Archivi tag: Jacobite Rising

E la barca va: The Prince & the Ballerina

Leggi in italiano

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met Charles Stuart. After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) the then twenty-six-year-old Bonnie Prince managed to escape and remain hidden for several months, protected by his loyalists, despite the British patrols and the price on his head!
Charles found many hiding places and support in the Hebrides but it was a dangerous game of hide-and-seek.

THE PRINCE & THE BALLERINA

The prince had managed to get to the Island of Banbecula of the Outer Hebrides, but the surveillance was very tight and had no way to escape. And here comes the girl, Flora MacDonald.
The MacDonalds as loyal to the king and Presbyterian confession, but they were sympathizers of the Jacobite cause and so Flora who lived in Milton (South Uist island) went on visiting her friend, wife of the clan’s Lady Margareth of Clanranald , and she was presented to Charles Stuart.

In another version of the story the prince was hiding at the Loch Boisdale on the Isle of South Uist, hoping to meet Alexander MacDonald, who had recently been arrested. Warned that a patrol would inspect the area, Charles fled with two jacobites to hide in a small farm near Ormaclette where the meeting with Flora MacDonald had been arranged. The moment was immortalized in many paintings like this by Alexander Johnston.

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

In the anecdotal version of the story, Flora devised a trick to take away Charlie from the island : on the pretext of visiting her mother (who lived in Armadale after remarried), she obtained the safe-conduct for herself and her two servants; under the name and clothes of the Irish maid Betty Burke, however, there was the Bonny Prince! (see more)

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e floraThe boat with four (or six) sailors to the oars left Benbecula on 27 June 1746 for the Isle of Skye in the Inner Hebrides. They arrived to Portée and on July 1st they left, the prince gave Flora a medallion with his portrait and the promise that they would meet one day

FLORA MACDONALD’S FANCY

Among the Scottish dances is still commemorated the dance with which Flora performed in front of the Prince. It ‘a very graceful dance, inevitable in the program of Highland dance competitions: it is a courtship dance, in which girl shows all her skills while maintaining a proud attitude and composure.
It is performed with the Aboyne dress, dress prescribed for the dancers in the national Scottish dances, as disciplined by the dance commission in the Aboyne Highland Gathering of 1970 (with pleated skirt doll effect, in tartan or the much more vaporous white cloth) .
Melody is a strathspey, which is a slower reel, typical of Scotland often associated with commemorations and funerals.

FLORA MACDONALD’S REEL

Many other musical tributes were dedicated to the beautiful Flora. The melody of this reel appears with many titles, the first printed version is found in Robert Bremer “Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances”, 1757 and also in Repository Complete of the Dance Music of Scotland by Niel Gow (Vol I). The reel is in two parts

Tonynara from “Sham Rock” – 1994

The Virginia Company

RUSTY NAIL: CLAN MACKINNON COCKTAIL

Rusty-NailTo repay the help given by Clan MacKinnon during the months when he had to hide from the English, Prince Stuart revealed to John MacKinnon the recipe for his secret elixir, a special drink created by his personal pharmacist. The MacKinnon clan accepted the custody of the recipe, until at the beginning of the ‘900, a descendant of the family decided that it was time to commercially exploit the recipe calling it “Drambuie”

4.5 cl Scotch whisky
2.5 cl Drambuie

Procedure: directly prepare an old fashioned glass with ice. Stir gently and garnish with a twist of lemon.

A double-scottish cocktali: Scotch Whiskey and Drambuie which is a liqueur whose recipe is a mix of whiskey, honey … secrets and legends. Even today the company is managed by the same family and keeps the contents of the recipe secret. (Taken from here)

At this point many will ask “But the Skye boat song, where did it end?” (here  is)

LINK
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755
http://thesession.org

There grows a bonie brier-bush

Leggi in italiano

“There grows a bonie brier-bush” is a traditional Scottish song modified by Robert Burns for editorial purpose and published in 1796 in the “Scots Musical Museum”; the double meaning concerned both the allusion to the relationship between a Jacobite rebel “Highland laddie” and a “Lowland lassie” follower of King George that the erotic context of the relationship (as we find it in the variant”The Cuckoo’s nest“)

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 3 & 4 1996
Junkman’s Choir in The Burns Sessions – Footage of recordings from inside Robert Burns’ Cottage, Alloway, Scotland (January 2018)

I
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush (1) in our kail-yard (2),
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush in our kail-yard;
And below the bonnie brier-bush
there’s a lassie and a lad,
And they’re busy, busy
courting in our kail-yard.
II
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard,
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard;
We’ll awa to Athole’s green (3),
and there we’ll no be seen,
Whare the trees and the branches
will be our safe-guard.
III
‘ Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ (4)?
Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ ?
Where Sandy (5) and Nancy
I’m sure will ding (6) them a’?’
‘ I winna gang to the dance
in Carlyle ha.’
IV
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa?
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa ?
I will awa to Edinburgh,
and win a penny fee (7),
And see an onie bonnie lad
will fancy me.
V
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me,
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me ;
A feather in his bonnet
and a ribbon at his knee (8),
He ‘s a bonnie, bonnie laddie,
and yon be he !

NOTES
Enghish translation *
1) in the ballads the rose is not only “a rose” but it is the symbol of love, symbolizes here the loss of virginity, the thorns are also a memento to the dangers of a sexuality outside of marriage
2) kail-yard is the garden in front of the door of the cottage, it has become synonymous with a group of storytellers of the end of the 19th century who often described Scottish rural life, often using dialectal forms.
3) Athole: Atholl is located in the heart of the Scottish Highlands and derives its name from the Gaelic “ath Fodla” or New Ireland following the invasions in the island of the Irish tribes in the seventh century, Athole is the old name for the area of Perthshire

4) “Carlisle Castle is situated in Carlisle, in the English county of Cumbria, near the ruins of Hadrian’s Wall. Given the proximity of Carlisle to the border between England and Scotland, it has been the centre of many wars and invasions. The most important battles for the city of Carlisle and its castle were during the Jacobite rising of 1745 against George II of Great Britain” (da Wiki)
5) Sandy is short for Alexander
6) to ding= overcome; wear out, weary; to beat, excel, get the better of.
7) panny fee= wages
8) in the eighteenth century there were no stretch fabrics so as to support the socks to the calves of the man (and the thighs of women) were used garters or ribbons turned several times around the leg and knotted (among which we must hide a small dagger) , even those who wore pants (adhering a bit like a tights) used to tie ribbons under the knee

LINK
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/kailyard.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/cuckoosnest.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/533.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=86781
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/90262457
https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14959

There grows a bonie brier-bush

Read the post in English  

“There grows a bonie brier-bush” è una canzone tradizionale scozzese modificata da Robert Burns per esigenze editoriali e pubblicata nel 1796 nello “Scots Musical Museum“; il doppio senso riguardava sia l’allusione alla relazione tra un ribelle giacobita “Highland laddie”  e una “Lowland lassie” seguace di re Giorgio che il contesto erotico della relazione (così come lo ritroviamo nella variante “The Cuckoo’s nest“)

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns, Vol. 3 & 4 1996
Junkman’s Choir in The Burns Sessions – Footage of recordings from inside Robert Burns’ Cottage, Alloway, Scotland (January 2018)


I
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush (1) in our kail-yard (2),
There grows a bonnie
brier-bush in our kail-yard;
And below the bonnie brier-bush
there’s a lassie and a lad,
And they’re busy, busy
courting in our kail-yard.
II
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard,
We’ll court nae mair below
the buss in our kail-yard;
We’ll awa to Athole’s green (3),
and there we’ll no be seen,
Whare the trees and the branches
will be our safe-guard.
III
‘ Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ (4)?
Will ye go to the dancin
in Carlyle’s ha’ ?
Where Sandy (5) and Nancy (6)
I’m sure will ding (7) them a’?’
‘ I winna gang to the dance
in Carlyle ha.’
IV
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa?
What will I do for a lad
when Sandy gangs awa ?
I will awa to Edinburgh,
and win a penny fee (8),
And see an onie bonnie lad
will fancy me.
V
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me,
He’s comin frae the North
that’s to fancy me ;
A feather in his bonnet
and a ribbon at his knee (9),
He ‘s a bonnie, bonnie laddie,
and yon be he !
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Nel nostro orto in cortile
cresce una bella rosa selvatica,
nel nostro orto in cortile
cresce una bella rosa selvatica
e sotto al bel rovo
ci sono una ragazza e un ragazzo
molti affaccendati
ad amoreggiare nel nostro orto
II
Non amoreggeremo più sotto
al cespuglio di rose nel nostro orto
non amoreggeremo più sotto
al cespuglio di rose nel nostro orto
partiremo per le praterie di Atholl,
e là non saremo più spiati
dove gli alberi e i rami
ci faranno da riparo
III
“Andrai al ballo
nel salone di Carlyle?
Andrai al ballo
Nel salone di Carlyle?
Dove Sandro e Agnese
di certo li batteranno tutti”
“Non andrò al ballo
nel salone di Carlyle”
IV
Come troverò un ragazzo
se Sandro se ne andrà?
Come troverò un ragazzo
se Sandro se ne andrà?
Andrò a Edimburgo
a guadagnarmi un salario
e vedere se un bel ragazzo
mi vorrà bene
V
Viene dal Nord
colui che mi sposerà
Viene dal Nord
colui che mi sposerà
Una piuma sul berretto
e un nastro alle ginocchia
E’ un bel, bel ragazzo
e da làggiù lui viene!

NOTE
1) nelle ballate la rosa non è solo “una rosa” ma è il simbolo della passione amorosa, simboleggia qui la perdita della verginità, le spine sono anche un memento ai pericoli di una sessualità fuori dal matrimonio
2) kail-yard è l’orticello davanti alla porta del cottage, è diventato sinonimo di gruppo di narratori di fine ’800 che descrissero, spesso servendosi di forme dialettali, la vita rurale scozzese.
3) Athole: Atholl si trova nel cuore delle Highlands scozzesi e deriva il nome dal gaelico “ath Fodla” ovvero Nuova Irlanda conseguente alle invasioni nell’isola delle tribù irlandesi nel VII sec, Athole è l’antico nome per l’area del Perthshire
4) “Il Castello di Carlisle  è un castello medievale inglese che si trova nella città di Carlisle, in Cumbria. Il castello ha oltre novecento anni ed è stato scenario di molti importanti episodi militari della storia inglese. Data la sua vicinanza ai confini fra Inghilterra e Scozia, fu per tutto il medioevo luogo di scontri e di invasioni. Le più importanti battaglie vissute però dalla città e dal castello di Carlisle furono durante le rivolte giacobite contro Giorgio I e Giorgio II, rispettivamente nel 1715 e nel 1745.” (da Wiki)
5) Sandy diminutivo di Alessandro
6) Nancy nel Settecento veniva usato come diminutivo di Anne ma anche più anticamente era il diminutivo di Annis (la forma medievale di Agnese)
7) to ding è un verbo scossese usato nel senso di eccellere, avere la meglio, superare, nel contesto vuole indicare la bravura della coppia di danzatori al gran ball di Carlisle
8) panny fee= wages
9) nel Settecento non esistevano i tessuti elasticizzati così per reggere le calze ai polpacci dell’uomo ( e alle cosce delle donne) si usavano delle giarrettiere o dei nastri girati più volte intorno alla gamba e annodati (tra cui alla bisogna si nascondeva un piccolo pugnale), anche chi portava i pantaloni (aderenti un po’ come una calzamaglia) usava annodare dei nastri sotto al ginocchio

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/kailyard.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/cuckoosnest.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/533.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=86781
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/90262457
https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14959

Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch

Stemma del clan Cameron di Lochiel, il motto originario era: Mo Righ ‘s Mo Dhuchaich (For King and Country)

Read the post in English

“Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch” (In the Heather’s My Bed) è un canto giacobita risalente al 1747 attribuito ad un guerriero highlander sostenitore della causa giacobita tale Dougal Roy Cameron.
La storia legata alla canzone è oltremodo avvincente: Dougal Roy Cameron (MacGillonie/MacOllonie) (oppure Dughall Ruadh Camaran) era un soldato nel reggimento di Donald Cameron di Lochiel, preso prigioniero nella battaglia di Culloden (o in qualche conflitto appena precedente) e poi liberato il 15 luglio 1747.
Poco prima della cattura aveva appreso della morte del fratello, giustiziato per ordine di uno spietato ufficiale di nome Grant di Knockando, mentre era in procinto di arrendersi insieme ai suoi comagni. Alcuni Cameron, che avevano assistito da vicino all’esecuzione, assicurarono che il capo plotone era un ufficiale che indossava una redingote blu e cavalcava un cavallo bianco. Al suo rilascio Dougal andò alla ricerca di quell’ufficiale per ucciderlo e lo trovò nei pressi del Loch Arkaig, ma ci fu uno scambio di persona  e uccise Munro di Culchairn che indossava la stessa giubba. Ecco perchè il nostro fuorilegge trascorre le notti insonni, nascosto in qualche buio e umido anfratto tra le forre, pentendosi di non essere riuscito nell’intento di vendicare il sangue del fratello .
Alla storia personale del guerriero s’intreccia la delusione per l’amara sconfitta della causa giacobita (attribuita come da copione al volta faccia di alcuni tra i maggiori capi clan) e la speranza di un ritorno trionfale del Bel Carletto.

ASCOLTA The Lochies riassumono il testo in otto strofe, per la versione integrale qui

I
Tha mo leabaidh ‘san fhraoch
Fo shileadh nan craobh,
‘S ged tha mi ‘sa choille
Cha do thoill mi na taoid.
II
Tha mo leab’ air an làr
‘S tha mo bhreacan gun sgàil,
‘S cha d’fhuair mi lochd cadail
O’n a spaid mi Cùl Chàirn.
III
Tha mo dhùil ann an Dia
Ged a dhìobradh Loch Iall,
Fhaicinn fhathast na chòirneal
An Inbhir Lòchaidh seo shìos.
IV
Bha thu dìleas do’n Phrionns’
Is d’a shinnsre o thùs,
‘S ged nach tug thu dha t’fhacal
Bha thu ceart air a chùl.
V
Cha b’ionnan ‘s MacLeòid
A tha ‘n-dràsd’ aig Rìgh Deòrs’,
Na fhògarrach soilleir
Fo choibhreadh ‘n dà chleòc.
VI
Cha b’ionnan ‘s an laoch
O Cheapaich nan craobh
Chaidh e sìos le chuid ghaisgeach,
‘S nach robh tais air an raon.
VII
Ach nuair a thig am Prionns’ òg
Is na Frangaich ‘ga chòir,
Théid sgapadh gun taing
Ann an campa Rìgh Deòrs’.
VIII
‘S ged tha mis’ ann am fròig
Tha am botal ‘nam dhorn,
‘S gun òl mi ‘s chan àicheadh
Deoch-slàint a’ Phrionns’ òg.
Traduzione inglese*
I
In the heather ‘s my bed
‘Neath the dew-laden trees,
And though I’m in the green-wood
I deserved not the ropes.
II
My bed’s on the ground
And uncovered’s my plaid,
Sleep has not come upon me
Since I murdered Culchairn.
III
My hope rests in God,
Though Lochiel has gone,
I’ll yet see him a colonel
In Inverlochy down here.
IV
Thou wast true to the Prince
And his race, from the first,
Though thou hadst never promised
Thou didst give him true aid.
V
Not so did MacLeod,
Who is now for King George,
A manifest outcast
‘Neath the shade of two cloaks.
VI
Not so the warrior brave
From Keppoch of the trees,
Who charged down with his heroes,
Unafraid on the field.
VII
But when comes the young Prince
With the Frenchmen to aid,
Unthanked will be scattered
The camp of King George.
VIII
And though I’m in a den,
There’s a glass in my hand,
And I’ll drink, and refuse not,
A health to Prince Charles.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
L’edera è il mio giaciglio
sotto gli alberi carichi di rugiada
e sono (nascosto) nel folto del bosco
perchè non meritavo l’impiccagione
II
Il mio giaciglio è la terra
e mi corpo con il mantello (1)
ma il sonno non viene
da quando ho ucciso Culchairn (2)
III
La mia speranza affido a Dio
anche se Lochiel (3) è partito
lo vedrò ancora colonnello
laggiù a Fort William (4).
IV
Tu eri un seguace del Principe
e alla sua causa, dal principio
e senza aver prestato giuramento,
gli desti il tuo aiuto sincero
V
Non così fece MacLeod (5),
che ora parteggia per Re Giorgio
un palese reietto
colui che serve due padroni (6)
VI
Non così il guerriero coraggioso
da Keppoch degli alberi (7)
che andò all’assalto con i suoi eroi
senza paura sul campo di battaglia
VII
Ma quando ritornerà il giovane Principe
aiutato dai Francesi (8)
in un amen sarà disperso
l’esercito (9) di Re Giorgio
VII
Anche in questo nascondiglio (10)
alzo il bicchiere
e non mi rifiuterò di bere
alla salute del Principe Carlo

NOTE
* John Lorne Campbell in “Highland Songs of the ’45” (1932)
1) è il pratico kilt del montanaro scozzese: Il vero kilt (in gaelico philabeg) è in effetti una lunga coperta (plaid) cioè un unico, lunghissimo, pezzo di stoffa (il tartan) delle dimensioni di 65-75 cm di altezza per una lunghezza di 5 metri circa, pieghettato e drappeggiato intorno ai fianchi e poi riportato sulle spalle come un mantello (che funzionava bene anche come grande tasca dove infilare gli oggetti da trasportare o le armi).  Era indubbiamente un capo pratico, senza troppe pretese di eleganza che teneva al caldo e al riparo, e perciò prevalentemente un abito “rustico”abbinato per lo più allo stivale ad altezza ginocchio (cuaron) ma più spesso portato a piede nudo (e dovevano avere dei fisici ben temprati questi scozzesi che se ne stavano al vento, pioggia e neve così conciati!) Ai rudi scozzesi di montagna  serviva come coperta per coprirsi durante il giorno e come giaciglio in cui dormire durante le notti passate nella brughiera. (continua)
2) il capitano Murno di Culcairn che aveva preso in prestito il mantello (o la giubba) di Grant
3) Donald Cameron di Lochiel (c.1700 – Ottobre 1748) soprannonimato semplicemente “Gentle Lochiel” per i suoi atti di magnanimità nei confronti  dei prigioneri,  fu tra i più influenti capoclan tradizionalmente fedele alla Casa Stuart. Si unì al Principe Carlo nel 1745 e dopo Culloden fuggì in Francia dove morì in esilio. La sua famiglia fu riabilitata e reintegrata nel titolo con l’amnistia del 1748.
4) Fort William a Inverlochy: uno dei forti che faceva parte della catena di fortificazioni (insieme a Fort Augustus e Fort George) utilizzata per tenere sotto controllo le possibili rivolte giacobite. E’ rimasto come presidio militare fino al 1855. Fort William è il centro più importante della Scozia, snodo ferroviario e stradale (qui si dipartono la West Highland Way e la Great Glen Way).
5) McLeod di McLeod ha promesso il suo sostegno al Principe per rimangiarsi la parola quando l’ha visto arrivare senza soldi e senza uomini. La sua defezione ha pesato pesantemente nel fallimento della rivolta.
6) Nel Medioevo il servizio feudale al proprio sire era tributato simbolicamente mettendosi “sotto al suo mantello”, così anche alla sposa durante la celebrazione del Matrimonio veniva appoggiato il mantello del futuro marito sulle spalle, in segno di sottomissione
7) Alexander McDonald di Keppoch morì alla testa del suo clan a Culloden mentre il resto dei McDonalds ripiegava
8) il Bel Carletto non ritornerà più in Scozia vedi
9) letterlamente l’accampamento
10) dopo Culloden molti guerrieri cercarono rifugio in grotte e anfratti per sfuggire ai rastrellamenti delle truppe inglesi:  nei mesi e anni successivi a Culloden fu caccia all’uomo per coloro che erano riusciti a fuggire dal campo della battaglia e per i loro sostenitori, anche le famiglie e i simpatizzanti vennero incarcerati e coloro che offrivano ospitalità ai fuggiaschi erano espropriati e processati per alto tradimento. Le Highlands furono militarizzate e tenute sotto stretto controllo inglese, senza parlare delle leggi volte a spezzare “l’highlander pride”

continua

APPROFONDIMENTO
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/war-songs-anti-war-songs/you-jacobites-by-name/

https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/

FONTI
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Cameron
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hamoleab.htm

LIMERICK LAMENTATION OR LOCHABER NO MORE?

Un lamento irlandese o scozzese?
La paternità della slow air è contesa tra Irlanda e Scozia,  secondo Bunting (Ancient Music of Ireland, 1840)  fu composta dal bardo irlandese-arpista Myles O’Reilly  (c. 1635) per commemorare la partenza dei giovani irlandesi dopo il trattato di Limerick (1691); secondo O’Neill (Irish Minstrels and Musicians, 1913) il compositore fu Thomas Connellan (c.1640-45 – 1698) Cloonmahon, contea di Sligo che la intitolò “The Breach of Aughrim”.
La melodia è toccante, da far sgorgar le lacrime per la sua mestizia..

MARBHNA (CAOINEADH) LUIMNI

It is sad and lone I am today, far from dear Erin’s shore
I may never, never, never see her again; I may never see her more.
In Irlanda oggi il brano è eseguito in versione strumentale occasionalmente suonato ai funerali o come emigration song.
ASCOLTA The Chieftains in “The Chieftains live” 1977

ASCOLTA Sharon Shannon & Liam O Maoinli

ASCOLTA Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill

ASCOLTA Na Casaidigh

LOCHABER NO MORE

In Scozia già popolare lament per cornamusa, la slow air venne versificata da Allan Ramsay  nel 1723, come il lamento di un highlander in partenza per  combattere tra le fila dei ribelli (la ribellione giacobita del 1715 vedi)

(c) The Fleming Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

ASCOLTA Breabach

ASCOLTA  The Rankin Family


I
Farewell to Lochaber (1), farewell to my Jean,
Where heartsome wi’ her (thee) I ha’e mony day been,
For Lochaber no more, Lochaber no more,
We’ll maybe return to Lochaber no more.
These tears that I shed they are all for my dear,
And no’ for the dangers attending on weir (2);
Tho’ borne on rough seas to a far distant (bloody) shore.
Maybe to return to Lochaber no more.
II
Though hurricanes rise, though rise ev’ry wind,
No tempest can equal the storm in my mind;
Tho loudest of thunders or louder waves roar,
There’s nothing like leavin’ my love on the shore.
To leave thee behind me, my heart is sair pain’d,
But by ease that’s inglorious no fame can be gain’d;
And beauty and love’s the reward of the brave,
And I maun deserve it before I can crave.
III
Then glory, my Jeanie, maun plead my excuse,
Since honour commands me, how can I refuse?
Without it I ne’er can have merrit for thee;
And losing thy favour, I’d better not be.
I go then, my lass, to win honour and fame;
And if I should chance to come gloriously hame,
I’ll bring a heart to thee, with love running o’er,
And then I’ll leave thee an’ Lochaber no more.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Addio Lochaber, e addio
mia Jean
dove ho trascorso con te molti giorni felici
perchè lascio  Lochaber, lascio Lochaber
e forse non ritornerò mai più a Lochaber.
Queste lacrime che verso, sono tutte per la mia cara
e non per i pericoli che mi attendono in guerra
trasportato dal mare ribelle in una spiaggia lontana (di sangue)
forse non ritornerò mai più a Lochaber.
II
Anche se gli uragani si levano, anche se si solleva il vento
nessuna tempesta può eguagliare la bufera nella mia anima,
più rumorosa dei tuoni o del ruggito delle onde più alte,
non c’è niente di come lasciare il mio amore sulla spiaggia.
Lasciarti indietro, il mio cuore è pieno di dolore,
ma con la cautela del senza gloria nessuna fama si può ottenere;
e la beltà e l’amore sono la ricompensa per il coraggio
e li devo meritare prima di poterli desiderare.
III
Allora la gloria, mia Jean dovrà perorare la mia spiegazione,
finchè  l’onore mi comanda, come posso io rifiutare?
Senza non potrò mai meritarti
e senza il tuo favore preferisco non vivere!
Vado dunque ragazza, per vincere onore e fama
e se avessi la possibilità di ritornare gloriosamente a casa
porterò il cuore a te, traboccante d’amore
e poi non lascerò te e Lochaber mai più.

NOTE
1) Lochaber è il cuore delle Highlands, nella parte meridionale della contea di Inverness: in questa regione l’acqua è una delle protagoniste assolute, ed una delle principali ragioni della sua bellezza; fiumi, laghi, cascate, mare … è un tripudio della natura che si incontra con magia, storia e l’amore dell’uomo per la terra  che abita. (continua)
FONTI
http://www.capeirish.com/guitar-book/pdf/lim4-g.pdf
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_Music_and_Musicians/Lochaber_no_more
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14886
https://thesession.org/tunes/8973
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/lochaber.htm

http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-095,-page-96-lochaber.aspx
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_lochaber.htm

THERE’LL NEVER BE PEACE TILL JAMIE COMES HAME

“There’ll Never Be Peace Till Jamie Comes Hame” è una vecchia canzone giacobita pubblicata nello “Scots Musical Museum”,  (vol IV, 1791) con il testo riscritto da Robert Burns, che conosceva la melodia con il titolo di “There are few good fellows when Jamie’s awa”. Giacomo è il figlio del deposto re Giacomo VII di Scozia che i Giacobiti riconoscevano come unico legittimo successore al trono e soprannominarono The Old Pretender per distinguerlo dal figlio il Principe Carlo Stuart.

Così scrive Robert Burns in una lettera ad Alexander Cunningham (1791) “You must know a beautiful Jacobite air “There’ll never be peace till Jamie comes hame”. When political combustion ceases to be the object of princes and patriots, it then, you know, becomes the lawful prey of historians and poets.”

LA MELODIA

La melodia è una slow air dolce e malinconica pubblicata da James Oswald in due raccolte “Curious Scots Tunes”, 1740, 22, e in “Caledonian Pocket Companion”, 1743, I. 20, conosciuta anche con il titolo di “There are few good fellows when Jamie’s awa” oppure di “By yon Castle wa’”
ASCOLTA Alessandro Tampieri, Alessandro Palmeri, Giorgio Dellarole (viol. e v.cello barocco e fisarm. 415)

ASCOLTA Sophie Ramsay in ‘The Seas Between Us‘ (vedi)

ASCOLTA Dougie Mathieson & Mags Macfarlane  in “A Tribute to Rabbie Burns”, 2015

ASCOLTA The Whistlebinkies


I
By yon Castle wa’ (1), at the close of the day,
I heard a man sing, tho’ his head it was grey:
And as he was singing, the tears doon came, –
There’ll never be peace till Jamie  (2) comes hame.
II
The Church is in ruins, the State is in jars,
Delusions, oppressions, and murderous wars,
We dare na weel say’t, but we ken wha’s to blame, –
There’ll never be peace till Jamie comes hame.
III
My seven braw sons for Jamie drew sword,
But now I greet (3) round their green beds in the yerd (4);
It brak the sweet heart o’ my faithful and dame, –
There’ll never be peace till Jamie comes hame.
IV
Now life is a burden that bows me down,
Sin’ I tint (5) my bairns (6), and he tint his crown;
But till my last moments my words are the same, –
There’ll never be peace till Jamie comes hame.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Ai piedi del castello all’imbrunire
udii un uomo cantare, sebbene con il capo canuto
e mentre cantava le lacrime scendevano –
“Non ci sarà mai pace finchè Giacomo (2) ritornerà sul trono”
II
La Chiesa è in rovina e lo Stato in discordia,
delusione, oppressione
e guerre feroci
e noi sappiamo bene
chi è da biasimare
– Non ci sarà mai pace finchè Giacomo ritornerà sul trono
III
I miei sette bravi figli per Giacomo cinsero la spada,
ma ora io li piango nei loro verdi giacigli al camposanto
e il povero cuore della mia leale dama si spezzò –
Non ci sarà mai pace finchè Giacomo ritornerà sul trono
IV
Ora la vita è un fardello che mi piega in due
dacchè persi i miei figli ed egli perse la corona;
ma fino all’ultimo respiro le mie parole saranno le stesse –
Non ci sarà mai pace finchè Giacomo ritornerà sul trono

NOTE
1) wa’=wall
2) La discendenza maschile del ramo Stuart  (la parte cattolica della famiglia) cercò periodicamente e fino al 1746 di riprendersi il trono con l’aiuto di Francia e Spagna: Giacomo Francesco Edoardo Stuart tentò di riprendersi il trono per due volte nel 1708 e nel 1715 sbarcando in Scozia e mettendosi alla testa dei suoi seguaci con l’appoggio di John Erskine, conte di Mar: il 6 settembre 1715 Lord Mar si incontrò con un gruppo di Highlander e nominò ufficialmente il Principe Giacomo Edoardo re di Scozia, Inghilterra e Francia con il nome di Giacomo VIII di Scozia (e Giacomo III d’Inghilterra e d’Irlanda). Anche questo secondo tentativo fallì e Giacomo passò il resto della sua vita dorata in esilio prima in Francia e poi dal 1717 in Italia. (vedi scheda dei personaggi principali qui)
3) greet=weep
4) yerd=kirkyard
5) sin I tint=as I lost
6) bairns=children

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/therellb.htm
https://www.flutetunes.com/tunes.php?id=2322
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-iv,-song-326,-pages-336-and-337-as-i-cam-down-by-yon-castle-wa.aspx

ORAN EILE DON PHRIONNSA

Read the post in English

Il Bonny Prince (Carlo Edoardo Stuart) ritratto da Allan Ramsay subito dopo la marcia su Edimburgo

Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa,  “Canzone per il Principe” (= Song to the Prince) ma anche dal primo verso “Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh” (in italiano “Appena mi sveglio”) venne scritta nel 1745 da Alexander McDonald (Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)  bardo delle Highlands e fervente giacobita, perché fosse indirizzata come missiva al Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart, noto più semplicemente come il Bonnie Prince Charlie o The Young Pretender. All’epoca il Principe si trovava in Francia nella vana attesa di un cenno di favore da parte del Re Luigi XV affinchè lo aiutasse a riprendersi il trono d’Inghilterra e Scozia. Ma la questione si trascinava per le lunghe, Luigi non ricevette mai a Corte il suo parente povero, così il ragazzo venne snobbato anche dalla Nobiltà parigina e di certo le parole d’incoraggiamento dei sostenitori in Scozia non potevano che dargli conforto. continua
Il testo originale di Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa ( anche “Moch Sa Mhadainn”, “Hùg Ò Laithill Ò” “Hùg Ò Laithill O Horo”), è scritto in gaelico scozzese, lingua che il principe non capiva (essendo nato e cresciuto a Roma).

Ne “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 By Elizabeth Jane Ross” (qui) sono riportati testo e melodia (#113) così nelle note dell’edizione pubblicata per lo School of Scottish Studies Archives, Edimburgo 2011 leggiamo “Questa toccante canzone giacobita è stata attribuita a Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald, c.1698–c.1770). Il testo e la traduzione di  JLC [John Lorne CAMPBELL(1933, Rev.1984)], riporta 17 strofe più il ritornello. Il testo deriva dall’edizione del 1839  (p.85) dalla collezione di Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (ASE); l’edizione del 1839 è identica a quella del 1834, ma il fatto che la canzone non appaia nella prima edizione (1751) solleva dubbi sull’attribuzione (vedi JLC 42, n.1): in effetti il testo è stato quasi certamente preso dall’edizione 1834 da PT, dov’è semplicemente intitolato ‘LUINNEAG’ senza alcuna attribuzione.

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in “Glenfinnan (Songs Of The ’45)” (1998) album interamente dedicato ai canti in gaelico che si sono conservati nelle Isole Ebridi sulla rovinosa parabola della ribellione giacobita capeggiata dal Bonnie Prince Charlie nel 1745

ASCOLTA Dàimh in Moidart to Mabou 2000, un gruppo di nuova generazione dalla West Coast della Scozia formato da musicisti  dall’Irlanda, Scozia, Capo Bretone e California.

Chi canta dopo aver impostato la prima strofa, prosegue riprendendo gli ultimi due versi come i primi della strofa successiva, e aggiunge altri due nuovi versi
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh
I
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
II
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
III
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
IV
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
V
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite

The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript
I
Early as I awaken
Great my joy, loud my laughter
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
III
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
IV
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
V
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Da quando seppi che il Principe verrà nella terra del Clanranald
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno
III
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
IV
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
V
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.

NOTE
1) Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart
2) il Clan dei Macdonald di Clanranald (Clan RanaldClan Ronald) è uno dei rami più grandi dei clan scozzesi in cui si eleggeva il Re delle Isole e di Argyll. All’epoca delle ribellione del 1745 il vecchio capo clan non era favorevole agli Stuard, ma non impedì al figlio di allearsi con il Giovane Pretendente. I due si conobbero a Parigi. Ranald il giovane fu tra i primi ad aderire alla causa giacobita facendo proseliti presso gli altri clan.

LA SERIE OUTLANDER

Il brano è stato riportato alla popolarità con l’inserimento nella seconda stagione della serie televisiva Outlander (sulle orme del grandissimo successo editoriale dell’omonima serie scritta da Diana Gabaldon), come sottolinea lo stesso direttore artistico Bear McCreary questo è uno dei pochi canti scritti proprio nel farsi della ribellione scozzese.
“Quando Jamie apre la lettera nell’episodio  “The Fox’s Lair” e scopre di essere stato invischiato nella rivoluzione, questa canzone era contemporanea essendo stata composta da qualche parte in Scozia  proprio in quel preciso momento.” (qui).

ASCOLTA Griogair Labhruidh in Outlander: Season 2, (Original Television Soundtrack) il brano ha un andamento marziale  e Griogair racconta
“È sempre difficile mediare il divario tra tradizione e innovazione, ma è qualcosa a cui mi sto abituando sempre più spesso, ho eseguito la canzone ad un ritmo molto più lento di quello tradizionale, ma penso che abbia raggiunto un grande effetto con i ricchi cori dei violini e gli elementi percussivi. Sono stato anche molto contento di lavorare con il mio amico John Purser che ha contribuito a dirigere la mia esecuzione della canzone per adattarla all’arrangiamento.

Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Hùg hó o ró nàill i
Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Seinn oho ró nàill i.
I
Moch sa mhadainn is mi dùsgadh,
Is mòr mo shunnd is mo cheòl-gáire;
On a chuala mi am Prionnsa,
Thighinn do dhùthaich Chloinn Ràghnaill.
II
Gràinne-mullach gach rìgh thu,
Slàn gum pill thusa Theàrlaich;
Is ann tha an fhìor-fhuil gun truailleadh,
Anns a’ ghruaidh is mòr nàire.
III
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle,
Dh’ èireadh suas le deagh nàdar;
Is nan tigeadh tu rithist,
Bhiodh gach tighearna nan àite.
IV
Is nan càraicht an crùn ort
Bu mhùirneach do chàirdean;
Bhiodh Loch Iall mar bu chòir dha,
Cur an òrdugh nan Gàidheal.


I
Early as I awaken,
Great my joy, loud my laughter,
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Thou’rt the choicest of all rulers,
Here’s a health to thy returning,
His the royal blood unmingled,
Great the modesty in his visage.
III
With nobility overflowing,
And endowed with all good nature;
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird.
IV
And thy friends would be joyful
If the crown were placed on thee,
And Lochiel, as he should be
Would be leading the Gaëls.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
III
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.
IV
I vostri amici saranno pieni di gioia
se sarete incoronato,
e Lochiel (3), come si conviene, farà arrivare i Gaeli per la battaglia

NOTE

Fedeli agli amici

3) Donald Cameron di Lochiel (c.1700 – Ottobre 1748) tra i più influenti capoclan tradizionalmente fedele alla Casa Stuart. Si unì al Principe Carlo nel 1745 e dopo Culloden fuggì in Francia dove morì in esilio.
La famiglia fu riabilitata e reintegrata nel titolo con l’amnistia del 1748.

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.ed.ac.uk/files/imports/fileManager/RossMS.pdf
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie1.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie2.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-return-to-scotland/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/63749/3
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/94215/5;jsessionid=40262AAD448EC6A5BD09862C091AD047

CULLODEN’S HARVEST

Non un brano tradizionale, ma d’autore con tanto di copyright registrato nel 1978 o 1986 (Coban Records) da Alastair McDonald, scozzese doc. La melodia è stata completamente riscritta sempre da Alastair McDonald da una fonte tradizionale.

CANNONI CONTRO SPADE

Un lament contemporaneo che commemora la sconfitta degli Highlanders nella loro ultima battaglia nei pressi di Inverness.
Ecco com’è andata: era una piovosa mattina del 16 aprile 1746..  continua
Per una versione “in diretta” dal libro-saga di Diana Gabaldon “La straniera” (in Italia nei volumi “Il ritorno” e “Il cerchio di pietre”) e prossimamente nella seri tv “The Outlander”.
battle-cockade

ASCOLTA  Deánta in “Ready for the Storm” 1995, in cui scrivono che la melodia è un”old Gealic sea song”. Le immagini del video sono per lo più le riprese del film documentario di Peter Watkins (1964) Sicuramente la versione più straziante e commovente.

ASCOLTA Richard Morrison


Chorus
Cold the winds on the moors blow.
Warm the enemy’s fires glow.
Black (1) the harvest of Culloden,
Pain and fear and death grow.
I
‘Twas love of our prince drove us to Drumossie,
But in scarcely the time that it takes me to tell
The flower of our country lay scorched by an army
As ruthless and red as the embers of hell.
II
The Campbell and McFall (7) did the work of the English.
McDonald in anger did no work at all.
‘Twas musket and cannon against honour (9) and courage.
Invaders men stood while our clansmen did fall.
III
None other than children are left to the women (10),
With only the memory of father and son
Turned out of their homes to make shelter for strangers.
The blackest of hours on this land has begun.
Traduzione italiano Riccardo Venturi
CORO
Soffiano venti freddi sulle brughiere,
ardono caldi i fuochi del nemico.
[nera] (1) la
 Messe  di Culloden,
crescon la pena, la paura e la morte.
I
Fu l’amore per il nostro principe (2) a portarci a Drumossie, (3)
Ma nel tempo appena che mi ci vuole a narrare (4)
il fiore del nostro paese giacque straziato (5) da un’armata
spietata e rosso sangue (6) come i tizzoni infernali.
II
I Campbell e i McFall fecero il gioco degli inglesi
I McDonald, in preda all’ira, non fecero nessun gioco. (8)
Furon moschetti e cannoni contro onore e coraggio,
gli invasori rimasero in piedi mentre i nostri uomini dei clan caddero.
III
Nessuno altro che i bambini restano ormai alle donne,
con soltanto il ricordo di un padre e di un figlio.
Scacciati dalle loro case (11) per alloggiare gli stranieri.
L’ora più nera del nostro paese è cominciata. (12)

NOTE
1) in alcune versioni like. Il verso è ripreso nell’ultima strofa con la chiusura “The blackest of hours”
2) Il Bonny Prince Charlie. Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlands! vedi
3) Drumossie ovvero Inverness
4) un ora tanto durò la battaglia
5) il generale Cumberland, comandante dell’esercito inglese [e figlio del re], ordinò che tutti i prigionieri e i feriti giacobiti fossero messi a morte, ma i capi clan e pochi altri vennero fatti prigionieri.
6) le giubbe rosse
7) Mary Dillon e Alastair  dicono “Red Campbell the fox” Il rosso Campbell la volpe trovato anche scritto come “Red Campbell, the false” inserire citazione di Gabaldon
8) nota di Riccardo: Nella canzone si accusano alcuni tra i principali clan scozzesi (e i due principali: i Campbell e i McDonald) di aver fatto poco o punto per la causa giacobita, e addirittura il gioco degli inglesi. La realtà storica è differente. Anche i Campbell e i McDonald condivisero il tragico destino di tutti i clan dopo la disfatta di Culloden.
9) Alastair dice “claymores” ovvero gli spadoni degli highlanders
10) Mary Dillon e Alastair dicono “Now mothers and children are left to their weeping” (Madri e figli sono lasciati nel pianto)
11) Nei mesi e anni successivi a Culloden fu caccia all’uomo per coloro che erano riusciti a fuggire dal campo della battaglia e per i loro sostenitori, anche le famiglie e i simpatizzanti vennero incarcerati e coloro che offrivano ospitalità ai fuggiaschi erano espropriati e processati per alto tradimento. Ancora Riccardo scrive  “I prigionieri incarcerati furono portati in Inghilterra per essere processati con accuse di alto tradimento; i processi si svolsero a Berwich, a York e a Londra. Fu stabilita una “percentuale fissa” di condanne a morte: un prigioniero su venti veniva messo al patibolo. In totale, 3470 scozzesi giacobiti vennero processati. 120 furono impiccati; 88 morirono in prigione; 936 furono deportati nelle colonie e 222 furono esiliati. Alcuni furono assolti e liberati, ma di altri 700 non si sa assolutamente niente” (tratto da qui)
12) Le Highlands furono militarizzate e tenute sotto stretto controllo inglese, senza parlare delle leggi volte a spezzare “l’highlander pride”

L’inquadramento storico della questione giacobita in https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/war-songs-anti-war-songs/you-jacobites-by-name/

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=4518&lang=it
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/twaslove.htm
https://nelcuoredellascozia.com/2015/10/30/cullodens-harvest/
https://nelcuoredellascozia.com/category/storia/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/deanta/cullodens.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9007
http://outlanderworld.blogspot.it/2016/10/jamie-fraser-e-la-battaglia-di-culloden.html
http://soldatiniestoria.blog.tiscali.it/2015/01/15/culloden-l%E2%80%99ultima-battaglia-di-liberta-del-clan-scozzesi/?doing_wp_cron

E LA BARCA VA: IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA, THE SKYE BOAT SONG

Read the post in English  

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e flora
Flora e il Bel Carletto

Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi.
Flora MacDonald aveva 24 anni quando incontrò  il Bonnie Prince e lo aiutò a lasciare le Ebridi, li vediamo raffigurati su una barchetta in balia delle onde, lei si avvolge nello scialle e guarda l’orizzonte, mentre il sole tramonta,  lui rema con foga.
(ecco com’è andata in realtà: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

LA TRAVERSATA IN MARE: LA FUGA DI CHARLES STUART

Il momento della fuga dalle Ebridi Esterne, per quanto “eroicomico”, è ricordato nella canzone “Skye boat song” (in italiano “La barca per Skye” ma anche” la barca per il cielo”) scritta da Sir Harold Boulton nel 1884 su di una melodia tradizionale che si dice sia stata arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod; una decina di anni prima Anne  stava facendo un’escursione sul Loch Coruisk, guarda caso proprio sull’isola di Skye e la sentì cantare da un gruppo di marinai; la canzone era “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in inglese “The Cuckoo in the Grove”) comparsa in stampa nel 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, di Alfred Moffat, con un testo attribuito a William Ross (1762 – 1790). La melodia è pertanto quantomeno risalente al tempo della vicenda.

LO IORRAM
Il brano è comparso nel libro Songs of the North pubblicato da Sir Harold Boulton e Anne Campbell MacLeod a Londra nel 1884. Nelle ristampe ed edizioni successive nel commento si fa riferimento alla melodia come a un “iorram” ossia a una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle Ebridi come valzer.

La canzone è stato un successo: fin da subito circolarono voci che spacciavano il testo come traduzione di una antico canto in gaelico e presto divenne un brano classico della musica celtica e in particolare della musica tradizionale scozzese inserito immancabilmente nelle compilation anche per matrimoni, fatto e rifatto in tutte le salse (dal beat al liscio, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), innumerevoli le versioni strumentali (da un solo strumento – arpa, cornamusa, chitarra, flauto – o due fino all’orchestra) con arrangiamenti classici, tradizionali, new age, per bande anche militari e corali. Su Spotify è possibile trovare moltissime versioni del brano e proprio per tutti i gusti! Tra quelle strumentali le mie preferite sono quelle con la chitarra di Greg Joy, Pete Lashley, Tom Rennie, ma anche una versione con arpa e flauto di Anne-Elise Keefer e una versione “insolita” (con tanto di basso-tuba o oboe) dei Leaf!

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
Over the sea to Skye
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head
III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
RITORNELLO
Veloce, bella barca,
come un uccello sulle ali

Avanti! Gridano i marinai!
Porta il ragazzo nato per essere re (1)
oltre il mare a Skye (2)
I
Forte ulula il vento,
forte ruggiscono le onde,
nubi minacciose riempiono il cielo;
frastornati i nostri nemici si fermano a riva e non osano seguirci
II
Benchè i flutti si accavallino,
il tuo sonno sarà docile
e l’oceano il letto del re
cullato dal mare (3),
Flora (4) vigilerà
vegliando sulla tua testa stanca
III
In molti combatterono quel giorno,
brandendo bene le spade, quando la notte venne in silenzio, giacevano morti  sul campo di Culloden (5).
IV
Bruciate le nostre case, esilio o morte,
dispersi gli uomini leali (6),
tuttavia prima che la spada si raffreddi nel fodero,
Carlo verrà di nuovo (7)


NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlandscontinua
2) L’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne, ma suona come “cielo” e quindi una metafora, l’autore lo impalma come eroe nel firmamento
3)  “rocked” è da intendersi, come in molte sea song e sea shanty (e in qualche lullaby), nel senso di dondolio (della culla in particolare)
4) Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790) che aiutò il principe nella fuga  continua
5) per l’approfondimento ho dedicato un’intera pagina ai Giacobiti vedi
6) la repressione inglese contro i giacobiti e i simpatizzanti fu brutale
7) nel 1884 Charles Stuart era ormai polvere, ma la letteratura romantica manteneva ancora vive le aspirazioni giacobite e i canti infiammavano ancora gli animi

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)Nel 1896 lo scrittore scozzese Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) scrisse una variante con nuove parole, evidentemente non soddisfatto di quanto scritto da un baronetto inglese.

Stevenson mette il canto in bocca allo stesso Charles, vecchio e disfatto nel suo esilio “dorato” tra Roma e Firenze. L’Alfieri ce lo descrive come irragionevole e sempre ubriaco padrone, ovvero querulo, sragionevole e sempre ebro marito (ma doveva avere il dente avvelenato essendo stato per anni l’amante della molto più giovane e bella moglie Luisa di Stolberg-Gedern contessa d’Albany). Il Principe sempre più amareggiato e dedito all’alcol, morì a Roma il 31 gennaio 1788 (abbandonato anche dalla moglie quattro anni prima).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
di Robert Louis Stevenson
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
OLTRE IL MARE PER SKYE
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Cantami del ragazzo del passato
dici, “Potrei essere io quello?”
con l’avventura nel cuore(1), salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Mull era a poppa, Rum era a babordo, Eigg sulla prua a dritta.
Gloria di gioventù brillava nel suo spirito, dov’è quella gloria ora?
III
Dammi ancora tutto ciò che fu,
dammi il sole che risplendeva
dammi la visione (2), dammi l’anima
dammi il ragazzo del passato
IV
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari
montagne di pioggia e di sole;
tutto ciò che era buono e giusto
tutto quello che ero, è morto

NOTE
1) “merry of soul” inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice” (per esempio She’s a merry little soul)
2) letteralmente dammi gli occhi

LA VERSIONE OUTLANDER

Più recentemente la canzone “Over the Sea to Skye” è stata ripresa nella serie “The Outlander” dalla saga di Diana Gabaldon ed è subito skyemania..
Il testo è modellato sulla versione di Robert Louis Stevenson anche se ogni riferimento al bel Carletto è stato sostituito dal “viaggio nel tempo” della bella Claire Randall  (dal 1945 nel 1743)

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbroug


I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul, she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Cantami di una ragazza del passato,
dici, “Potrei essere io quella?”
con l’avventura nel cuore (1) lei salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari,
montagne con la pioggia e il sole
Tutto ciò  che era bello e buono,
tutto quello che ero è morto.

NOTE
1 ) “merry of sou” viene inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice”
la strofa in francese
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye

Versione ulteriormente riarrangiata da Bear McCreary in seguito al successo della serie e completata con le strofe di Robert Louis Stevenson
Outlander -The Skye Boat Song(Extended)

Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song La versione francese

Per l’ambientazione nel Mar dei Caraibi Bear McCreary ha ulteriormente arrangianto la vecchia melodia tradizionale scozzese sviluppando l’elemento percussivo e melodico
Outlander Season III

 FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

LA BATTAGLIA DI SHERRA-MOOR

180px-John-Erskine-11th
John-Erskine Lord Mar


Robert Burns scrive nel 1789 la sua versione della Battaglia (la prima parte qui) sulla melodia “The Cameronian Rant”: due pastori si incontrano su una collina e discutono su chi abbia vinto la battaglia di Sherra-moor (Sheriffmuir).

Le rivendicazioni al trono di Giacomo Stuart “Il vecchio Pretendente” si infransero nella Battaglia di Sheriffmuir il 13 novembre 1715, che si concluse in sostanza con un nulla di fatto (a parte tanti morti) – battaglia comandata da Lord Mar senza nemmeno la presenza in campo del “Pretendente”..
Giacomo Francesco Edoardo Stuart arrivò a bordo di una nave francese in dicembre, trovò la sua causa disperata e fuggì in Francia: l’esercito di Mar si disperse e la rivolta finì. Nel 1717 venne concesso, con l’”Act of Grace” un generale perdono a tutti gli Highlanders che parteciparono all’insurrezione.

ASCOLTA The Corries ; Sherramuir Fight

ASCOLTA Jamie McMenemy

I.
‘O, cam ye here the fight to shun,
Or herd the sheep wi’ me, man?
Or were ye at the Sherra-moor,
Or did the battle see, man?’
‘I saw the battle, sair and teugh,
And reekin-red ran monie a sheugh;
My heart for fear gae sough for sough,
To hear the thuds, and see the cluds
O’ clans frae woods in tartan duds,
Wha glaum’d at kingdoms three, man.”CHORUS
Huh! Hey dum dirrum hey dum dan
Huh! Hey dum dirrum dey dan.
Huh! Hey dum dirrum hey dum dandy
Hey dum dirrum dey dan.
II.
‘The red-coat lads wi’ black cockauds
To meet them were na slaw, man:
They rush’d and push’d and bluid outgush’d,
And monie a bouk did fa’, man!
The great Argyle led on his files,
I wat they glanc’d for twenty miles;
They hough’d the clans like nine-pin kyles,
They hack’d and hash’d, while braid-swords clash’d,
And thro’ they dash’d, and hew’d and smash’d,
Till fey men died awa, man.
III.
‘But had ye seen the philibegs
And skyrin tartan trews, man,
When in the teeth they daur’d our Whigs
And Covenant trueblues, man!
In lines extended lang and large,
When baig’nets o’erpower’d the targe,
And thousands hasten’d to the charge,
Wi’ Highland wrath they frae the sheath
Drew blades o’ death, till out o’ breath
They fled like frighted dows, man!’
IV.
‘They’ve lost some gallant gentlemen,
Amang the Highland clans, man!
I fear my Lord Panmure is slain,
Or in his en’mies’ hands, man.
Now wad ye sing this double fight
Some fell for wrang, and some for right,
But monie bade the world guid-night:
Say, pell and mell, wi’ muskets’ knell
How Tories fell, and Whigs to Hell
Flew off in frighted bands, man!’
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
“Sei venuto qui per sfuggire alla battaglia
o per custodire le pecore con me, amico?
Oppure eri a Sheriffmuir
e hai visto la battaglia, amico?”
“Ho visto la battaglia, amara e dura
e il puzzo del sangue spargersi nei fossi;
il mio cuore tremava di paura
nell’ascoltare i colpi e nel vedere l’annuvolarsi
dai boschi dei clan in tartan
a sfidare i Tre Regni(1), amico ”

II
Le giubbe rosse e coccarde nere(2)
ad incontrarli non erano riluttanti, amico:
essi si precipitavano e spingevano e il sangue scorreva copioso e molti corpi caddero, amico!
Il grande Argyle conduceva le sue file
(avranno attraversato più di venti miglia)
essi colpirono i clan come birilli,
li fecero a pezzi e sbudellarono mentre le grandi spade si scontravano,
ed essi si dibattevano, tagliavano e fracassavano finchè gli uomini predestinati morirono, amico.”

III
“Ma avevi visto i kilt
e i pantaloni in tartan dagli sgargianti colori,amico,
quando mostravano i denti ai Whigs (3)
ai Covenanter(4) e ai Lealisti, amico!
Allineati su un ampio fronte
quando le baionette e gli scudi abbandonarono
e a migliaia si affrettarono alla carica (5)
con l’ira degli Highlands, essi dal fodero
sguainavano le lame mortali, a perdifiato
e (i Whigs) scappavano come piccioni timorosi, amico”

IV
“Hanno perduto dei galantuomini valorosi
tra i clan delle Highlands.
Temo che il mio Lord Panmure sia morto
o in mano ai suoi nemici.
E’ tempo di cantare questo duplice scontro,
alcuni caddero a torto e altri a ragione,
ma molti diedero la buonanotte al mondo:
alla rinfusa, con il rintocco dei moschetti
dicci come i Conservatori (3) caddero e i Whigs volarono dritti all’inferno in bande spaventate”

NOTE
La versione originaria ha due ulteriori strofe prima del finale, che però non essendo più cantate al giorno d’oggi, non mi sono data la pena di tradurre.

1) per tutta la questione giacobita vedere la pagina dedicata qui
2) La coccarda appuntata sul cappello è una moda del Settecento ed era indossata come simbolo della fedeltà a una certa ideologia, o anche come indicazione di status sociale (e più spesso parte della divisa di un servitore). In Gran Bretagna la coccarda bianca indicava i giacobiti mentre i governativi indossavano la coccarda nera o blu.
3) una distinzione sommaria tra i due partiti classifica i tories, come proprietarî di terre (landed men), mentre i whigs, come rappresentanti della ricchezza mobiliare (moneyed men). Whigs, è una parola di probabile origine scozzese, forse col significato di predone, o forse viene da “whig”, latte acido, di certo era un insulto che nel 1600 si rivolgeva a questa corrente politica ma rimase appiccicato come un etichetta nei secoli successivi. Non mi sembra il caso di andare a distinguere tra le sottili o più sostanziali divergenze tra i due partiti, quanto sottolineare che furono i Whigs ad appoggiare incondizionatamente la nuova dinastia inaugurata con l’elezione di Re Giorgio I di Hannover.
4) Covenanter era il nome dato agli scozzesi presbiteriani che si ricollegavano direttamente al patto di alleanza biblico (tra Dio e il popolo d’Israele). Le riunioni in aperta campagna vennero denominate “conventicles” e considerate illegali passibili di pena capitale.
5) gli scozzesi andavano così in battaglia: la famosa carica degli highlanders consisteva nel correre verso la schiera dei nemici slacciandosi il cinturone, liberandosi del plaid,precipitandosi a grandi balzi , urlando come ossessi e brandendo minacciosamente la grande spada (con i lembi della camicia che svolazzano sul culo nudo). Il kilt un tempo era infatti più che altro una lunga coperta drappeggiata introno ai fianchi e trattenuta da una cintura anzichè da una fibbia. vedi

TRADUZIONE IN INGLESE (tratta da qui; per la traduzione in francese invece qui)
I
O, came you here the fight to shun,
Or herd the sheep with me, man?
Or were you at the Sheriffmuir,
Or did the battle see, man?’
‘I saw the battle, sore and tough,
And reeking red ran many a ditch;
My heart for fear gave sigh for sigh,
To hear the thuds, and see the clouds
Of clans from woods in tartan clothes,
Who grasped at kingdoms three, man.

II
The red-coat lads with black cockades
To meet them were not slow, man:
They rushed and pushed and blood outgushed,
And many a body did fall, man!
The great Argyle led on his files,
I know they shown for twenty miles;
They knocked the clans like nine-pin skittles,
They hacked and hashed, while broad-swords clashed,
And through they dashed, and hewed and smashed,
Till fated men died away, man.

III
‘But had you seen the kilts
And flaring tartan trousers, man,
When in the teeth they dared our Whigs
And Covenant, Trueblues, man!
In lines extended long and large,
When bayonets over powered the targe,
And thousands hastened to the charge,
With Highland wrath they from the sheath
Drew blades of death, till out of breath
They fled like frightened pigeons, man!’

IV
‘They have lost some gallant gentlemen,
Among the Highland clans, man!
I fear my Lord Panmure is slain,
Or in his enemies’ hands, man.
Now would you sing this double fight,
Some fell for wrong, and some for right,
But many bade the world good night:
Say, pell and mell, with muskets’ knell
How Tories fell, and Whigs to Hell
Flew off in frighted bands, man!’

LA TERZA VERSIONE: Sheriffmuir
Cantata dai McCalmans in ‘Side By Side By Side’ 1977: ho solo trovato il testo (qui)

FONTI
http://www.grianpress.com/Tannahill/TANNAHILL’S%20SONGS%2027C.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/454.htm
http://digital.nls.uk/1715-rising/songs/will-ye-go-tae-sheriffmuir/index.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/sheriffmur.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=7898

http://data.historic-scotland.gov.uk/pls/htmldb/f?p=2500:15:0::::BATTLEFIELD:17
https://thesession.org/tunes/284
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/sheramui.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/s/sheriffm.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/s/sherramu.html
http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/29309/