She Moved through the Fair like the swan in the evening moves over the lake

Leggi in italiano

The original text of “She Moved trough the Fair” dates back to an ancient Irish ballad from Donegal, while the melody could be from the Middle Ages (for the musical scale used that recalls the Arab one). The standard version comes from the pen of Padraic Colum (1881-1972) which rewrote it in 1909. There are many versions of the text (additional verses, rewriting of the verses), also in Gaelic, reflecting the great popularity of the song, the song was published in the Herbert Hughes collection “Irish Country Songs” (1909), and in the collection of Sam Henry “Songs of the People” (1979).
In its essence, the story tells of a girl promised in marriage who appears in a dream to her lover. But the verses are cryptic, perhaps because they lack those that would have clarified its meaning; this is what happens to the oral tradition (who sings does not remember the verses or changes them at will) and the ballad lends itself to at least two possible interpretations.

In the first few strophes, the woman, full of hope, reassures her lover that her family, although he is not rich, will approve his marriage proposal, and they will soon be married; they met on the market day, and he looks at her as she walks away and, in a twilight image, compares her to a swan that moves on the placid waters of a lake.

cigno in volo

The third stanza is often omitted, and it is not easy to interpret: the unexpressed pain could be the girl’s illness (which will cause her death) – probably the consumption- for this reason people were convinced that their marriage would not be celebrated.
And we arrive at the last stanza, the rarefied and dreamy one in which the ghost of her appears at night: an evanescent figure that moves slowly to call him soon to death .

The other interpretation of the text (shared by most) supposes she escaped with another one (or more likely her family has combined a more advantageous marriage, not being the suitor loved by her quite rich). But the love he feels for her is so great and even if he continues his life by marrying another, he will continue to miss her.
The verses related to an unexpressed pain are therefore interpreted as the lack of confidence in the new wife because he will be still, and forever, in love with his first girlfriend.
The final stanza becomes the epilogue of his life, when he is old and dying, he sees his first love appear beside to console him.

As we can see both the reconstructions are adaptable to the verses, admirable and fascinating of the song, precisely because of their meager essentiality (an ante-litteram hermeticism): no self-pity, no sorrow shown, but the simplicity of a great love, that few memories passed together can be enough to fill a life.

A single, strong, elegiac image of a candid swan in the twilight, anticipation of her fleeting passage on earth. The song is a lament and there are many musicians who have interpreted it, recreating the rarefied atmosphere of the words, often with the delicate sound of the harp.

Loreena McKennitt  from Elemental  ( I, II, III, IV)
Nights from the Alhambra 2007

Moya Brennan & Cormac De Barra from Against the wind

Cara Dillon live

Sinead O’Connor  (Sinead has recorded many versions of this song )


I
My (young) love said to me,
“My mother(1) won’t mind
And my father won’t slight you
for your lack of kind(2)”
she stepped away from me (3)
and this she did say:
“It will not be long, love,
till our wedding day”
II
She stepped away from me (4)
and she moved through the fair (5)
And fondly I watched her
move here and move there
And then she turned homeward (6)
with one star awake(7)
like the swan (8) in the evening(9)
moves over the lake
III
The people were saying
“No two e’er were wed”
for one has the sorrow
that never was said(10)
And she smiled as she passed me
with her goods and her gear
And that was the last
that I saw of my dear.
IV (11)
Last night she came to me,
my dead(12) love came
so softly she came
that her feet made no din
and she laid her hand on me (13)
and this she did say
“It will not be long, love,
‘til our wedding day”
NOTES
1) Padraic Colum wrote
“My brothers won’t mind,
And my parents.. ”
2) kind – kine: “wealth” or “property”. Others interpret the word as “relatives” so the protagonist is an orphan or by obscure origins
3) or she laid a hand on me (cwhich is a more intimate and direct gesture to greet with one last contact)
4) or She went away from me
5) the days of the fair were the time of love when the young men had the opportunity to meet with the girls of marriageable age
6) Loreena McKennitt sings
And she went her way homeward
7) the evening star that appears before all the others is the planet Venus
8) The swan is one of the most represented animals in the Celtic culture, portrayed on different objects and protagonist of numerous mythological tales. see more
9) in the evening it refers to the moment when they separate
10) the sorrow that never was said: obscure meaning
11) Loreena McKennitt sings
I dreamed it last night
That my true love came in
So softly she entered
Her feet made no din
She came close beside me
12) some interpreters omit the word “death” by proposing for the dream version, or they say “my dear love” or “my own love” but also “my young love
13) or “She put her arms round me

Chieftains&Van Morrison

Chieftains&Sinead O’Connor
Fairport Convention

Alan Stivell from “Chemíns De Terre” 1973
Andreas Scholl

A version entitled “The Wedding Song” has been handed down, which develops the theme of abandonment, and which is to be considered a variant even if with a different title
second part

LINK
http://thesession.org/tunes/4735
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-meaning-and-interpretation-part-1/
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-modern-lyrics-and-variations/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/anne.briggs/songs/shemovesthroughthefair.html

Staines Morris to the Maypole haste away

Leggi in italiano
In the TV series “The Tudors” an outdoor May Day has been set up, with the picturesque dancers of the Morris Dance, their rattles and handkerchiefs, the archery, the fight of the roosters, the dances with the ribbons around the May pole, performed by graceful maidens with flower crowns in their hair. The background music is titled “Stanes Morris”, in the video follow two reproductions, the first of  Les Witches group, the second a little slower of The Broadside Band.

The May poles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were very tall and decorated with green garlands, ribbons or two-color striped paintings: the tradition is rooted in England, Italy, Germany and France, a real focal point of the rousing activities at his feet , symbolic fulcrum of the group of dancers.

john-cousen-dancing-round-the-maypole-on-the-village-green-in-elizabethan-times
John Cousen: Ballando intorno al palo del Maggio in epoca elisabettiana

TO THE MAYPOLE HASTE AWAY (Staine Morris )

The melody is a dance reported in “The English Dancing Master” by John Playford, first edition of 1651, but already danced at the court of Henry VIII or in the Elizabethan era. In the video it is a Morris Dance while Playford describes it as a country dance (for instructions see)
Morris Dance version
It was William Chappell in his “Popular Music of the Old Time” of (1855-56) to combine the Tudor melody with the text “Maypole song” written in 1655 by Robert Cox for the comedy “Actaeon and Diana” . So Chappell writes “This tune is taken from the first edition of The Dancing Master. It is also in William Ballet’s Lute Book (time of Elizabeth); and was printed as late as about 1760, in a Collection of Country Dances, by Wright.
The Maypole Song, in Actæon and Diana, seems so exactly fitted to the air, that, having no guide as to the one intended, I have, on conjecture, printed it with this tune.

The text invites young people in following Love to dance and sing around the May Pole.
Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from ‘Prince Heathen.’ 1969 (simply perfect!)

Shirley Collins from Morris On, 1972, the folk rock experiment of a group of excellent trad musicians John Kirkpatrick, Richard Thompson, Barry Dransfield, Ashley Hutchings  and Dave Mattacks.

Lisa Knapp & David Tibet from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017  (amazing version with a further step ahead of the 70s rock rework)

MAYPOLE SONG
I
Come, ye young men, come along
with your music, dance and song;
bring your lasses in your hands,
for ‘tis that which love commands.
Refrein:
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday,
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday
II
‘Tis the choice time of the year,
For the violets now appear:
Now the rose receives its birth,
And pretty primrose decks the earth.
III
Here each bachelor may choose
One that will not faith abuse
Nor repay, with coy disdain
Love that should be loved again
IV
And when you are reckoned now
For kisses you your sweetheart gave
Take them all again and more
It will never make them poor
V
When you thus have spent your time,
Till the day be past its prime,
To your beds repair at night,
And dream there of your day’s delight.

second part: JOAN TO THE MAYPOLE

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html 
Traditional Music (con spartito)
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/stainesmorris.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60673

Tam Lin by Fairport Convention vs Steeleye Span

The traditional ballad of the Elven Knight Tam Lin, is of Scottish origin and dates back to the late Middle Ages.
A melody called “Young Thomlin” dates back to the 1600s, but historians stated the origin of the ballad since the 13th century. The ballad was transcribed by Robert Burns in 1792 (in Johnson’s Scots Musical Museum) and is one of the ballad variants collected by Francis James Child in his “The English and Scottish Popular Ballads”, Child Ballad # 39 A (42 stanzas)
Musical Notation

A ballad that is also a fairy tale for children full of hidden meanings and symbolism.
(first part introduction and texts / versions list)
[La ballata tradizionale del Cavaliere elfico Tam Lin, è di origine scozzese e risale al tardo Medioevo. 
Una melodia dal nome “Young Thomlin” è del 1600, ma gli storici riallacciano l’origine della ballata fin dal XIII secolo. La ballata è stata trascritta da Robert Burns nel 1792 (in Johnson’s Museum) e costituisce una delle varianti collezionate da Francis James Child in “The English and Scottish Popular Ballads“, Child Ballad # 39 A (42 strofe)
Musical Notation

Una ballata che è anche una fiaba per bambini ricca di significati nascosti e simbolismi.
(prima parte introduzione e elenco testi/ versioni)]

THE SEASON OF LOVE
[LA STAGIONE DELL’AMORE]

Stephanie Law: Janet in the sacred wood picks up a rose. Although it is not explicitly mentioned the month of May it is quite clear that the season in which the beautiful Janet and the elf meet is Spring, since roses have just blossomed: we are in the realm of fairies – who love roses – and therefore they make them grow where they want, we imagine them in the wild variety, the small roses with five petals. [Janet nel bosco sacro raccoglie una rosa. Anche se non è espressamente citato il mese di Maggio è del tutto evidente che la stagione in cui si incontrano la bella Janet e l’elfo è la primavera, essendo appena sbocciate le rose: siamo nel regno delle fate -che amano le rose- e quindi le fanno crescere dove vogliono, ce le immaginiamo nella varietà selvatica (rosa canina), le piccole roselline dai cinque petali ]

The whole first part of the ballad is a clear allusion to the first sexual experience, voluntarily sought by the girl who enters the sacred wood attracted by the scent of wild roses, it is Spring and with the awakening of Nature also the blood flows faster in the veins and the heart beats by love: the rose is also the “rose of roses” and the cloak that covers the modesty of the woman (and represents the paternal protection) must be left in pawn and then lost, I do not therefore complety agree with the interpretations that they see the relationship between the two as a male violence, indeed there are all the signs of an ancient ritual of sexual initiation.
Tutta la prima parte della ballata è una chiara allusione alla prima esperienza sessuale, volontariamente ricercata dalla fanciulla che si addentra nel bosco sacro attratta dal profumo delle rose selvatiche, è Primavera e con il risveglio della Natura anche il sangue scorre più velocemente nelle vene e il cuore batte smanioso d’amore: la rosa è anche “la rosa delle rose” femminile e il mantello che copre il pudore della donna (e rappresenta la protezione paterna) deve essere lasciato in pegno e quindi perso, non concordo perciò con le interpretazioni che vedono il rapporto tra i due come una violenza da parte maschile, anzi ci sono tutti i segni di un antico rituale di iniziazione sessuale.

THE END OF SUMMER
[LA FINE DELL’ESTATE]

Stephanie Law: dettaglio della schiera fatata, la regina delle fate

The second part takes place on Winter during the Celtic feast of Samain, and it’s about the test that our heroine must overcome to free the elf: the illusions of the fairy queen will make her believe that she is witnessing the transformation of Tam Lin into a dragon (or snake) and in bear; but she will have to show courage and true love to keep the knight with her arms (in the extended version Janet will have to make one last effort and throw the knight into the water of the sacred well.)
A similar theme of transmutation in animals is present in the Cretan tale of Thetis and Peleus, the parents of Achilles, and in fact the two stories are similar but in the Greek myth the woman is a nereid and she’ll transform before becoming human.
La seconda parte si svolge nell’inverno durante la festa celtica di Samain, con le prove che la nostra eroina deve superare per liberare l’elfo: le illusioni della regina delle fate le faranno credere di assistere alla trasformazione di Tam Lin in drago (o serpente) e in orso; ma lei dovrà dare prova di coraggio e di grande amore e tenere stretto a sè il cavaliere fino a quando comparirà nudo tra le sue braccia (nella versione estesa Janet dovrà compiere un ultimo sforzo e gettare il cavaliere nelle acque del pozzo.)
Un tema simile di trasmutazione in animali è presente nella favola cretese di Thetis e Peleus ovvero i genitori di Achille, e in effetti i due racconti sono simili ma nel mito greco è la donna ad essere una nereide e a trasformarsi prima di poter diventare umana.

However, always looking for traces of ancient teachings in the ballad, we can read the second part as a metaphor of childbirth.
Sempre però cercando nella ballata le tracce di antichi insegnamenti, possiamo leggere la seconda parte come una metafora del parto.

StephanieLawTamLin-TheFaeryHostLarge

In the illustration (fairytale, dreamy) of Stephanie Law we see the fairies riding on the bridge, (and the white horse of Tam Lin). The moon is waning, but the detail is wrong because the night of Samain coincides with the new moon. The ballad does not have a happy ending because the fairy queen casts a mortal curse on the woman.
Nella illustrazione (fiabesca, sognante) di Stephanie Law vediamo il passaggio della schiera fatata sul ponte, ove si distingue il cavallo bianco di Tam Lin. La luna è calante, ma il dettaglio è errato perché la notte di Samain coincide con la luna nuova (la data una volta non era fissa, ma era regolata sul calendario lunare). La ballata non ha un lieto fine perché la regina delle fate lancia una maledizione mortale sulla donna.

Fairport Convention (voice Sandy Denny) in “Liege and Lief” , 1969. There are no words, simply mythical!
Non ci sono parole, semplicemente mitici!

Fairport Convention in “Fairport’s Sense of Occasion” album (2007)

English version*
I
“I forbid you maidens all
that wear gold in your hair (1)
To travel to Carter Hall (2)
for young Tam Lin is there
II
None that go by Carter Hall
but they leave him a pledge
Either their mantles of green
or else their maidenhead”.
III
Janet tied her kirtle green
a bit above her knee
And she’s gone to Carter Hall
as fast as go can she.
IV
She’d not pulled a double rose,
a rose but only two
When up there came young Tam Lin
says “Lady, pull no more”.
V
“And why come you to Carter Hall
without command from me?” (3)
“I’ll come and go”, young Janet said,
“and ask no leave of thee”.
VI
Janet tied her kirtle green
a bit above her knee
And she’s gone to her father
as fast as go can she
VII
Well, up then spoke her father dear
and he spoke meek and mild
“Oh, and alas, Janet,” he said,
“I think you go with child” (4)
VIII
“Well, if that be so,” Janet said,
“myself shall bear the blame
There’s not a knight in all your hall
shall get the baby’s name
IX
For if my love were an earthly knight
as he is an elfin grey
I’d not change my own true love
for any knight you have”
X
Janet tied her kirtle green
a bit above her knee
And she’s gone to Carter Hall
as fast as go can she
XI
“Oh, tell to me, Tam Lin,” she said,
“why came you here to dwell?”
“The Queen of Faeries caught me
when from my horse I fell
XII
And at the end of seven years (5)
she pays a tithe to hell
I so fair and full of flesh
and feared it be myself
XIII
But tonight is Hallowe’en
and the faery folk ride
Those that would their true love win
at Miles Cross they must buy.
XIV
So first let past the horses black
and then let past the brown
Quickly run to the white steed (6)
and pull the rider down
XV
For I’ll ride on the white steed,
the nearest to the town
For I was an earthly knight,
they give me that renown
XVI
Oh, they will turn me
in your arms to a newt or a snake
But hold me tight and fear not,
I am your baby’s father.
XVII
And they will turn me
in your arms into a lion bold
But hold me tight and fear not
and you will love your child.
XVIII
And they will turn me
in your arms into a naked knight
But cloak me in your mantle
and keep me out of sight.”
XIX
In the middle of the night
she heard the bridle ring
She heeded what he did say
and young Tam Lin did win
XX
Then up spoke the Faery Queen,
an angry queen was she
“Woe betide her ill-farred face,
an ill death may she die”
XXI
“Oh, had I known, Tam Lin,” she said,
“what this knight I did see
I have looked him in the eyes 
and turned him to a tree”
Traduzione italiana in rima di Maurizio**
I
Attente voi tutte fanciulle
che avete il capello dorato (1)
all’Argine dei Biancospini (2)
che da Tamlino è abitato!
II
Chi passa per i Biancospini
un pegno lasciare dovrà:
Il verde mantello che porta
o la sua verginità.
III
Giovanna con la veste verde
che scopre le gambe di un po’
all’Argine dei Biancospini
corre più svelta che può.
IV
Aveva già colto una rosa
un’altra voleva staccare
Ed ecco, le appare Tamlino:
“Donna, non me le toccare!
V
Perché vieni qui ai Biancospini
se non hai l’invito da me? (3)”
“Io vado dovunque mi pare,
non devo chiederlo a te!”
VI
Giovanna con la veste verde
che scopre le gambe di un po’
a casa dai suoi genitori
corre più svelta che può.
VII
Il padre la guarda e le parla,
la voce è un sommesso bisbiglio
“Ahimè mia Giovanna” le dice
“Credo che tu aspetti un figlio.” (4)
VIII
“Se è vero” risponde Giovanna
“Io sola e soltanto so come,
nessuno dei tuoi cavalieri
può dare al bimbo il suo nome.
IX
Se solo il mio amore
non fosse un elfo verdastro e fatato!
Perché non lo voglio cambiare
con chi è del nostro casato.”
X
Giovanna con la veste verde
che scopre le gambe di un po’
All’Argine dei Biancospini
corre più svelta che può”Tamlino,
XI
Raccontami” dice
“Perché vivi qui in questo stallo?”
“La Fata Regina mi prese
quando cascai dal cavallo.
XII
Al settimo anno (5) lei deve
pagare all’inferno un balzello,
un uomo piacevole e forte:
temo che io sarò quello.
XIII
Ma questa è la notte dei Santi
e tu mi puoi ancora salvare,
ché passa il corteo delle fate:
devi a un incrocio aspettare.
XIV
Tu lascia passare i cavalli
che han pelo nero o marrone,
Ma quando vedrai quello bianco (6)
tira giù chi è sull’arcione,
XV
perché io sarò il cavaliere
che ti troverai fra le mani:
Il bianco destriero è un onore
solo per gli esseri umani.
XVI
Allora sarò trasformato
in drago o serpente fischiante
ma stringimi senza temere,
pensa che sono il tuo amante.
XVII
Allora sarò trasformato
in orso o leone ferino
ma stringimi senza temere,
son il padre del tuo bambino.
XVIII
Infine sarò trasformato
in un cavaliere spogliato
avvolgimi nel tuo mantello,
tienimi bene celato(7)”
XIX
Giovanna nella notte fonda
ascolta il corteo scalpitare
fa come Tamlino le ha detto
e lo riesce a salvare.
XX
La Fata Regina si volta
le parla con voce furiosa:
“Tu sia maledetta,
tu muoia di morte assai dolorosa.
XXI
Se avessi saputo, Tamlino,
di avere da te questo sdegno
ti avrei trasformato con gli occhi
in un bel pezzo di legno!”

NOTE
* lyrics: Child Ballad # 39A ; Fairport Convention  
**tratto da vedi –un’altra traduzione in italiano qui
1) In the Middle Ages it was customary for maidens to wear gold clasps (or golden nets, headbands) in their long hair; the minstrel then addresses the virgin girls to warn them not to venture into the forest of Carterhaugh because it is inhabited by an elf (it is known that the elves are excellent lovers and eager to conquer the virtue of virgins maidens!)
wear gold in your hair: il traduttore italiano scrive “capello dorato”. Nel Medioevo era costume per le ragazze da marito portare dei fermagli d’oro (o retine dorate, cerchietti) nei capelli; il menestrello quindi si rivolge alle fanciulle vergini per avvertirle di non avventurarsi nel bosco di Carterhaugh perché è abitato da un elfo (è noto che gli elfi siano ottimi amanti nonché bramosi di conquistare la virtù di vergini fanciulle!).
2) the story is set in a real and well-identified place, the Carterhaugh wood still existing in Selkirk (in the Scottish Border) where the Ettrick and Yarrow rivers flow together (see)
la storia è ambientata in un luogo reale e ben identificato, il bosco di Carterhaugh tuttora esistente a Selkirk (nel Border scozzese) dove confluiscono i fiumi Ettrick e Yarrow (vedi)
3) before entering the greenwood (the sacred wood) it is necessary to ask permission of the fairies that inhabit it, Lady Janet being the owner of the forest behaves incautiously. The gift requested by the fairies is symbolic: the cloak that covers the modesty of the woman (and represents the paternal protection) must be left in a pledge and then lost.
prima di entrare nel greenwood ossia nel bosco sacro è necessario chiedere il permesso delle fate che lo abitano, Lady Janet essendo la proprietaria del bosco si comporta in modo incauto. Il dono richiesto dalle fate è simbolico: il mantello che copre il pudore della donna (e rappresenta la protezione paterna) deve essere lasciato in pegno e quindi perso. 
4) The sexual relationship between the two here is not explicit, but the father after a while notices the pregnancy of his daughter and she proudly claims the paternity to the elf not accepting any other shotgun wedding.
Il rapporto sessuale tra i due qui non è esplicitato, ma il padre dopo un po’ si accorge della gravidanza della figlia ed ella rivendica con orgoglio la paternità all’elfo non accettando nessun altro matrimonio riparatore.
5) seven years is a symbolic period to indicate a punishment, once it was also the duration of an apprenticeship to learn a trade, but also the legal duration to be able to declare a missing person legally dead. Is a transitional position of Tam Lin thus emerging: a prisoner, a magician’s apprentice or a man waiting to pass definitively in the Fairy World?
The period is about to expire with the night of Halloween, one of the most important Celtic festivals with that of Beltane: the winter festival (called Samhain).
The young knight went to hunt with impunity in the sacred wood, profaning the taboo of inviolability, so the fairy queen is keeping him prisoner. Here is quoted, very Christianly, the tribute (the tenth) that the fairies must pay to the devil, an allusion to the human sacrifices that the pagans due to their deities! This explains, in a Christian perspective, the fairy abductions: the love of the dame sans merci leads straight to hell!
sette anni è un periodo simbolico per indicare una punizione, una volta era anche la durata di un apprendistato per imparare un mestiere, ma anche la durata giuridica per poter dichiarare legalmente morta una persona scomparsa. Viene così a delinearsi una posizione transitoria di Tam lin: un prigioniero, un apprendista mago o un uomo in attesa di passare definitivamente nel Mondo delle Fate? Il periodo sta per scadere con la notte di Halloween, una delle feste celtiche più importante con quella di Beltane: ossia la festa dell’Inverno (detta Samhain). 
Un giovane cavaliere è andato a cacciare impunemente nel bosco sacro, profanando il tabù dell’inviolabilità, così la regina delle fate lo tiene prigioniero. Qui è citato, molto cristianamente, il tributo (la decima) che le fate devono versare al diavolo, un’allusione ai sacrifici umani che si credeva facessero i pagani alle divinità boschive! Si spiegano così, in un ottica cristiana, i rapimenti fatati: l’amore della dame sans merci porta dritto all’inferno!
6) the white horse reserved to Tam Lin indicates his particular beauty, his purity as a human not yet completely transformed into an elf
il cavallo bianco riservato a Tam Lin indica la sua particolare bellezza, la sua purezza in quanto umano non ancora trasformato completamente in elfo 
7)  it is the green mantle of Janet to protect the man “reborn” from the queen of fairies, which precisely because of its magical color will hide his escape (but also a bit ‘of realism it takes after all we are in November!)
è il mantello verde di Janet a proteggere l’uomo “rinato” dalla regina delle fate, che proprio per il suo colore magico lo coprirà nella fuga (ma anche un po’ di realismo ci vuole dopotutto siamo a novembre!)

Steeleye Span in  “Tonight’s the Night…, Live” 1992
the song is divided into two parts (12 + 12) and also the melody changes, first more rhythmic and lively, it becomes slow and twilight in the second part, the last 4 stanzas change again: it is the curse of the fairy, almost a spoken
il brano è diviso in due parti (12+12) e anche la melodia cambia, prima più cadenzata e vivace, diventa lenta e crepuscolare nella seconda parte, le ultime 4 strofe cambiano ancora: è la maledizione della fata, quasi un parlato


I
oh, I forbid you maidens all
that wear gold in your hair.
to come or go by Carterhaugh
for young tam lin is there.
II
If you go by Carterhaugh
you must leave him a wad.
either your rings or green mantle
or else your maidenhead.
III
she’s away o’er gravel green
and o’er the gravel brown.
she’s away to carterhaugh
to flower herself a gown.
IV
she had not pulled a rosy rose
a rose but barely one.
when by came this brisk young man
says, lady let alone.
V
how dare you pull my rose, madam?
how dare you break my tree?
how dare you come to carterhaugh
without the leave of me?
VI
well may I pull the rose, she said
well may I break the tree.
for carterhaugh it my father’s
I’ll ask no leave of thee.
riff
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
VII
he’s taken her by the milk-white hand
and there he’s laid her down.
and there he asked no leave of her
as she lay on the ground.
VIII
oh tell me, tell me, then she said
oh tell me who art thee.
my name it is tam lin, he said
and this is my story.
IX
As it fell out upon a day
a-hunting I did ride.
there came a wind out of the north
and pulled me betide.
X
And drowsy, drowsy as I was
the sleep upon me fell.
the queen of fairies she was there
and took me to herself.
riff
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
XI
at the end of every seven years
they pay a tithe to hell.
and I’m so fair and full of flesh
I’m feared ‘twill be myself.
XII
Tonight it is good halloween
the fairy court will ride.
and if you would your true love win
at miles cross, you must bide.
riff
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
XIII
Gloomy was the night
and eerie was the way.
this lady in her green mantle
to miles cross she did go.
XIV
With the holy water in her hand
she cast the compass round.
at twelve o’clock the fairy court
came riding o’er the mound.
XV
First came by the black steed
and then came by the brown.
then Tam lin on the milk-white steed
with a gold star in his crown.
XVI
She’s pulled him down into her arms
and let the bridle fall.
The queen of fairies she cried out
Young Tam lin is away.
XVII
They’ve shaped him in her arms
an adder or a snake.
she’s held him fast and feared him not
to be her earthly mate.
XVIII
They’ve shaped him in her arms again
fire burning bold.
she’s held him fast and feared him not
till he was iron cold.
XIX
They’ve shaped him in her arms
to a wood black dog so wild.
she’s held him fast and feared him not
the father of her child.
XX
They’ve shaped him in her arms
at last into a naked man.
she’s wrapped him in the green mantle
and knew that she had him won.
riff
The queen of fairies she cried out
young Tam lin is away.
XXI
Had I known, had I known, Tam lin
long before, long before you came from home.
had I known, I would have taken out your heart
and put in a heart of stone.
XXII
Had I known, had I known, Tam lin
that a lady, a lady would steal thee.
had I known, I would have taken out your eyes
and put in two from a tree.
XXIII
Had I known, had I known, Tam lin
that I would lose, that I would lose the day.
had I known, I would have paid my tithe to hell
before you’d been won away.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
E’ proibito a tutte le fanciulle
che portano l’oro nei capelli 
di venire o andare a Carterhaugh
che il giovane Tam Lin vi dimora!
II
Se andate a Carterhaugh
un pegno dovete lasciare:
o l’anello o il verde mantello
o la vostra verginità.
III
Lei scappò sul sentiero verde
e sul sentiero di terra
scappò a Carterhaugh
per decorare di fiori il vestito
IV
Aveva appena colto una rosa
una rosa soltanto
quando questo bel giovane appare
e dice: “Donna, lascia stare!
V
Come osi cogliere le mie rose, madama?
Come osi spezzare i miei rami?
Come osi venire a Carterhaugh
senza il mio permesso?”
VI
“Io posso cogliere le rose
e posso spezzare i rami
perchè Carterhaugh è di mio padre
e non ti chiederò il permesso”
riff
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
VII
La prende per la bianca mano
e la stende a terra
e là non le chiede il permesso
mentre lei giace a terra
VIII
“Dimmi oh dimmi -poi disse lei-
dimmi il tuo nome”
“Il mio nome è Tam Lin- disse lui-
e questa è la mia storia
IX
Accadde un giorno
che cavalcavo per la caccia,
venne un vento dal nord
e mi spinse via
X
E intontito come ero
cadde su di me il sonno
la regina delle fate era là
e mi prese con se
riff
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
XI
Alla fine di ogni sette anni
si paga un tributo all’inferno
e io sono così bello e forte
che temo toccherà a me
XII
Stanotte è la notte di Halloween
e la corte fatata cavalcherà
e se vuoi conquistare il tuo vero amore
al Bivio della Croce devi aspettare
riff
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
XIII
Tenebrosa era la notte
e scura era la strada
questa dama nel suo mantello verde
andò al Bivio della Croce
XIV
Con l’acqua santa in mano
posò la bussola 
a mezzanotte in punto la corte fatata
venne cavalcando dal tumulo
XV
Per primo passò il destriero nero
e poi quello baio
e quindi Tam Lin sul destriero bianco
con una stella dorata sulla corona
XVI
Lei lo attirò tra le sue braccia
e fece cadere la briglia.
Gridò la regina delle Fate
“Il giovane Tam lin è scappato”
XVII
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia
in una vipera o un serpente
ma lei lo tenne stretto e senza temerlo
era il suo compagno umano
XVIII
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia ancora
in un feroce fuoco ardente
ma lei lo tenne stretto e senza temerlo
finchè divenne freddo ferro
XIX
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia 
in un cane nero del bosco e selvaggio
ma lei lo tenne stretto e senza temerlo 
era il padre di suo figlio
XX
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia 
infine in un uomo nudo
e lei lo avvolse nel mantello verde
e seppe di averlo conquistato
riff
Gridò la regina delle Fate
“Il giovane Tam lin è scappato”
XXI
“Se avessi saputo, se avessi saputo Tam Lin
molto tempo prima quando arrivasti da casa
se avessi saputo, ti avrei cavato il cuore
e messo un cuore di pietra
XXII
Se avessi saputo, avessi saputo Tam Lin 
che una dama, una dama ti avrebbe rubato,
se l’avessi saputo ti avrei cavato gli occhi
e messi altri due di legno
XXIII
Se avessi saputo, avessi saputo Tam Lin
che ti avrei perduto che ti avrei perduto un giorno, se l’avessi saputo avrei pagato
il mio tributo all’inferno prima”

COME HOME WITH ME, LITTLE MATTY GROVES

“Little Musgrave” ovvero “Matty Groves” è una murder ballad  sull’adulterio medievale che si conclude tragicamente con la morte dei due amanti.

SECONDA MELODIA: MATTY GROVES

Questa versione della ballata è stata resa popolare dai Fairport Convention che hanno composto una melodia sul testo tradizionale. Il racconto è ancora più conciso delle versioni testuali già esaminate (vedi prima parte) e si sofferma sul dialogo dei tre protagonisti, tagliando il ruolo dei servitori.

ASCOLTA Fairport Convention in Liege & Lief 1969 con la voce di Sandy Danny

e questa basterebbe ma curiosando tra le varie e tantissime  “cover” ecco dei giovanissimi

ASCOLTA Strangelings


I
A holiday, a holiday and the first one of the year(1)
Lord Donald’s wife came into the church
the Gospel for to hear
and when the meeting it was done, she cast her eyes about
and there she saw little Matty Groves walking in the crowd.
“Come home with me, little Matty Groves.
Come home with me tonight.
Come home with me, little Matty Groves and sleep with me ‘til light”
“Oh, I can’t come home, I won’t come home and sleep with you tonight
by the rings on your fingers I can tell you are Lord Donald’s wife”
“But if I am Lord Donald’s wife Lord Donald’s not at home
he is out in the far cornfields bringing the yearlings home”
II
And a servant who was standing by and hearing what was said
he swore Lord Donald he would know before the sun would set
and in his hurry to carry the news he bent his breast and ran
and when he came to the broad mill stream he took off his shoes and he swam.
III
Little Matty Groves, he lay down and took a little sleep
when he awoke, Lord Donald was standing at his feet
saying, “How do you like my feather bed and how do you like my sheets?
How do you like my lady who lies in your arms asleep?”
“Oh, well, I like your feather bed and well, I like your sheets
but better I like your lady gay who lies in my arms asleep”
IV
“Well, get up, get up”, Lord Donald cried “Get up as quick as you can!
It’ll never be said in fair England I slew a naked man”
“Oh, I can’t get up, I won’t get up I can’t get up for my life
for you have two long beaten swords and I not a pocket knife”
“Well, it’s true I have two beaten swords
and they cost me deep in the purse
but you will have the better of them and I will have the worse.
And you will strike the very first blow and strike it like a man
I will strike the very next blow and I’ll kill you if I can”
V
So Matty struck the very first blow and he hurt Lord Donald sore
Lord Donald struck the very next blow and Matty struck no more.
And then Lord Donald he took his wife and he sat her on his knee
saying, “Who do you like the best of us Matty Groves or me?”
And then up spoke his own dear wife never heard to speak so free
“I’d rather a kiss from dead Matty’s lips than you or your finery”
VI
Lord Donald, he jumped up and loudly he did bawl
he struck his wife right through the heart and pinned her against the wall
“A grave, a grave”, Lord Donald cried “To put these lovers in
but bury my lady at the top for she was of noble kin”
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Era un giorno di festa il primo dell’anno (1)
e la moglie di Lord Donald andò in chiesa
per sentire il Vangelo
e quando l’incontro terminò,
lei si guardò intorno
e là vide il giovane Matty Groves camminare tra la folla.
Vieni con me,
giovane Matty Groves, vieni a casa con me stanotte
Vieni con me, giovane Matty Groves
e dormirai con me
finchè sarà giorno
Oh, io non posso e non voglio venire a dormire con voi stanotte,
perchè dagli anelli alle vostre dita presumo voi siate la moglie di Lord Donald“”Anche se fossi la moglie di Lord Donald, Lord Donald non è a casa,
è nei campi di grano, lontano per riportare a casa i puledri di un anno
II
E un servitore che le stava accanto e sentì quello che si dissero,
giurò che Lord Donald avrebbe saputo tutto, prima del tramonto.
E nella fretta di portare la notizia, fece un inchino e corse via.
E quando arrivò al mulino presso il fiume
si tolse le scarpe e nuotò.
III
Il giovane Matty Groves, si sdraiò (2)
e si addormentò un poco,
quando si alzò Lord Donald stava dritto ai suoi piedi
e disse “Quanto ti piace il mio letto di piume, quanto ti piacciono le mie lenzuola? (3)
E quanto ti piace la mia signora che giace tra le tue braccia addormentata?

Oh beh, mi piacciono il tuo letto di piume, le tue lenzuola e ancora di più la tua allegra moglie, che giace tra le mie braccia addormentata
IV
Beh allora alzati – gridò Lord Donald – più in fretta che puoi che non si dica mai nella bella Inghilterra che io abbia ucciso un uomo disarmato (4)”
Oh io non posso e non voglio alzarmi, perchè voi avete due lunghe spade affilate e io nemmeno un coltello in tasca
E’ vero che ho due lunghe spade
affilate che mi hanno alleggerito la scarsella (5),

ma tu avrai la migliore delle due
e io avrò la peggiore.

E tu potrai colpire per primo
e colpire con forza (6).
Io colpirò per secondo
e cercherò di ucciderti

V
Così Matty fece il primo affondo e lasciò il segno su Lord Donald,
Lord Donald colpì per secondo e Matty non rispose più.
E poi Lord Donald prese sua moglie e la fece sedere sulle sue ginocchia
e le disse “Chi preferisci tra Matty Groves e me?
E così parlò la sua cara moglie e mai prima parlò in modo così sincero “Preferisco una bacio dalle labbra di Matty morto che voi e le vostre buone maniere
VI
Lord Donald balzò in piedi e forte tirò una stoccata
e colpì suo moglie dritto al cuore
e la infilzò contro il muro
Una tomba, una tomba – Lord Donald gridò- Per metterci questi amanti dentro, ma seppellite la mia signora in cima perchè lei era di nobile nascita

NOTE
1) il primo giorno dell’anno secondo il vecchio calendario giuliano coincideva con il 25 marzo giorno dell’Annunciazione così era in Inghilterra fino al 1752
2) facendo quello che era andato a fare con la Lady
3) tutta la situazione richiama un po’ la Raggle Taggle Gypsy
4) il termine “nudo” viene più propriamente definito come
“disarmato
5) nel senso che sono costate molto
6) letteralmente “come un uomo”

continua

FONTI
http://zeegrooves.blogspot.it/2010/02/fairport-convention-matty-groves.html

Ye Mariners All (A jug of this)

sailor drinking“Ye Mariners All” was collected at the beginning of the 20th century by the Hammond brothers from Mrs Marina Russell of Upwey in Dorset and published in “The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs” (1959); it is a melancholic or caustic drinking song. The text appears in print around 1840 combined with the melody “A Brisk Young Sailor Courted Me” or “Died for Love” that is the lament of a girl betrayed by a sailor. The ballad is classified mostly in sea songs and is not really an Irish song about drinking. The Clancy Brothers recorded it with the title of “A Jug of this” as an Irish lament.
Raccolta sul campo agli inizi del Novecento dalla signora Marina Russell di Upwey, Dorset e pubblicata nel The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs (1959) “Ye Mariners All” è una drinking song dalla vena malinconica o caustica. Il testo compare in stampa verso il 1840 abbinato alla melodia “A Brisk Young Sailor Courted Me” ovvero “Died for Love” cioè il lamento di una fanciulla tradita da un marinaio.
La ballata è classificata per lo più nelle sea songs e non è propriamente una canzone irlandese sul bere. I Clancy Brothers l’hanno registrata con il titolo di “A Jug of this” l’effetto è una sorta di irish lament.

Tommy Makem

Fairport Convention in Tipplers Tales 1978 con un lungo preambolo strumentale il canto inizia a 2:30

Seth Lakeman in The Punch Bowl 2002.

Lehto&Wright live 2010

Robin Holcomb & Jessica Kenny in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
Oh ye Mariners (1) as you pass by,
Well come into drink if you are dry.
Come and spend, my lads,
your money brisk,
And pop your nose in (this one.
Drink another) jug of this (2).
II
Oh ye tipplers, have you that crown (3)?
For you are welcome all to sit down.
Come and spend, my lads,
your money brisk,
And pop your nose in (this one.
In another) jug of this.
III
Now I’m old and I can scarcely crawl,
I’ve an old grey beard and a head that’s bald.
Crown my desire
and fulfill my bliss,
With a pretty young girl
And a(nother) jug of this (4).
IV
Now I’m in my grave
and I am dead (5),
And all these sorrows are passed and fled.
Go and turn myself (transform me) into a fish (6),
And let me swim (around you)
In a(nother) jug of this.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Voi marinai (1) di passaggio
entrate a bere se avete sete,
venite a spendere, ragazzi
i vostri soldi alla svelta,
e infilate il naso
in questa boccia (2)
II
Voi, forti bevitori, avete una corona (3)?
Perchè siete tutti invitati a sedervi,
venite e spendete, ragazzi,
i vostri soldi alla svelta,
e infilate il naso
in questa boccia
III
Ora che sono vecchio e cammino a stento,
ho una vecchia barba grigia e una testa calva,
corono il mio desiderio
e soddisfo la mia beatitudine
con una bella ragazzina
e questa boccia (4)
IV
Ora che sono nella tomba
e sono morto (5)
e tutti i dolori sono passati e finiti
mi trasformo in un pesce (6)
per poter nuotare (intorno a te)
in questa boccia

NOTE
1) in the first transcriptions (the Hammond brothers) its report “mourners” as if the guests invited to enter the pub to drink were those of a funeral procession. In reality it is the word mar’ners a dialectal form for sailors [nelle prime trascrizioni (the Hammond brothers ) si riporta “mourners” come se gli invitati ad entrare nel pub per bere fossero quelli di un corteo funebre. In realtà si tratta della parola mar’ners una forma dialettale per marinai]
2) ovvero “e infilate il naso in questo, bevete un’altra boccia di questo“. Non è automatico tradurre in italiano il temine jug: in fiorentino si direbbe boccia, che richiama l’immagine delle bottiglie di vino da 5 litri (una bottiglia piuttosto grande con il collo stretto). Ma può essere anche una caraffa con tanto di manico e collo più svasato che assomiglia a una brocca. Potrebbe anche essere un vaso di vetro per conservare marmellate o ortaggi o il barattolo del miele. Un termine quanto mai generico che a me richiama l’orcio toscano, il recipiente di terracotta, panciuto e di forma allungata con il collo ristretto, spesso a due manici in cui si conservavano o trasportavano i liquidi. In antico era una unità di misura equivalente a circa 38 litri, ma rimpicciolito ecco che l’orcio era usato come una brocca.
jug= boccia, brocca, caraffa, bottiglia.
3) oppure “Oh mariners all, if you’ve half a crown”: la corona in senso di moneta
4) letteralmente “in un’altra boccia (brocca) di questo
5) evidently not all those who end up in the grave can consider themselves dead, so the singer prefers to specify it! [evidentemente non tutti quelli che finiscono nella tomba possono considerarsi morti, così chi canta preferisce specificarlo!]
6) I don’t know if there are intentional connotations towards Christian symbologies, but what a heavenly bliss for those who love the drink !! [mi piace l’idea della reincarnazione in un pesce anche se non so se ci siano intenzionali connotazioni verso simbologie cristiane, ma quale paradisiaca beatitudine per chi ama il bere!! ]

To revive the atmosphere I propose a country dance favourite by mariners (in John Playford’s English Dancing Master 1651)
Per ravvivare l’atmosfera propongo una contraddanza favorita dai marinai (dal Dancing Master di Playford 1651)
“Row Well, Ye Mariners” 

LINK
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/yemarinersall.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/xyz/yemarine.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49380
http://celtic-lyrics.com/lyrics/279.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/mariners
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/27.html

GLASGERION (JACK ORION)

Ballata tradizionale inglese
Child Ballad #67
Musica: A. L. Lloyd (1961)

Glasgerion, è il bardo gallese Keraint (Geraint the Blue Bard )-qualificato dall’aggettivo “glas” ossia Azzurro (erano infatti i Bardi -perlomeno quelli in cima alla gerarchia (ossia di nobili natali) – a vestirsi d’azzurro -come carattere distintivo del loro status sociale) “Keraint il Bardo Azzurro” è citato nei Mabinogion: Keraint figlio di Owain, Principe di Glamorgan visse probabilmente nell’VIII- IX secolo.
Ohibò ecco da dove viene il Principe Azzurro delle fiabe!! Senonchè “azzurro“, in lingua gallese, significa “più importante, principale” e infatti 500 anni dopo Chaucher lo colloca nel suo “House of Fame” accanto ad Orfeo (o almeno così ritengono gli studiosi identificando il Glaskirion di Chaucer con il bardo gallese).

George Sheridan Knowles - Glasgerion 1892

NEL BLU TINTO DI BLU

Glasten o glas ma un tempo woad ossia “erba selvatica” detta glastum da Plinio, è il colore blu ottenuto dagli antichi Celti  un blu verde-grigio  (o azzurro-verde) dalla lavorazione dell’erba guada, un’erba detta anche erba gialla per via del colore delle sue infiorescenze, l’Isatis tinctoria delle Brassicaceae (la famiglia dei cavoli per intenderci).
Il colorante si trova nelle foglie le quali si raccolgono con frequenti tagli (4-5 all’anno) – e secondo tradizione l’ultimo taglio si faceva  l’equinozio d’autunno (e nel Medioevo cristiano con il giorno di San Michele Arcangelo)
A parte i reperti tessili datati al V secolo a.C. anche Giulio Cesare e Plinio descrivono l’usanza dei Celti di tingersi i corpi prima della battaglia con il guado.
La pianta oltre che nel Nord europa fu coltivata anche in molte regioni italiane fino a quanto venne soppiantata dall‘indaco indiano portato da Marco Polo dai suoi viaggi in Oriente, una pianta di maggior resa tintoria.
La coltivazione dell’erba guada è stata oggi ripresa e valorizzata sia in Francia che in Italia con ottimi risultati.

Nell’antichità greca e romana il blu era considerato un colore poco prestigioso confuso con il verde e il grigio, finchè poco dopo l’Anno Mille mutarono i gusti e la percezione estetica riguardante tale colore.
Perché il blu diventasse un colore significativo, capace di trasmette idee e suscitare emozioni, furono necessarie nell’Europa cristiana almeno due cose: che le materie di base per la pittura e la tintura delle stoffe non fossero più un bene raro e difficile da distillare come nell’antichità; e che nuove abitudini si sedimentassero nell’inconscio collettivo trasformando la sensibilità ed il gusto degli individui. Lo storico francese Michel Pastoureau ha datato al 1100 il punto di svolta riguardo al colore blu. Grazie allo sviluppo del commercio e dei mezzi di produzione materiale nacque una nuova sensibilità religiosa e culturale, ed il colore blu si impose sulla scena europea per rimanerci fino ai giorni nostri. Il primo segnale che qualcosa stava cambiando lo diede, in pittura, il mantello della Vergine: precedentemente era stato quasi sempre dipinto di bruno, violetto o bianco in segno di lutto ed  afflizione. Poi, improvvisamente, diventò ovunque di un bel blu chiaro e luminoso, trasformandosi in un simbolo di purezza e misericordia. Vestirsi di blu ormai non era più una stravaganza. Ma nessun libro – scrive Pastoureau- nessuna opera d’arte e nessun avvenimento esercitò tale influenza sulla moda quanto il libro di Goethe “I dolori del giovane Werter”, pubblicato nel 1774. Per almeno 10 anni il capo più richiesto dai giovani di tutta Europa fu proprio “l’abito alla Werter” e cioè la marsina blu che l’eroe indossava quando conobbe Carlotta. Lo stesso Goethe vestiva spesso di blu, e nella sua Teoria dei Colori definì l’associazione del blu e del giallo come l’armonia cromatica assoluta. Ma non fu il solo: al pari del grande scrittore tedesco tutto il movimento romantico portò un culto assoluto al colore blu. Per i romantici il blu costellava la poesia, il sogno, la melanconia, il languore assetato di assoluto.  (tratto da qui)

LA BALLATA

La ballata in Reliques of Ancient English Poetry di Sir Thomas Percy risale sicuramente al medioevo e il nostro Bardo è coinvolto in una vicenda tragicomica: vezzeggiato ospite alla mensa del Re, riesce a sedurre con il suo canto la bella Principessa la quale lo invita a recarsi nella sua camera nel cuore della notte.
Il servitore del Bardo approfitta dell’occasione e gioca d’anticipo entrando per primo nella camera della principessa,  la prende così per terra, senza tante buone maniere. Poi torna negli alloggi del Bardo e lo sveglia per esortarlo ad andare all’appuntamento fissato. Nel vederlo ritornare la Principessa sulle prime si mostra sorpresa e poi scopre di essere stata violata dal servitore del Bardo e preferisce uccidesi. Glasgerion va dal  paggio e lo uccide e poi volge la lama su di sè. Una storia come piaceva a quei tempi con tanto spargimento di sangue e uccisioni di giovani vite e rigide regole di comportamento sociale da far rispettare!

In seguito Glasgerion diventa Jack Orion ovvero Jack O’Rian, ed è proprio la versione tardo settecentesca della ballata ad essere stata rimaneggiata e messa in musica da Andrew Lancaster Lloyd (1961)
È la versione interpretata e fatta conoscere da Bert Jansch nel 1966, nell’album omonimo. Probabilmente di origine tardosettecentesca, si tratta di una versione un po’ edulcorata nel linguaggio ma comunque che non si allontana da quella più antica tramandata dal Folio Percy. La storia di questa versione è comunque controversa e riflette interventi arbitrari moderni che non sono stati infrequenti nel Folk revival degli anni ’60. Fu infatti nel 1961 che, basandosi su una autentica versione stampata prima che la ballata scomparisse del tutto dalla tradizione orale, che lo studioso e folklorista Albert Lancaster Lloyd (1908-1982) compose una versione “modernizzata” e una melodia adatta (della versione più antica e anche di quelle più tarde non si è mai conosciuta la musica). Lloyd, che era anche cantante in proprio, la incise nel 1966 nell’album First Person con Dave Swarbrick (“Swarb”) al fiddle: fu questa versione che fu poi ripresa da Bert Jansch e dai Pentangle. Nel 1968 era stata interpretata anche da Martin Carthy, ancora con Dave Swarbrick al fiddle, nell’album But Two Came By. In una nota nel libretto dell’album, Martin Carthy osserva interessantemente: ‘The song in its traditional form was, according to evidence at our [his and A. L. Lloyd’s] disposal, not very widespread, which serves to highlight one of the curious features of the folk revival, that is, the many songs which were not at all common in tradition are very commonly sung in the revival and vice versa.’ Nel 1970, infine, la sua versione più famosa e nella quale viene generalmente ricordata: quella dei Pentangle in Cruel Sister, interpretata a tre voci da Bert Jansch, John Renbourn e Jacqui McShee. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA su Spotify A.L. Lloyd & Dave Swarbrick ·  in English & Scottish Folk Ballads 2006. Nella versione di LLoyd vengono omesse le strofe del suicidio della principessa e del bardo, apparentemente l’unico a morire è il servo.


I
Jack Orion was as good fiddler
As ever fiddled on a string,
And he could drive young women mad
With the tune his wires would sing.
II
He could fiddle the fish out of salt water
Or water from a marble stone,
Or the milk out of a maiden’s breast
Though baby she had none.
III
So he sat and played in the castle hall
And fiddled them all so sound asleep,
Except it was for the young countess,
And for love she stayed awake.
IV
And first he played a slow, slow air
And then he played it brisk and gay,
And, “O dear love,” behind her hand
This lady she did say.
V
“Ere the day has dawned and the cocks have crown
And flapped their wings so wide,
It’s you may come up to my bedroom door/ And stretch out at my side.”
VI
So he lapped his fiddle in a cloth of green/ And he stole out on his tip toe,
And he’s off back to his young boy Tom
As fast as he could go.
VII
Ere the day has dawned and the cocks have crown
And flapped their wings so wide,
I’m bid to go to that lady’s door
And stretch out at her side.
VIII
Well lie down, rest you, my good master,
Here’s a blanket to your hand.
And I’ll waken you in as good a time
As any cock in the land.”
IX
And Tom took the fiddle into his hand,
Fiddled and he sang for a full hour,
Till he played his master fast asleep
And he’s off to that lady’s bower.
X
And when he come to the countess’ door
He twirled so softly at the pin,
And the lady true to her promise
Rose up and let him in.
XI
Well he didn’t take that lady gay
To bolster or to bed,
But down upon her bedroom floor
Right soon he had her laid.
XII
And he neither kissed her when he came
Nor yet when from her he did go,
But in and out of her bower window
The moon like a coal did glow.
XIII
“Oh ragged are your stockings, love,
And stubble is your cheek and chin,
And tangled is that yellow hair
That I saw late yestre’en.”
XIV
“My stockings belong to my boy Tom
And they were the first come to my hand,
And I tangled all my yellow hair
When coming against the wind”
XV
He took his fiddle into his hand,
So saucy there he sang,
And he’s off back to his own master
As fast as could run.
XVI
“Well up, well, my master dear,
For while you sleep and snore so loud
There’s not a cock in all this land
But has flapped his wings and crowed.”
XVII
Jack Orion took the fiddle into his hand/ And he fiddled and he played so merrily,/ And he’s off away to the lady’s house/ As fast as go could he.
XVIII
Well, when he come to the lady’s door
The fiddler twirled upon the pins,
Saying softly, “Here’s your own true love,
Rise up and let me in.
XIX
She says,“Surely you didn’t leave behind
A bracelet or a velvet glove,
Or are you returned back again
To taste more of me love?”
XX
Jack Orion swore a bloody oath,
“By oak and ash and bitter thorn,
Lady, I never was in your room
Since the day that I was born.”
XXI
Oh then it was your little foot page
That falsely has beguiled me,
And woe that the blood of that ruffian boy
Should spring in my body.”
XX
And home then went Jack Orion, crying,
“Tom, my lad, come here to me!”
And he hanged that boy from his own gatepost
High as the willow tree.
tradotto da Riccardo Venturi*
I
Jack Orion era il miglior violinista(1)
Che mai avesse suonato su corda,
Faceva impazzire le giovani donne
Quando suonava una melodia sul suo violino
II
Avrebbe fatto uscire i pesci dall’acqua salata/O acqua da una lastra di marmo,
O latte dal petto di una vergine
Sebbene mai avesse avuto figli (2)
III
E continuò a suonare nella sala del castello/ Finché, suonando, non li fece addormentar tutti;/tutto a causa della giovane principessa/ Che per amore se ne stava sveglia.
IV
E prima suonò una melodia (3) solenne e lenta/ E poi ne fece sgorgare una allegra;/ E “Oh Amore caro” di nascosto la dama gli diceva.
V
“All’alba, quando i galli avranno cantato
E ben sbattuto le loro ali,
allora vieni ed entra in camera mia
per distenderti al mio fianco.”

VI
Ripose il violino in una tela verde
e, muovendosi con circospezione,
corse via dal suo giovane servo Tom, più veloce del vento.
VII
All’alba, quando i galli avranno cantato
E ben sbattuto le loro ali,
Sono stato invitato a entrare da quella dama
Per distendermi al suo fianco.”
VIII
“Giaci pure nel tuo letto, caro padrone,
ecco prendi una coperta;
ti sveglierò al momento giusto
meglio di un gallo.”
IX
E Tom prese il violino in mano
suonò e cantò per una buona ora
suonò finchè il suo padrone prese sonno e così se ne andò dalla dama.
X
E quando giunse alla camera della signora
Toccò leggermente il battente;
La signora fu fedele alla sua parola,
Si alzò e lo fece entrare.
XI
Beh, non prese quella bella signora
Sul capezzale e neanche sul letto,
La rovesciò giù sul pavimento
E rapidamente la montò.
XII
Non le diede un bacio né all’arrivo
E neppure quando andò via;
Splendeva la luna come brace
Guizzando dentro e fuori dalla finestra.
XIII
“Le tue calze sono stracciate, amore,
Hai le guance ispide di barba,
Pieni di nodi sono i tuoi capelli biondi
Che ho visto solo ieri sera.”
XIV
“Le calze sono del mio paggio Tom,
Sono le prime che mi son capitate in mano,
e mi sono annodato i biondi capelli
mentre venivo controvento.”
XV
Tom prese il violino in mano
E cantò in modo insolente,
Poi tornò alla casa del suo padrone
Il più veloce che poté.
XVI
“Svegliati, svegliati, mio buon padrone,
perchè mentre dormivi sodo e russavi
nessun gallo del paese ha cantato
e  sbattuto le ali”

XVII
Jack Orion prese il violino in mano
suonò e cantò contento
e se ne andò dalla dama
più veloce del vento.
XVIII
E quando giunse alla porta
il violinista toccò il battente;
dicendo piano: “Ecco il tuo vero amore
alzati e fammi entrare
XIX
“Oh, lai lasciato qui da me
Il tuo braccialetto o un guanto?
Oppure sei tornato
Per fare ancora l’amore con me?”
XX
Jack Orion tirò una bestemmia sanguinosa (4) “Sulla quercia, le ceneri e le amare spine Signora, non sono mai stato in casa tua/ Dal giorno che sono nato.”
XXI
“Oh, allora è stato il tuo paggetto
Che mi ha ingannata così crudelmente,
Che sventura che il sangue di quel furfante/ Scorra dentro al mio corpo (5).”
XX
Jack Orion corse a casa,
gridando,
 “Tom, ragazzo mio, vieni qua da me.”
e impiccò quel servo al proprio cancello
in alto come il salice

NOTE
* traduzione di  Riccardo Venturi per il testo dei Pentangle (sotto), adattato da Cattia Salto sulla versione di Bert Lloyd
1)  lo strumento in origine era l‘arpa bardica
così recita la versione del foglio Percy [traduzione di Riccardo Venturi da qui]

Glasgerion was a kings owne sonne,
And a harper he was good,
He harped in the kings chamber
Where cappe and candle yoode,
And soe did hee in the Queens chamber
Till ladies waxed wood.
Glasgerion era l’unico figlio d’un re,
Era un buon suonatore d’arpa;
Suonava l’arpa alla corte del re
Dove passavan calici e candelabri,
E così fece nelle stanze della regina
Facendo impazzire le dame.

2) Le Arpe magiche sono molto citate nella mitologia celtica, arpe dotate di straordinari poteri che  suscitano forti emozioni negli uomini e negli animali e compiono incantesimi sulle cose inanimate. continua
3) le tre melodie suonate dal bardo riprendono pari pari le melodie suonate dal Dio Dagda con la sua arpa magica denominata “sussurro del dolce albero di mele”. Così racconta la leggenda: durante la battaglia di Mag Tured tra i Fomori, leggendari abitanti dell’Irlanda e i Thuata DŽeDanann, i figli della dea Dana, dai quali discende il popolo irlandese, i Fomori rubarono l’arpa al dio Dagda.  In una rocambolesca sortita nel campo nemico lo stesso dio Dagda accompagnato dal dio Lugh e Ogma, chiama a sè con un’invocazione magica l’arpa e suona le tre fondamentali e nobili melodie musicali per le quali si riconoscono gli arpisti: la melodia del pianto, quella del riso, e quella del sonno.
4) Così commenta Riccardo Venturi: “Cioè sulla quercia con la quale era stata fabbricata la croce di Gesù, sulle sue ceneri e sulle spine della corona.  Per i puritani standard inglesi, anche moderni, si tratta di una bestemmia veramente sanguinosa
5) in realtà è lo sperma di un umile servo quello che scorre nella vagina della principessa: nei tempi antichi le pulzelle nobili venivano tranquillamente stuprate dagli eserciti conquistatori, per questo si toglievano la vita quando il nemico sfondava le porte della città o del mastio. Se sopravvivevano venivano degradate a servire come serve o vendute come schiave.

ASCOLTA Pentangle Jack Orion in Cruel Sister, 1967. In una versione a tre voci Bert Jansch (il narratore), John Renbourn (il bardo e lo scudiero), Jacqui McShee (la principessa). Così commenta Alberto di Musica e Memoria: “Questa ballata tradizionale nell’LP Cruel Sister occupa una intera facciata e segna la adozione, per la prima volta, della chitarra elettrica con distorsore (al minuto 14:46) da parte dei Pentangle, forse per adeguarsi in qualche modo allo stile folk-rock allora imperante (Fairport Convention, Steeleye Span), mentre sino ad allora erano stato fedeli ai soli strumenti acustici e al massimo alla chitarra elettrificata stile jazz.” (tratto da qui)
La versione portata nel gruppo da Bert Jansch (che l’aveva registrata nel 1966 nel suo album dal titolo omonimo) è più tragica e dettagliata.

ASCOLTA Fairport Convention – Jack O’Rion 1978

I
Jack Orion was as good a fiddler
As ever fiddled on a string
He could make young women mad
To the tune his fiddle would sing
II
He could fiddle the fish out of salt water
Or water from a marble stone
Or milk from out of a maiden’s breast
Though baby she’d got none
III
He’s taken his fiddle into his hand
He’s fiddled and he’s sung
And oft he’s fiddled unto the King
Who never thought it long
IV
And he sat fiddling in the castle hall
He’s played them all so sound asleep
All but for the young princess
And for love she stayed awake
V
And first he played at a slow grave tune
And then a gay one flew
And many’s the sigh and loving word
That passed between the two
VI
Come to my bower, sweet Jack Orion
When all men are at rest
As I am a lady true to my word
Thou shalt be a welcome guest
VII
He’s lapped his fiddle in a cloth of green
A glad man, Lord, was he
Then he’s run off to his own house
Says, Tom come hither unto me
VIII
When day has dawned and the cocks have crown
And flapped their wings so wide
I am bidden to that lady’s door
To stretch out by her side
IX
Lie down in your bed, dear master
And sleep as long as you may
I’ll keep good watch and awaken you
Three hours before ‘tis day
X
But the rose up that worthless lad
His master’s clothes did don
A collar he’s cast about his neck
He seemed the gentleman
XI
Well he didn’t take that lady gay
To bolster nor to bed
But down upon the bower floor
He quickly had her laid
XII
And he neither kissed her when he came
Nor when from her he did go
And in and out of her window
The moon like a coal did glow
XIII
Ragged are your stockings love
Stubbly is your cheek and chin
And tangled is that yellow hair
That I saw yestereen
XIV
The stockings belong to my boy Tom
They’re the first come to my hand
The wind has tangled my yellow hair
As I rode o’er the land
XV
Tom took his fiddle into his hand
So saucy there he sang
Then he’s off back to his master’s house
As fast as he could run
XVI
Wake up, wake up my good master
I fear ‘tis almost dawn
Wake up, wake up the cock has crowed ‘Tis time that you were gone
XVII
Then quickly rose up Jack Orion
Put on his cloak and shoon
And cast a collar about his neck
He was a lord’s true son
XVIII
And when he came to the lady’s bower
He lightly rattled the pin
The lady was true to her word
She rose and let him in
XIX
Oh whether have you left with me
Your bracelet or your glove?
Or are you returned back again
To know more of my love?
XX
Jack Orion swore a bloody oath
By oak and ash and bitter thorn
Saying, lady I never was in your house
Since the day that I was born
XXI
Oh then it was your young footpage
That has so cruelly beguiled me
And woe that the blood of the ruffian lad
Should spring in my body
XXII
Then she pulled forth a little sharp knife
That hung down at her knee
O’er her white feet the red blood ran/ Or ever a hand could stay
And dead she lay on her bower floor
At the dawning of the day
XXIII
Jack Orion ran to his own house
Saying, Tom my boy come here to me
Come hither now and I’ll pay your fee
And well paid you shall be
XXIV
If I had killed a man tonight
Tom I would tell it thee
But if I have taken no life tonight
Tom thou hast taken three
XXV
Then he pulled out his bright brown sword
And dried it on his sleeve
And he smote off that vile lad’s head
And asked for no man’s leave
XXVI
He set the sword’s point to his breast
The pommel to a stone
Through the falseness of that lying lad
These three lives were all gone.
tradotto da Riccardo Venturi *
I
Jack Orion era il miglior violinista (1)
Che mai avesse suonato su corda,
Faceva impazzire le giovani donne
Quando suonava una melodia sul suo violino
II
Avrebbe fatto uscire i pesci dall’acqua salata
O acqua da una lastra di marmo,
O latte dal petto di una vergine
Sebbene mai avesse avuto figli (2)
III
Prese il suo violino in mano
E si mise a suonare e a cantare;
E spesso suonava al cospetto del Re
Che mai se ne aveva a annoiare.
IV
E continuò a suonare nella sala del castello/ Finché, suonando, non li fece addormentar tutti;
E tutto questo a causa della giovane principessa/ Che per amore se ne stava sveglia.
V
E prima suonò una melodia solenne e lenta (3)/ E poi ne fece sgorgare una allegra;/ E molti furono i sospiri e le parole d’amore
Che scorsero fra quei due.
VI
“Vieni in camera mia, dolce Jack Orion,
Quando tutti saranno a riposare;
Sono una donna fedele alla mia parola,
Sarai un ospite ben gradito.”
VII
Ripose il violino in una tela verde
E, com’è vero Iddio, era un uomo felice;
Poi corse via a casa sua
E disse, “Tom, vieni qui da me
VIII
All’alba, quando i galli avranno cantato
E ben sbattuto le loro ali,
Sono stato invitato a entrare da quella dama
Per distendermi al suo fianco.”
IX
“Giaci pure nel tuo letto, caro padrone,
E dormi quanto più puoi;
Farò buona guardia e ti sveglierò
Tre ore prima che faccia giorno.”
X
Invece si alzò, quell’indegno ragazzo,
E indossò i vestiti del suo padrone;
Si mise pure un colletto al collo,
Sembrava proprio un gentiluomo.
XI
Beh, non prese quella bella signora
Sul capezzale e neanche sul letto,
La rovesciò giù sul pavimento
E rapidamente la montò.
XII
Non le diede un bacio né all’arrivo
E neppure quando andò via;
Splendeva la luna come brace
Guizzando dentro e fuori dalla finestra.
XIII
“Le tue calze sono stracciate, amore,
Hai le guance ispide di barba,
Pieni di nodi sono i tuoi capelli biondi
Che ho visto solo ieri sera.”
XIV
“Le calze sono del mio paggio Tom,
Sono le prime che mi son capitate in mano,/ I capelli me li ha annodati il vento/ Mentre cavalcavo per la campagna.”
XV
Tom prese il violino in mano
E cantò in modo insolente,
Poi tornò alla casa del suo padrone
Il più veloce che poté.
XVI
“Svegliati, svegliati, mio buon padrone,
Temo che sia quasi l’alba,
Svegliati, svegliati, il gallo ha cantato,
È ora che tu vada.”
XVII
Allora si alzò veloce Jack Orion,
Si infilò il mantello e le scarpe,
E si mise un colletto al collo (6),
Era davvero figlio di un signore.
XVIII
E quando giunse alla camera della signora
Toccò leggermente il battente;
La signora fu fedele alla sua parola,
Si alzò e lo fece entrare.
XIX
“Oh, lai lasciato qui da me
Il tuo braccialetto o un guanto?
Oppure sei tornato
Per fare ancora l’amore con me?”
XX
Jack Orion tirò una bestemmia sanguinosa (4)“Sulla quercia, le ceneri e le amare spine:
-Disse – Signora, non sono mai stato in casa tua
Dal giorno che sono nato.”
XXI
“Oh, allora è stato il tuo paggetto
Che mi ha ingannata così crudelmente,
Che sventura che il sangue di quel furfante
Scorra dentro al mio corpo (5)”
XXII
Allora sguainò un pugnaletto acuminato
Che teneva appeso al ginocchio.
Sui suoi candidi piedi scorse il sangue
Prima che mano la potesse fermare;
E morta giacque sul pavimento della camera
Mentre spuntava il giorno.
XXIII
Jack Orion corse a casa,
Disse, “Tom, ragazzo mio, vieni qua da me./ Vieni qua che ti devo pagare,
E ben pagato tu sarai.
XXIV
Se io avessi ucciso un uomo stanotte
Tom, io te lo avrei detto; Ma tu non hai preso una sola vita, stanotte,/Tom, tu stanotte ne hai prese tre.”
XXV
E allora sguainò la sua spada brunita e lucente
E se la asciugò sulla manica;
Poi troncò la testa a quel ragazzo dappoco
E non chiese il permesso a nessuno.
XXVI
Si appoggiò la punta della spada al petto
E l’impugnatura a una pietra;
Per la falsità di quel ragazzo bugiardo
Quelle tre vite se n’eran tutte andate.

NOTE
* (da qui)
6) la moda del collare in pizzo inizia con il 500 detto collare a lattughe diventato poi la più rigida gorgiera, formata da parecchi strati sovrapposti di bianco lino o di pizzo. Viene però sostituito ben presto dal collare di pizzo a bavera, sempre prezioso ma decisamente più pratico. Il cantastorie non manca occasione di ribadire la differenza di ceto sociale tra il nobile e il servitore perchè nel Medioevo la nobiltà si arrogava un diritto di superiorità “di sangue” sul volgo (il sangue blu delle fiabe): questa superiorità era portatrice di qualità morali oltre che di buone maniere (e non faceva difetto l’arroganza).

Il racconto tragico diventa una storiella comica nella versione intitolata Do Me Ama, una fo’c’sle song  dalle origini settecentesche. continua 

FONTI
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/67-glasgerion.aspx
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/recordings–info-67-glasgerion.aspx
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/arpa-celtica.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=48292&lang=it
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=48292&lang=it#agg229803
http://www.musicaememoria.com/pentangle_cruel_sister.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/jackorion.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_67
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/j/jackorio.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32313
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18386
http://www.dyeinghousegallery.com/tingere-lindaco-ecco-si-fa/
http://www.oikos-group.it/contenuti/colore/colore-e-societa/storia-archivio

THE BANKS OF CLAUDY

ventoUna canzone tradizionale irlandese ampiamente diffusa nei broadsides ottocenteschi, anche scritta come Claudy Banks assai popolare in Gran Bretagna, in Nord America e Australia; il tema è un cosiddetto “reily ballad”  da considerarsi come una variante di “A fair young maid all in her garden“.
A traditional Irish song widely used in nineteenth-century broadsides, also written as Claudy Banks very popular in Britain, North America and Australia; the theme is a “reily ballad” to be considered as a variant of “A fair young maid all in her garden“.

La palma per aver annotato la canzone per conto della Folk Song Society va alla signora Kate Lee che trascrisse Claudy Banks dal canto della famiglia Copper. Claudy si trova nell’Irlanda del Nord e la versione australiana della canzone riporta anche Newry un paese vicino a Claudy, così si può ragionevolmente presumere che questa ballata prese vita in Irlanda, ma è stata per molto tempo ambientata in Gran Bretagna al punto che alcuni collezionisti scozzesi del XIX secolo affermarono che proveniva dal loro paese. Si tratta di quel genere di broadside ballad che fiorirono durante il periodo della guerra tra Gran Bretagna e Francia  per l’imperialismo territoriale al di fuori dell’Europa, quando un marinaio avrebbe potuto restare per molti anni lontano da casa senza possibilità di comunicare con la sua fidanzata rimasta a casa” (tradotto da qui)
The honour of noting the first folksong on behalf of the Folk Song Society went to Mrs Kate Lee who noted down Claudy Banks from the singing of the Copper family. Claudy is in the north of Ireland, and the Australian version of the song refers also to Newry, not too far from Claudy. So we may reasonably conclude that this ballad began life in Ireland. But it has long been acclimatised in Britain, and some nineteenth century Scottish collectors indeed claimed that it originated in that country. It belongs to a kind of broadside balladry that flourished during that long period of struggle between Britain and France for imperial domination outside Europe, when a sailor might be away for many years with little chance of communicating with a lover at home“. (from here)

LA MELODIA
The tune

La melodia non è univoca ma la più diffusa è quella della ballata irlandese The Handsome Cabin Boy.
The melody is not unique but the most widespread is that of the Irish ballad The Handsome Cabin Boy..
Howard Baer

RILEY  BALLADS

Il modello archetipo del tema è quello di Ulisse e Penelope: l’uomo (di solito il signor Riley) ritorna dopo molti anni passati per mare (tra guerre e avventure) e incontra (sotto mentite spoglie) la moglie (o la fidanzata) e la sottopone ad un test per avere la prova della sua fedeltà. L’uomo così rassicurato, si rivela alla donna.
Una situazione di genere ben antica, diventata ormai stereotipata, che  non per questo  cessa di emozionare chi canta e chi ascolta. In queste ballate ad un certo punto viene menzionato un dono che i due si sono scambiati prima della partenza e che viene mostrato alla fine in segno di riconoscimento, ma si tratta più di un corollario o un accessorio alla storia, un dettaglio che non compare in tutte le “riley ballads” proprio come come in “The Banks of Claudy”.
The archetypal model of the theme is that of Ulysses and Penelope: the man (usually Mr. Riley) returns after many years spent by sea (between wars and adventures) and meets (in disguise) his wife (or girlfriend) and he submits it to a test to have proof of his loyalty. The man so reassured, reveals himself to the woman.
A situation of a very ancient kind, which has become stereotypical, which does not cease to upset those who sing and those who listen. In these ballads at a certain point a gift is mentioned that the two exchanged before departure and which is shown at the end in recognition, but it is more a corollary or an accessory to the story, a detail that does not appear in all the “riley ballads” just like in “The Banks of Claudy”.

Mary Dillon in North 2013

VERSIONE M. Dillon
I
Twas on one summer’s evening (1),
I wandered from my home,
Down by a flowery garden
I carelessly did roam;
I overheard a damsel
in sorrow she complained,
All for her absent lover
who’s plowing the raging main(2).
II
I quickly than stepped up to her
And I took her by surprise.
I’ll own she did not know me
having dressed all in disguise;
Said I, “My fairy creature,
My joy and heart’s delight
How far you go to travel
This dark and dreary night?”
III
Unto the Banks of Claudy(3)
kind sir if you will show
Pity a lady distracted,
For it’s there I have to go;
for I am in search of a young man,
Johnny is his name,
and spied the Banks of Claudy
I’m told he does remain.”
III
“These are the banks of Claudy,
Fair maid, where on you stand
Don’t depend on Johnny
For he’s a false young man.
don’t depend on Johnny
For he’ll not meet you here
go carry with me to the green woods
No danger need you fear.
IV
“Oh Johnny was here tonight my dear,
he would keep me from all harm (4),
But he’s in the land of battle
All dressed in uniform;
He’s in the land of battle,
His foes to destroy,
Like a grecian king of honour (5)
Fought in the Wars of Troy.”
V
“O it’s six long weeks and better,
Since Johnny left the shore;
he’s sailed the green wild ocean,
Where the raging billows roar,
he sailed the green wide ocean,
For honour and for fame,
and they told his ship was wrecked
and lost on the coast of Spain.”
VI
When she heard this dreadful news,
She fell in deep despair,
by flopping of her arms
And a tearing out her hair;
Saying, “If my love he is gone (drowned)
There’s no man on earth I’ll take
to the lonesome groves and valleys
I will wander for his sake.”
VII
Oh it’s when he saw her loyalty
he could no longer stand
He flew into her arms saying,
“Betsy, I’m the lad.”
Saying, “Betsy, I’m the young man
The cause of all your pain
and since we’ve met on Claudy banks
We’ll never shall part again.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Era una sera d’estate (1)
che bighellonavo fuori casa
per un giardino fiorito,
vagando distrattamente,
ho sentito una damigella
addolorata che si lamentava,
per il suo innamorato assente,
a solcare il mare agitato (2).
II
Mi sono subito avvicinato a lei
prendendola di sorpresa,
anche se sapevo che non mi avrebbe riconosciuto essendo camuffato.
Mia incantevole creatura,
gioia e delizia del mio cuore,
quanto lontano dovete viaggiare
in questa notte buia e triste?
III
Fino  alle rive del Claudy (3)
gentile signore, se mostrerete pietà
per una poveretta confusa,
perchè è là che devo andare;
Sono in cerca di un giovanotto
di nome Johnny
e scruterò le rive del Claudy
(perchè) mi hanno che oggi ritorna
III
Queste sono le rive del Claudy,
bella fanciulla, proprio dove state
ma non cercate Johnny
perchè è un giovanotto bugiardo;
non cercate Johnny
perchè non lo incontrerete qui,
venite con me nel folto dei boschi
e non dovrete temere alcun pericolo“.
IV
Oh se Johnny fosse qui stanotte, mio caro, mi avrebbe protetta,
ma è sul campo di battaglia
con indosso l’uniforme
è nel campo di battaglia
a distruggere il nemico
come un re greco di parola (5)
che combatte nella guerra di Troia
V
Sono sei lunghe settimane o più
da quanto Johnny ha lasciato il paese,
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
dove ruggiscono le onde impetuose;
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
per l’onore e la fama,
ma dicono che la sua nave naufragò dispersa sulla costa della Spagna
VI
Quando seppe della terribile notizia
cadde nella cupa disperazione
dimenando le mani
e strappandosi i capelli.
Se il mio amore è morto,
non prenderò altro uomo in terra,
ma per boschi solitari e valli
vangherò in sua memoria
VII
E quando egli vide la sua fedeltà
non si trattenne più a lungo
dal gettarsi tra le sue braccia
Betsy, sono io il ragazzo
che è la causa di tutto il tuo dolore,
ma ora che ci siamo incontrati sulle rive del Claudy,
non ci separeremo mai più“.

NOTE
1) Mary modifica qualche verso restando però fedele  alla versione standard, l’incontro  talvolta è ambientato in un mattino di Maggio; la strofa d’apertura è un classico delle ballate popolari in cui la storia viene presentata come una testimonianza di una persona presente ai fatti accaduti, a garanzia della loro autenticità.
Mary modifies some verses but remains faithful to the standard version, the meeting is sometimes set on a morning in May; the opening stanza is a classic of folk ballads in which the story is presented as a testimony of a person present to the events, to guarantee their authenticity.
2) all’epoca di Shakespeare main= high sea; quando la Spagna era potenza coloniale con il temine “Spanish Main” si indicava una specifica parte di territorio compreso tra il Mare dei Caraibi e il Golfo del Messico. Termini spesso usate nelle ballate sono: “bounty main” “angry main” e “raging main” con accezione di mare mosso.
at the time of Shakespeare main = high sea; when Spain was a colonial power with the term “Spanish Main” it was indicated a specific part of territory between the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. Terms often used in ballads are: “bounty main” “angry main” and “raging main” as a rough sea.
3) in Irlanda ci sono molti corsi d’acqua con il nome di Claude / Claudy / Cloddy / Caldy; alcuni ritengono che il riferimento vada al fiume Clyde (Scozia), altri che invece sia il villaggio di Claudy nel Derry (Irlanda del Nord) .. come sempre la discussione è accesa quando i due paesi si contendono l’origine di una canzone tradizionale!
in Ireland there are many watercourses with the name of Claude / Claudy / Cloddy / Caldy; some believe that the reference goes to the river Clyde (Scotland), others that it is the village of Claudy in Derry (Northern Ireland) .. as always the discussion is very hot when the two countries compete for the origin of a traditional song!
4) questo è l’unico verso che non sono proprio riuscita a capire cosa dice Mary, ho preso così come riferimento la versione standard
5) Menelao fu il re greco che andò a Troia con l’intento di riprendersi la moglie. Il paragone non mi sembra molto azzeccato, visto che Elena era fuggita con il troiano Paride!! L’immagine vuole probabilmente richiamare l’ardore guerresco di quando un tempo si combatteva impugnando la spada.
Menelaus was the Greek king who went to Troy with the intention of recovering his wife. The comparison does not seem very apt, as Elena had escaped with the Trojan Paris! The image probably wants to recall the martial ardour of the sword fights

Ballynameen Bridge, Claudy, Co. Derry

Anche i Fairport Convention registrarono la canzone con il titolo Claudy Banks (in Rhythm of the Time, 2008) da ascoltare su Spotify (qui) con una delle melodie alternative con cui viene cantata la canzone.
Altra melodia (una slow air del Donegal) nella versione di Loreena McKennitt (in Elemental 1985):  un andamento lento con il solo accompagnamento dell’arpa celtica, rumore d’oceano e grida di gabbiano in sottofondo.
Also the Fairport Convention recorded the song with the title Claudy Banks (in Rhythm of the Time, 2008) to listen to Spotify (here) with one of the alternative melodies with which the song is sung.
Another melody (a slow air of Donegal) in the version of Loreena McKennitt(in Elemental 1985): a slow melody with the only accompaniment of Celtic harp, ocean noise and seagull cries in the background.

VERSIONE L. McKennitt
I
As I walked out one morning
All in the month of May
Down by a flowery garden
I carelessly did stray
II
I overheard a young maid
In sorrow did complain
All for her absent lover
Who ploughs the raging main.
III
I boldly stepped up to her
And put her in surprise
I know she did not know me
I being in disguise.
IV
I says, “Me charming creature
My joy, my heart’s delight,
How far have you to travel
This dark and dreary night?”
V
“I’m in search of a faithless young man
Johnny is his name
And along the banks of Claudy
I’m told he does remain.”
VI
“This is the banks of Claudy,
Fair maid, where you stand
But don’t depend on Johnny
For he’s a false young man.
VII
“Oh, don’t depend on Johnny
For he’ll not meet you here
But tarry with me in yon green woods
No danger need you fear.”
VIII
“Oh, it’s six long weeks or better
Since Johnny left the shore
He’s crossing the wild ocean
Where the foam and the billows roar.
IX
“He’s crossing the wild ocean
For honour and for fame
But this I’ve heard, the ship was wrecked/All on the coast of Spain .”
X
Oh it’s when she heard this dreadful news/She flew into despair
By the wringing of her milk-white hands/And the tearing of her hair.
XI
Saying, “If Johnny he is drowned
No man on earth I’ll take
But through lonesome groves and valleys/I’ll wander for his sake.”
XII
Oh it’s when he saw her loyalty
No longer could he stand
He flew into her arms saying,
“Betsy, I’m the man.”
XIII
Saying, “Betsy, I’m the young man
The cause of all your pain
But since we’ve met on Claudy banks
We’ll never part again.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre bighellonavo fuori casa una mattina nel mese di Maggio
nei pressi di un giardino fiorito,
incautamente mi smarrii,
II
Incontrai una damigella
addolorata che si lamentava,
per il suo innamorato assente,
a solcare il mare agitato .
II
Mi sono subito avvicinato a lei
prendendola di sorpresa,
anche se sapevo che non mi avrebbe riconosciuto essendo camuffato.
IV
Dico io “Mia incantevole creatura,
gioia e delizia del mio cuore,
quanto lontano dovete viaggiare
in questa notte buia e triste?
V
“Cerco un giovanotto infedele
di nome Johnny
per le rive del Claudy
mi hanno detto che si aggira
VI
Queste sono le rive del Claudy,
bella fanciulla, proprio dove state
ma non contate su Johnny
perchè è un giovanotto bugiardo;
VII
Non contate su Johnny

perchè non lo incontrerete qui,
ma venite con me nel folto dei boschi
e non dovrete temere alcun pericolo“.
VIII
Sono sei lunghe settimane o più
da quanto Johnny ha lasciato il paese,
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
dove ruggiscono le onde impetuose;
IX
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
per l’onore e la fama,
ma dicono che la sua nave naufragò
sulla costa della Spagna

X
Quando lei seppe della terribile notizia
cadde nella cupa disperazione
dimenando le mani bianco latte
e strappandosi i capelli
XI
dicendo “Se Johnny è annegato,
non prenderò altro uomo in terra,
ma per boschi solitari e valli
vangherò per amor suo
XII
E quando egli vide la sua fedeltà
non si trattenne più a lungo
dal gettarsi tra le sue braccia
Betsy, sono io il ragazzo
XIII

Betsy, sono io il ragazzo
che è la causa di tutto il tuo dolore,

ma ora che ci siamo incontrati sulle rive del Claudy, non ci separeremo mai più“.

LINK
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BanksClaudy.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/57.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/claudybanks.html http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BanksClaudy.html http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=694 http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/bkofclau.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=28611 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/domhnaill/banks.htm http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/compilations/banks.htm http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mckennitt/banks.htm

MY LAGAN LOVE

Con la stessa melodia, una slow air delicata e malinconica, e due titoli simili si identificano ben tre canzoni.

LA VERSIONE DELLA TRADIZIONE IRLANDESE

Il testo è stato scritto nel 1904 dal poeta di Belfast Joseph Campbell (1879-1944) su una melodia tradizionale irlandese del Donegal. La canzone è stata pubblicata in “Songs of Uladh” di Herbert Hughes e Joseph Campbell, scritta probabilmente nel 1903 durante una vacanza nel nord del Donegal e nella nota si spiega come il brano sia arrivato a lui dalla tradizione orale ottocentesca.

“I got this from Proinseas mac Suibhne who played it for me on the fidil. He had it from his father Seaghan mac Suibhne, who learned it from a sapper working on the Ordnance Survey in Tearmann about fifty years ago. It was sung to a ballad called the “Belfast Maid,” now forgotten in Cill-mac-nEnain”
[Traduzione italiano: Ho ricevuto questo da Proinseas mac Suibhne che lo ha suonato per me al violino. L’ha avuto da suo padre Seaghan mac Suibhne, che lo imparò da un lavoratore… circa 50 anni fa. Era cantata con una melodia detta Belfast Maid ormai dimenticata.]

E’ la storia di un innamorato e del suo “lily fair” (in italiano bel giglio) dai capelli neri e dagli occhi nocciola che vive lungo le rive del fiume Lagan. L’uomo sbircia dal buco della serratura la vita della donna, che vive da sola con il padre barcaiolo, e nella quarta strofa finalmente anche lei ricambia il suo amore.

Sono le parole, unite alla melodia, ad essere intense, espressione di un amore totalizzante, che rende l’uomo schiavo perchè “love is lord of all“!

Ma nella prima strofa il poeta, noto nazionalista irlandese, dichiara velatamente il suo amore per l’Irlanda! Seosamh MacCathmhaoil cosi come si faceva chiamare il poeta in uno pseudonimo in gaelico, infarcisce il brano di credenze tradizionali preveniente da un mondo rurale idealizzato.

My-Lagan-Love
Illustrazione relativa a My Lagan Love pubblicata in “Songs of Uladh”

In genere nelle registrazioni in commercio la II strofa è saltata. Ottime registrazioni anche da Anuna in Invocation, Jim McCann in Grace, ma sono tantissimi gli artisti e i gruppi che la propongono.

ASCOLTA Lisa Hannigan & The Chieftains in Voice of Ages, un’interpretazione crepuscolare da pelle d’oca (strofe I, III)

ASCOLTA Sinead O’Connor in Sean Nos Nua (strofe I, III, IV)

ASCOLTA The Corrs in Home (strofe I, III, IV)


I
Where Lagan(1) stream sings lullaby
There blows a lily fair
The twilight gleam is in her eyes
The night is on her hair
And, like a love sick lennan-shee(2)
She has my heart in thrall
No life have I, no liberty,
For love is lord of all
II
Her father sails a running-barge
‘Twixt Leamh-beag and The Druim(3);
And on the lonely river-marge
She clears his hearth for him.
When she was only fairy-high
Her gentle mother died;
But dew-Love keeps her memory
Green on the Lagan side
III
And sometimes when the beetle’s horn
Hath lulled the eve to sleep,
I steal unto her shieling(4) lorn
And through the door-ring peep,
There on the crickets’ singing-stone(5)
She spares the bogwood fire,
And hums in sad sweet and undertone,
The song of heart’s desire
IV
Her welcome, like her love for me,
Is from her heart within:
Her warm kiss is felicity
That knows no taint of sin.
And, when I stir my foot to go,
‘Tis leaving Love and light
To feel the wind of longing blow
From out the dark of night.
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Là dove il fiume Lagan(1) canta una nenia, cresce un bel giglio
il riflesso del crepuscolo brilla nei suoi occhi, la notte sui suoi capelli
e come una fata (2), malata d’amore,
lei tiene il mio cuore in schiavitù
non vivo più, non sono più libero
che Amore è padrone di ogni cosa
II
Suo padre spinge le vele della chiatta
tra Lamberg e il Drum(3)
e sulla sponda del fiume solitario
lei accudisce la sua casa per lui.
Quando era solo una piccola fata
la sua buona madre morì,
ma l’amore rinverdisce il ricordo di lei con le lacrime, sulla sponda del Lagan.
III
A volte quando il corno del coleottero
ha fatto addormentare la sera cullandola,
io mi avvicino alla sua dimora(4) solitaria
attraverso la soglia sbircio,
là sul focolare dove cantano i grilli(5),
lei che alimenta il fuoco con la legna di brughiera e mormora dolcemente sottovoce la canzone che il cuore desidera
IV
Il suo benvenuto, come l’amore per
me, giunge dal più profondo:
il suo bacio caloroso è la felicità
che non conosce la macchia del peccato
e, quando riesco ad andarmene
così lascio Amore e luce
per sentir soffiare il vento della nostalgia fuori nel buio della notte

NOTE
1) Lagan: fiume che attraversa Belfast, Altri però ritengono che il fiume sia un torrente che sfocia nel Lough Swilly nella contea di Donegal, non lontano da Letterkenny, dove Herbert Hughes raccolto la canzone nel 1903.
2) Lennan-shee – Shide Leannan (lett fata bambino) leman shee  è la fata che cerca l’amore tra gli umani. La fata, che è un essere sia di genere maschile che femminile, dopo aver sedotto un mortale lo abbandona per ritornare nel suo mondo. L’amante si tormenta per l’amore perduto fino alla morte.
Gli amanti delle fate hanno una vita breve, ma intensa. La fata che prende come amante un umano e anche la musa ispiratrice dell’artista che offre il talento in cambio di un amore devoto, portando l’amante alla follia o a una morte prematura.
3) Lambeg è un villaggio tra Lisburn e Belfast e the Drum è il sito di un canale parallelo al fiume in prossimità del ponte che lo attraversa
4) shieling: riparo stagionale di pastori tipo capanno
5) Crickets’ singing-stone: I grilli sono animali portafortuna e sentire il loro canto vicino al focolare era di buon auspicio. Era consuetudine per i novelli sposi portare nella nuova casa una coppia di grilli dalla casa dei genitori.

LA VARIANTE AL FEMMINILE

Con delle lievi modifiche al testo tradizionale Caroline Lavelle ricava una canzone romantica al femminile


I
Where Lagan streams sing lullabies
Through clouds of lilies fair
The half-light gleam is in his eyes
The night is on his hair
Like a love-sick lenashee
He has my heart to call
No life have I
No liberty
For his love is lord of all
II
And often when the late birdsong
Has lulled all the world to sleep
I will steal into my lover’s arms
Our secrets there to keep
And on the cricket’s singing stone
He’ll make a drywood fire
And tell me then, sweet undertones
The song of my heart’s desire.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Dove il Lagan(1) scorre e canta una ninnananna tra le nubi di bei gigli,
il riflesso del crepuscolo è nei suoi occhi, la notte sui suoi capelli
e come un usignolo (2) innamorato
prende il mio cuore da chiamare
non vivo più,
nessuna libertà, perchè il suo Amore è padrone di ogni cosa.
II
E spesso quando l’ultimo canto
ha fatto addormentare il mondo cullandolo, starò tra le braccia del mio amore, per custodire i nostri segreti
e sul focolare dove canta il grillo
lui farà un fuoco di legna secca
e mi canterà sommessamente
il canto che il mio cuore anela

NOTE
1) al plurare in inglese per indicare i rivoletti del fiume Lagan quando scende a valle
2) lenashee in questo contesto è un appellativo dell’usignolo, nel verso suggessivo dice infatti “birdsong”, il canto dell’usignolo, l’uccello che canta di notte.
L’usignolo è l’uccello che canta solo di notte e nella tradizione popolare è il simbolo degli amanti e dei loro convegni amorosi, immortalato da Shakespeare nel “Romeo e Giulietta” . Così il canto dell’usignolo ha assunto una caratteristica negativa, egli non è il cantore della gioia come l’allodola bensì della malinconia e della morte. continua

MY LAGAN LOVE BY CARDER BUSH

ASCOLTA Kate Bush (vedi Hounds of Love ristampa 1997 nelle bonus track) con l’incanto della sola voce

Il testo del fratello non tiene conto di quello di J. Campbell, ma, suggestionato della melodia, parla di Lagan come di una persona che muore ed è rimpianto dalla donna che lo amava.

TESTO DI JOHN CARDER BUSH
I
When rainy nights are soft with tears,
And Autumn leaves are falling,
I hear his voice on tumbling waves
And no one there to hold me.
At evening’s fall he watched me walk.
His heart was mine.
But my love was young, and felt
The world was not cruel, but kind.
II
Where Lagan’s light fell on the hour,
I saw him far below me-
Just as the morning calmed the storm-
With no one there to hold him.
My loves have come, my loves have gone,
And nothing’s left to warm me,
Save for a voice on the traveling wind,
And the glimpse of a face at morning.
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Quando le notti di pioggia piangono lacrime e le foglie d’autunno cadono,
sento la sua voce nelle onde agitate,
e non c’è nessuno ad abbracciarmi.
All’arrivo della sera mi guardava passeggiare, il suo cuore era il mio..
Il mio amore era giovane e credeva che il mondo non fosse crudele, ma buono.
II
Dove allo scoccare dell’ora la luce di Lagan mi apparve,
lo vidi lontano dietro di me –
proprio mentre il mattino calmava la tempesta –
e non c’è nessuno ad abbracciarlo.
I miei amanti sono venuti, i miei amanti sono andati
e niente è rimasto per riscaldarmi,
eccetto che una voce nel vento vagabondo e il lampo di un volto al mattino.

THE QUIET JOYS OF BROTHERHOOD

Canzone scritta sulla melodia popolare My Lagan Love da Richard Fariña e interpretata dalla sua compagna Mimi Baez, il brano compare nell’album “Memories” del 1968 pubblicato dopo la morte dello stesso autore in un incidente, subito ripreso dai Fairport Convention (in Liege and Lief -1969)

La poesia richiama una mitica terra dalla natura incontaminata contrapposta alla terra deturpata dalla mano dell’uomo ispirata dalla magica frase “For love is lord of all“.

ASCOLTA Mimi e Richard Fariña

ASCOLTA con la voce magica di Sandy Danny e un violino da brivido

TESTO DI RICHARD FARIÑA
I
Where gentle tides go rolling by
Along the salt-sea strand
The colours blend and roll as one
Together in the sand
And often do the winds entwine
To send their distant call
The quiet joys of brotherhood
When love is lord of all
II
Where oat and wheat together rise
Along the common ground
The mare and stallion light and dark
Have thunder in their sound
The rainbow sign, the blended flood
Still have my heart enthralled
The quiet joys of brotherhood
When love is lord of all
III
But men have come to plow the tides
The oat lies on the ground
I hear their fires in the field
They drive the stallion down
The roses bleed, both light and dark
The winds do seldom call
The running sands (1) recall the time
When love was lord of all
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Dove vanno e vengono liete le maree
lungo la battigia della spiaggia
i colori mescolati e confusi in uno, insieme alla sabbia
e spesso i venti si avvinghiano
per inviare il loro richiamo lontano:
la gioia e la pace della fratellanza
quando Amore è padrone di ogni cosa
II
Dove avena e grano crescono insieme,
nella stessa terra
la giumenta e lo stallone, bianco e nero,
hanno il tuono nei loro nitriti,
l’arcobaleno, il flusso delle acque, hanno sempre incantato il mio cuore.
La gioia e la pace della fratellanza
quando l’amore è padrone di ogni cosa
III
Ma uomini vennero a devastare le maree, l’avena è stesa a terra e
ho sentito i loro spari nel campo,
hanno domato lo stallone
la rose sanguinano giorno e notte,
i venti soffiano di rado
la sabbia scorre, ricorda il tempo
quando Amore era padrone di ogni cosa.

NOTE
1) la sabbia nella clessidra

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5808 http://mainlynorfolk.info/sandy.denny/songs/quietjoysofbrotherhood.html

SIR PATRICK SPENS

the-shipwreckChild ballad #58
Sir Patrick Spens

Una ballata tradizionale dalle antiche origini storicamente riguardante una spedizione navale per ordine del re di Scozia, è la cronaca di uno sventurato viaggio in mare che si conclude con un naufragio. Gli studiosi non sono concordi nell’individuare con precisione i personaggi coinvolti nella vicenda, alcuni ipotizzano si trattasse della missione diplomatica incaricata al trasporto di Margherita figlia di Alessandro III di Scozia data in sposa ad Erik II re di Norvegia; era l’agosto del 1281 e sulla via del ritorno, probabilmente ad autunno inoltrato, la nave affondò al largo delle Isole Ebridi. Altri invece  che la vicenda si riferisca all’altra Margherita, nota come la “Vergine della Norvegia” figlia dei due, che morì in mare nei pressi delle isole Orcadi nel settembre del 1290 all’età di 7 anni.
Per altri invece il re è Giacomo VI, che nell’agosto del 1589 inviò i suoi emissari al “matrimonio per procura” con Anna di Danimarca. La spedizione che doveva portare la sposa in Scozia fu dispersa in mare a causa di una tempesta e la nave di Anna riuscì a sbarcare sulle coste della Norvegia. A ottobre il re partì personalmente per cercare la moglie e la raggiunse a Oslo il 19 novembre.
Sull’isola Papa Stronsay (Isole Orcadi) a Knowle Earl c’è una tomba che viene ricordata dagli abitanti del luogo come la tomba di Sir Patrick Spens.

La ballata ha numerose varianti e melodie abbinate: quella interpretata da Ewan MacColl  nella versione imparata dal padre è quella più epica!

ASCOLTA Un’altra versione collezionate dalla tradizione orale scozzese negli archivi Tobar an Dualchais

Due sono però le melodie riprese a partire dal folk revival americano degli anni 70: quella dei Fairport Convention e quella di Nic Jones.

PRIMA VERSIONE: FAIRPORT CONVENTION

La prima release  ufficiale del brano è in Full House   1970 con Dave Swarbrick come voce solista, seguita da una bonus track in Liege & Lief 2002 con la voce di  Sandy Danny.
La melodia è la stessa della ballata Hughie Graeme   (versione di Ewan MacColl)
Il testo riprende i tratti più salienti della  ballata: il perentorio ordine del re nel mandare un comandante esperto del  mare in un pericoloso viaggio (o per una missione particolarmente delicata e  della massima importanza); il tentativo di Spens di declinare l'”invito” adducendo il pretesto di non essere l’uomo più adatto per l’impresa; il presagio nefasto della mezza luna e l’avvistamento della sirena; l’ultimo pensiero alla moglie che attenderà invano il suo ritorno
ASCOLTA Fairport Convention in Liege & Lief 2002

I
The King sits in Dunfirmline town, drinking of a blood Red wine
“Where can I get a steely skipper
to sail this might boat of mine?”
II
Then up there spoke a bonny boy,
sitting at the King’s right knee/”Sir Patrick Spens is the very best seaman/that ever sailed upon the sea”
III
The King has written a broad letter
and sealed it up with his own right hand
Sending word unto Sir Patrick
to come to him at his command
IV
“An enemy then this must be
who told the lie concerning me
For I was never a very good seaman,/nor ever do intend to be”
V
“Last night I saw the new moon clear/with the old moon in her hair/And that is a sign since we were born/that means there’ll be a deadly storm”
VI
They had not sailed upon the deep a day,/a day but barely free/When loud and boisterous blew the winds/and loud and noisy blew the sea
VII
Then up there came a mermaiden,
a comb and glass all in her hand
“Here’s to you my merry young men
for you’ll not see dry land again”
VIII
“Long may my lady stand
with a lantern in her hand
Before she sees my bonny ship come/sailing homeward to dry land”
IX
Forty miles off Aberdeen,
the waters fifty fathoms deep
There lies good Sir Patrick Spens
with the Scots lords at his feet

Traduzione di Cattia Salto *
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un capitano d’acciaio
per far salpare questa mia nave?”
II
S’alza a parlare un bel fanciullo
che stava al fianco destro del Re:
“Tra i marinai che conoscano il mare
Sir Patrick Spens è di certo il migliore.”
III
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
firmandolo di sua propria mano
e l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
perchè si rimettesse al suo comando.
IV
“Un nemico di certo deve essere,
che ha mentito su di me perchè io non sono un buon marinaio,
e mai ho preteso di esserlo”
V
“La luna nuova, l’ho vista bene iersera con quella vecchia tra i capelli (1); e questo è da sempre un segno per indicare che ci sarà un’orrenda tempesta”
VI
Non avevano navigato che un giorno quando soffiò forte un vento di tempesta e il mare si sollevò alto e impetuoso.
VII
Allora venne una sirena con il pettine e lo specchio tra le mani;
“Ecco per voi, cari giovanotti
non vedrete più la terraferma”.
VIII
“A lungo, la mia sposa attenderà
con la lanterna in mano
prima di vedere la mia bella nave
veleggiare verso la terraferma”.
IX
Quaranta miglia al largo di Aberdeen l’acqua è profonda cinquanta metri; là giace il bravo Sir Patrick Spens, ed i signori scozzesi ai suoi piedi.

NOTE
*dalla traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (qui)
1) è opinione dei marinai scozzesi che vedere la sagoma scura della luna nuova con una piccola porzione di falce della luna vecchia sia segno di tempesta.

SECONDA VERSIONE: NIC JONES

La versione testuale è più articolata della precedente, la missione resta sempre segreta ed è conservata nel testo della lettera recapitata a Sir Patrick mentre si trova sulla spiaggia; nel leggere le prime righe egli si mettere a ridere pensando ad uno scherzo, ma arrivato alla fine della lunga lettera piange per la crudeltà della sorte: il re gli ha  impartito l’ordine di comandare una piccola flotta di 7 navi in una stagione inadatta ai viaggi per mare: nella ballata resterà sempre vago il ruolo diplomatico di Spens che più probabilmente è un semplice comandante di vascello e buon marinaio ma non un nobile essendo l’appellativo di Sir un aggiunta gratuita o più tarda (riferita alla nobiltà d’animo e alla sua condotta valorosa).

Pur nella drammaticità della cronaca non mancano ironiche pennellate ai danni della nobiltà scozzese, la prima nella VII strofa, una sorta di “visione” da parte di Spens in cui immagina i Lord preoccupati di bagnarsi le scarpe mentre stanno per annegare, e i loro cappelli piumati galleggiare sull’acqua dopo che la nave è affondata; e nell’ultima strofa in cui l’abisso accoglie i corpi dei nobili.. ai piedi di Spens, in una sorta di giustizia divina.

Magistrale e “cinematografica” come nota Roberto Venturi, la scena delle donne in attesa, che non sanno ancora ciò che è accaduto ai loro sposi: un dolore solo annunciato con la forza evocativa dell’immagine. Concludo citando le parole di Riccardo Venturi:
“Sir Patrick Spens è da molti anche vista come il contrasto tra il Potere e la Ragione, con il Re che, bevendo il suo prezioso vino, ordina all’esperto marinaio una cosa assurda e pericolosa senza neanche chiedere il suo parere; con i nobili che, in una situazione tanto tragica, altro non pensano che ai loro bei vestiti ed alle scarpe; con i poveri marinai che periscono tragicamente per assolvere al loro dovere. Ma tutto sfuma con un tono dolente, di rassegnazione: così è stato, e così doveva essere.”

MU6
James Archer: The Legend of Sir Patrick Spens, 1870

ASCOLTA Nic Jones in Ballad and Song 1970

La melodia è quella contenuta nei due volumi “Traditional Ballad Airs” pubblicati alla fine del XIX secolo da Dean William Christie, Vol I pag 6 (per scaricare i volumi vedi)

I
The King he sits in Dunfermline town,/A-drinking the blood-red wine;/”O where will I get a fine mariner/To sail seven ships of mine?”
II
And then up spoke a fine young man,/Sat at the King’s right knee: “Sir Patrick Spens is the best mariner/has ever sailed the seas.”
III
So the King has a-written a broad letter,/And signed it with his own hand, And he’s sent it off to Sir Patrick Spens,/a-walking all on the strand.
IV
And the very first line that Patrick he read/ a little laugh then gave he,/
And the very last line that Patrick read/The salt tears filled his eyes.
V
‘Oh who is he that’s done this deed
And told the King of me?
For never was I a good mariner
and never do intend to be’
VI
“Late yestreen I saw the new moon,
With the old moon in her arms,
And I fear, I fear, a deadly storm
our ship’n she will come to harm.”
VII
O our Scots nobles were licht laith
To weet their cork-heil’d schoone;
Bot lang owre a’ the play wer playd
Their hats they swam aboone.
VIII
“But rise up, rise up my merry men all./Our little ship she sails in the morn/Whether it’s a-windy, or whether it’s a-wet
or whether there’s a deadly storm”
IX
And they hadn’t been a-sailing a league or more,/ A league but barely nine./’Til the wind and wet and sleet and snow
coming a-blowing up behind.
X
“O where can I get a little cabin boy
to take the helm in hand?
While I go up to the topmast high
and see if I can ‘t spy land”
XI
“Come down, come down Sir Patrick Spens
We fear that we all must die
For in and out of the good ship’s hull/The wind and the ocean fly”
XII
And the very first step that Patrick he took
The water it came to his knees
And the very last step that Patrick he took
They drowned they were in the seas
XIII
And many was the fine feathered bed/That floated on the foam
And many was the little Lord’s son
That never never more came home
XIV
And long long may their Ladies sit
With their fans all in their hands
Before they see Sir Patrick Spens
Come a-sailing along the strand
XV
For it’s fifty miles to Aberdeen shore
It’s fifty fathoms deep
And there does lie Sir Patrick Spens
With the little Lords at his feet

Tradotto da Cattia Salto*
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un buon marinaio
per far salpare sette delle mie navi?”
II
S’alza a parlare un bel giovanotto
che stava al fianco destro del Re:
“Sir Patrick Spens è il miglior marinaio che abbia mai solcato i mari ”
III
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
firmandolo di sua propria mano
e l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
che camminava sulla spiaggia.
IV
La prima riga che Sir Patrick lesse
scoppiò a ridere proprio di gusto;
ma la seconda riga che lesse,
gli occhi gli si empiron di pianto.
V
“Oh chi è stato a farmi questo,
e ha parlato di me al Re? Perchè io non sono un buon marinaio, e mai ho preteso di esserlo”
VI
“La luna nuova, l’ho vista bene iersera con quella vecchia tra le braccia (1); e io temo un’orrenda tempesta a danno delle nostre navi.”
VII
Eran restii, quei nobili scozzesi
a bagnarsi i loro tacchi di sughero;
ma prima che tutto fosse finito i loro cappelli galleggiavan sull’acqua.
VIII
“Ma alzatevi, alzatevi miei valenti compagni la nostra cara nave salperà al mattino
che ci sia vento o pioggia
o anche un’orrenda tempesta!”
IX
E non avevano percorso che una lega o poco più di nove
quando il vento e la pioggia,
il nevischio e la neve vennero a rincorrerli
X
“Dove posso trovare un mozzo
che prenda il timone in mano?
Mentre vado sulla coffa
e cercare di avvistare una terra”
XI
“Scendi, scendi Sir Patrick Spens
temiamo tutti di morire
perchè dentro e fuori allo scafo della nave vento e oceano si riversano”
XII
E al primo passo che Sir Patrick Spens fece,
l’acqua gli arrivò alle   ginocchia
e l’ultimo passo che Sir Patrick Spens fece,
erano annegati nell’oceano
XIII
E molti furono i bei letti di piume
che galleggiarono sulle onde
e molti furono i figli di Lord
che mai, mai più ritornarono a casa
XIV
A lungo, a lungo le loro spose
staranno con il ventaglio in mano in attesa di vedere Sir Patrick Spens veleggiare verso terra.
XV
Cinquanta miglia al largo di Aberdeen
l’acqua è profonda cinquanta metri;
là giace Sir Patrick Spens,
con i nobili ai suoi piedi.

NOTE
*dalla traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (qui)
1) Il verso è citato anche da Samuel Taylor Coleridge in “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”

TERZA VERSIONE: SIR WALTER SCOTT

Aggiungo all’ascolto ancora due interpretazioni, anche per le varianti testuali contenute: fu Sir Walter Scott nel suo Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border – Volume 1 a ricamare sul riscontro storico della cronaca e ad aggiungere i riferimenti alla Norvegia 

 Jim Malcolm in Home (2002) Melodia di Jim Malcom.


I
The king sits in Dunfermline town
Drinking the blude-red wine;
“Whare will I find a skeely skipper
To sail this new ship o mine?”
And up and spak the eldest knicht
From where he sat by the king’s richt knee;/”Sir Patrick Spens is the best sailor/That ever sail’d the sea.”
II
The king has written a braid letter
And seal’d it with his hand
And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens
Who was walking on the strand.
The first word that Sir Patrick read
So loud, loud laugh did he;
The neist word that Sir Patrick read
The tears blinded his e’e.
Chorus (repeat):
“To Noroway, to Noroway
To Noroway o’er the faem
The king’s daughter o Noroway
it’s you must bring her hame.”
III
“O wha is this has done this deed
And tauld the king o me
To send us out, this time of year
To sail upon the sea?”
“Be it wind, weet, hail, or sleet
Our ship must sail the faem;
The king¹s daughter o Noroway
‘Tis we must bring her hame.”
IV
“Mak ready all my merry men
our gude ship sails the morn.”
“Alas alack, my master dear,
for I fear a deadly storm.
I saw the new moon late yestreen
Wi’ the auld moon in her arm;
And if we gang to sea the morn
I fear we’ll come to harm.”
V
They hadna sail’d a league, a league
A league but barely three
The darkness grew the wind blew loud
And gurly grew the sea.
The ankers brak, the topmast lap
And it was sic a deadly storm:
The waves cam owre the broken ship
Till a’ her sides were sorely torn.
VI
O laith o laith, were our Scots lords
To wet their cork-heel’d shoon;
But lang afore the play was play’d
They wat their hats aboon.
And mony was the feather bed
That flatter’d on the faem;
And mony was the gude lord’s son
That never mair cam hame.
VII
O lang, lang may the ladies sit
Wi’ their fans into their hand
Before they see Sir Patrick Spens
Come sailing to the strand.
Half-owre, to Aberdour
Tis fifty fathoms deep;
And there lies Sir Patrick Spens
Wi’ the Scots lords at his feet.
Tradotto da Riccardo Venturi*
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
Bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un buon marinaio
Per far salpare questa mia nuova nave?” S’alza a parlare un anziano cavaliere (1) Che stava al fianco destro del Re: “Tra i marinai che conoscano il mare Sir Patrick Spens è di certo il migliore.”
II
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
Firmandolo di sua propria mano
E l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
Lui camminava sulla spiaggia.
La prima riga che Sir Patrick lesse
Scoppiò a ridere proprio di gusto;
Ma la seconda riga che lesse,
Gli occhi gli si empiron di pianto.
CORO
“Per la Norvegia, la Norvegia
per la Norvegia sulle onde del mare
la figlia del re di Norvegia (2)
devi riportare a casa”
III
“Chi è stato a farmi questo,
e ha parlato di me al Re?
Mandarci fuori in questa stagione (3),
a solcare il mare?
Che ci sia vento o pioggia o grandine e nevischio, la nostra nave deve navigare sulle onde; 
la figlia  del re della Norvegia dobbiamo riportare a casa”
IV
“Presto, presto, miei valenti compagni,
Dobbiam salpare domattina;”
“Che cosa dici, mio comandante?
Io temo un’orrenda tempesta.
“La luna nuova, l’ho vista iersera
Con quella vecchia tra le braccia;
Ed ho paura, mio comandante
Che passeremo una grande sciagura.”
V
E non avevano percorso una lega o poco più di tre
che l’oscurità crebbe, il vento soffiò forte e la tempesta gonfiò il mare
L’ancora si spezzò, l’albero maestro s’inclinò ed era proprio un’orrenda tempesta: le onde soverchiarono la nave danneggiata, finchè i suoi fianchi si rovesciarono
VI
Eran restii, quei nobili scozzesi
A bagnarsi i loro tacchi di sughero;
Ma prima che tutto fosse finito
I loro cappelli galleggiavan sull’acqua.
E molti furono i bei letti di piume
che galleggiarono sulle onde
e molti furono i figli di Lord
che mai più ritornarono a casa
VII
A lungo, a lungo le loro spose
staranno con il ventaglio in mano in attesa di vedere Sir Patrick Spens veleggiare verso terra.
Laggiù, laggiù, vicino a Aberdour
L’acqua è profonda cinquanta metri;
Là giace il bravo Sir Patrick Spens,
Ed i signori scozzesi ai suoi piedi.

NOTE
* integrazione di Cattia Salto
1) quella del vecchio cavaliere è un topico per indicare un consigliere del Re di provata esperienza
2) Sir Scott propende per il viaggio di ritorno in Scozia di Margherita “Vergine della Norvegia” in qualità di nuova regina dopo la morte senza eredi del nonno Alessandro III.
3) in questo verso si fa riferimento alla consuetudine, diventata anche legge, di non andare per i mari del Nord da ottobre a febbraio, i mesi più pericolosi per le frequenti tempeste

ASCOLTA Anaïs Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer in Child Ballads 2013


I
The king sits in Dumfermline town
Drinking the blood red wine
Where can I get a good captain
To sail this ship of mine?
Then up and spoke a sailor boy
Sitting at the king’s right knee
“Sir Patrick Spens is the best captain
That ever sailed to sea”
II
The king he wrote a broad letter
And he sealed it with his hand
And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens
Walking out on the strand
“To Norroway, to Norroway
To Norway o’er the foam
With all my lords in finery
To bring my new bride home”
III
The first line that Sir Patrick read
He gave a weary sigh
The next line that Sir Patrick read
The salt tear blinds his eye
“Oh, who was it? Oh, who was it?
Who told the king of me
To set us out this time of year
To sail across the sea”
IV
“But rest you well, my good men all
Our ship must sail the morn
With four and twenty noble lords
Dressed up in silk so fine”
“And four and twenty feather beds
To lay their heads upon
Away, away, we’ll all away
To bring the king’s bride home”
V
“I fear, I fear, my captain dear
I fear we’ll come to harm
Last night I saw the new moon clear
The old moon in her arm”
“Oh be it fair or be it foul
Or be it deadly storm
Or blow the wind where e’er it will
Our ship must sail the morn”
VI
They hadn’t sailed a day, a day
A day but only one
When loud and boisterous blew the wind
And made the good ship moan
They hadn’t sailed a day, a day
A day but only three
When oh, the waves came o’er the sides
And rolled around their knees
VII
They hadn’t sailed a league, a league
A league but only five
When the anchor broke and the sails were torn
And the ship began to rive
They hadn’t sailed a league, a league
A league but only nine
When oh, the waves came o’er the sides
Driving to their chins
VIII
“Who will climb the topmast high
While I take helm in hand?
Who will climb the topmast high
To see if there be dry land?”
“No shore, no shore, my captain dear
I haven’t seen dry land
But I have seen a lady fair
With a comb and a glass in her hand”
IX
“Come down, come down, you sailor boy/I think you tarry long
The salt sea’s in at my coat neck
And out at my left arm”
“Come down, come down, you sailor boy/It’s here that we must die
The ship is torn at every side
And now the sea comes in”
X
Loathe, loathe were those noble lords
To wet their high heeled shoes
But long before the day was o’er
Their hats they swam above
And many were the feather beds
That fluttered on the foam
And many were those noble lords
That never did come home
XI
It’s fifty miles from shore to shore
And fifty fathoms deep
And there lies good Sir Patrick Spens
The lords all at his feet
Long, long may his lady look
With a lantern in her hand
Before she sees her Patrick Spens
Come sailing home again
Tradotto da Riccardo Venturi*
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
Bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un buon marinaio
Per far salpare questa mia nave?”
S’alza a parlare un marinaio
Che stava al fianco destro del Re:
“Tra i marinai che conoscano il mare
Sir Patrick Spens è di certo il migliore.”
II
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
Firmandolo di sua propria mano
E l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
Lui camminava sulla spiaggia.
“Per la Norvegia, la Norvegia
per la Norvegia sulle onde del mare
con tutti i nobili in pompa magna
a portare a casa la mia nuova moglie”
III
La prima riga che Sir Patrick lesse
Scoppiò a ridere proprio di gusto;
Ma la seconda riga che lesse,
Gli occhi gli si empiron di pianto.
“Chi è stato a farmi questo,
e ha parlato di me al Re?
Mandarci fuori in questa stagione,
e mettersi in mare?”
IV
“Ma riposate bene miei compagni, la nostra nave deve salpare al mattino; con ventiquattro nobili signori vestiti di bella seta.

E ventiquattro letti di piume su cui appoggiare le loro teste, via via a portare a casa la nuova moglie del Re”
V
“Temo mio caro capitano
temo che avremo di che pentirci
vidi iersera la luna nuova
Con quella vecchia tra le braccia”
“Faccia bello o faccia brutto
o faccia un’orrenda tempesta e il vento soffi a volontà, la nostra nave deve partire al mattino”
V
Non era trascorso che un giorno di navigazione, solo un giorno
quando il vento soffiò forte e tempestoso, e fece gemere la nave.
Non era trascorso che un giorno di navigazione, o forse tre
quando le onde si riversarono dalle fiancate
e salirono fino alle ginocchia
VII
E non avevano percorso una lega o poco più di tre
che l’ancora si spezzò, e le vele si strapparono
e la nave si sfasciò.
E non avevano percorso una lega o poco più di nove
quando le onde si riversarono dalle fiancate
e salirono fino al mento
VIII
“Chi sale sulla coffa
mentre tengo il timone?
Chi sale sulla coffa
a vedere se c’è della terra ferma?”
“Nessuna spiaggia, nessuna spiaggia mio caro capitano, non ho visto terra ferma, ma ho visto una bella dama con un pettine e uno specchio in mano”
IX
“Scendi, scendi mozzo,
credo che sei rimasto abbastanza
il mare è arrivato al collo
e ho solo fuori il mio braccio sinistro”
“Scendi, scendi mozzo,
è qui che dobbiamo morire
la nave è squassata da ogni parte
e il mare è entrato”
X
Eran restii, quei nobili scozzesi
A bagnarsi i loro tacchi di sughero;
Ma prima che tutto fosse finito
I loro cappelli galleggiavan sull’acqua.
E molti furono i bei letti di piume
che galleggiarono sulle onde
e molti furono i figli di Lord
che mai più ritornarono a casa
XI
A cinquanta miglia dalla costa
e a cinquanta metri di profondità;
Là giace il bravo Sir Patrick Spens,
Ed i signori ai suoi piedi.
A lungo, a lungo la sua sposa
starà con una lanterna in mano
in attesa di vedere Sir Patrick Spens
Veleggiare verso terra.

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch058.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/sandy.denny/songs/sirpatrickspens.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=24503&lang=en
http://sites.williams.edu/sirpatrickspens/the-library/
http://sairam-english-literature.blogspot.it/2009/06/ballad-sir-patrick-spens-poem-summary.html
http://rmangum2001.wordpress.com/2010/05/16/sir-patrick-spens/
http://sites.williams.edu/sirpatrickspens/origins/
http://www.papastronsay.com/island/
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_58
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8429
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63902

She moved through the fair

Read the post in English

Il testo originale di “She Moved trough the Fair” risale ad una antica ballata irlandese del Donegal, mentre la melodia potrebbe essere di epoca medievale (per la scala musicale utilizzata che richiama quella araba). La versione standard viene dalla penna di Padraic Colum (1881-1972) che la riscrisse nel 1909. Del testo esistono molte versioni (strofe aggiuntive, riscrittura dei versi), anche in gaelico, a testimonianza della grande popolarità del brano, la canzone è stata pubblicata nella raccolta di Herbert Hughes “Irish Country Songs” (1909), e nella raccolta di Sam Henry “Songs of the People” (1979).
Nella sua essenza la storia narra di una fanciulla promessa in sposa che appare in sogno al suo innamorato. Ma i versi sono criptici, forse  perchè mancano quelli che ne avrebbero chiarito il significato; è quello che succede alla tradizione orale (chi canta non ricorda i versi o li cambia a suo piacimento) e la ballata si presta ad almeno due possibili interpretazioni.

LA MORTE

Nelle prime strofe la donna, speranzosa, rassicura l’innamorato che la sua famiglia, nonostante lui non sia ricco, ne approverà la proposta di matrimonio, e loro presto si sposeranno; i due si sono incontrati nel giorno di mercato, e lui la guarda mentre si allontana e, in un’immagine crepuscolare, la paragona ad un cigno che si muove sulle placide acque.

cigno in volo

La terza strofa è spesso omessa, ed è a prima lettura di non facile interpretazione: “La gente diceva / “Non si sposeranno mai” / ma uno era il dolore / che non fu mai detto”; il dolore inespresso potrebbe essere la malattia della ragazza (che ne causerà la morte) -data l’epoca probabilmente la tisi, ossia la morte per consunzione– per questo la gente era convinta che il matrimonio non si sarebbe celebrato.
E arriviamo all’ultima strofa, quella rarefatta e sognante in cui il fantasma di lei appare di notte (immagine rafforzata dalla aggiunta della parola dead accanto ad amore) : una figura evanescente che si muove piano senza alcun rumore e che lo chiama presto alla morte.

L’ABBANDONO

L’altra interpretazione del testo (condivisa dai più) vede l’uomo abbandonato dalla donna, perchè fuggita con un altro (o più probabilmente la sua famiglia le ha combinato un matrimonio più vantaggioso, non essendo il pretendente amato da lei abbastanza ricco). Ma l’amore che prova per lei è così grande e anche se proseguirà la sua vita sposandosi con un’altra, continuerà a sentirne la mancanza.
I versi relativi al dolore inespresso vengono quindi interpretati come la mancata confidenza alla nuova moglie di essere ancora, e per sempre, innamorato della sua prima fidanzata.
La strofa finale diventa l’epilogo della sua vita, quando vecchio e in punto di morte, vede il suo primo amore apparirgli accanto per consolarlo.

Come si vede entrambi le ricostruzioni sono adattabili ai versi, ammirevoli e affascinanti del canto, proprio per la loro scarna essenzialità (un ermetismo ante litteram?): nessuna autocommiserazione, nessun dolore sbandierato, ma la semplicità di un amore così grande, che pochi ricordi passati insieme possono bastare per riempire una vita.

Un’unica, forte, immagine elegiaca, di lei candido cigno che incede nel crepuscolo, anticipazione del suo passaggio fugace sulla terra. Il brano è un lament dalla tristezza infinita e sono moltissimi i musicisti che lo hanno interpretato, ricreando quell’atmosfera rarefatta delle parole, spesso con il delicato suono dell’arpa.

Moltissimi gli interpreti che propongono versioni diverse del testo, banco di prova per le voci femminili sebbene a cantare sia l’uomo

Loreena McKennitt  in Elemental (strofe  I, II, III, IV)

Nights from the Alhambra 2007

Moya Brennan (ossia Máire che si è decisa a inglesizzare il suo nome, visto che tutti lo pronunciavano non tenendo conto dell’accentazione gaelica) con Cormac De Barra all’arpa in Against the wind

Cara Dillon in Hills of Thieves, 2009 (nel video live con Solas)

Una giovane Sinead O’Connor  (che cambia il soggetto in chiave femminile) ha così intensamente espresso la strofa finale, quasi sussurrata
Sinead ha registrato molte versione della canzone che spesso canta anche dal vivo


I
My (young) love said to me,
“My mother(1) won’t mind
And my father won’t slight you
for your lack of kind(2)”
she stepped away from me (3)
and this she did say:
“It will not be long, love,
till our wedding day”
II
She stepped away from me (4)
and she moved through the fair (5)
And fondly I watched her
move here and move there
And then she turned homeward (6)
with one star awake(7)
like the swan (8) in the evening(9)
moves over the lake
III
The people were saying
“No two e’er were wed”
for one has the sorrow
that never was said(10)
And she smiled as she passed me
with her goods and her gear
And that was the last
that I saw of my dear.
IV (11)
Last night she came to me,
my dead(12) love came
so softly she came
that her feet made no din
and she laid her hand on me (13)
and this she did say
“It will not be long, love,
‘til our wedding day”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
La mia giovane innamorata mi disse:
“A mia madre non importerà,
e mio padre non ti disprezzerà
per la tua mancanza di proprietà”,
e si allontanò da me
ed ecco cosa mi disse,
“Non manca molto, amore
al nostro matrimonio”.
II
Si allontanò da me,
attraversando la Fiera
e con occhi amorevoli la seguii
mentre si spostava in qua e là.
Poi si diresse verso casa,
c’era una sola stella nel cielo della sera
e lei mi parve incedere come un cigno,
sulle acque del lago.
III
La gente diceva
“Non si sposeranno mai”
ma uno era il dolore
che non fu mai detto,
e lei mi sorrise mentre passava
andando con la spesa,
e fu l’ultima immagine
del mio amore che vidi
IV
L’altra notte venne da me,
il mio amore defunto,
venne da me così piano
che i suoi piedi non fecero alcun rumore,  e pose la mano su di me
ed ecco cosa mi disse,
“Non manca molto, amore
al giorno del nostro matrimonio”.

NOTE
* ho provato a rendere un po’ più fluida la precedente traduzione
1) nella poesia di Padraic Colum dice “My brothers won’t mind,
And my parents.. ”  ci sono i fratelli al posto della madre e i genitori al posto del padre
2) kind – kine: termine di difficile definizione, si può intendere come “ricchezza” o “proprietà” nel senso di beni in natura, per il tempo in questione poteva trattarsi di bestiame (kine che si scrive in modo simile) perciò the lack of kind potrebbe essere un termine colloquiale nel linguaggio anglo-irlandese per indicare “la mancanza di sostanza”. Altri interpretano la parola come “parenti” ovvero il protagonista è orfano o dalle origini oscure
3) in altre versioni she laid a hand on me (che è un gesto più intimo e diretto per salutare con un ultimo contatto)
4) oppure She went away from me
5) i giorni di fiera erano il tempo dell’amore quando i giovani avevano occasione di incontrarsi con le fanciulle in età da marito
6) Loreena McKennitt dice “And she went her way homeward
7) la stella della sera che compare prima di tutte le altre è il pianeta Venere
8) Il cigno è uno degli animali maggiormente rappresentati nella cultura celtica, effigiato su diversi oggetti e protagonista di numerosi racconti mitologici. continua
9) in the evening è riferito al momento in cui i due si separano
10) the sorrow that never was said: la donna era malata o è una mancata confidenza? Questa strofa viene oggi per lo più omessa in quanto il significato non è ben comprensibile nell’immediatezza dell’ascolto.
11) la versione di Loreena McKennitt è leggermente diversa dice:
I dreamed it last night
That my true love came in
So softly she entered
Her feet made no din
She came close beside me
(Sognai l’altra notte,  che il mio vero amore venne entrando così piano che i suoi piedi non fecero rumore. Lei mi venne accanto)
12) alcuni interpreti omettono la parola “morte” propendendo per la versione del sogno, oppure dicono “my dear love” o “my own love” o anche “my young love
13) oppure “She put her arms round me

Con un brano così popolare tra i musicisti irlandesi sono inevitabili le esclusioni però non posso tacere sulla versione dei Chieftains&Van Morrison

e ancora dei Chieftains&Sinead O’Connor
dei Fairport Convention nel lontano 1969

e del bretone Alan Stivell da “Chemíns De Terre” 1973
dopo la versione di Stivell quella che amo tra le voci maschili è quella del controtenore tedesco Andreas Scholl

E’ stata tramandata anche una versione intitolata “The Wedding Song” che sviluppa il tema dell’abbandono, e che è da ritenersi una variante seppure con diverso titolo continua nella seconda parte

FONTI
http://thesession.org/tunes/4735
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-meaning-and-interpretation-part-1/
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-modern-lyrics-and-variations/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/anne.briggs/songs/shemovesthroughthefair.html