situazione comica creatasi tra i due protagonisti “cento argentee trote, che saltano dagli stagni
5) bràc= brae= Beurla (reindeer)
6) bean an fhèid
7) Faoilteach

Il simbolismo dei doni matrimoniali è evidente: l’abbondanza degli armenti è benaugurale per la fertilità della coppia.

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2106.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/books/pdf/carminagadelicah02carm.pdf
http://luideagbheag.blogspot.com/2016/11/a-nigheann-righ-nan-roiseal-soluis.html

https://www.thecastlesofscotland.co.uk/the-best-castles/scenic-castles/duntulm-castle/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/07/01/isola-di-skye-informazioni-generali/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/06/30/isola-di-skye-4-giorni-tra-le-nuvole/

Crathadh d’aodaich

Una “mouth music song” dalle Isole Ebridi cantata da Karen Matheson sull’aria di un reel, le parole non hanno molto senso, sono delle frasi ripetute in cui una ragazza attende il ritorno del suo fidanzato. Spera che arrivi in tempo per la festa di Samain e così lo esorta a dispiegare le vele della nave al vento!

ASCOLTA Capercaille live The Tree; già registrato nell’album “Dusk Till Dawn” (1998) e in “Beautiful Wasteland” (1998)

The Tree
I
Thig thu’n taobh-sa mu Shamhainn
Crathadh d’aodaich a ghaoil
Thig thu ma bhios gaoth ann
Crathadh d’aodaich a ghaoil
Thig thu’n taobh-sa mu Shamhainn
Crathadh d’aodaich a ghaoil
Thig thu ma bhios gaoth ann
II
Bith thu nad ruith air a’ rathad
Bith thu nad ruith air a’ rathad
Bith thu nad ruith air a’ rathad
Sior chrathadh d’aodaich
Bith thu nad ruith air a’ rathad
Bith thu nad ruith air a’ rathad
Bith thu nad ruith air a’ rathad
Sior chrathadh d’aodaich


I
You will come this way about Samain
With sails unfurled, my love
You will come if there is a fair wind
With sails unfurled, my love
You will come this way about  Samain
With sails unfurled, my love
You will come if there is a fair wind
II
You will make haste on the way
You will make haste on the way
You will make haste on the way
Under full sail
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Arriverai così per Samain
a vele spiegate, amore mio
verrai se ci sarà la brezza
a vele spiegate, amore mio
Arriverai così per Samain
a vele spiegate, amore mio
verrai se ci sarà la brezza
II
Ti affretterai lungo la rotta
Ti affretterai lungo la rotta
Ti affretterai lungo la rotta
a vele spiegate

FONTI
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/87097/8;jsessionid=1D0E389C93ECFB5A6793FD3AE4CD3935

MY BOATMAN

Read the post in English

“Fear a’ bhàta” è una canzone in gaelico scozzese probabilmente di fine ‘700 che è stata versificata anche in inglese con il titolo “O Boatman” (My Boatman) pur mantenendo il coro in gaelico.
Tra tutte le versioni in inglese (vedi), la più preziosa anche dal punto di vista della scrittura è senz’altro quella del 1849 con le parole tradotte dal gaelico da Thomas Pattison e l’arrangiamento melodico di Malcolm Lawson (pubblicata in “Songs of the North”, MacLeod e Harold Boulton, 1895)

La ragazza è in attesa di una visita del bel barcaiolo, che sembra invece preferire altre fanciulle!
Silly Wizard in Caledonia’s Hardy Sons 1978, Andy Stewart – voce, Bob Thomas – chitarra; Johnny Cunningham – mandola, Phil Cunningham – tastiera elettronica


Sandy Denny 

North Sea Gas in The Fire and the Passion of Scotland 2013


Thomas Pattison
I
How often haunting the highest hilltop
I scan the ocean I sail tae sea/wilt come tonight love wilt come tomorrow?
Wilt ever come, love, to comfort me?
CHORUS
Fhir a bhata no horo eil’e(1)
Fhir a bhata no horo eil’e
Fhir a bhata no horo eil’e
o fare ye well(2), love, where e’er ye be
II
They call thee fickle, they call thee false one,
and seek tae change me, but all in vain;
thou art my dream yet throughout the dark night/ and every morn yet (morning)  I watch the main
III
There’s not a hamlet -too well I know it-
where you go wandering or stay(3) awhile
but all its old folks you win wi’ talking
and charm its maidens with song and smile
IV
Dost thou remember the promise made me
the tartan plaidie, the silken gown,
the ring of gold with thy hair and portrait(4)?
That gown and ring I will never own

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Spesso salgo sulla collina più alta
e scruto il mare per vedere la tua vela,
verrai stanotte amore o verrai domani?
Verrai presto a confortarmi?RITORNELLO
Uomo della barca la, la la
Uomo della barca la, la la
Uomo della barca la, la la
buonasorte, amore, ovunque tu sia
II
Ti chiamano il volubile, ti chiamano il bugiardo
e cercano di farmi cambiare idea, ma invano; perchè tu sei il mio sogno nell’oscurità della notte
e ogni mattino io guardo il mare
III
Non c’è borgo – lo so troppo bene
dove tu non vada  ramingo o un poco ti fermi,
ma superi tutta la vecchia gente nelle chiacchiere
e incanti le fanciulle con la voce e il sorriso
IV
Non ti ricordi la promessa che mi hai fatto,
il plaid di tartan e la gonna di seta
il gioiello d’oro con i tuoi capelli e il ritratto?
Quella gonna e gioiello non avrò mai

NOTA
1) sostanzialmente una frase non-sense che alcuni vogliono tradurre “and no one else” cioè come “mio e di nessun altra”
2) è sia un saluto che un augurio di buona fortuna: Il mio saluto a te ovunque tu vada
3) a volte come “sits”
4) si tratta di un piccolo medaglione con il coperchio all’interno del quale si celava una miniatura e una ciocca di capelli dell’innamorato, un pegno in vista del matrimonio

continua versione in gaelico
FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45602

DÓMHNALL MAC ‘IC IAIN

Dómhnall Mac ‘Ic Iain (A Mhic Iain ‘ic Sheumais in italiano Donald, figlio di Giovanni, figlio di Giacomo) è una waulking song ancora popolare nelle Highlands, che racconta del ferimento di Dòmhnall Mac Iain ‘ic Sheumais  nella battaglia di Carinish (isola di North Uist -Ebridi, 1601).

Mac_Donald_of_Clan_Ranald-_-_(Eyre-Todd)La solita faida tra clan questa volta a causa di una donna ripudiata da Donald Gorm Mor MacDonald che guarda caso era sorella di Rory MacLeod. Tra botte e risposte (vedi) il nostro Donald del Clan Ranald ha fatto piazza pulita dei MacLeod a Carinish ma viene ferito gravemente da una freccia. Secondo la tradizione fu la madre adottiva NicCoiseam a cantare questa canzone mentre accudiva la sua ferita.

Donald si riprese dopo tre settimane e fu in grado di ripartire per l’isola di Skye .. e la faida continua

ASCOLTA  Mary Jane Lamond  in “Suas e!” (1997) versi I, II, III, IV, I, II, V

GAELICO SCOZZESE
I (x2)
Ma dh’eugas Dòmhnall mac ‘ic Iain
Eugaich e an cosnach
Ma dh’eugas Dòmhnall mac ‘ic Iain
Bidh sinn air a thòrradh
II (x2)
Gheobh sinn aran agus ìm
‘S càise na banaraich
Gheobh sinn aran agus ìm
Uisge-beath’ an Tòisich
III (x2)
Iain Bàn mac Dhòmhnaill ‘ic ‘ic Iain
‘S làidir gu carachd e
Iain Bàn mac Dhòmhnaill ‘ic ‘ic Iain
Chuir e dheth a chòta
IV (x2)
Dòmhnall mac Iain againn fhìn
Fear a b’fheàrr a bh’aca-san
Dòmhnall mac Iain againn fhìn
Fear a b’fheàrr a’ Bhràigh’
V (X2)
Tha mi ‘g iarraidh uisge beatha
Tha mi ‘g iarraidh beer eile
Tha mi ‘g iarraidh uisge beatha
Chan eil mi gad iarraidh

traduzione inglese
I
If Donald son of the son of John dies
He’ll die employed
If Donald son of the son of John dies
We’ll be at his funeral
II
We’ll get bread and butter
And the milkmaid’s cheese
We’ll get bread and butter
And the Toiseach’s whisky
III
Fair John son of Donald
son of the son of John
He’s strong at wrestling
Fair John son of Donald
son of the son of John
He put off his coat
IV
Our own Donald son of John
The best man they had
Our own Donald son of John
The best man in the Brae
V
I want whiskey
I want another beer
I want whiskey
I don’t want you
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Se Donald figlio del figlio di John muore, morirà da servitore (1)
Se Donald figlio del figlio di John muore andremo al suo funerale
II
Avremo pane e burro
e il formaggio della lattaia
avremo pane e burro
e il migliore whisky di Tòisich
III
Il bel John figlio di Donald
figlio del figlio di John
è forte e robusto
Il bel John figlio di Donald
figlio del figlio di John
ha messo da parte la corazza
IV
Il nostro Donald figlio di John
il migliore uomo che avevano
Il nostro Donald figlio di John
il migliore uomo della Collina
V
Voglio il whisky
e voglio dell’altra birra
voglio whisky
e non ti voglio

NOTE
1) non è ben chiaro il senso della frase essendo Donald un capo clan

Da quei romanticoni che sono gli Scozzesi il luogo della battaglia è segnato da un cartello e ancora numerosi turisti si recano sulla collina a visitare i ruderi della chiesa che fu luogo dello scontro (Trinity Temple)

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/lamond/domhnall.htm
http://www.hebrideanconnections.com/historical-events/109037

E LA BARCA VA: IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA, THE SKYE BOAT SONG

Read the post in English  

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e flora
Flora e il Bel Carletto

Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi.
Flora MacDonald aveva 24 anni quando incontrò  il Bonnie Prince e lo aiutò a lasciare le Ebridi, li vediamo raffigurati su una barchetta in balia delle onde, lei si avvolge nello scialle e guarda l’orizzonte, mentre il sole tramonta,  lui rema con foga.
(ecco com’è andata in realtà: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

LA TRAVERSATA IN MARE: LA FUGA DI CHARLES STUART

Il momento della fuga dalle Ebridi Esterne, per quanto “eroicomico”, è ricordato nella canzone “Skye boat song” (in italiano “La barca per Skye” ma anche” la barca per il cielo”) scritta da Sir Harold Boulton nel 1884 su di una melodia tradizionale che si dice sia stata arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod; una decina di anni prima Anne  stava facendo un’escursione sul Loch Coruisk, guarda caso proprio sull’isola di Skye e la sentì cantare da un gruppo di marinai; la canzone era “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in inglese “The Cuckoo in the Grove”) comparsa in stampa nel 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, di Alfred Moffat, con un testo attribuito a William Ross (1762 – 1790). La melodia è pertanto quantomeno risalente al tempo della vicenda.

LO IORRAM
Il brano è comparso nel libro Songs of the North pubblicato da Sir Harold Boulton e Anne Campbell MacLeod a Londra nel 1884. Nelle ristampe ed edizioni successive nel commento si fa riferimento alla melodia come a un “iorram” ossia a una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle Ebridi come valzer.

La canzone è stato un successo: fin da subito circolarono voci che spacciavano il testo come traduzione di una antico canto in gaelico e presto divenne un brano classico della musica celtica e in particolare della musica tradizionale scozzese inserito immancabilmente nelle compilation anche per matrimoni, fatto e rifatto in tutte le salse (dal beat al liscio, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), innumerevoli le versioni strumentali (da un solo strumento – arpa, cornamusa, chitarra, flauto – o due fino all’orchestra) con arrangiamenti classici, tradizionali, new age, per bande anche militari e corali. Su Spotify è possibile trovare moltissime versioni del brano e proprio per tutti i gusti! Tra quelle strumentali le mie preferite sono quelle con la chitarra di Greg Joy, Pete Lashley, Tom Rennie, ma anche una versione con arpa e flauto di Anne-Elise Keefer e una versione “insolita” (con tanto di basso-tuba o oboe) dei Leaf!

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
Over the sea to Skye
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head
III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
RITORNELLO
Veloce, bella barca,
come un uccello sulle ali

Avanti! Gridano i marinai!
Porta il ragazzo nato per essere re (1)
oltre il mare a Skye (2)
I
Forte ulula il vento,
forte ruggiscono le onde,
nubi minacciose riempiono il cielo;
frastornati i nostri nemici si fermano a riva e non osano seguirci
II
Benchè i flutti si accavallino,
il tuo sonno sarà docile
e l’oceano il letto del re
cullato dal mare (3),
Flora (4) vigilerà
vegliando sulla tua testa stanca
III
In molti combatterono quel giorno,
brandendo bene le spade, quando la notte venne in silenzio, giacevano morti  sul campo di Culloden (5).
IV
Bruciate le nostre case, esilio o morte,
dispersi gli uomini leali (6),
tuttavia prima che la spada si raffreddi nel fodero,
Carlo verrà di nuovo (7)


NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlandscontinua
2) L’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne, ma suona come “cielo” e quindi una metafora, l’autore lo impalma come eroe nel firmamento
3)  “rocked” è da intendersi, come in molte sea song e sea shanty (e in qualche lullaby), nel senso di dondolio (della culla in particolare)
4) Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790) che aiutò il principe nella fuga  continua
5) per l’approfondimento ho dedicato un’intera pagina ai Giacobiti vedi
6) la repressione inglese contro i giacobiti e i simpatizzanti fu brutale
7) nel 1884 Charles Stuart era ormai polvere, ma la letteratura romantica manteneva ancora vive le aspirazioni giacobite e i canti infiammavano ancora gli animi

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)Nel 1896 lo scrittore scozzese Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) scrisse una variante con nuove parole, evidentemente non soddisfatto di quanto scritto da un baronetto inglese.

Stevenson mette il canto in bocca allo stesso Charles, vecchio e disfatto nel suo esilio “dorato” tra Roma e Firenze. L’Alfieri ce lo descrive come irragionevole e sempre ubriaco padrone, ovvero querulo, sragionevole e sempre ebro marito (ma doveva avere il dente avvelenato essendo stato per anni l’amante della molto più giovane e bella moglie Luisa di Stolberg-Gedern contessa d’Albany). Il Principe sempre più amareggiato e dedito all’alcol, morì a Roma il 31 gennaio 1788 (abbandonato anche dalla moglie quattro anni prima).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
di Robert Louis Stevenson
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
OLTRE IL MARE PER SKYE
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Cantami del ragazzo del passato
dici, “Potrei essere io quello?”
con l’avventura nel cuore(1), salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Mull era a poppa, Rum era a babordo, Eigg sulla prua a dritta.
Gloria di gioventù brillava nel suo spirito, dov’è quella gloria ora?
III
Dammi ancora tutto ciò che fu,
dammi il sole che risplendeva
dammi la visione (2), dammi l’anima
dammi il ragazzo del passato
IV
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari
montagne di pioggia e di sole;
tutto ciò che era buono e giusto
tutto quello che ero, è morto

NOTE
1) “merry of soul” inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice” (per esempio She’s a merry little soul)
2) letteralmente dammi gli occhi

LA VERSIONE OUTLANDER

Più recentemente la canzone “Over the Sea to Skye” è stata ripresa nella serie “The Outlander” dalla saga di Diana Gabaldon ed è subito skyemania..
Il testo è modellato sulla versione di Robert Louis Stevenson anche se ogni riferimento al bel Carletto è stato sostituito dal “viaggio nel tempo” della bella Claire Randall  (dal 1945 nel 1743)

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbroug


I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul, she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Cantami di una ragazza del passato,
dici, “Potrei essere io quella?”
con l’avventura nel cuore (1) lei salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari,
montagne con la pioggia e il sole
Tutto ciò  che era bello e buono,
tutto quello che ero è morto.

NOTE
1 ) “merry of sou” viene inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice”
la strofa in francese
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye

Versione ulteriormente riarrangiata da Bear McCreary in seguito al successo della serie e completata con le strofe di Robert Louis Stevenson
Outlander -The Skye Boat Song(Extended)

Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song La versione francese

Per l’ambientazione nel Mar dei Caraibi Bear McCreary ha ulteriormente arrangianto la vecchia melodia tradizionale scozzese sviluppando l’elemento percussivo e melodico
Outlander Season III

 FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

LEIS AN LURGAINN (WITH THE LURGAINN)

Una canzone popolare nelle Highlands scozzesi viene dall’isola di Mingulay (Ebridi) ed originariamente era scritta in gaelico scozzese. Secondo la leggenda fu il capitano MacInnes  di ritorno dall’Irlanda sulla sua nave “The Lurgainn” (in inglese “Pretty Girl”) a dover affrontare una terribile tempesta.

the-shipwreck

ASCOLTA Maggie Macinnes

ASCOLTA Rankin Family. Così riportano nelle note “Written by a MacInnes from Fort William after returning home safely from a stormy voyage to Ireland on his ship, The Lurgainn”

ORIGINALE IN GAELICO SCOZZESE
Sèist (1)
Leis an Lurgainn o hi
leis an Lurgainn o ho
Beul an anmoich o hi
S’fheudar falbh le cuid sheol
I
A’ Cuan Eirinn, O hi
Muir ag eirigh, Ho ro
S cha bu leir dhuinn, O hi
Ni fon ghrein ach nan fheol.
II
Seachad Ile, O hi
Beul na h- oichdhe, Ho ro
Las sinn coinnlean, O hi
‘S chuir sinn combaist air doigh
III
Seachad Aros, O hi
Bha i gabh, Ho ro
N’ fhairge laidir, O hi
Suas gu barr a chruinn sgoid
IV
’S thuirt a sgiobar, O hi
Ri chuid ghillean, Ho ro
Glachd thu misneach, O hi
’S cuir thu riof na cuid seol (4)


chorus:
With the Lurgainn o hi
With the Lurgainn o ho
At nightfall o hi
We must go off with the sail up
I
The Irish sea, O hi
the sea rising, Ho ro
we couldn’t see, O hi
anything under the sun but the clouds
II
Passing Islay, O hi
At the start of the night, Ho ro
We lit candles, O hi
And got the compass in order(2)
III
Passing Aros, O hi
The weather was wild(3), Ho ro
The strong sea, O hi
Reaching up to the topmost sail
IV
The skipper said, O hi
to his boys, Ho ro
Take courage, O hi
And tie the sails
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Coro
Con il Lurgainn
Con il Lurgainn
al cadere della notte
dobbiamo andare con le vele alzate
II
Il mare d’Irlanda
sorge la marea
non abbiamo visto
altro che nubi durante il giorno
II
Passando Islay
all’inizio della notte
abbiamo acceso i lumi
e ci siamo regolati con la bussola
III
Passando Aros
il tempo era scatenato
il mare forte
raggiungeva le vele più alte
IV
Il capitano disse
alla sua ciurma
“Fatevi coraggio
e ingabbiate le vele”

NOTE
1) Maggie Macinnes dice:
Leis a Lurgainn O hi
Leis a chalpa gun fheòl
Am beul an anamich O hi
S ‘eudar falbh leis na seoid
2) set our compass
3) It was hazardous
4) in altere versioni
“Glacaibh misneachd o hì
‘S dèanamh dìchioll a sheòid”
“Have confidence
and do your best”

La canzone prosegue con ulteriori strofe ad esempio in Tickettyboo ~ Mairi MacInnes

Suas a h-aodach o hì
Ri croinn chaola o hò
Snàmh cho aotrom o hì
Ris an fhaoilinn air lòn
Fhuair sinn fosgladh o hì
Ma ceann toisich o hò
Fear ga taomadh o hì
‘S gillean coltach air bòrd
Up with the sails
On their slender masts
swimming as lightly
as the gull on the pond
We sprang a leak
In the front of the bow
One man bailing her out
And lads like him on deck

La canzone rispunta ancora in gaelico scozzese con il titolo di “Leis a’ Mhaighdinn”  (With the Maiden) a Cape Breton (Nuova Scozia) (testo qui)

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Una versione con il testo in inglese che traduce in rima la versione in gaelico è stata registrata da Dougie MacLean, Alan Roberts and Alex Campbell. (C.R.M.)

ASCOLTA Dougie McLean (da ascoltare qui) 1979

I giovani gruppi di origini scozzesi e non, affascinati dalla lotta tra capitano e mare in tempesta si sono impadroniti della canzone facendone una versione rock. L’arrangiamento segue la scia di un certo rock scozzese in salsa barbara che va per la maggiore nelle feste celtiche, con tanto di svolazzo di kilt, petti villosi o pettorali in bella vista, bicipiti forzuti e polsi fasciati da polsiere in cuoio, berretti scozzesi e altro armamentario preso in prestito dal medieval re-enactment.
Dal punto di vista dell’organico i gruppi puntano sul mix basso-chitarra elettrica-batteria accostato a organetto, violino, cornamuse e svariati strumenti della tradizione popolare lasciati nelle loro sonorità acustiche o potenziati da effetti elettronici.

ASCOLTA The Pints

ASCOLTA Cromdale


I
On the ocean o´he
Waves in motion o´ho
Not but clouds could we see
O´er the blue sea below
Chorus
Leis a Lurrighan o´he
Leis a Lurrighan o´ho
In the grey dark of evening
O´er the waves let us go
II
Islay loomin´ o´he
In the gloamin´ o´ho
Our ship´s compass set we
And our lights we did show
III
Aros passing o´he
Was harrassing o´ho
The proud billows to see
High as masthead to flow
IV
Captain hollers o´he
To his fellows o´ho
Those that courage would flee
Let him go down below
V
In the tempest o´he
Waves were crashing o´ho
And the cry of the sea
As the cold winds did blow
VI
Captain hollers o´he
To his fellows o´ho
Those that won´t stay with me
Let them go down below
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Sull’oceano
le onde agitate, solo nuvole possiamo vedere sul mare blu
Chorus
Leis a Lurrighan o´he
Leis a Lurrighan o´ho
nel buio della sera
sulle onde andiamo
II
Islay si avvicina
nella luce del crepuscolo
seguiamo la bussola
e le nostre luci
III
Superata Aros
fu un tormento
vedere le fiere onde
riversarsi alte come l’albero maestro
IV
Il capitano urla
ai compagni
“Coloro ai quali il coraggio venisse meno
che vadano sottocoperta”
V
Nella tempesta
le onde si schiantavano
e il lamento del mare
come i venti freddi soffiava
VI
Il capitano urla
ai compagni
“Coloro che non vogliono stare con me
che vadano sottocoperta”

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=91311
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85175
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic18443.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/macinnes/leis.htm
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/leisanlurgainn.php
http://www.maggiemacinnes.com/lyrics/afagail06.html

Pulling the Dulse dalla Scozia

Read the post in English

Da secoli le popolazioni che vivono lungo le coste hanno imparato a raccogliere, per il consumo abituale, diverse qualità di alghe.
In particolare in Scozia e Irlanda le alghe dulse e il muschio irlandese hanno sempre fatto parte della dieta degli abitanti costieri.

dulse_3276643cSimile ad una manina con le dita aperte di un rosso porpora l’alga dulse cresce lungo le coste dell’Atlantico del Nord e del Pacifico Nord-Occidental ed è un superfood, ricca ferro, calcio, potassio vitamine, aminoacidi (proteine di alta qualità) e sali minerali. Mangiata cruda ha una consistenza elastica tipo chewingum e come tale era consumata dai marinai inglesi del XVII secolo che la masticavano al posto del tabacco. Ha un sapore molto salato, definito anche come piccante ed è un alimento molto versatile.
Le Alghe sono varie di forma e di gusto così come le verdure di terra: come comparare un porro a una carota, un pomodoro a una zucca? Così vale per una Kombu e una Dulse, una Wakame e una Lattuga di Mare. Per chi prova per la prima volta a cucinare le alghe è consigliabile usarne piccole quantità per avere il tempo di abituarsi ed apprezzare questi nuovi sapori. Quando aprirete il vostro pacchetto di Alghe disidratate non avrete ancora un’idea di come sono questi vegetali marini ma quando le reidraterete le sorprese non mancheranno. Le alghe assumeranno colori vivaci e l’aspetto diventerà immediatamente invitante. Le alghe riprendono vita e vi sentirete immediatamente trasportati sulle onde e sugli spruzzi d’acqua di mare; esse sprigioneranno un delicato profumo di iodio che si diraderà poi durante la cottura.
Cucinare le Alghe offre altrettante possibilità che cucinare le verdure terrestri. Tutti i tipi di cottura sono possibili: bollite, al vapore, stufate, marinate, al forno, saltate, grigliate, fritte, latto-fermentate, crude. I tempi di cottura variano in funzione delle Alghe scelte, dal grado di intenerimento desiderato e dalla ricetta che avrete deciso di preparare. (tratto da qui)

LA RACCOLTA DELLE ALGHE (DULSING)

Le alghe dulse vengono raccolte principalmente in Scozia, Irlanda del Nord, Scandinavia, Islanda e Bretagna nei mesi tra giugno ed ottobre durante le fasi di bassa marea e vendute in foglie oppure macinate: i raccoglitori (in via di estinzione) salpano alle prime ore del mattino con l’alta marea, quando il mare si ritira ecco che le alghe restano attaccate agli scogli e alle rocce lungo la linea del basso fondale e vengono raccolte a mano. Per l’autoconsumo la raccolta di piccole quantità viene fatta direttamente a riva, tra gli scogli. Le alghe sono poi stese sulla spiaggia ad asciugare, alla fine si arrotolano in grosse balle e sono portate agli stabilimenti per il trattamento e il confezionamento.
E’ essenziale che le acque del mare in cui avviene la raccolta siano non inquinate (le alghe assorbono grandi quantità di inquinanti -fertilizzanti e metalli pesanti perciò sono anche dei validi spazzini del mare..) e che la filiera della produzione garantisca alta standard qualitativi.

ADÓ, ADÉ

Dalle isole Ebridi ci viene questo canto dei raccoglitori di alghe rosse (dulse), raccolto da Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser e tradotto in inglese per il suo “Songs of the Hebrides”

Quadriga Consort (voce Elisabeth Kaplan)

The Salt Flats in The Salt Flats 2011  ♪
Stessa melodia ma tutt’altro arrangiamento, dall’Irlanda del Nord (Belfast) nelle note “Pulling the Sea Dulse is a working tune detailing the harvest seaweed at the shore. It is surprisingly upbeat and the Dulse in question resonated with childhood memories of Dulse and Yellow Man at the Auld Lammas Fair in Northern Ireland.”


CHORUS
Adó, Adé
Clings dulse to the sea rock
Clings heart to the loved one
Be’t high tide or low tide
Adó, Adé.
I
Pulling the dulse
by the sea rocks at low tide,
Ne’er pull I thy love(1), lad,
be’t high tide or low.
II
Shoreward the sea mew
comes flying at low tide,
But seaward my heart flies out
seaward to thee(2).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Adó, Adé
come alga attaccata allo scoglio,
si aggrappa il cuore all’amato
con l’alta che con la bassa marea
Adó, Adé
I
Raccogliendo le alghe
dagli scogli con la bassa marea
non mi allontano mai dal tuo amore(1), ragazzo che ci sia alta o bassa marea
II
Il gabbiano verso riva
viene volando con la bassa marea
ma dal mare il mio cuore vola via
dal mare fino a te(2)

NOTE
1) vuol dire che serba la fedeltà verso l’innamorato
2) con buona probabilità emigrato in America o imbarcato su qualche nave come marinaio (ad esempio su una baleniera).

seconda parte continua

FONTI
http://www.fondazioneslowfood.com/it/arca-del-gusto-slow-food/alga-duileasg/
http://www.materiarinnovabile.it/art/100/Alghe_meno_raccolta_piu_produzione