Archivi tag: Great Big Sea

Row me bullies boys row (Alan Doyle)

Leggi in italiano

The most recent version of this popular sea shanty comes from the movie “Robin Hood Prince of Thieves” by Ridley Scott (2010), and was written for the occasion by Alan Doyle (front man of the Canadian band Great Big Sea), recalling the melody and the structure of the Liverpool Judies refrain, with a text that remind the typical phrases of these seafaring songs; so obviously everyone adds the verse that he likes.

russel crow crew
I’ll sing you a song, it’s a song of the sea
I’ll sing you a song if you’ll sing it with me
While the first mate is playing the captain aboard
He looks like a peacock with pistols and sword
The captain likes whiskey, the mate, he likes rum
Us sailers like both but we can’t get us none
Well farewell my love it is time for to roam
The old blue peters are calling us home

In Taberna  

Strangs and Stout

CHORUS
And it’s row me bully boys
We’re in a hurry boys
We got a long way to go
And we’ll sing and we’ll dance
And bid farewell to France
And it’s row me bully boys row.
I
I’ll sing you a song,
it’s a song of the sea
Row me bully boys row
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
II
Well farewell my love
it is time for to roam
Row me bully boys row
The old blue peters
are calling us home
And it’s row me bully boys row

Barnacle Buoys

I
When we set sail for Bristol
the sun was like crystal
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
We found muddier water
when passing Bridge Water
And it’s row, me bully boys row
Chorus:
And it’s row, me bully boys,
we’re in a hurry, boys
We’ve got a long way to go
And we’ll drink as we glance
– a last look at France
row, me bully boys, row
II
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
III
So we’ve been away
for many a day now
So we’ll fill out our sails
and drink all the ale now
IV
So we’ll drink and we’ll feast
with no care in the least
And soon, as we’re craving’,
we’ll sail up to Avon
V
As we tied up in Bristol,
me heart was a-thumpin’
Then I found my girl Alice,
who took me a-scrumpin’

and so on!

ITALIAN VERSION: VOGA AMICO MIO VAI

here is the italian versione in the movie


CORO
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più (amico)

un altro po’, dove si va non lo so
Balliamo cantiamo e la Francia lasciamo
voga un altro po’ vai
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Voga un altro po’ dove si va non lo so
La Francia non la rivedremo giammai
Voga amico mio vai
E’ tardi oramai voi siete già nei guai
Voga amico mio vai
O voi non scherzate oppure rischiate
Voga voga un po’ di più
Ma non si può stare troppo via dal mare
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Partiamo di nuovo per non ritornare
Voga amico mio vai

ARCHIVE:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
‘Frisco
New York
from Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

LINK
https://thesession.org/discussions/24758
https://www.musixmatch.com/it/testo/Rambling-Sailors/Row-Me-Bully-Boys
http://www.songsterr.com/a/wsa/misc-soundtrack-robin-hood-row-me-bully-boys-chords-s376527
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=158562
https://reelsoundtrack.wordpress.com/2010/05/15/robin-hood-soundtrack/

Banks of Newfoundland sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

There are several sea songs entitled “the Banks of Newfoundland”, not to be properly considered variations on the same melody, even if they share a common theme, the dangers of fishing or navigation offshore of Newfoundland.

As a first approach I classified the titles on the first verse and grouped a first block.

  • Me bully boys of Liverpool
  • O you western ocean labourers
  • Come all me lads and fair young maids

Me bully boys o’ Liverpool

Probably the best known version of “the Banks of Newfoundland”, describing the dangers of winter navigation in the North Atlantic.
The incipit is as a warning song directed to the “bully boys” of Liverpool (or Belfast according to the Irish Rovers version): they are mostly Irish workers of the mid-nineteenth century who let themselves be attracted by the short engagement time on an Atlantic line ship without realizing the hard working conditions (see the Black Ball Line study)
The ballad perhaps began in Ireland as a broadside, but it became popular as forebitter song (or capstan shanty) on the sailing ships carrying emigrants from Britain to America during the 19th century, and was preserved by maritime singers in both Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.

Black Ball Line clipper in a strong wind: the largest sails have been reefed, and the highest sails closed

Ewan MacColl & A. L. Lloyd from Blow Boys Blow, 1957
Lloyd notes “In winter, the westward run from Liverpool to New York was a hard trip for packet ships, through heavy ships, contrary winds, sleet and snow. The large crews were kept busy reefing as the gales increased or piling on canvas whenever the wind abated.  The Banks of Newfoundland sets out the picture of a hard Western Ocean crossing before the days of steam.” (from here)

Great Big Sea (from I to III, V,  see) same melody but marching trend

I
Me bully boys o’ Liverpool,
I’ll have you to beware,
When ye sail in the packet ship (1),
no dungaree jumpers wear (2);
But have a big monkey jacket (3)
all ready to your hand,
For there blows some cold nor’westers (4)/on the Banks of Newfoundland!
Chorus
We’ll scrape her and we’ll scrub her
With holystone and sand (5),
And we think of them cold nor’westers
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
There was Jack Lynch from Ballynahinch,
Mike Murphy and some more (6),
I tell ye where, they suffered like hell
on the way to Baltimore;
They pawned (7) their gear in Liverpool
and they sailed as they did stand,
there blows some cold nor’westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
The mate he stood on the fo’c’sle (8) head, and loudly he did roar:
“Now rattle (9) her in, my lucky lads!
We’re bound for America’s shore!
Go wash the mud off that dead-man’s face
and heave to beat the band (10),
For there blows some cold nor’westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland!”
IV
So now it’s reef and reef (11), me boys,
with the canvas frozen hard,
And it’s mount and pass (12) every mother’s son
on a ninety-foot tops’l yard.
Never mind about boots and oilskins,
but haul or you’ll be damned!
For there blows some cold nor’westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
And now we’re off the Hook (12), me boys,
and the lands are white with snow,
But soon we’ll see the pay table
and have all night below;
And on the docks, come down in flocks,
them pretty girls will stand,
Saying, “It’s snugger with me
than it is at sea on the Banks of Newfoundland.”

NOTES
1) “Packet ships” used to carry mail from Britain to America.
2) dungaree (dungeon ) jumper, jacket= denim jacket
3) “monkey jacket” because of its resemblance to the short jacket of the trained monkeys, it was a short, close-fitting wool jacket with double-breasted and pewter buttons favored by sailors; we find the term in Melville “no more monkey jackets and tarpaulins for me”. Yet even the toughest woolen jacket was not free to become soaking wet under a storm. For these sailors waterproofed their clothes, shoes and hair with resinous substances
4) the wind that blows from NW pushes in the South-East direction, in the wind rose it is called the Mistral wind
5) the maintenance work of the hull is carried out in the dry dock, where the ship is taken to dryness, but not having a special port basin the ship was pulled to shore at high tide and made to lay on its side
6) the crews of the Atlantic packet ships were for the most part Irish
7)  as Italo Ottonello teaches us “At the signing of the recruitment contract for long journeys, the sailors received an advance equal to three months of pay which, to guarantee compliance with the contract, it was provided in the form of “I will pay”, payable three days after the ship left the port, “as long as said sailor has sailed with that ship.” Everyone invariably ran to look for some complacent sharks who bought their promissory note at a discounted price, usually of forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind. “The purchasers, boarding agents and various procurers,” the enlisters, “as they were nicknamed,” were induced to ‘seize’ the sailors and bring them on board, drunk or drugged, with little or no clothes beyond what they were wearing, and squandering or stealing all sailor advances.
8) “Fo’c’sle” is a contraction of “fore castle” (fore = foreward), the living quarters inside the hull of a ship.
9) 
In Dana Rattle down, Rattle up
10) “to beat the band” = very briskly; very fast; or “to beat all” in the sense of “doing your best” but also excelling with other clippers, especially with regard to navigation times (see here)
11) Written incorrectly as “reef and reif”: To “reef” sail is to furl and lash it to the “topsl yard” or any other yard. The crew did this while standing on a single line which they would “mount” and sometimes “pass” another shipmate to do the job.
12)  Mudcat “Mount and Pass meaning to go out on the yard (the rope is called a stirrup hence the “mount”) and pass canvas as its reefed up”
13) “The Hook” is a reference to Sandy Hook in the Long Island sound

O you western ocean labourers

The second version shares a text similar to the first one, with different melody, but resumes part of the transportation song Van Diemen’s Land (British broadside ballad [Laws K25] for variant see here, here)

Siobhan Miller from Strata 2017 (I, II, IV, V)

Teyn from Far From The Tree 2016 they follow the traditional text spread in Cornwall, with an instrumental arrangement all of their own. Reported by John Farr’s testimony of Gwithian on the north coast of Cornwall, in Canow Kernow (Cornwall songs full text here)

I
O you western ocean labourers
I’ll have you all beware (1),
when you’re working on a packet ship no dungaree oil skin (2) wear.
But have a big monkey jacket
already at your command
and I’ll bid  farewell to the Virgin rocks (3)/
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
Chorus:
We’ll rub (scrape) her and scrub her
With holy stone and sand,
And we’ll bid farewell to the virgin rocks On the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
As I lay on my bunk one night
a’dreaming all alone.
I dreamt I was in Liverpool
‘way up by Marylebone (4),
With my true love there beside me
and a jug of ale in my hand,
But I woke quite brokenhearted, boys on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III (5)
We had one Lynch from Ballinahinch,
Jimmy Murphy and Mike Moore;
It was in the winter of sixty-two,
Those sea-boys suffered sore,
For they’d pawned their clothes in Liverpool,
And sold them out of hand (6),
Not thinking of the cold Northwesters
On the Banks of Newfoundland
IV (7)
We had one female passenger,
Bridget Riley was her name,
she was fourteen years transported boy for playing not the game (8)
But she tore up her flannel petticoats To make mittens for our hands,
For she couldn’t see the poor boys freeze
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
And now we’re off Sandy Hook, my boys,
And the land’s all covered with snow,.
The tug-boat take up our hawser
And for New York we will tow;
And when we get to the Black Ball dock,
All the boys and girls there will stand, for if we are here we cannot be there on the Banks of Newfoundland.

NOTES
1) or “Ye rambling boys of Erin, ye rambling boys, beware” (see)
2) dungaree jumpers
3) or “For there blows some cold Northwesters”.Virgin Rocks are a series of rocky ridges just below the surface of the ocean on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland
4) Marylebone – an affluent inner-city area of central London, located within the City of Westminster. It is sometimes written as St Marylebone (or, archaically, Mary-le-bone). Marylebone is roughly bounded by Oxford Street to the south, Marylebone Road to the north, Edgware Road to the west and Great Portland Street to the east. A broader definition designates the historic area as Marylebone Village and encompasses neighbouring Regent’s Park, Baker Street and the area immediately north of Marylebone Road, containing Marylebone Station, the original site of the Marylebone Cricket Club at Dorset Square, and the neighbourhood known as Lisson Grove as far as the border with St John’s Wood. The area east of Great Portland Street up to Cleveland Street, known as Fitzrovia since the 1940s, is considered historically to be East Marylebone. (tratto da qui)
5) the Teyn line:
We had Jack Lynch from Ballinahinch
Mike Murphy and some more
And I’ll tell you boys they suffered like hell
On the way to Baltimore
For they’d pawned their gear in Liverpool
And sailed as they did stand
For they’d pawned their gear in Liverpool
Not thinking of Newfoundland
6)  “They pawned their clothes in Liverpool and sold their notes of hand”
7) the Teyn line:
Well we had one female passenger
Bridget Reilly was her name
Unto her I had promised marriage
And on me she had claim
For she tore up all her petticoats
To make mittens for my hands
Saying I can’t see my true love freeze
On the Banks of the Newfoundland,
8)  “Play the Game” it means taking risks, not following the rules; probably refers to poaching, among the reasons for deportation to the penal colonies of Australia

Stan Hugill version: capstan shanty

Again thanks to the meticulous work of Hulton Clint (or Ranzo, nicknamed the YouTube chanteyman, from Hartford, Connecticut) that gives us back the sea shanty version as reported by Stan Hugill, an obvious parody of the sea shanty Van Diemen’s Land. In  “Shanties from the Seven Seas” Hugill writes: “Still in the realms of convict ships and transportation, we have next the old forebitter often used as a capstan song, The Banks of Newf’n’land. Its convict connection is the fact that it was really a parody of an older forebitter, itself originally a shore ballad called Van Diemen’s Land, a song often sung in Liverpool and as a forebitter often heard in Liverpool ships. A note attached to the record The Singing Sailor states that “Versions can still be heard in Scotland and Ireland, but it is in Liverpool and Salford (Lancs.) that the song lives most vigorously”. It tells of the sufferings of poachers transported to Van Diemen’s Land.”

I
Ye ramblin’ boys o’ Liverpool,
ye sailor men beware,
When you go in a Yankee packet ship, no dungaree jumpers wear;
But have a monkey jacket
all up to your command,
For there blows some cold nor’westers
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
Coro
We’ll wash her and we’ll scrub her down
With holystone and sand,
And we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks
And the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
We had one Lynch from Ballynahinch, Spud Murphy and Mike Moore,
‘Twas in the winter of seventy-three those sea-boys suffered sore;
They popped their clothes in Liverpool, sold them all out of hand,
Not thinkin’ on the cold nor’winds,
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
We had a lady fair aboard,
Kate Connor was her name,
To her I promised marriage, and on me she had a claim;
She tore up her flannel petticoats to make mittens for my hands,
For she could not see her true love freeze
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
IV
I dreamed a dream the other night,
and I thought I was at home,
Alongside of my own true love,
and she in Marybone (1);
A jug of ale all on my knee, a glass of ale in hand,
But when I woke, my heart was broke
On the Banks of Newfoundland.

NOTES
1) Liverpool’s popular district

DANCE TUNE

Come all me lads and fair young maids

Another melody for the version without refrain that shows the process of transformation through the oral tradition of a text that changes as time passes and situations. Sometimes considered as a song distinct from the previous ones referring to work on fishing vessels.
Pete Shepheard from They Smiled As We Cam In, 2018 
who noted : This is one of my favourite songs and I seem never to have tired of it since I first recorded it from St Andrews fisherman Tom Gordon in 1964. He learned it in turn from a man who had sailed on the whaler fleet out of Leith in the early 1900s. This is the only version I have come across that is modernised into the steam boat era – and incidentally dated in the text to 1906.

Matthew Byrne live, instrumental arrangement by Matthew Byrne & Billy Sutton

I
Come all me lads and fair young maids, come all ye sports beware,
when you go steamboat sailing,
no dungaree jackets wear;
And always wear a life belt,
or keep it close at hand,
there blows a cold nor-westerly wind on the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
We had on board some passengers
the Swedies and some more
’Twas in the year of nineteen-six that we did suffer sore,
We pawned our clothes in Liverpool, we pawned them every hand,
not thinking of the nor-westerly winds on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
And we had on board a fair young maid, Bridget Wellford was her name,
To her I promised marriage
and a pawn she had a claim ;
She tore her flannel petticoats
to make mittens for my hands,
she would not see her true love perish on the Banks of Newfoundland.
IV
Last night as I lay in my bunch I dream a pleasent dream,
that I was back in Scotland beside a flowing stream;
with the girl I love on my knee and a bottle in my hand,
I woke up broken hearted
on the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
Now we’re bound for Sandy Bay
where the high hills covered in snow,
Our steam boat she’s so hell-of-a fast, by New York we will go;
We’ll scrub her up and we’ll scrub her down with holystone and sand,
And we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks and the Banks of Newfoundland.

NOTES
*text taken partly from the version of Pete Shepheard  here

transportation song
working on a  fisher ship
the Eastern Light
captain’s death (american ballad)
shipwreck and rescue on the Banks (Canadian ballad)

 

LINK
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/118/
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-banks-of-newfoundland-emc/
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/bnk_newfoundland.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/banksofnewfoundland.html
https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/The-Paul-McKenna-Band/The-Banks-of-Newfoundland

http://gestsongs.com/01/banks1.htm
http://gestsongs.com/01/banks3.htm
http://gestsongs.com/02/banks5.htm
https://www.springthyme.co.uk/1042/42_09.htm

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44529
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17059
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130147

 

On the Banks of Newfoundland

Read the post in English

Ci sono parecchie  sea songs dal titolo “the Banks of Newfoundland”,  da non considerarsi propriamente come variazioni su una stessa melodia, anche se condividono un tema comune, i pericoli della pesca o della navigazione al largo di Terranova.

Come primo approccio ho classificato i titoli in base al primo verso e raggruppato un primo blocco.

  • Me bully boys of Liverpool
  • O you western ocean labourers
  • Come all me lads and fair young maids

Me bully boys o’ Liverpool

Probabilmente la versione più conosciuta di “the Banks of Newfoundland”, in cui si descrivono i pericoli della navigazione invernale nell’Atlantico del Nord.
L’incipit è quello di una warning song diretta ai “bravi ragazzi” di Liverpool (o di Belfast secondo la versione degli Irish Rovers), sono per lo più lavoratori irlandesi di metà Ottocento che si lasciano attrarre dal breve tempo d’ingaggio su una nave di linea nella tratta atlantica senza rendersi conto delle dure condizioni di lavoro (vedasi per l’approfondimento Black Ball Line)
La ballata ebbe forse inizio in Irlanda come broadside, ma diventò popolare come forebitter song (o capstan shanty) sulle packet ships nella tratta Liverpool-New York, che passava accanto alle coste dell’isola di Terranova, collezionata infine nei repertori folk di Terranova e Nuova Scozia.

Clipper della Black Ball Line con il forte vento: le vele più grandi sono state terzarolate, e le vele più alte chiuse

Ewan MacColl & A. L. Lloyd in Blow Boys Blow, 1957
Lloyd scrive “In inverno, la rotta verso ovest da Liverpool a New York era un viaggio difficile per le navi di linea, con navi pesanti, venti contrari, nevischio e neve. Gli equipaggi di grandi dimensioni erano impegnati a fare serrare le vele quando il vento aumentavano o a distendere tela ogni volta che il vento diminuiva. Le rive di Terranova danno l’immagine di una dura traversata dell’Oceano Occidentale prima dei giorni di vapore.” (tratto da qui)

Great Big Sea (strofe da I a III, V, testo qui) stessa melodia ma andamento da marcia


I
Me bully boys o’ Liverpool,
I’ll have you to beware,
When ye sail in the packet ship (1),
no dungaree jumpers wear (2);
But have a big monkey jacket (3)
all ready to your hand,
For there blows some cold nor’westers (4)/on the Banks of Newfoundland!
Chorus
We’ll scrape her and we’ll scrub her
With holystone and sand (5),
And we think of them cold nor’westers
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
There was Jack Lynch from Ballynahinch,
Mike Murphy and some more (6),
I tell ye where, they suffered like hell
on the way to Baltimore;
They pawned (7) their gear in Liverpool
and they sailed as they did stand,
there blows some cold nor’westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
The mate he stood on the fo’c’sle (8) head, and loudly he did roar:
“Now rattle (9) her in, my lucky lads!
We’re bound for America’s shore!
Go wash the mud off that dead-man’s face
and heave to beat the band (10),
For there blows some cold nor’westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland!”
IV
So now it’s reef and reef (11), me boys,
with the canvas frozen hard,
And it’s mount and pass (12) every mother’s son
on a ninety-foot tops’l yard.
Never mind about boots and oilskins,
but haul or you’ll be damned!
For there blows some cold nor’westers
on the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
And now we’re off the Hook (12), me boys,
and the lands are white with snow,
But soon we’ll see the pay table
and have all night below;
And on the docks, come down in flocks,
them pretty girls will stand,
Saying, “It’s snugger with me
than it is at sea on the Banks of Newfoundland.”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Miei bravacci di Liverpool
vi devo avvertire
quando vi imbarcate su di un postale di linea, non indossate una giacchetta di jeans ma tenete a portata di mano una giacca da scimmia,
perchè là soffiano dei freddi  venti da nord-ovest sui Banchi di Terranova!
Coro
La raschieremo e la strofineremo
con la pietra pomice e la sabbia
e penseremo a quei venti freddi di maestrale sui Banchi di Terranova
II
C’erano Jack Lynch
di Ballynahinch,
Mike Murphy e altri ancora;
ti dico come patirono le pene d’inferno
sulla rotta per Baltimora;
avevano preso in pegno la loro attrezzatura a Liverpool
e si misero in mare proprio quando
soffiano i venti freddi di maestrale
sui Banchi di Terranova
III
L’ufficiale stava in cima al castello di prua e forte tuonava
“Ora salite, ragazzi fortunati!
siamo diretti verso la terra d’America!
Andate a lavare via il fango da quella faccia da morto
e manovrate al meglio
perchè là soffiano dei venti freddi da nord-ovest sui Banchi di Terranova

IV
Quindi ora si riducono le vele, ragazzi, con la tela ghiacciata indurita
è un piegare e passare a ogni figlio di buona madre, sul pennone di gabbia a novanta piedi.
Non preoccupatevi di stivali e cerate,
ma issate o sarete dannati!
perchè là soffiano dei venti freddi da nord-ovest sui Banchi di Terranova
V
E ora siamo al largo di Sandy Hook, ragazzi miei,
e le terre sono bianche come neve,
Ma presto vedremo la tabella dei pagamenti e passeremo tutta la notte a terra; e sul molo, arriveranno a stormi,
quelle  belle ragazzine,
a dire: “È meglio accoccolarsi con me
che essere in mare
sui Banchi di Terranova “

NOTE
1) “Packet ships” postali perchè navi utilizzate per trasportare la posta tra Gran Bretagna e America
2) dungaree (dungeon ) jumper, jacket= denim jacket
3) letteralmente “giacca da scimmia” per la sua somiglianza con la giacca corta delle scimmie ammaestrate, era una giacca di lana corta e aderente con doppio petto e bottoni in peltro prediletta dai marinai; troviamo il termine in Melville “no more monkey jackets and tarpaulins for me“. Eppure anche la più robusta giacca di lana non era esente da diventare bagnata fradicia sotto una tempesta. Per questi impermeabilizzavano vestiti, scarpe e capelli con sostanze resinose
4) il vento che soffia da NW spinge in direzione Sud-Est, nella rosa dei venti è detto maestrale
5) i lavori di manutenzione dello scafo sono eseguiti nel bacino di carenaggio, dove la nave viene portata a secco , non disponendo di un apposito bacino portuale la nave era tirata a riva durante l’alta marea e fatta adagiare su un fianco: all’operazione di raschiatura dell’opera viva si accompagnava il calatafaggio, l’operazione consisteva nel cacciare a forza stoppa e pece nelle fessure tra le tavole di legname per rendere stagno lo scafo.
6) gli equipaggi delle packet ships che facevano la spola tra Liverpool-New York erano per la maggior parte irlandesi
7) come ci insegna Italo Ottonello ” All’atto della firma del contratto d’arruolamento per i viaggi di lungo corso, i marinai ricevevano un anticipo pari a tre mesi di paga che, a garanzia del rispetto del contratto, era erogato in forma di pagherò, esigibile tre giorni dopo che la nave aveva lasciato il porto, “sempre che detto marinaio sia salpato con detta nave”. Tutti, invariabilmente, correvano a cercare qualche ‘squalo’ compiacente che comprasse il loro pagherò ad un valore scontato, di solito del quaranta per cento, con molta parte dell’importo fornito in natura. Gli acquirenti, procuratori d’imbarco e procacciatori vari, – gli ‘arruolatori’, com’erano soprannominati – erano indotti a ‘sequestrare’ i marinai e portarli a bordo, ubriachi o drogati, con poco o niente vestiario oltre quello che avevano indosso, e sperperare o rubare loro tutto l’anticipo.
8) “Fo’c’sle” è una contrazione di “fore castle” (fore = foreward)
9) 
In Dana scendere  verso il basso. Rattle down. A salire. Rattle up
10) “to beat the band” è un’espressione americana che trae origine dall’iberno-inglese = very briskly; very fast; potrebbe anche significare “to beat all” nel senso di “fare del proprio meglio” ma anche di eccellere rispetto agli altri clipper delle altre compagnie, soprattutto in merito ai tempi di navigazione (sull’origine del termine qui)
11)  scritto erroneamente come “reef and reif”
12) trovato su Mudcat “Mount and Pass meaning to go out on the yard (the rope is called a stirrup hence the “mount”) and pass canvas as its reefed up”
13) “The Hook”= Sandy Hook 

O you western ocean labourers

La seconda versione condivide un testo simile alla prima, con una diversa melodia, ma riprende parte del testo della transportation song Van Diemen’s Land (British broadside ballad [Laws K25] per le varianti vedi qui, qui)

Siobhan Miller in Strata 2017 (I, II, IV, V)

Teyn in Far From The Tree 2016 ♪ seguono il testo tradizionale  diffuso in Cornovaglia, con un arrangiamento strumentale tutto loro. Riportato dalla testimonianza di John Farr di Gwithian sulla costa nord della Cornovaglia, in Canow Kernow (in italiano Canti della Cornovaglia (testo completo qui)


I
O you western ocean labourers
I’ll have you all beware (1),
when you’re working on a packet ship no dungaree oil skin (2) wear.
But have a big monkey jacket
already at your command
and I’ll bid  farewell to the Virgin rocks (3)/
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
Chorus:
We’ll rub (scrape) her and scrub her
With holy stone and sand,
And we’ll bid farewell to the virgin rocks On the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
As I lay on my bunk one night
a’dreaming all alone.
I dreamt I was in Liverpool
‘way up by Marylebone (4),
With my true love there beside me
and a jug of ale in my hand,
But I woke quite brokenhearted, boys on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III (5)
We had one Lynch from Ballinahinch,
Jimmy Murphy and Mike Moore;
It was in the winter of sixty-two,
Those sea-boys suffered sore,
For they’d pawned their clothes in Liverpool,
And sold them out of hand (6),
Not thinking of the cold Northwesters
On the Banks of Newfoundland
IV (7)
We had one female passenger,
Bridget Riley was her name,
she was fourteen years transported boy for playing not the game (8)
But she tore up her flannel petticoats To make mittens for our hands,
For she couldn’t see the poor boys freeze
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
And now we’re off Sandy Hook, my boys,
And the land’s all covered with snow,.
The tug-boat take up our hawser
And for New York we will tow;
And when we get to the Black Ball dock,
All the boys and girls there will stand, for if we are here we cannot be there on the Banks of Newfoundland.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
O voi lavoratori transatlantici
vi devo avvertire
quando vi imbarcate su di un postale di linea, niente giacca cerata
ma tenete a portata di mano una giacca da scimmia,
e dirò addio alle Virgin Rocks sui Banchi di Terranova!
Coro
La raschieremo e la strofineremo
con la pietra pomice e la sabbia
e diremo addio alle Virgin Rocks
sui Banchi di Terranova

II
Una notte che stavo nella mia cuccetta
dormivo tutto solo.
Ho sognato di essere a Liverpool
laggiù a Marylebone,
con il mio vero amore accanto a me
e una brocca di birra in mano,
ma mi svegliai con il cuore afflitto, ragazzi sui Banchi di Terranova.
III
C’era un Lynch da Ballinahinch,
Jimmy Murphy e Mike Moore;
era nell’inverno del sessantadue,
quei marinai soffrirono assai,
perché avevano impegnato i loro vestiti a Liverpool,
e li hanno venduti senza discussioni,
senza pensare al freddo maestrale
sui Banchi di Terranova
IV
Abbiamo avuto un passeggero femmina, si chiamava Bridget Riley
aveva un ragazzo di quattordici anni mandato alle colonie penali per non aver seguito le regole, ma lei stracciò le sue sottane di flanella per fare guanti per le nostre mani, perché non riusciva  vedere i ragazzi poveri congelarsi
sui Banchi di Terranova.
V
E ora siamo al largo di Sandy Hook,
ragazzi,
e la terra è tutta coperta di neve,
il rimorchiatore prese la nostra gomena e ci trascinò a New York;
e quando arriveremo al molo della Black Ball,
sarà pieno di ragazzi e  ragazze, perché se siamo qui non possiamo essere là
sui Banchi di Terranova

NOTE
1) il verso d’inizio è anche “Ye rambling boys of Erin, ye rambling boys, beware” (vedi testo)
2) dungaree jumpers
3) oppure”For there blows some cold Northwesters”. Le Virgin Rocks sono una serie di creste rocciose appena sotto la superficie dell’oceano sui Grandi Banchi di Terranova
4) Marylebone – una ricca area del centro di Londra, situata all’interno della città di Westminster. A volte è scritto come St Marylebone (o, arcaicamente, Mary-le-bone). Marylebone è approssimativamente delimitata da Oxford Street a sud, Marylebone Road a nord, Edgware Road a ovest e Great Portland Street a est. Una definizione più ampia indica l’area storica come Marylebone Village e comprende il vicino Regent’s Park, Baker Street e l’area immediatamente a nord di Marylebone Road, che contiene Marylebone Station, il sito originario del Marylebone Cricket Club a Dorset Square e il quartiere noto come Lisson Grove fino al confine con St John’s Wood. L’area ad est di Great Portland Street fino a Cleveland Street, conosciuta come Fitzrovia dagli anni ’40, è considerata storicamente East Marylebone. (tratto da qui)
5) I Teyn dicono:
We had Jack Lynch from Ballinahinch
Mike Murphy and some more
And I’ll tell you boys they suffered like hell
On the way to Baltimore
For they’d pawned their gear in Liverpool
And sailed as they did stand
For they’d pawned their gear in Liverpool
Not thinking of Newfoundland
6) la frase in origine doveva essere  “They pawned their clothes in Liverpool and sold their notes of hand” (impegnarono il loro anticipo e vendettero i loro pagherò)
7) una diversa versione dei Teyn
Well we had one female passenger
Bridget Reilly was her name
Unto her I had promised marriage
And on me she had claim
For she tore up all her petticoats
To make mittens for my hands
Saying I can’t see my true love freeze
On the Banks of the Newfoundland,
8)  “Play the Game” vuol dire prendersi dei rischi, non seguire le regole; si riferisce probabilmente alla caccia di frodo, tra i motivi di deportazione nelle colonie penali d’Australia

La versione di Stan Hugill: capstan shanty

Ancora grazie al meticoloso lavoro di Hulton Clint (o Ranzo soprannominato  lo YouTube chanteyman, da Hartford, Connecticut) che ci restituisce la versione sea shanty così come riportata da Stan Hugill, una evidente parodia della sea shanty Van Diemen’s Land come pubblicato nel suo “Shanties from the Seven Seas” che così scrive in merito: “Ancora nei regni delle navi e dei trasporti forzati, abbiamo la prossima  vecchia  forebitter usata spesso come capstan song, The Banks of Newf’n’land. Il suo riferimento al trasporto forzoso è il fatto di essere una parodia di una vecchia  forebitter, originariamente una ballad  dal titolo Van Diemen’s Land, una canzone spesso cantata a Liverpool e come forebitter spesso ascoltata nelle navi di Liverpool. Una nota allegata al disco The Singing Sailor afferma che “Le versioni possono ancora essere ascoltate in Scozia e in Irlanda, ma è a Liverpool e Salford (Lancs.) che la canzone è più radicata”. Racconta delle sofferenze dei bracconieri trasportati nella terra di Van Diemen.


I
Ye ramblin’ boys o’ Liverpool,
ye sailor men beware,
When you go in a Yankee packet ship, no dungaree jumpers wear;
But have a monkey jacket
all up to your command,
For there blows some cold nor’westers
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
Coro
We’ll wash her and we’ll scrub her down
With holystone and sand,
And we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks (1)
And the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
We had one Lynch from Ballynahinch, Spud Murphy and Mike Moore,
‘Twas in the winter of seventy-three those sea-boys suffered sore;
They popped their clothes in Liverpool, sold them all out of hand,
Not thinkin’ on the cold nor’winds,
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
We had a lady fair aboard,
Kate Connor was her name,
To her I promised marriage, and on me she had a claim;
She tore up her flannel petticoats to make mittens for my hands,
For she could not see her true love freeze
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
IV
I dreamed a dream the other night,
and I thought I was at home,
Alongside of my own true love,
and she in Marybone (2);
A jug of ale all on my knee, a glass of ale in hand,
But when I woke, my heart was broke
On the Banks of Newfoundland.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ragazzacci di Liverpool,
voi marinai attenti
quando vi imbarcate su di un postale americano, niente giacca di pelle, ma tenete a portata di mano una giacca da scimmia,
perchè là soffiano i venti freddi di Nord-Ovest sui Banchi di Terranova!
Coro
La laveremo e la strofineremo
con la pietra pomice e la sabbia
e diremo addio alle Virgin Rocks
e ai Banchi di Terranova

II
C’era un Lynch da Ballinahinch,
“Spud” Murphy e Mike Moore;
era nell’inverno del settantatre,
quei marinai soffrirono assai,
perché avevano impegnato i loro vestiti a Liverpool, e li vendettero senza discussioni, senza pensare al freddo vento del Nord
sui Banchi di Terranova
III
Abbiamo avuto una bella signora a bordo, si chiamava Kate Connor
le promisi di sposarla e su di me aveva credito,  lei stracciò le sue sottane di flanella per farne manopole per le mie mani, perché non sopportava di  vedere congelarsi il suo vero amore
sui Banchi di Terranova
IV
Ho sognato l’altra notte
e credevo di essere a casa
accanto al mio vero amore
di Marybone,
una brocca di birra alle ginocchia e in  in mano,
ma mi svegliai con il cuore afflitto,
sui Banchi di Terranova.

NOTE
1)   i Grandi Banchi di Terranova sono un tratto di mare dal fondale basso a sud-est dell’isola canadese di Terranova, di forma grosso modo triangolare spesso sconvolto dalle tempeste, infido e pericoloso per la presenza di iceberg e la frequente nebbie. Le Virgin Rocks sono una serie di creste rocciose appena sotto la superficie dell’oceano, un’ottima  base di pesca per le golette dell’Ottocento
2) le golette da pesca uscivano in mare a maggio e non rientravano sino a settembre
2) quartiere popolare di Liverpool

LA MELODIA DA DANZA

Come all me lads and fair young maids

Altra melodia per la versione senza ritornello che mostra il processo di trasformazione attraverso la tradizione orale di un testo che muta al passare del tempo e delle situazioni. A volta considerata come un canto distinto dai precedenti riferito al lavoro sui pescherecci.
Pete Shepheard in They Smiled As We Cam In, 2018 
che scrive nelle note : Questa è una delle mie canzoni preferite e non mi ha mai stancato da quando l’ho registrata per la prima volta dal pescatore di St. Andrews Tom Gordon nel 1964. L’ha imparato a sua volta da un uomo che aveva navigato sulla flotta baleniera da Leith nel primi anni del 1900. Questa è l’unica versione che ho incontrato e che è stata modernizzata nell’era delle barche a vapore – e incidentalmente datata nel testo al 1906.

Matthew Byrne live, arrangiamento strumentale Matthew Byrne & Billy Sutton


I
Come all me lads and fair young maids, come all ye sports beware,
when you go steamboat sailing,
no dungaree jackets wear;
And always wear a life belt,
or keep it close at hand,
there blows a cold nor-westerly wind on the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
We had on board some passengers
the Swedies and some more
’Twas in the year of nineteen-six that we did suffer sore,
We pawned our clothes in Liverpool, we pawned them every hand,
not thinking of the nor-westerly winds on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
And we had on board a fair young maid, Bridget Wellford was her name,
To her I promised marriage
and a pawn she had a claim ;
She tore her flannel petticoats
to make mittens for my hands,
she would not see her true love perish on the Banks of Newfoundland.
IV
Last night as I lay in my bunch I dream a pleasent dream,
that I was back in Scotland beside a flowing stream;
with the girl I love on my knee and a bottle in my hand,
I woke up broken hearted
on the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
Now we’re bound for Sandy Bay
where the high hills covered in snow,
Our steam boat she’s so hell-of-a fast, by New York we will go;
We’ll scrub her up and we’ll scrub her down with holystone and sand,
And we’ll bid adieu to the Virgin Rocks and the Banks of Newfoundland.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti, ragazzi e ragazze giovani e gentili,  fare attenzione ai vostri passatempi, quando vi imbarcate su di un battello a vapore,  non indossate una giacchetta di jeans ma indossate sempre una cintura di salvataggio o tenetela a portata di mano dove soffiano i freddi venti di nord-ovest,
sui Banchi di Terranova!
II
Avevamo a bordo dei passeggeri, svedesi e molti altri
era il 1906 che ci fece tribolare tanto,
abbiamo dato in pegno i nostri vestiti a Liverpool con leggerezza,
senza pensare ai venti di nord-ovest
sui Banchi di Terranova!
III
E avevamo a bordo una bella giovane, si chiamava Bridget Wellford
le promisi di sposarla
e un pegno pretendeva;
si strappò le sottane di flanella
per fare guanti per le mie mani,
non avrebbe visto il suo vero amore perire sui Banchi di Terranova.
IV
Una notte che stavo nella mia cuccetta
feci un bel sogno
che ero in Scozia accanto a un ruscelletto
con  la mia ragazza sulle ginocchia e una bottiglia in mano,
ma mi svegliai con il cuore afflitto,
sui Banchi di Terranova
V
E ora che siamo diretti a Sandy Bay, dove le alte colline sono ricoperte di neve, il nostro battello a vapore corre spedito e andremo a New York.
La raschieremo e la strofineremo
con la pietra pomice e la sabbia
e diremo addio alle Virgin Rocks sui Banchi di Terranova

NOTE
* testo tratto in parte dalla versione di Pete Shepheard  qui

transportation song
la pesca sui Banchi
the Eastern Light
morte del capitano (ballata americana)
naufragio e soccorso sui Banchi (ballata canadese)

 

FONTI
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/118/
https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-banks-of-newfoundland-emc/
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/bnk_newfoundland.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/banksofnewfoundland.html
https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/The-Paul-McKenna-Band/The-Banks-of-Newfoundland

http://gestsongs.com/01/banks1.htm
http://gestsongs.com/01/banks3.htm
http://gestsongs.com/02/banks5.htm
https://www.springthyme.co.uk/1042/42_09.htm

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44529
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17059
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130147

Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

Leggi in Italiano

Entitled “Jolly Roving Tar” but more frequently “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” here is a forebitter song that ironizes on the idle occupations of a sailor when he is ashore.
For my money’s gone,” says the sailor who is well liked and fondled by the ladies when his pockets are full, but immediately put aside for another sailor when the money ends!

A similar song (we do not know if original or a traditional version rewriting) was written in New York in 1885 by Ed Harrigan & David Braham for the music hall entitled ‘Old Lavender‘ (text and score here); a version published by John and Alan Lomax in “American Ballads & Folk Songs” was attributed to John Thomas, a Welsh sailor who was on “the Philadelphian” in 1896. (text here), but the main source of the best known variant comes from “Grammy” Fish .

“GRAMMY” FISH

Mrs. Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) spent the first 24 years of her life in Black Brook, NY, not far from the Canadian border. Lena’s main source of songs was her own family, the Bourne; his ancestors were the first settlers of Cape Cod and a lot of songs (with many English and Irish traditional tunes) had passed to the family generations since emigration . As a lumber trader, her father  collected many songs from the people he met in the New England woods in his travels.
Once married, Lena moved to Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Two collectors of traditional songs (Helen Harkness Flanders and Marguerite Olney) interviewed her in 1940 and recorded about 175 songs; the following year Anne and Frank Warner collected a hundred songs in four recording sessions half of which completly new ones.
“Grammy” Fish had taken her role as a witness of the past to heart so as to transcribe the “old songs” in many notebooks to leave them to the new generations.

Assassin’s Creed Rogue, Sea Shanty Edition

Bootstrappers live

I
Ships may come and ships may go
as long as the seas do roll
But a sailor lad just like his dad
he loves the flowing bowl
a woman ashore he does adore
a girl who’s plump and round
when your money’s all gone,
it’s the same old song
“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!”
CHORUS
Come along, come along,
me jolly brave boys,
There’s plenty more grog(1) in the jar
We’ll plough the briny ocean line
like a jolly roving tar
II
When Jack’s ashore, he’ll make his way
To some old boarding house(2)
He’s welcomed in with rum and gin,
likewise with pork and scouse
He’ll spend and spend and never offend
Till he lies drunk on the ground
When his money’s all gone…
III
Then Jack will slip(3) on board
some ship bound for India or Japan
and in Asia there, the ladies fair
all love a sailor man
He’ll go ashore and he’ll not scorn
to buy some girl her gown
when his money’s all gone…
IV
When Jack is worn and weatherbeat
too old to cruise about
they’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(4) calls him out
Then he’ll raise hands high
and loud he’ll cry “Thank Christ, I’m homeward bound!”
when his money’s all gone…

NOTES
1) grog= drink
2) Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, which the sailors define as” recruiters “, who provide” indifferently lodging and boarding “. They often welcome sailors “on credit”. On the advance received by boarders at the time of enrollment, they recover for food and accommodation, and with the rest they provide them with poor quality clothing and equipment “. (Italo Ottonello)
3)  or “He then will sail aboard some ship
4)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes. (the eight bells were ringed at 4, at 8, at 12, at 16, at 20 and at midnight). An hourglass was used to calculate the time.

Great Big Sea from Play 1997. Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection, #71.

I
Ships may come and ships may go
As long as the sea does roll.
Each sailor lad just like his dad,
He loves the flowing bowl.
A trip on shore he does adore
With a girl who’s nice and round.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
[Chorus]
Come along, come along,
You jolly brave boys,
There’s lots of grog(1) in the jar.
We’ll plough the briny ocean
With the jolly roving tar.
II
When Jack comes in, it’s then he’ll steer
To some old boarding house(2).
They’ll welcome him with rum and gin,
And feed him on pork scouse.
He’ll lend, spend and he’ll not offend (3) Till he’s lyin’ drunk on the ground
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
III
Jack, he then, oh then he’ll sail
Bound down for Newfoundland.
All the ladies fair in Placentia(4) there
They love that sailor man
He’ll go to shore out on a tear
And he’ll buy some girl a gown.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
IV
When Jack gets old and weather beat,
Too old to roam about,
They’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(5) calls him out.
Then he’ll raise his eyes up to the skies,
Sayin’ “Boys, we’re homeward bound.”
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!

NOTES
3) meaning that he will not offend the innkeeper with a refusal
4) Placentia is a small Canadian city formed by the union of the villages of Jerseyside, Townside, Freshwater, Dunville and Argentia .
5)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes.

ENGLISH VERSION

In the nineteenth century there was a completely different version in which poor Susan was distraught because the fine William was still far from the sea, she decided to follow him as a sailor. The version is still popular in Newfoundland. As much as I searched the web at the moment I did not find a video to listen to.
It was in the town of Liverpool, all in the month of May,
I overheard a damsel, alone as she did stray,
She did appear like Venus or some sweet, lovely star,
As she walked toward the beach, lamenting for her jolly, roving Tar.

Jolly Roving Tar by “Irish Rovers”

The text was written by George Millar the founder of the “Irish Rovers” and although a different song borrows some phrases from “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” other equally famous sea songs on sailors.
The Irish Rover from Another Round 2005: various dances taken from fantasy films and animations

I
Well here we are, we’re back again
Safe upon the shore
In Belfast town we’d like to stay
And go to sea no more
We’ll go into a public house
And drink till we’re content
For the lassies they will love us
Till our money is all spent
CORO
So pass the flowin’ bowl
Boys there’s whiskey in the jar
And we’ll drink to all the lassies
And the jolly roving tar
II
Oh Johnny did you miss me
When the nights were long and cold
Or did you find another love
In your arms to hold
Says he I thought of only you
While on the sea afar
So come up the stairs and cuddle
With your jolly roving tar
III
Well in each other’s arms they rolled
Till the break of day
When the sailor rose
and said farewell
I must be on me way
Ah don’t you leave me Johnny lad
I thought you’d marry my
Says he I can’t be married
For I’m married to the sea
IV
Well come all you bonnie lasses
And a warning take by me
And never trust an Irishman
An inch above your knee
He’ll tease you and he’ll squeeze you
And when he’s had his fun
He’ll leave you in the morning
With a daughter or a son

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/jolly-roving-tar.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/JollyRovinTar/lomax.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/jolly.htm
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/GETUPJAC.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/08/getup.htm
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/catalog/levy:072.028
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=338
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96587
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96582
http://adirondackmusic.org/subpages/69/9/6/lena-bourne-fish

MARY MAC

Una vecchia canzone scozzese Up Amang The Heather o “The Hill of Bennachie” potrebbe essere benissimo la matrice della versione attuale di Mary Mac una scanzonata e popolare drinking song, che è iniziata a circolare anche in Irlanda intorno agli anni 60-70.
La particolarità di questa versione della melodia è che il tempo diventa sempre più veloce, e le parole sono scandite sempre più velocemente in una specie di scioglilingua. Qui sembra quasi la parte seconda della storia raccontata in “Up among the heather”: dopo che il nostro galletto si è divertito a rotolarsi nell’erica con la ragazza (c’è chi preferisce la ginestra o il fieno..) è  costretto ad affrontare un matrimonio riparatore!

Il testo è stato accreditato a Tommy Makem che registrò per primo la canzone nel 1977 con il titolo di “Mary Mac”.
ASCOLTA Tommy Makem & Clancy Brothers (strofe I, II, III, VI e VII)
un vero scioglilingua che arrotola le “erre”

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea (strofe I e da III a VII), la IV e la V strofa sono chiaramente estrapolate da “Up among the heather.”

ASCOLTA Carbon Leaf ci sono delle leggere variazioni testuali riportate nelle note


I
There’s a neat(1) little lass
and her name is Mari Mac,
Make no mistake, she’s the girl
I’m gonna track;
Lots of other fellas
try to get her on her back,
But I’m thinking that
they’ll have to get up early(2).
Mari Mac’s mother’s
making Mari Mac marry me,
My mother’s making me
marry Mari Mac;
Well I’m going to marry Mari
for when Mari’s taking care of me,
We’ll all be feeling merry
when I marry Mari Mac.
Kaiyut-little-ottle-eetle-ottle-eetle-um(3)
II
Now this wee lass,
she has a lot of class.
She has a lot of brass
and her mother thinks I’m a gas(4).
So I’d be a silly ass
if I let the matter pass,
for my mother thinks
she suits me rather fairly
III
Now Mari and her mother
are an awful lot together,
In fact, you hardly see the one
or the one without the other;
And people(5) often wonder
if it’s Mari or her mother,
Or the both of them together
I am courting.
IV
Well up among the heather
in the hills of Benifee (6)
Well I had a bonnie lass
sitting on me knee
A bumble bee stung me
right above me knee
Up among the heather
in the hills of Benifee
V
Well I said, “Wee bonnie lassie,
where you going to spend the day?”
She said, “Among the heather
in the hills of Benifee;
Where all the boys and girls
are making out so free(7),
Up among the heather
in the hills of Benifee.”
VI
The wedding’s on Wednesday,
everything’s arranged,
Soon her name will be changed to mine
unless her mind be changed;
And making the arrangements,
I’m feeling quite deranged(8),
Marriage is an awful undertaking.
VII
(It’s) Sure to be a grand affair,
grander than a fair,
going to be a fork and plate
for every man that’s there(9);
And I’ll be a bugger
if I don’t get my share(10),
If I don’t, we’ll be very much mistaken.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’è una ragazzina fantastica
e si chiama Mary Mac,
nessun errore, lei è la ragazza
che ho preso di mira.
Un sacco di altri ragazzi
cercano di andarle dietro
ma credo che
dovevano svegliarsi prima!
La madre di Mary Mac
sta facendo Mary Mac sposare con me,
mia madre mi sta facendo
sposare con Mary Mac
Beh io mi vado a sposare Mary
che quando Mary si prenderà cura di me,
saremo tutti allegri,
quando mi sposerò Mary Mac
Kaiyut-little-ottle-eetle-ottle-eetle-um!

II
Questa ragazzina
ha un sacco di classe
ha un sacco di gingilli
e sua madre pensa che io sia uno sbruffone. Così sarei un asino sciocco
se lasciassi cadere la faccenda
perchè mia madre pensa
che sia quella giusta per me.
III
Ora Maria e sua madre
stanno un sacco di tempo insieme,
infatti difficilmente vedrete
l’una senza l’altra
e la gente si chiede spesso
se è Mari o sua madre
o entrambe insieme
che sto corteggiando.
IV
Su tra l’erica
sulle colline del Benifee,
avevo una bella ragazza
seduta sulle mie ginocchia
un calabrone mi punse
proprio sopra il ginocchio
lassù tra l’edera
sulle colline del Benifee.
V
Ho detto, “bene bella ragazza, dove hai intenzione di trascorrere la giornata?”
dice: “Tra l’erica sulle
colline di Benifee;
dove tutti i ragazzi e le ragazze
se la spassano,
lassù tra l’erica
sulle colline di Benifee!”
VI
Il matrimonio è per mercoledì,
tutto è organizzato,
presto il suo nome cambierà nel mio
a meno che lei cambi intenzione;
prendere gli accordi (per la festa di nozze)
mi fa sentire un po’ folle,
il matrimonio è un impegno terribile.
VII
Sarà di certo una grande festa
più grandiosa di una fiera
ci sarà una forchetta e un piatto
per ogni uomo presente;
e io sarei uno stronzetto
se non mettessi la mia parte,
se non lo facessi, sarebbe molto sbagliato

NOTE
1) i Carbon Leaf dicono wee Makem dice little
2) letterlamente “alzarsi per tempo”
3) abbellimento non sense. Il coro è evidentemente uno scioglilingua
4) Makem dice “There a little lass and she has a lot of brass, has a lot of gas and her father thinks I’m gas”
5) i Carbon Leaf dicono lads
6) le  hill o’ Bennachie sono storpiate in colline di Benifee (vedi)
7) i Carbon Leaf dicono “where all the boys and girls are makin’ it for free”
8) i Carbon Leaf dicono “We’re makin’ the arrangements and I’m just a bit deranged”.
9) Makem e i Carbon Leaf dicono “There’s gonna be a coach and pair for every couple there.”
10) Makem e i Carbon Leaf dicono “We’ll dine upon the finest fare. I’m sure to get my share”.

FONTI
http://chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/marymac.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/04/marymack.htm

THE MUMMERS ARE PLANKIN’ HER DOWN

Mummers sono uomini (e donne) travestiti e camuffati, che nascondono il volto dietro veli e teli con il buco per gli occhi e la bocca, simili a spettri, e che un tempo, in certi particolari giorni dell’anno, andavano a visitare i loro vicini di casa in casa, cantando e ballando e facendo confusione. (vedi introduzione)

CHRISTMAS MUMMING

Un’usanza solstiziale che richiama certe tradizioni celtiche di Samain (vedi) è quella dell’house visiting  tipica del Mumming Natalizio diffusa un tempo nelle Isole Britanniche e anche nei paesi con una forte immigrazione irlandese e scozzese.
mummer-songLa tradizione che andava scomparendo a Terranova è stata documentata nientemeno che con una canzone scritta nel 1973 da Bud Davidge del gruppo Simani, dal titoloThe Mummer’s song (illustrata da Ian Wallace ).
Oggi il Mumming Natalizio si è trasformato in una sorta di parata carnevalesca per le strade, mentre un tempo era una house-visiting cioè un giro casa per casa dei mummers che venivano accolti nella stanza più calda (di solito la cucina) e rifocillati con bevande.
Travestiti in modo stravagante ed estemporaneo (con grottesche imbottiture per deformare la corporatura, con gli indumenti che in genere si portano sotto i vestiti portati invece sopra – reggiseni mutandoni del nonno e calzamaglia, con i volti incappucciati o velati o anneriti) “le maschere” portavano lo scompiglio e un po’ di paura, soprattutto perchè era difficile riconoscere in quei travestimenti, il vicino della porta accanto: uno suonava il violino e un altro l’organetto e avrebbero danzato per un po’ con gli abitanti della casa per portare il buonumore.

ASCOLTA Simani 

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea inizia direttamente con le strofe

Spoken:
Don’t seem like Christmas if the Mummers are not here,
Granny would say as she’d knit in her chair;
Things have gone modern and I s’pose that’s the cause,
Christmas is not like it was.
(Knock, knock, knock, knock)
Please open the door. We have…
I
Hark, what’s the noise out by the porch door?
(dear) Granny, ‘tis Mummers, there’s twenty or more.
Her old weathered face brightens up with a grin,
“Any Mummers, nice Mummers ‘lowed in?”
II
Come in, lovely Mummers, don’t bother the snow,
We can wipe up the water sure after you go;
Sit if you can or on some Mummer’s knee,
Let’s see if we know who ya be.
III
Ah, there’s big ones and small ones, and tall ones and thin,
(There’s) boys dressed as women and girls dressed as men,
(With) humps on their backs and mitts on their feet,
My blessed, we’ll die with the heat.
IV
(Well), there’s only one there that I think that I know,
That tall fellow standing alongside the stove;
He’s shaking his fist for to make me not tell,
Must be Willy from out on the hill.
V
Oh, but that one’s a stranger, if ever was one,
With his underwear stuffed and his trapdoor undone (1);
Is he wearing his mother’s big forty-two bra?
I knows, but I’m not going to say.
VI
I s’pose you fine mummers would turn down a drop
Of home brew or alky, whatever you got?
Not the one with his rubber boots on the wrong feet,
He’s enough for to do him a week.(2)
VII
Well I ‘spose you can dance? Yeah, they all nod their heads,
They’ve been tapping their feet ever since they came in;
And now that the drinks have been all passed around,
the mummers are plankin’ her down (3).
VIII
Ah, be careful the lamp! Now hold on to the stove,
Don’t you swing Granny hard, ‘cause you know that she’s old;
No need for to care how you buckles the floor (4),
‘Cause the mummers have danced here before.
IX
Oh, my God, how hot is it? We better go,(5)
I allow that we’ll all get the devil’s own cold;
Good night and good Christmas, mummers me dear,
Please God, we will see you next year.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Parlato:

“Non sembra Natale se non arrivano le Maschere- direbbe la Nonnina mentre sferruzza sulla sua sedia – i tempi sono diventati moderni e credo che sia questo il motivo,
per cui il Natale non è com’era”
Toc, Toc, Toc, Toc, 
“Aprite la porta per favore abbiamo…”
I
Ascolta, che rumore viene dalla porta del portico?
“Cara Nonnina, ecco le Maschere, sono una ventina o più.”
La sua faccia segnata dalle rughe si illumina con un sorriso
“Dei Mummers, bei Mummers possiamo entrare?”
II
“Ah venite cari mummers, non badate alla neve, asciugheremo l’acqua dopo che ve ne sarete andati;
sedetevi dove potete oppure sulle ginocchia di qualche altra Maschera.
Cercheremo di indovinare chi siete.”
III
Ah ce ne sono di grandi e di piccoli
di alti e di magri,
ci sono uomini vestiti da donna e ragazze vestite da uomini,
con gobbe sulla schiena e muffole ai piedi
“Benedetto me, scoppieremo dal caldo!!”.
IV
“Beh ce n’è soltanto uno che credo di conoscere,
quel tipo alto che sta accanto alla stufa;
sta agitando il pugno per non farmelo dire,
potrebbe essere Willy che viene dalla collina.”
V
“Oh ma quell’altro è uno straniero, se mai ce ne fosse uno, con la biancheria imbottita e la patta sul didietro aperta(1), indossa il grosso reggiseno taglia 42 della madre!
Lo conosco, ma non dirò chi è”
VI
“Immagino che voi bei mummers gradiate un goccetto
di birra fatta in casa o del distillato, ne volete?”
“Non quello con gli stivali di gomma nel piede sbagliato, ha fatto il pieno per tutta la settimana”(2)
VII
“Immagino che voi sappiate danzare?” Si – tutti annuiscono
hanno battuto il tempo con il piede sin da quando sono arrivati,
e ora che è stato fatto girare il bere,
di certo i mummers ci daranno dentro (3).
VIII
Attenti alla lampada! Adesso tenetevi alla stufa!
Non fate girare la nonnina in fretta, perché sapete che è anziana;
e non badate se rigate il pavimento (4)
perché i mummers hanno danzato qui da prima.
IX
“Oh mio Dio ma quanto caldo fa? E’ meglio se andiamo (5)”
“Suppongo che abbiamo tutti il sangue freddo come il diavolo”
“Buona Notte e Buon Natale,
miei cari mummers
a Dio piacendo, vi vedremo il prossimo anno”

NOTE
1) letteralmente botola si riferisce ad uno sbrago nei pantaloni sul didietro
2) i Great Big Sea dicono invece
Sure, the one with his rubber boots on the wrong feet
Ate enough for to do him all week.
3) letteralmente “la spalmeranno a terra” nel senso che la danza diventerà sempre più frenetica
4) i Great Big Sea dicono: And never you mind how you buckle the floor
5) i Great Big Sea dicono: We’ll never know

FIGGY DUFF with no Figgy Pudding

“Tarry Trousers” l’esibizione-concerto dei Figgy Duff per natale con musica e mummers

il concerto completo qui

FONTI
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/684274795
http://thegrimmteaparty.blogspot.it/2009/12/have-yourself-creepy-little-christmas.html
http://www.somethingsaturdays.com/the-blog/mummers-parade-saturday
https://joannadawson.wordpress.com/2010/12/21/any-mummers-llowd-in/
http://www.msgr.ca/msgr-2/mummering4.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/01/mummers.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/mummerscarol.htm

I’M A ROVER AND SELDOM SOBER

Nella tradizione popolare sono assai numerose le ballate dette “night-visiting song” in cui l’amante (un vagabondo, un soldato o un marinaio, ma anche un bracciante agricolo o un giovane apprendista) bussa di notte alla finestra (porta) della fidanzata e viene fatto entrare nella camera da letto. Alcune sono collegate al tema dell’emigrazione, l’innamorato chiede un ultimo intimo incontro prima di partire per l’America, altre aggiungono un tocco “macabro” alla storia, trattandosi della visita di un revenant ossia di un fantasma fin troppo in carne!! Questa variante irlandese prende le mosse dalla ballata “The Grey Cock“, ma il gallo qui che canta è solo uno dei tanti uccelli che saluta il sorgere del sole per avvisare il “rover” che è tempo di andare al lavoro!
The cocks were waking the birds were whistling;
the streams they ran free about the brae
“Remember lass I’m a ploughman’s laddie
and the farmer I must obey.”

ASCOLTA The Dubliners che ne fanno un classico

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea 


I (1)
There’s ne’er a nicht I’m gane to ramble, there’s ne’er a nicht I’m gane to roam There’s ne’er a nicht I’m gane to ramble, intae the erms of me ain true love
CHORUS
I’m a rover (2), seldom sober,
I’m a rover of high degree
It’s when I’m drinking
I’m always thinking
how to gain my love’s company
II
Though the night be
as dark as dungeon,
not a star can be seen above
I will be guided without a stumble (3),
into the arms of the one I love
III
He stepped up to her bedroom window,
kneeling gently upon a stone
And he tapped at the bedroom window (4); “My darling dear
do you lie alone?”
IV
She raised her heid on her snaw-white pillow wi’ her arms around her breast,
“Wha’ is that at my bedroom window disturbin’ me at my lang night’s rest?”
V
“It’s only me your own true lover;
open the door (6) and let me in
For I have travelled a weary journey (7) and I’m near drenched to my skin (8).”
VI (9)
She opened the door with the greatest pleasure,/she opened the door and she let him in/They both shook hands and embraced each other, until the morning they lay as one
VII
Says I: “My love I must go and leave you, to climb the hills they are far above
But I will climb with the greatest pleasure, since I’ve been in the arms of my love”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non c’è notte in cui non vada a zonzo, non c’è  notte in cui non vada a bighellonare, non c’è notte in cui non vada a zonzo, tra le braccia del mio vero amore
CORO
“Sono un libertino (2) raramente sobrio, sono un libertino d’alta classe
e quando bevo,
penso sempre a ottenere
la compagnia del mio amore.”

II
“Sebbene la notte sia
più buia di una prigione,
e nemmeno una stella si riesce a vedere in cielo, 
sarò guidato senza passi falsi (3)
nelle braccia del mio unico vero amore”
III
Si presentò alla finestra della sua stanza da letto,
inginocchiandosi piano sulla pietra
bussò alla finestra della camera (4):
Mio caro amore,
dormi sola?
IV
Lei sollevò la testa dal soffice e candido cuscino con le braccia intorno al seno
Chi è che alla finestra disturba il mio riposo in questa lunga notte (5)?
V
Sono solo io,  proprio il tuo vero amore, apri la porta (6) e fammi entrare
poiché ho viaggiato a lungo e sono bagnato quasi fino al midollo (8)”
VI
Lei aprì la porta con gran piacere,
aprì la porta e lo fece entrare
si strinsero le mani e si abbracciarono l’un l’altra,
e fino al mattino furono una cosa sola
VII
dico io: “Amore mio debbo lasciarti,
per scalare le colline che sono molto distanti

ma le scalerò con gran piacere
visto che sono stato tra le braccia
del mio amore

NOTE
1) strofa aggiuntiva dei Dubliners
2) rover in questo contesto significa più propriamente “viveur” cioè un festaiolo, compagno di bisbocce, ossia un gaudente che passa le notti a bere, giocare d’azzardo e andare a donne. In italiano un termine che potrebbe racchiudere questi significati è “libertino”
3) il verso viene dalla versione revenant ballad “Senza posare piede” sono espressioni che stanno a indicare una vecchia credenza popolare: coloro che vengono in visita dall’Altro Mondo Celtico (dove hanno vissuto secondo lo scorrere del tempo fatato – un giorno presso Fairy corrisponde ad un anno terrestre) non devono posare i piedi sul suolo perchè altrimenti vengono raggiunti dall’età terrestre
4) oppure “He whispers through her bedroom window” (in italiano: sussurra alla finestra della camera)
5) la lunga notte è molto probabilmente quella del Solstizio d’Inverno
6) open up please
7) I hae come on a lang journey
8)  ho tradotto l’espressione secondo l’equivalente frase idiomatica in italiano: nella ballata “The Grey Cock” William è bagnato perchè presumibilmente è morto annegato, qui si suppone che si tratti del cattivo tempo: uno dei pretesti condivisi nelle night songs per far aprire la porta alla fanciulla dormiente è proprio quello della notte fredda e piovosa. (vedi)
9) She opened up with the greatest pleasure,
unlocked the door and she let him in
They both embraced and kissed each other;
till the morning they lay as one

Un’ulteriore variante viene dalla Scozia (vedi)
ASCOLTA The Corrie Folk Trio

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/this-ae-nicht/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/iamarover.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/imoftendrunkandimseldomsober.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thegreycock.html
http://sangstories.webs.com/imarover.htm
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah07/ah07_05.htm

Row me bullies boys row (Alan Doyle)

Read the post in English

La versione più recente di questa popolarissima sea shanty viene dal film “Robin Hood Principe dei Ladri” di Ridley Scott (2010), ed è stata scritta per l’occasione da Alan Doyle (front man della band canadese Great Big Sea),  richiamando la melodia e la struttura del ritornello di Liverpool Judies con un testo che ricorda le tipiche frasi dei questi canti marinareschi; va da se che ognuno ci aggiunge la strofa che più gli piace.

russel crow crew
I’ll sing you a song, it’s a song of the sea
I’ll sing you a song if you’ll sing it with me
While the first mate is playing the captain aboard
He looks like a peacock with pistols and sword
The captain likes whiskey, the mate, he likes rum
Us sailers like both but we can’t get us none
Well farewell my love it is time for to roam
The old blue peters are calling us home

In Taberna  che ne fanno un bell’arrangiamento

Strangs and Stout bella anche questa versione con l’innesto del tune Julia Delaney

le versioni testuali che ho trovato in rete sono molte


CHORUS
And it’s row me bully boys
We’re in a hurry boys
We got a long way to go
And we’ll sing and we’ll dance
And bid farewell to France
And it’s row me bully boys row.
I
I’ll sing you a song,
it’s a song of the sea
Row me bully boys row
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
II
Well farewell my love
it is time for to roam
Row me bully boys row
The old blue peters
are calling us home
And it’s row me bully boys row
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
remate bravacci
abbiamo fretta, ragazzi
ci vuole ancora molto
e noi canteremo e danzeremo
e diremo addio alla Francia,
remate bravacci

I
Vi canterò una canzone,
è una canzone marinaresca
remate bravacci
Navigammo
nei mari più pericolosi
remate bravacci
ma adesso siamo di ritorno,
così custodite le vostre figlie
remate bravacci
II
Addio amore mio
è tempo di andare
remate bravacci
L’Old Blue Peter
ci riporta verso casa
remate bravacci, remate|

Barnacle Buoys


I
When we set sail for Bristol
the sun was like crystal
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
We found muddier water
when passing Bridge Water
And it’s row, me bully boys row
Chorus:
And it’s row, me bully boys,
we’re in a hurry, boys
We’ve got a long way to go
And we’ll drink as we glance
– a last look at France
row, me bully boys, row
II
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
III
So we’ve been away
for many a day now
So we’ll fill out our sails
and drink all the ale now
IV
So we’ll drink and we’ll feast
with no care in the least
And soon, as we’re craving’,
we’ll sail up to Avon
V
As we tied up in Bristol,
me heart was a-thumpin’
Then I found my girl Alice,
who took me a-scrumpin’
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Quando siamo salpati per Bristol
il sole era come cristallo
remate bravacci
abbiamo trovato acque fangose
superato Bridge Water
remate bravacci
CORO
remate bravacci
abbiamo fretta, ragazzi
ci vuole ancora molto
e noi berremo e daremo un’ultima occhiata per dire addio alla Francia,
remate bravacci

II
Abbiamo navigato
nei mari più pericolosi
ma adesso siamo di ritorno,
così custodite le vostre figlie.
III
Siamo stati via
per tanto tempo
così andremo a gonfie vele
e berremo tutta la birra.
IV
Berremo e faremo festa
senza preoccuparci del resto
e presto come abbiamo desiderato
sbarcheremo a Avon.
V
Mentre ci siamo imbarcati a Bristol
il mio cuore batteva forte
allora ho trovato la mia ragazza Alice che mi ha dato una fregatura

e chi ne ha più ne mette!

LA VERSIONE ITALIANA: VOGA AMICO MIO VAI

Ecco come è stato tradotto il testo nell’adattamento in italiano


CORO
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più (amico)

un altro po’, dove si va non lo so
Balliamo cantiamo e la Francia lasciamo
voga un altro po’ vai
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Voga un altro po’ dove si va non lo so
La Francia non la rivedremo giammai
Voga amico mio vai
E’ tardi oramai voi siete già nei guai
Voga amico mio vai
O voi non scherzate oppure rischiate
Voga voga un po’ di più
Ma non si può stare troppo via dal mare
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Partiamo di nuovo per non ritornare
Voga amico mio vai

ARCHIVIO:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
la versione ‘Frisco
la versione New York
la versione dal film Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

FONTI
https://thesession.org/discussions/24758
https://www.musixmatch.com/it/testo/Rambling-Sailors/Row-Me-Bully-Boys
http://www.songsterr.com/a/wsa/misc-soundtrack-robin-hood-row-me-bully-boys-chords-s376527
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=158562
https://reelsoundtrack.wordpress.com/2010/05/15/robin-hood-soundtrack/

“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!” about a jolly roving tar

Read the post in English

Intitolata “Jolly Roving Tar” ma più frequentemente “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” ecco una forebitter song che ironizza sulle oziose occupazioni di un marinaio quando si trova sulla terra ferma.
For my money’s gone, ‘tis the same old song” dice il marinaio che è benvoluto e vezzeggiato dalle donnine quando ha le tasche piene, ma messo subito da parte per far posto ad un altro ancora in grana, quando i soldi finiscono!!

Una canzone simile (non sappiamo se originale oppure riscrittura di una versione tradizionale)  è stata scritta a New York nel 1885 da Ed Harrigan & David Braham per il music hall dal titolo ‘Old Lavender’ (testo e spartito qui); una versione pubblicata da John and Alan Lomax in “American Ballads & Folk Songs” è stata attribuita a John Thomas un marinaio gallese imbarcato sul Philadelphian nel 1896. (testo qui), ma la fonte principale della variante più conosciuta  proviene da “Grammy” Fish.

“GRAMMY” FISH

La signora Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) visse da ragazza a Black Brook, NY, poco lontano dal confine canadese. La principale fonte delle sue canzoni era ovviamente la sua famiglia, i Bourne con il padre e lo zio in testa; i suoi antenati furono i primi coloni di Capo Cod e i canti erano passati alle varie generazioni della famiglia dai tempi dell’emigrazione con molti brani della tradizione inglese e irlandese. Il padre inoltre in qualità di commerciante di legname viaggiava molto e imparò (trasmettendole alla figlia) ulteriori canzoni nei boschi del New England.
Una volta sposata Lena si trasferì a Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Due collezionisti delle canzoni tradizionali la intervistarono nel 1940 e registrarono circa 175 canzoni (Helen Harkness Flanders e Marguerite Olney), l’anno successivo Anne e Frank Warner raccolsero un centinaio di canzoni in quattro sessioni di registrazione la metà delle quali non raccolte nell’anno precedente.
La signora aveva a preso così a cuore il suo ruolo di testimone del passato da trascrivere su numerosi quaderni le “vecchie canzoni” proprio per lasciarle in eredità alle nuove generazioni.

Assassin’s Creed Rogue, Sea Shanty Edition

Bootstrappers live


I
Ships may come and ships may go
as long as the seas do roll
But a sailor lad just like his dad
he loves the flowing bowl
a woman ashore he does adore
a girl who’s plump and round
when your money’s all gone,
it’s the same old song
“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!”
CHORUS
Come along, come along,
me jolly brave boys,
There’s plenty more grog(1) in the jar
We’ll plough the briny ocean line
like a jolly roving tar
II
When Jack’s ashore, he’ll make his way
To some old boarding house(2)
He’s welcomed in with rum and gin,
likewise with pork and scouse
He’ll spend and spend and never offend
Till he lies drunk on the ground
When his money’s all gone…
III
Then Jack will slip(3) on board
some ship bound for India or Japan
and in Asia there, the ladies fair
all love a sailor man
He’ll go ashore and he’ll not scorn
to buy some girl her gown
when his money’s all gone…
IV
When Jack is worn and weatherbeat
too old to cruise about
they’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(4) calls him out
Then he’ll raise hands high
and loud he’ll cry “Thank Christ, I’m homeward bound!”
when his money’s all gone…
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Le navi vanno e vengono
e navigano in lungo e in largo il mare
ma un giovane marinaio proprio come suo padre ama la boccia piena
e una donna a terra adora
una ragazza che sia graziosa e rotondetta, e quando i soldi sono andati è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
Venite avanti
allegri e bravi ragazzi
c’è tanto grog(1) nella bottiglia
solcheremo l’oceano salmastro
come un allegro marinaio vagabondo
II
Quando Jack sbarca si dirigerà
verso una qualche vecchia pensione d’imbarco(2)
dove gli danno il benvenuto con rum e gin
e lo riempiranno con stufato di maiale.
Spenderà e spenderà e mai smetterà
finchè finirà ubriaco steso a terra
quando i soldi sono andati..
III
Jack allora dormirà(3) a bordo
di qualche nave con destinazione India o Giappone e in Asia là, le belle signore
tutte amano un marinaio
Andrà a riva e non disprezzerà
di comprare ad una ragazza un vestito
quando i soldi sono andati…
IV
Quando Jack diventa vecchio e stanco
troppo vecchio per andare in giro
si fermerà in qualche negozio di rum
finchè l’ottavo rintocco (4) lo chiamerà
Allora solleverà gli occhi al cielo
e forte griderò “Grazie Cristo, sono in rotta verso casa”
quando i soldi sono andati…

NOTE
1) qui il termine è da intendersi nel senso generico di liquore e non più propriamente della bevanda mescolata con acqua servita sulle navi ai marinai
2) Le “boarding houses” sono pensioni per marinai, presenti in ogni grande porto di mare. “Sono tenute da procuratori d’imbarco (boarding masters), di dubbia reputazione, che i marinai definiscono «arruolatori», i quali forniscono «indifferentemente alloggio e imbarco». Spesso accolgono i marinai «a credito». Sull’anticipo ricevuto dai pensionanti all’atto dell’arruolamento, si rifanno del vitto e dell’alloggio, e con il resto forniscono loro abbigliamento e attrezzature di scarsa qualità“. (Italo Ottonello)
3)  oppure He then will sail aboard some ship
4) l’espressione è squisitamente nautica sta per “quando arriverà il momento”,  è finito il suo turno di guardia a bordo come pure la sua vita (vedi nota 5)

Great Big Sea in Play 1997. Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection, #71.


I
Ships may come and ships may go
As long as the sea does roll.
Each sailor lad just like his dad,
He loves the flowing bowl.
A trip on shore he does adore
With a girl who’s nice and round.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
[Chorus]
Come along, come along,
You jolly brave boys,
There’s lots of grog(1) in the jar.
We’ll plough the briny ocean
With the jolly roving tar.
II
When Jack comes in, it’s then he’ll steer
To some old boarding house(2).
They’ll welcome him with rum and gin,
And feed him on pork scouse.
He’ll lend, spend and he’ll not offend (3) Till he’s lyin’ drunk on the ground
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
III
Jack, he then, oh then he’ll sail
Bound down for Newfoundland.
All the ladies fair in Placentia(4) there
They love that sailor man
He’ll go to shore out on a tear
And he’ll buy some girl a gown.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
IV
When Jack gets old and weather beat,
Too old to roam about,
They’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(5) calls him out.
Then he’ll raise his eyes up to the skies,
Sayin’ “Boys, we’re homeward bound.”
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Le navi vanno e vengono e navigano in lungo e in largo il mare,
ogni giovane marinaio proprio come suo padre, ama la boccia piena.
Un giro a terra adora fare
con una ragazza che sia graziosa e rotondetta,
ma quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
Venite avanti
allegri e bravi ragazzi
c’è tanto grog nella bottiglia
solcheremo l’oceano salmastro
con l’allegro marinaio vagabondo
II
Quando Jack arriva, allora si fionderà verso una vecchia pensione d’imbarco(2)
dove lo accoglieranno con rum e gin
e lo riempiranno con stufato di maiale
Presterà, spenderà e non rifiuterà (3)
finchè finirà ubriaco steso a terra
quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
III
Jack allora oh allora farà vela,
destinazione Terranova;
tutte le belle signore di Placentia (4) là
amano quel marinaio
Andrà a riva con una lacrima
e comprerà ad una ragazza un vestito
quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
IV
Quando Jack diventa vecchio e stanco
troppo vecchio per andare in giro
si fermerà in qualche negozio di rum
finchè l’ottavo rintocco (5) lo chiamerà
Allora solleverà gli occhi al cielo
dicendo “Ragazzi, siamo in rotta verso casa”
quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”

NOTE
1) vedi nota sopra
2) vedi nota sopra
3) nel senso che non offenderà l’oste con un rifiuto
4) la strofa è una variante locale di Terranova, Placentia è una piccola città canadese costituita dall’unione dei villaggi di Jerseyside, Townside, Freshwater, Dunville e Argentia..
5) sui vascelli il suono squillante di una campana regolava il tempo, ogni turno di guardia di 4 ore era segnalato da 8 rintocchi. (gli otto rintocchi di campana erano suonati alle 4, alle 8, alle 12, alle 16, alle 20 e a mezzanotte). Per calcolare il tempo si usava una clessidra. “Otto campane in marina indicava anche un cambiamento, un passaggio da una situazione ad un’altra, un “taglio” quindi tra il vecchio e il nuovo.
Al proposito ricordo che mio padre, maresciallo della Regia Marina, usava la frase “Sono suonate le otto campane” per significare che per un Marinaio era finita… finito il suo turno di guardia a bordo come pure la sua vita; sì era un modo di dire anzi un eufemismo per affermare che si poteva dargli l’estremo saluto!” (Marino Miccoli, tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Sempre nell’Ottocento circolava una versione completamente diversa in cui la povera Susan era affranta perché il bel William stava ancora lontano per mare, decide di seguirlo nei panni di marinaio, imbarcandosi su una nave nientemeno che del padre. La versione è ancora popolare a Terranova. Per quanto abbia cercato nel web al momento non ho trovato un video da ascoltare. Rimandando ad altri tempi un approfondimento..
It was in the town of Liverpool, all in the month of May,
I overheard a damsel, alone as she did stray,
She did appear like Venus or some sweet, lovely star,
As she walked toward the beach, lamenting for her jolly, roving Tar.

LA VERSIONE IRISH ROVER Jolly Roving Tar

Il testo è stato scritto da George Millar il fondatore degli Irish Rover (irlandesi trapiantati in Canada per chi non li conoscesse) e pur essendo una diversa canzone prende in prestito alcune frasi sia da “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” che da altre altrettanto famose sea song sui marinai.
The Irish Rover in Another Round 2005:il video è una simpatica sincronizzazione con varie danze prese da spezzoni di film fantasy e animazioni


I
Well here we are, we’re back again
Safe upon the shore
In Belfast town we’d like to stay
And go to sea no more
We’ll go into a public house
And drink till we’re content
For the lassies they will love us
Till our money is all spent
CORO
So pass the flowin’ bowl
Boys there’s whiskey in the jar
And we’ll drink to all the lassies
And the jolly roving tar
II
Oh Johnny did you miss me
When the nights were long and cold
Or did you find another love
In your arms to hold
Says he I thought of only you
While on the sea afar
So come up the stairs and cuddle
With your jolly roving tar
III
Well in each other’s arms they rolled
Till the break of day
When the sailor rose
and said farewell
I must be on me way
Ah don’t you leave me Johnny lad
I thought you’d marry my
Says he I can’t be married
For I’m married to the sea
IV
Well come all you bonnie lasses
And a warning take by me
And never trust an Irishman
An inch above your knee
He’ll tease you and he’ll squeeze you
And when he’s had his fun
He’ll leave you in the morning
With a daughter or a son
traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Eccoci qui, siamo di ritorno
al sicuro sulla terra, nella città di Belfast preferiremmo restare
e non andare più per mare.
Andremo nel pub
e berremo fino a essere pieni
perché le ragazze ci amano
fino a quando tutti i soldi spendiamo
CORO
Così passa la boccia piena
ragazzi c’è il whisky nel bicchiere
berremo a tutte le ragazze
e all’allegro marinaio vagabondo
II
“Oh Johnny mi sei mancato
quando le notti erano lunghe e fredde
o hai trovato un altro amore
da tenere tra le braccia?”
Dice lui “Pensavo solo a te
mentre ero lontano per mare
così sali le scale e stringiti
al tuo allegro marinaio vagabondo”
III
Tra le braccia uno dell’altra si cullarono
fino al sorgere dell’alba
quando il marinaio si alzò
e disse “addio devo andare via”
“Oh non mi lasciare mio giovane marinaio
credevo che mi sposassi”
dice lui “Non posso sposarmi
perché sono sposato con il mare”
IV
Venite tutte voi, belle ragazze
e prendete questo avviso da me
non concedete mai a un irlandese
un pollice sopra al ginocchio
vi stuzzicherà e stringerà
e quando avrà preso il suo piacere
vi lascerà al mattino
con una figlia o un figlio

continua
FONTI
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/jolly-roving-tar.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/JollyRovinTar/lomax.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/jolly.htm
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/GETUPJAC.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/08/getup.htm
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/catalog/levy:072.028
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=338
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96587
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96582
http://adirondackmusic.org/subpages/69/9/6/lena-bourne-fish

HARBOUR LE COU

“Harbour le cou” è una sea song popolare a Terranova (Newfoundland), Canada, il racconto umoristico di uno sfortunato marinaio di Torbay che appena sbarcato a Harbour Le cou trova una damigella da corteggiare, ma incontra anche un vecchio amico il quale molto poco cameratescamente lo smaschera per quel donnaiolo che è mandando i suoi saluti a moglie e figli..

L’AUTORE

“Captain” Jack Dodd (1902-1978) di Torbay fu pescatore, marinaio, scrittore di canzoni e cantante, cercatore di tesori, un Jack of all -trade ma soprattutto un avventuriero. Si dice abbia fatto il giro del mondo per ben tre volte. Ha scritto ‘The Wind in the Rigging‘ (1972)  e “Cabot’s Voyage to Newfoundland” (1974) vedi

IL PORTO

Rose Blanche-Harbour le cou è un piccolo paese di pescatori che si trova sulla costa sud-occidentale dell’isola di Terranova in una piccola baia, abitata pare solo dal 1810

VIDEO di Paul Corman

LA CANZONE

ASCOLTA Gordon Lightfoot 1964

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea

ASCOLTA Ryan’s fancy


I
As I rode ashore from my schooner close by
A girl on the beach sir I chanced to espy,/Her hair it was red and her bonnet was blue/Her place of abode was in Harbour Lecou.
II
Oh boldly I asked her to walk on the sand
She smiled like an angel and held out her hand
So I buttoned me guernsey(1) and hoved way me chew(2)
In the dark rolling (flowing) waters of Harbour Lecou
III
My ship she lay anchored far out on the tide
As I strolled along with that maid at my side/I told her I loved her, I said I’ll be true,/And I winked at the moon over Harbour Lecou
IV
As we walked on the sands(3) at the close of the day
I thought of my wife who was home in Torbay(4)
I knew that she’d kill me if she only knew
I was courting this lassie in Harbour Lecou.
V
As we passed a log cabin(5) that stood on the shore
I met an old comrade I’d sailed with before,
He treated me kindly saying “Jack, how are you?/Its seldom I see you in Harbour Lecou”.
VI
And as I was parting, this maiden in tow,/He broke up my party with one single blow/ He said “Regards to your missus, and your wee kiddies too,
I remember her well, she’s from Harbour Lecou”.
VII
I looked at this damsel a standing ‘long side/Her jaw it just dropped and her mouth opened wide
And then like a she-cat upon me she flew/And I fled from the furys of Harbour Lecou(6)
VIII
So come all you young sailors who walk on the shore
Beware of old comrades you sailed with before
Beware of the maidens with the bonnets of blue
And the pretty (fighting) young damsels of Harbour Lecou.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Mentre sbarcavo a terra dalla mia goletta
una ragazza sul litorale mi è capitato di vedere
dai capelli rossi e con il berretto blu
abitava a Harbour Lecou.
II
Le ho chiesto con baldanza di passeggiare sulla spiaggia
lei sorrise come un angelo e tese la mano
così mi sono abbottonato il Guernsey (1) e ho gettato la mia cicca (2)
nelle cullanti acque scure di Harbour Lecou
III
La mia nave era all’ancora in alto mare
mentre io passeggiavo con quella fanciulla al fianco
le dissi che l’amavo e che ero sincero
e strizzai l’occhio alla luna su Harbour Lecou
IV
Mentre camminavamo sulla spiaggia (3) sul finir del giorno
pensavo a mia moglie che era a casa a Torbay (4)
sapevo che mi avrebbe ucciso se solo avesse saputo
che stavo corteggiando questa ragazza di Harbour Lecou
V
Mentre oltrepassavamo un capanno(5) che stava sulla spiaggia
incontrai un vecchio compagno con cui avevo navigato un tempo
mi trattò gentilmente dicendo “Jack come va? Raramente ti vedo a Harbour Lecou”
VI
E mentre ci separavamo con questa ragazza a rimorchio,
mi ha rovinato la festa e tutto d’un fiato disse “Salutami la tua signora e anche i tuoi bambini, me la ricordo bene è di Harbour Lecou”
VII
Guardai verso la fanciulla che mi stava al fianco,
la mascella le cadde e la bocca si spalancò e poi come una gatta verso di me si lanciò e io fuggii dalla furia di Harbour Lecou (6)
VIII
Così venite tutti giovani marinai che passeggiate sulla spiaggia
fate attenzione ai vecchi compagni con cui avete navigato un tempo,
fate attenzione alle fanciulle con il berretto blu
e alle giovani (combattive) fanciulle di Harbour Lecou
maglione guernsey
tratto da http://www.aransweatermarket.com/mens-crew-neck-guernsey-sweater

NOTE
1) maglione da marinaio detto ‘Ganzie‘ perchè confezionato nell’isola di Guernsey, è diventato un indumento tradizionale dei pescatori inglesi. Il modello originale è lavorato in un solo pezzo senza cuciture partendo dal collo e per praticità il davanti è identico al dietro. Le maniche sono leggermente sopra il polso, dettaglio che serviva per non bagnarsi  con l’acqua di mare durante il lavoro. La lavorazione della maglia è molto stretta a maglia rasata o con motivi a trecce e zig zag. Era tradizionalmente confezionato dalle mogli (o sorelle) dei pescatori con i motivi che si passavano di madre in figlia attraverso le generazioni (un po’ come i motivi aran irlandesi).
Due erano gli stili: quello da lavoro (”working”) a maglia rasata detto anche in inglese plain stitch, Jersey Stitch, Flat Stitch, o Stockinette Stitch, e l’altro raffinato (”finer”) per le grandi occasioni.
2) to heave away one’s chew
3) oppure we strolled along
4) Torbay è una cittadina dell’isola di Terranova e si trova nella penisola di Avalon vicino a Saint John’s
5) tipica costruzione con tronchi di legno dei pescatori; i capanni sono piccoli e costruiti prorpio sull’acqua come rimessa della barca e le attrezzature per la pesca.
6) oppure Was a fit of the furies in Harbour Le Cou

FONTI
http://roseblanche.ca/about_rose-blanche.html
http://www.mun.ca/folklore/munfla/dodd.php
http://guernsey-knitwear.myshopify.com/pages/the-history-of-the-guernsey-jumper
https://lamagliadimarica.com/2014/05/03/guernsey-i-pullover-dei-pescatori-dellisola-del-canale/
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/01/lecou.htm
http://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/18-04.htm
http://gaddingaboutwithgrandpat.blogspot.it/2012/08/harbour-le-cou-newfoundland.html
http://www.aransweatermarket.com/mens-crew-neck-guernsey-sweater