The Oda G

This song was written by Stanley G. Triggs, who worked as a deckhand on British Columbia tugboats (Canada) in the late 1950s. According to the liner notes for his Folkways album, ‘Bunkhouse and Forecastle Songs of the Northwest’, the Oda G was a tugboat that he worked on, one of the oldest on the coast. 
Questa canzone è stata scritta da Stanley G. Triggs, che ha lavorato come abile marinaio sui rimorchiatori della British Columbia (Canada) alla fine degli anni ’50. Secondo le note di copertina del suo album della Folkways Records, “Bunkhouse and Forecastle Songs of the Northwest“, l’Oda G era un rimorchiatore su cui lavorava, uno dei più vecchi della costa. 

Stanley G. Triggs in Bunkhouse and Forecastle Songs of the Northwest1961

Ed Harcourt in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
Come all you jolly tugboatmen
And listen unto me
While I tell you a story of hardships and glory
Of a lusty old life on the deep briny sea.
II
There once was a stalwart old tugboat,
Her name was the Oda G. (1)
And I’ll let you know, boys,
at pullin’ a tow, boys,
There was no huskier tugboat than she.
III
She came off the ways in ‘eighty-nine,
For storms she cared not a damn
It was boasted around,
’twas the talk of the town
That she knew that old coastline
as well as a man.
IV
Now her mate was an expert at running the logs
He ne’er seemed to come to no harm/ But he ran out of luck when he fell in the chuck (2)
With a rusty old boom-chain wrapped round his left arm.
V
Her engineer was a lazy young tramp
All day he did nothin’ but read
On the fantail (3) he sat on his young lazy prat
Till a big roarin’ wave swept him into the sea
VI
And her deckhand was paintin’ the bulwarks (4) so fine,
Paintin’ so carefully,
But he met his fate when, to admire his paintin’,
He took a step back and fell into the sea.
VII
Now her skipper, he was very fine man
At seafarin’ he was a pip
But without a crew he didn’t know what to do
So he grabbed up a lifebelt and abandoned the ship.
VIII
But the old Oda G. she kept tuggin’ along
She towed those logs down to Long Bay
And old Penney (5) hurrayed for the money he saved
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Venite voi allegri marinai dei rimorchiatori
ed ascoltatemi,
mentre vi racconto una storia di fatiche e gloria
di una vecchia dura vita in alto mare
II
C’era una volta un vecchio rimorchiatore,
il suo nome era Oda G.
e sappiate, ragazzi,
a trainare, ragazzi,
non c’era rimorchiatore più potente.
III
Venne varata nell’ottantanove,
delle tempeste non le importava un accidente
Si è vantato,
secondo le chiacchiere di città
che conoscesse quella vecchia costa
altrettanto bene di un uomo.
IV
L’ufficiale era un esperto nel far rotolare i tronchi/ non sembrava che gli venisse mai un danno/ ma fu sfortunato a cadere in mare 
con una vecchia catena di sbarramento arrugginita avvolta attorno al braccio sinistro.
V
L’ingegnere era un pigro perdigiorno/ non faceva altro che leggere in continuazione/ sul ponte di coperta si sedeva con il giovane pigro culo e una grande onda forte lo trascinò in mare
VI
L’Abile Marinaio stava dipingendo le murate tanto bene,/ dipingendo con attenzione,/ ma andò incontro al suo destino quando, per ammirare la sua pittura,/ fece un passo indietro e cadde in mare.
VII
Il comandante, era un uomo eccellente,
in mare’era uno tosto,
ma senza un equipaggio non sapeva cosa fare
così afferrò un salvagente e abbandonò la nave.
VIII
Eppure la vecchia Oda G. continuava a camminare
rimorchiò quei tronchi fino a Long Bay
e il vecchio Penney gongolò per i soldi risparmiati

NOTE (from here)
1) essendo il rimorchiatore una nave è di genere femminile così il nome
2) ‘chuck’, meaning water, is heard only in the Northwest. It comes from the Chinook jargon used in early trading. [“chuck”, che significa acqua, si sente solo nel nord-ovest. Viene dal gergo Chinook usato nei primi commerci con gli indiani.]
3) The fantail is the extreme aft (back) of the boat. On a tugboat, the aft deck is low to the water, to allow a clear run for the towlines to the winch. The fantail would be a quiet place to read, being as far as you can get on a tugboat from the sound of the engines (and the engineer’s job). [Il ponte di coperta è la parte posteriore (poppa) della barca. Su un rimorchiatore, il ponte di poppa è basso a pelo dell’acqua, per consentire una corsa libera alla catena di traino dell’argano. Di certo un posto tranquillo dove leggere, essendo il più lontano possibile dal rumore dei motori (e del lavoro dell’ingegnere).]
4) Tugboats have a narrow ledge, just wide enough to stand on, around the outside of the bulwarks (the solid ‘railing’ around the outside of the boat). You can do this by leaning sideways rather than forward to paint. You must constantly resist the impulse to take a step back to paint the way you would normally, because there is nothing behind you but air and water. [I rimorchiatori hanno una stretta sporgenza, appena larga abbastanza da stare in piedi, attorno alla murata (la solida “ringhiera” attorno alla parte esterna della barca).  Devi costantemente resistere all’impulso di fare un passo indietro per dipingere come faresti normalmente, perché non c’è niente dietro di te, solo aria e acqua.]
5) the owner [il proprietario]

LINK
http://www.shantynet.com/lyrics/the-oda-g/
http://maritimefolknet.org/cds-from-maritime-folknet/tugboat-cd/the-oda-g/

http://cfmb.icaap.org/content/30.1/BV30-1art3.pdf
http://cfmb.icaap.org/content/30.1/BV30-1art4.pdf

Loreena McKennitt

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Loreena McKennitt (Morden, 1957) has often been called a goddess of Harmony for her beautifull voice (lyrical singing with the Celtic technique of the “old style” Sean-nós) combined with the charming amber-haired figure.
A clever multi-instrumentalist (piano, Celtic harp, dulcimer, accordion) and composer, as well as a tenacious supporter of her musical project defined by herself as “eclectic Celtism“.
Her activity as a musician began in the corners of the Canadian streets where she played and sang the traditional Irish music with her harp and she self-produced her CD: Elemental, Parallel Dreams and The visit are essential musical projects, practically filmed live; the breakthrough comes with “The Mask and the Mirror” (1994), a concept album immersed in world music along the path of Santiago that welds the spirituality (and music-prayer) of Islam, Christianity and Judaism.
Loreena usually picks some musicians proficient in instruments related to each album to record with, but her core members are: guitarist Brian Hughes & percussionist Rick Lazar (both 1989), and violinist Hugh Marsh (1991). Cellist Caroline Lavelle & keyboardist/percussionist Donald Quan joined in 1995.

Elemental 1985

The debut album of the Canadian singer (Irish father and Scottish mother) when she was still playing on the street with her celtic harp and the offer box, it was recorded in a Stratford barn with almost all of the traditional Irish songs.
Blacksmith
She Moved Through the Fair
Stolen Child
The Lark
Carrighfergus 
Kellswater
Banks of Claudy
Come by the Hills
Lullaby

To Drive the Cold Winter Away 1987

The album consists of winter and Christmas songs, recorded in part at Annaghmakerrig, in County Monaghan (Ireland), in the Benedictine Abbey of Glenstal in Limerick (Ireland) and in the Church of Our Lady in Guelph, Ontario, in Canada. Essential and sparse it is centered on the angelic vocalism of the artist, so the author writes in the notese “As a child my most vivid impression of music for the winter season came from songs and carols recorded in churches or great halls, rich with their own unique ambience and tradition. In that spirit, I have ventured into several similar locations that I have come to cherish in my travels.”
In Praise of Christmas 
The Seasons
The king (Hunting the Wren)
Banquet Hall
Snow ( lyric by Archibald Lampman)
Balulalow
Let Us the Infant Greet
The Wexford Carol
The Stockford Carol

Let all that are to Mirth Inclined

Parallel Dreams 1989

Samain Night
Moon Cradle
Huron ‘Beltane’ Fire Dance (live at Alhambra ): as implied by its title, the “Huron Beltane Fire Dance” starts off as a very tribal, Native American-sounding chant, then shifts into a Celtic-Irish string piece

Annachie Gordon
Standing Stones
Dickens’ Dublin (The Palace)
Breaking the Silence
Ancient Pines

The visit 1991

I have long considered the creative impulse to be a visit – a thing of grace, perhaps, not commanded or owned so much as awaited, prepared for. A thing, also, of mystery. This recording endeavours to explore some of that mystery.
It looks as well into the earlier eastern influences of the Celts and the likelihood that they started from as far away as Eastern Europe before being driven to the western margins of Europe, particularly in the British Isles. With their musical influences came rituals around birth and death which treated the land as holy and haunted; this life itself as a visit. Afterwards, one’s soul might move to another plane, or another form – perhaps a tree. The Celts knew then, as we are re-learning now, a deep respect for all the life around them. This recording aspires to be nothing as much as a reflection into the weave of these things.” – L.M. (from here)

All Souls Night
Bonny Portmore
Between the Shadows 
(Live in Paris and Toronto)


live from San Francisco 1995 and also in “Troubadours On The Rhine”

The Lady of Shalott
Greensleeves
Tango to Evora: Loreena wrote the music on commission, for the soundtrack of the documentary “The Burning Times” by the Canadian director Donna Read, on witchcraft and the bonfires ( (a feminist re-interpretation of the witchcraft trials). A few years later Haris Alexiou writes a text that is a small fairy tale wrapped in the Greek myth and titled “Nefelis Tango”

Julia Juliati & Ronny Dutra in Tango to Evora

Courtyard Lullaby
The Old Ways
Cymbeline

The Mask and Mirror 1994

Loreena McKennitt reads the book of Idries Shah “The Sufi” (1964) and composes an album “The Mask and Mirror” (1994) in which she asks herself about spirituality and religion: “… Who was God? And what is religion, spirituality? What was revealed and what was hidden … what was the mask and what was the mirror?
And she does so by exploring mysticism, the violent, sudden, irruption of God in the soul.

The Mystic’s Dream
The Bonny Swans 
The Dark Night of the Soul
Marrakesh Night Market
Full Circle
Santiago

Live in Paris and Toronto 1999 


Cé Hé Mise le Ulaingt? The Two Trees
Prospero’s Speech

A Winter Garden – Five Songs for the Season 1995-2008

with Christmas music

1995
Coventry Carol
God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen
Good King Wenceslas
Snow ( lyric by Archibald Lampman)
Seeds of Love

2008
The Holly & The Ivy
Un flambeau, Jeannette, Isabelle
The Seven Rejoices of Mary
Noël Nouvelet!
Breton Carol
Gloucestershire Wassail
Emmanuel

In the Bleak Midwinter 

The Book of Secrets 1997

It is the cd that decrees the worldwide success of Loreena and leads her to face a world tour in spring 1998; in the summer of that year, near the wedding, the fiancé drowns during a boat crossing in Lake Huron, to his memory the artist dedicates the double “Live in Paris and Toronto” (1999): a magnificent live, sublime, a perfect performances and a wealth of sounds, a magical fusion between the expressiveness of each individual musician, with little gems of pure beauty in the note-for-note.

Prologue

The Mummers’ Dance
Skellig
Marco Polo inspired by a Sufi melody

The Highwayman
La Serenissima dedicated to Venice and the Venetian Baroque

Night Ride Across The Caucasus
Dante’s Prayer

Seven years of silence followed (with the exception of the collaboration with the Chieftains for the track YOU RAMBLING BOYS OF PLEASURE in Tears of Stone 1999) and of travels for the Mediterranean between 2000 and 2005, in particular Greece. A wanderer who wins the nickname of Irish gypsy

An Ancient Muse 2006

Some of the songs on this album were premiered at the Alhambra in Granada (Spain) on the dates 14, 15 and 16 September 2006 to inaugurate the return to the artist’s stage; of the concerts was released a memorable live album entitled “Nights from the Alhambra”.
The publication of the album An Ancient Muse was followed by a tour (in 2007)
Incantation
The Gates of Istanbul
Caravanserai
The English Ladye and the Knight ( lyric by Sir Walter Scott)
Kecharitomene

Penelope’s Song
Sacred Shabbat traditional tune of the Balkans
live version from “A Mediterranean Odyssey” her Mediterranean Tour in summer 2009

Beneath A Phrygian Sky
Never-ending Road (Amhrán Duit)

bonus track
Raglan Road

Nights from Alhambra 2007 ( full album)

The Wind That Shakes the Barley 2010

collection of traditional Irish songs rearranged by the artist
As I Roved Out
On a Bright May Morning
Brian Boru’s March
Down by the Sally Gardens
The Star of the County Down
The Wind That Shakes the Barley
The Death of Queen Jane
The Emigration Tunes

The Parting Glass

Lost Souls 2018

Spanish Guitars and Night Plazas
A Hundred Wishes
Ages Past, Ages Hence
The Ballad of the Fox Hunter ( lyric by William Butler Yeats)
Manx Ayre

La Belle Dame Sans Merci ( lyric by John Keats )
Sun, Moon and Stars

Breaking of the Sword
Lost Souls

LINK
Official Web site
FAQ: Old Ways Mailing List 

Paddy Lay Back: take a turn around the capstan

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Paddy Lay Back is a kilometer sea shanty, variant wedge, sung by sailors both as a recreational song and as a song to the winch to raise the anchor (capstan shanty).

Stan Hugill in his “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, testifies a long version with about twenty stanzas (see), here only those sung by himself for the album ” “Sea Songs: Newport, Rhode Island- Songs from the Age of Sail”, 1980: “It was both a forebitter and a capstan song and a very popular one too, especially in Liverpool ships. […] It is a fairly old song dating back to the Mobile cotton hoosiers and has two normal forms: one with an eight-line verse – this was the forebitter form; and the second with a four-line verse – the usual shanty pattern. Doerflinger gives a two-line verse pattern as the shanty – a rather unusual form, and further on in his book he gives the forebitter with both four- and eight-line verses. He gives the title of the shanty as Paddy, Get Back and both his versions of the forebitter as Mainsail Haul. Shay, Sampson and Bone all suggest that it was a fairly modern sea-song and give no indication that any form was sung as a shanty, but all my sailing-ship acquaintances always referred to it as a shanty, and it was certainly sung in the Liverpool-New York Packets as such – at least the four-line verse form. […] Verses from 11 onwards [of the 19 verses given, incl. v. 3, lines 1-4 above] are fairly modern and nothing to do with the Packet Ship seamen, but with the chorus of ‘For we’re bound for Vallaparaiser round the Horn’ are what were sung by Liverpool seamen engaged in the West Coast Guano Trade.” (Stan Hugill)
(all the strings except III)
Stan Hugill

Nils BrownAssassin’s Creed Rogue   (I, II, III, V, VI)

I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord (Christ) I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
‘Bout ship’s stations, boys,
be handy (be handy)! (2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser(3)
‘round the Horn (4)! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco(5) and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey(6) barque (7) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (8)
III
Now I joined her on a cold December mornin’,
A-frappin’ o’ me flippers to keep me warm.
With the south cone a-hoisted as a warnin’ (9),
To stand by the comin’ of a storm.
IV
Now some of our fellers had bin drinkin’,
An’ I meself wuz heavy on the booze;
An’ I wuz on me ol’ sea-chest a-thinkin’
I’d turn into me bunk an’ have a snooze.
V
I woke up in the mornin’ sick an’ sore,
An’ knew I wuz outward bound again;
When I heard a voice a-bawlin’ (calling) at the door,
‘Lay aft, men, an’ answer to yer names!’
VI
‘Twas on the quarterdeck where first I saw you,
Such an ugly bunch I’d niver seen afore;
For there wuz a bum an’ stiff from every quarter,
An’ it made me poor ol’ heart feel sick an’ sore.
VII
There wuz Spaniards an’ Dutchmen an’ Rooshians,
An’ Johnny Crapoos jist acrosst from France;
An’ most o’ ‘em couldn’t speak a word o’ English,
But answered to the name of ‘Month’s Advance’.
VIII
I knew that in me box I had a bottle,
By the boardin’-master ‘twas put there;
An’ I wanted something for to wet me throttle,
Somethin’ for to drive away dull care.
IX
So down upon me knees I went like thunder,
Put me hand into the bottom o’ the box,
An’ what wuz me great surprise an’ wonder,
Found only a bottle o’ medicine for the pox

NOTES
1) pawl – short bar of metal at the foot of a capstan or close to the barrel of a windlass which engage a serrated base so as to prevent the capstan or windlass ‘walking back’. […] The clanking of the pawls as the anchor cable was hove in was the only musical accompaniment a shanty ever had! (Hugill, Shanties 414)
2)  it is a typical expression in maritime songs
3) Valparaiso – a seaport in central Chile on the Pacific Ocean west-northwest of Santiago.
4) the Horn – Cape Horn – a rocky headland on an island at the extreme Southern tip of South America, belonging to Chile. It is notorious for gales and heavy seas.
5) Frisco – San Francisco
6) limey – The origin of the Yanks calling English sailors ‘Limejuicers’ […] was the daily issuing of limejuice to British crews when they had been a certain number of days at sea, to prevent scurvy, according to the 1894 Merchant Shipping Act (Hugill, Shanties 54)
7) barque – a sailing ship of three or more masts having the foremasts rigged square and the aftermast rigged fore-and-aft; any boat, especially a small sailing vessel
8) the sailor has spent all the advance on high-alcohol drinking
9) A storm-cone is a visual signalling device made of black-painted canvas designed to be hoisted on a mast – if apex upwards, a gale is expected from the North, if from the South, apex downward. The storm cone was devised by Rear Admiral Robert Fitzroy, former commander of HMS Beagle, head of a department of the Board of Trade known today simply as the Met Office, and inventor of weather forecasts.
“In 1860 he devised a system of issuing gale warnings by telegraph to the ports likely to be affected. The message contained of a list of places with the words:
‘North Cone’ or ‘South Cone’ – for northerly or southerly gales respectively
‘Drum’  – for when further gales were expected,
Drum and North/South Cone’ – for particularly heavy gales or storms. ” (from herei) (see more)

FOLK VERSION: Valparaiso Round the Horn

For his title the song has become a traditional Irish song, a popular drinking song, connected to equally popular jigs (eg Irish washer woman)! Also known as “The Liverpool song” and “Valparaiso Round the Horn”. Among the favorite pirate song of course!

The Wolfe Tones from “Let The People Sing” 1972 make a folk version that has become the standard of a classic irish drinking song (Paddy Lie Back)
The Irish Rovers live

Sons Of Erin

I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
About ships for England boys be handy(2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser
‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
There were Frenchmen, there were Germans, there were Russians
And there was Jolly Jacques came just across from France
And not one of them could speak a word of English
But they’d answer to the name of Bill or Dan
IV
I woke up in the morning sick and sore (5)
I wished I’d never sailed away again
Then a voice it came thundering thru’ the floor
Get up and pay attention to your name
V
I wish that I was in the Jolly Sailor (6)
With Molly or with Kitty on me knee
Now I see most any men are sailors
And with me flipper I wipe away my tears

NOTES
1) see above
2) or Bout ship’s stations, boys
3) see above
4) see above
5) a euphemism to describe the hangover
6) the name varies at the discretion of the singer

 LINK
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/paddy-lay-back/american-folk-celtic/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/PaddyLayBack/hugill.html
https://maritime.org/chanteys/paddy-lay-back.htm
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/12/36-paddy-lay-back.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/p/paddylay.html

Row me bullies boys row (Alan Doyle)

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The most recent version of this popular sea shanty comes from the movie “Robin Hood Prince of Thieves” by Ridley Scott (2010), and was written for the occasion by Alan Doyle (front man of the Canadian band Great Big Sea), recalling the melody and the structure of the Liverpool Judies refrain, with a text that remind the typical phrases of these seafaring songs; so obviously everyone adds the verse that he likes.

russel crow crew
I’ll sing you a song, it’s a song of the sea
I’ll sing you a song if you’ll sing it with me
While the first mate is playing the captain aboard
He looks like a peacock with pistols and sword
The captain likes whiskey, the mate, he likes rum
Us sailers like both but we can’t get us none
Well farewell my love it is time for to roam
The old blue peters are calling us home

In Taberna  

Strangs and Stout

CHORUS
And it’s row me bully boys
We’re in a hurry boys
We got a long way to go
And we’ll sing and we’ll dance
And bid farewell to France
And it’s row me bully boys row.
I
I’ll sing you a song,
it’s a song of the sea
Row me bully boys row
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
II
Well farewell my love
it is time for to roam
Row me bully boys row
The old blue peters
are calling us home
And it’s row me bully boys row

Barnacle Buoys

I
When we set sail for Bristol
the sun was like crystal
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
We found muddier water
when passing Bridge Water
And it’s row, me bully boys row
Chorus:
And it’s row, me bully boys,
we’re in a hurry, boys
We’ve got a long way to go
And we’ll drink as we glance
– a last look at France
row, me bully boys, row
II
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
III
So we’ve been away
for many a day now
So we’ll fill out our sails
and drink all the ale now
IV
So we’ll drink and we’ll feast
with no care in the least
And soon, as we’re craving’,
we’ll sail up to Avon
V
As we tied up in Bristol,
me heart was a-thumpin’
Then I found my girl Alice,
who took me a-scrumpin’

and so on!

ITALIAN VERSION: VOGA AMICO MIO VAI

here is the italian versione in the movie


CORO
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più (amico)

un altro po’, dove si va non lo so
Balliamo cantiamo e la Francia lasciamo
voga un altro po’ vai
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Voga un altro po’ dove si va non lo so
La Francia non la rivedremo giammai
Voga amico mio vai
E’ tardi oramai voi siete già nei guai
Voga amico mio vai
O voi non scherzate oppure rischiate
Voga voga un po’ di più
Ma non si può stare troppo via dal mare
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Partiamo di nuovo per non ritornare
Voga amico mio vai

ARCHIVE:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
‘Frisco
New York
from Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

LINK
https://thesession.org/discussions/24758
https://www.musixmatch.com/it/testo/Rambling-Sailors/Row-Me-Bully-Boys
http://www.songsterr.com/a/wsa/misc-soundtrack-robin-hood-row-me-bully-boys-chords-s376527
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=158562
https://reelsoundtrack.wordpress.com/2010/05/15/robin-hood-soundtrack/

The Eastern Light (the Banks of Newfoundland)

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There are several sea songs entitled “the Banks of Newfoundland”, not to be properly considered variations on the same melody, even if they share a common theme, the dangers of fishing or navigation offshore of Newfoundland.

Most sad was my misfortune in the year of ‘sixty-three

Sometimes as “The Eastern Light” the ballad of the Canadian tradition entitled “the Banks of Newfoundland” describes a fishing season on the Great Banks of Newfoundland , the fishing boat left the port of Gloucester (Massachusetts) in the month of March and our sailor was definitely drunk when boarding.

Kenneth Peacock collected it from James Rice in 1951, and published it in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 1, 1965, he noted that this appears to be an American ballad of New England origin, also Helen Creighton had collected this ballad in Nova Scotia as The Gloucester Fishermen,

Jim Rice [1879-1958] of Cape Broyle from MUNFLA ♪

The Dardanelles live,  (from The Eastern Light, 2011) instrumental arrangement Matthew Byrne & Billy Sutton

I
‘Twas of my sad misfortune
in the year of seventy-three (1),
I set on board the fisher ship
all off a drunken spree (2),
her name it was The Eastern Light (3),
as you might  understand,
We were bound down on a salt sea trip to the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
The saturday day beein the first of March, we left Gloucester port
the girls all wove their handkerchiefs
as we sailed down the shore
we had a jar of rum on board
which gathered round all the crew,
We drank the health to the Gloucester girls, in bidding us adieu.
III
It’s early in the morning boys
our cook he give a bawls,
“Get out and get your breakfast, b’ys, get out and haul your trawls (4).
You’ll scarce have time to light your pipe, your dory (5) she do go,
You’ll have to make three sets today
no matter how hard it blows”
IV
We fished around  the foggy bank (6)
the space of seventeen days,
We boarded a couple of Frenchmen boat, no brandy could we raise.
The halibut they be in kind of scarce, we run our cod-fish gear,
our skipper he says ‘I’ll fill her up, if it takes a half a year.”
V
We fished around the foggy bank
our skipper he louded shout
“Come hoist aboard your dories, b’ys, and break your anchor out;
come hoist the …(?)
we’ll get her under way,
provisions are getting kind of scarce, we can no longer stay,
VI
And now the anchor’s on the bow
we are homeward bound,
And when we get to Gloucester port
we’ll pass the glasses round.
We’ll go down to Johnny McLoudy
and we’ll have a happy night,
We’ll drink the health of the Gloucester girls,
and success to the “Eastern Light”.


NOTES
* transcribed by Cattia Salto in part from here
1) the date changes for some is 1873. for others the 1863: also written as “in eighteen hundred and seventy-three”
2) in some verses not reported here the sailor curses his love for liquor, because if he had kept sober, he would never have boarded
3) a fishing vessel named “Eastern Light” 70 tons, was built in 1866, owned by “Maddocks and Company of Gloucester”, Massachusetts.
4) “Banks Dory” is the boat built in a serial way and in large quantities starting from 1850, flat-bottomed for one or two men depending on the dimension. see more.
5) but traditional fishing on the Great Banks at least until the end of the nineteenth century was done with lines (see more)
6)  The Grand Banks of Newfoundland are a group of underwater plateaus south-east of Newfoundland roughly triangular in shape often overwhelmed by storms, treacherous and dangerous due to the presence of icebergs and the frequent fog. The mixing of  the cold Labrador Current with the warm waters of the Gulf Stream helped to create one of the richest fishing grounds in the world, but it’s also causes fog in the area, and before the advent of instrumental navigation, it made the Banks very insidious

transportation song
working on a  fisher ship
the Eastern Light
captain’s death (american ballad)
shipwreck and rescue on the Banks (Canadian ballad)

LINK
https://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/4-12.htm
http://gestsongs.com/01/banks4.htm
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiEASTRNLT.html

The Eastern Light (the Banks of Newfoundland)

Read the post in English

Ci sono parecchie  sea songs dal titolo “the Banks of Newfoundland”,  da non considerarsi propriamente come variazioni su una stessa melodia, anche se condividono un tema comune, i pericoli della pesca o della navigazione al largo di Terranova.

Most sad was my misfortune in the year of ‘sixty-three

Talvolta con il nome “The Eastern Light” la ballata della tradizione canadese intitolata “the Banks of Newfoundland” descrive una stagione di pesca sui Grandi Banchi di Terranova, il peschereccio è partito dal porto di Gloucester (Massachusetts) nel mese di Marzo e il nostro marinaio era decisamente ubriaco al momento dell’imbarco.

Kenneth Peacock che la collezionò da James Rice nel 1951, (in Songs Of The Newfoundland Outports, Volume 1, 1965) ritiene sia stata una ballata americana originaria del New England, anche Helen Creighton ha raccolto la stessa ballata in Nuova Scozia con il titolo di The Gloucester Fishermen.

Jim Rice [1879-1958] di Cape Broyle dall’Archivio MUNFLA ♪

The Dardanelles live,  (in The Eastern Light, 2011) arrangiamento strumentale Matthew Byrne & Billy Sutton


I
‘Twas of my sad misfortune
in the year of seventy-three (1),
I set on board the fisher ship
all off a drunken spree (2),
her name it was The Eastern Light (3),
as you might  understand,
We were bound down on a salt sea trip to the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
The saturday day beein the first of March, we left Gloucester port
the girls all wove their handkerchiefs
as we sailed down the shore
we had a jar of rum on board
which gathered round all the crew,
We drank the health to the Gloucester girls, in bidding us adieu.
III
It’s early in the morning boys
our cook he give a bawls,
“Get out and get your breakfast, b’ys, get out and haul your trawls (4).
You’ll scarce have time to light your pipe, your dory (5) she do go,
You’ll have to make three sets today
no matter how hard it blows”
IV
We fished around  the foggy bank (6)
the space of seventeen days,
We boarded a couple of Frenchmen boat, no brandy could we raise.
The halibut they be in kind of scarce, we run our cod-fish gear,
our skipper he says ‘I’ll fill her up, if it takes a half a year.”
V
We fished around the foggy bank
our skipper he louded shout
“Come hoist aboard your dories, b’ys, and break your anchor out;
come hoist the …(?)
we’ll get her under way,
provisions are getting kind of scarce, we can no longer stay,
VI
And now the anchor’s on the bow
we are homeward bound,
And when we get to Gloucester port
we’ll pass the glasses round.
We’ll go down to Johnny McLoudy
and we’ll have a happy night,
We’ll drink the health of the Gloucester girls,
and success to the “Eastern Light”.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Per triste sventura
nell’anno del settantatré ,
mi sono imbarcato su un peschereccio
ubriaco fradicio,
il suo nome era “The Eastern Light” ,
come saprete
eravamo in partenza per un viaggio nel mare salato ai Banchi di Terranova.
II
Il sabato, il primo di marzo, abbiamo lasciato il porto di Gloucester,
le ragazze sventolavano i fazzoletti,
mentre partivamo da terra,
avevamo a bordo una bottiglia di rum
attorno a cui tutto l’equipaggio si radunò, abbiamo bevuto alla salute delle ragazze di Gloucester, che di dicevano addio.
III
Era l’alba, ragazzi
il nostro cuoco grida,
“Alzatevi a fare colazione, ragazzi,
andate a pescare,
avrete poco tempo per accendere la pipa, la vostra dory deve andare,
dovrete fare tre turni oggi
non importa quanto sia forte il vento”
IV
Abbiamo pescato sui Banchi nebbiosi
per la durata di diciassette giorni,
abbordammo un paio di barchette francesi, ma non potevamo procurarci del brandy
siccome la passera era scarsa, ricorriamo alla nostra attrezzatura per il merluzzo,
il nostro comandante dice “La riempirò, ci volesse un anno e mezzo”.
V
Abbiamo pescato sui Banchi nebbiosi
il nostro comandante ha urlato forte
“Venite a issare a bordo i vostri dory ragazzi, e leviamo l’ancora;
….,
per partire,
le provviste stanno diventando scarse, e non possiamo più restare,
VI
E ora l’ancora è a prua
siamo diretti verso casa,
E quando arriveremo al porto di Gloucester
faremo girare i bicchieri.
Faremo un salto a Johnny McLoudy
per passare una buona serata,
e berremo alla salute delle ragazze di Gloucester,
e al successo della “Eastern Light”.


NOTE
* trascritto da Cattia Salto in parte da qui
1) la data cambia per alcuni è il 1873. per altri il 1863: anche scritto come ” in eighteen hundred and seventy-three”
2) in alcune strofe qui non riportate il marinaio maledice il suo amore per i liquori, perchè se si fosse mantenuto sobrio, non si sarebbe mai imbarcato
3) un peschereccio dal nome “Eastern Light” 70 tonnellate, fu costruito nel 1866, di proprietà di “Maddocks and Company of Gloucester”, Massachusetts.
4) “Banks dory” è la barchetta costruita in modo seriale e in grande quantità a partire dal 1850,  a fondo piatto per uno o due uomini a seconda della dimensione continua.
5) letteralmente dice “trascina le reti da traino” ma la pesca tradizionale sui Grandi Banchi almeno fino alla fine dell’ottocento si faceva con le lenze (vedi)
6) i Grandi Banchi di Terranova: un tratto di mare dal fondale basso a sud-est dell’isola canadese di Terranova, di forma grosso modo triangolare spesso sconvolto dalle tempeste, infido e pericoloso per la presenza di iceberg e la frequente nebbia.  L’incrocio tra la calda corrente del Golfo e la fredda corrente del Labrador, che sollevano dal fondale le sostanze nutrienti, ne fanno una delle zone più pescose al mondo. Il mescolarsi di acque calde e fredde è causa però anche di nebbia che, prima dell’avvento della navigazione strumentale, rendeva la zona molto insidiosa. (daWiki)

transportation song
la pesca sui Banchi
the Eastern Light
morte del capitano (ballata americana)
naufragio e soccorso sui Banchi (ballata canadese)

 

FONTI
https://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/4-12.htm
http://gestsongs.com/01/banks4.htm
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiEASTRNLT.html

Shipwreck on the Great Newfoundland Banks

Leggi in italiano

There are several sea songs entitled “the Banks of Newfoundland”, not to be properly considered variations on the same melody, even if they share a common theme, the dangers of fishing or navigation offshore of Newfoundland, on the Great Banks

Oh, you may bless your happy lots, all ye who dwell on shore

“Banks of Newfoundland” tells the tragic story of a ship tormented by the hurricane and unable to maneuver, stuck on the Great Banks, the only hope left: the sighting of another ship for rescue!
And after more than fifteen days without provisions it remains only the “law of the sea” to give extreme support to the remaining men.

CANADIAN VERSION

Margaret Christl &d Ian Robb from The Barley Grain for Me, 1976 
comparing the variant collected in 1957 by Edith Fowke from the voice of O J Abbott of Ontario and published in The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs (1973) (see text)

I
Oh, you may bless your happy lots (1),
all ye who dwell on shore,
For it’s little you know of the hardships that we poor seamen bore.
Yes, it’s little you know of the hardships that we were forced to stand
For fourteen days and fifteen night on the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
Our ship, she sailed through frost and snow from the day we left Quebec,
And if we had not walked about we’d have frozen to the deck.
But we being true-born sailor men as ever ship had manned
Our Captain, he doubled our grog each day on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
Well, there never was a ship, me boys, that sailed the western waves,
But the billowy seas came a-rolling in and bent them into staves.
Our ship being built of unseasoned wood, it could but little stand,
The hurricane, it met us there on the Banks of Newfoundland.
IV
Well, we fasted for thirteen days and nights, our provisions giving out,
On the morning of the fourteenth day, we cast our lines about (2).
Well, the lot, it fell on the Captain’s son (3), and thinking relief at hand,
We spared him for another night on the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
On the morning of the fifteenth day, no vessel did appear.
We gave to him another hour to offer up a prayer.
Well, Providence to us proved kind; kept blood from every hand (4),
For an English vessel hove in sight on the Banks of Newfoundland.
VI
We hoisted aloft our signal; they bore down on us straightaway.
When they saw our pitiful condition, they began to weep and pray.
Five hundred souls we had on board when first we left the land
There’s now alive but seventy-five on the Banks of Newfoundland.
VII
They took us off that ship, me boys; we was more like ghosts than men.
They fed us and they clothed us and brought us back again.
They fed us and they clothed us, and brought us straight to land.
While the billowy waves roll o’er the graves on the Banks of Newfoundland.

NOTES
1) luck
2) the one who pulled the shorter straw was the “winner”, and sacrificed himself for the good of the survivors, this practice was called “law of the sea”
3) a commonplace because in the ballads on cannibalism at sea it always touches to the young cabin boy
4) the juxtaposition between the two verses with the man ready for the sacrifice and sighting at dawn of the ship that will rescue them, wants to mitigate the harsh reality of cannibalism, a horrible practice to tell but that is always lurking in the moments of desperation and as an extreme resource for survival, see“The Ship in Distress

Comparing
irish version:
Eddie Butcher
1968 from ITMA
Andy Irvine from Abocurragh, 2010  (text here)

american version:
Mabel Worcester
 1967 from the University of Maine digital archive

transportation song
working on a  fisher ship
the Eastern Light
captain’s death (american ballad)
shipwreck and rescue on the Banks (Canadian ballad)

 

LINK
https://www.itma.ie/digital-library/sound/banks_of_newfoundland_eddie_butcher
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BanksNewfoundland.html
https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/songstorysamplercollection/18/
http://gestsongs.com/02/banks6.htm

Naufragio sui Grandi Banchi di Terranova

Read the post in English

Ci sono parecchie  sea songs dal titolo “the Banks of Newfoundland”,  da non considerarsi propriamente come variazioni su una stessa melodia, anche se condividono un tema comune, i pericoli della pesca o della navigazione al largo di Terranova sui Grandi Banchi.

Oh, you may bless your happy lots, all ye who dwell on shore

naufragioIn “Banks of Newfoundland” si narra la tragica storia, di una nave tormentata dall’uragano e impossibilitata a manovrare, bloccata sui Grandi Banchi, l’unica speranza rimasta: l’avvistamento di un’altra nave per i soccorsi!
E dopo più di quindici giorni senza provviste resta solo la “legge del mare” a dare l’estremo sostegno agli uomini rimasti.

VERSIONI CANADESI

Margaret Christl &d Ian Robb in The Barley Grain for Me, 1976 
si confronti con la variante collezionata nel 1957 da Edith Fowke dalla voce di  O J Abbott di Ontario e pubblicata ne The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs (1973) (vedi testo)


I
Oh, you may bless your happy lots (1),
all ye who dwell on shore,
For it’s little you know of the hardships that we poor seamen bore.
Yes, it’s little you know of the hardships that we were forced to stand
For fourteen days and fifteen night on the Banks of Newfoundland.
II
Our ship, she sailed through frost and snow from the day we left Quebec,
And if we had not walked about we’d have frozen to the deck.
But we being true-born sailor men as ever ship had manned
Our Captain, he doubled our grog each day on the Banks of Newfoundland.
III
Well, there never was a ship, me boys, that sailed the western waves,
But the billowy seas came a-rolling in and bent them into staves.
Our ship being built of unseasoned wood, it could but little stand,
The hurricane, it met us there on the Banks of Newfoundland.
IV
Well, we fasted for thirteen days and nights, our provisions giving out,
On the morning of the fourteenth day, we cast our lines about (2).
Well, the lot, it fell on the Captain’s son (3), and thinking relief at hand,
We spared him for another night on the Banks of Newfoundland.
V
On the morning of the fifteenth day, no vessel did appear.
We gave to him another hour to offer up a prayer.
Well, Providence to us proved kind; kept blood from every hand (4),
For an English vessel hove in sight on the Banks of Newfoundland.
VI
We hoisted aloft our signal; they bore down on us straightaway.
When they saw our pitiful condition, they began to weep and pray.
Five hundred souls we had on board when first we left the land
There’s now alive but seventy-five on the Banks of Newfoundland.
VII
They took us off that ship, me boys; we was more like ghosts than men.
They fed us and they clothed us and brought us back again.
They fed us and they clothed us, and brought us straight to land.
While the billowy waves roll o’er the graves on the Banks of Newfoundland.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Oh, potete benedire il vostro felice destino, tutti voi che abitate sulla riva,
perché conoscete molto poco delle difficoltà che noi poveri marinai sopportiamo./Sì, sapete proprio poco delle difficoltà che siamo stati costretti a sopportare,
per quattordici giorni e quindici notti sui Banchi di Terranova.
II
La nostra nave, ha navigato tra il gelo e la neve dal giorno in cui abbiamo lasciato il Quebec, e se non avessimo camminato, ci saremmo congelati sul ponte./ Ma noi siamo veri marinai, che mai nave abbia avuto,/ il nostro Capitano, ogni giorno ci ha raddoppiato il grog, sui Banchi di Terranova.
III
Beh, non c’è mai stata nave, ragazzi, che abbia navigato nel mare occidentale, con le onde che arrivavano rotolando e si schiantavano sulle doghe./ La nostra nave costruita con legno non stagionato, aveva poco da stare a galla,/ l’uragano ci ha affrontato sui Banchi di Terranova..
IV
Beh, abbiamo digiunato per tredici giorni e notti, le nostre vettovaglie erano finite, la mattina del quattordicesimo giorno, abbiamo tirato a sorte/ Beh, il fato, è caduto sul figlio del Capitano, e pensando di avere un soccorso sottomano,/lo abbiamo risparmiato per un’altra notte sui Banchi di Terranova
V
La mattina del quindicesimo giorno non apparve nessuna nave.
gli abbiamo dato un’altra ora per dire una preghiera./Bene, la Provvidenza ci si è mostrata gentile a tenere lontano il sangue dalle nostre mani,
perchè avvistammo una nave inglese  sui Banchi di Terranova.
VI
Abbiamo issato in alto il nostro segnale; si sono subito diretti verso di noi./ Quando videro la nostra pietosa condizione, cominciarono a piangere  e a pregare./ di cinquecento anime che avevamo a bordo quando abbiamo lasciato la terra, erano ora vive solo settantacinque sui Banchi di Terranova
VII
Ci hanno portato via da quella nave, ragazzi; eravamo più fantasmi che uomini.
Ci hanno nutrito e vestito e riportati indietro
Ci hanno nutrito e vestito e riportati dritto a terra.
Mentre le onde  fluttuavano sulle tombe nei Banchi di Terranova.

NOTE
1) luck
2) quello che tirava la paglia più corta era il “vincitore”, e si sacrificava per il bene dei sopravvissuti, questa pratica era definita “legge del mare
3) un luogo comune perchè nelle ballate sul cannibalismo in mare tocca sempre al giovane mozzo
4)  la giustapposizione tra le due strofe con l’uomo pronto per il sacrificio e l’avvistamento all’alba della nave che li soccorrerà, vuole mitigare la cruda realtà del cannibalismo, una pratica orribile a dirsi ma che è sempre in agguato nei momenti di disperazione e come risorsa estrema per la sopravvivenza vedasi “The Ship in Distress

Si confrontino
la versione irlandese:
Eddie Butcher
1968 dall’archivio ITMA
Andy Irvine in Abocurragh, 2010  (testo qui)

la versione americana:
Mabel Worcester
 1967 dall’archivio digitale dell’Università del Maine 

transportation song
la pesca sui Banchi
the Eastern Light
morte del capitano (ballata americana)
naufragio e soccorso sui Banchi (ballata canadese)

 

FONTI
https://www.itma.ie/digital-library/sound/banks_of_newfoundland_eddie_butcher
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BanksNewfoundland.html
https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/songstorysamplercollection/18/
http://gestsongs.com/02/banks6.htm

Bound down for Newfoundland

Leggi in italiano

There are several sea songs entitled “the Banks of Newfoundland”, not to be properly considered variations on the same melody, even if they share a common theme, the dangers of fishing or navigation offshore of Newfoundland.

A long narrative tradition in Newfoundland is inspired by events and people of local significanc, so sea ballads speak of shipwrecks and calamities. (see more)
One particular theme is presented with various titles (The Schooner Mary Ann, Banks of Newfoundland) and variations starting from an American ballad of the late 1800 authored by captain Cale White entitled Bound Down To Newfoundland (Roud No. 647) and spread equally in Nova Scotia.

Graham Herbert ~ Off To Sea (Canada)

On St. Patrick’s Day, the seventeenth from New York we set sail

Also with the title “Bound down for Newfoundland” the ballad narrates the death of the young captain, struck by smallpox, on board the American schooner Mary Ann (or the brigantine the Eveline): probably it is a fishing ship heading to the Newfoundland Banks for the fishing season.
This particular version was collected by Helen Creighton [1899-1989] and published in Songs And Ballads From Nova Scotia.
To tell a sad story, mourning the young captain’s death, the matched melody is all too cheerful. The song is sometimes classified as an irish ballad.

The Corries from Bonnet, Belt & Sword 1967

Ryans Fancy  from Sullivan’s Gypsies 1970 ( I, III, IV, V)

I
On St. Patrick’s Day, the seventeenth
From New York we set sail
Kind fortune did favour us
Wi’ a sweet and a pleasant gale
We bore away from Americay
The wind bein’ off the land
And wi’ courage brave we ploughed the wave Bound down for Newfoundland
II
Our Captain’s name was Nelson
Just twenty years of age
As true and brave a sailor lad
As ever ploughed the wave
The Eveline our brig (1) was called
Belonging to McLean
And wi’ courage brave we ploughed the wave
Bound down for Newfoundland
III
When three days out to our surprise
Our Captain he fell sick
He shortly was not able
To take his turn on deck
The fever raged which made us think
That death was near at hand
So we bore away from Halifax (1)
Bound down for Newfoundland
IV
At three o’clock we sighted a light
That we were glad to see
The small-pox bein’ ragin’
That’s what it proved to be
At four o’clock in the afternoon
As sure as God’s command
He passed away in Arichat (2)
Bound down for Newfoundland
V
All that night long we did lament
For our departed friend
And we were prayin’ unto God
For what had been his end
We prayed that God would guide us
And keep us by his hand
And send us fair wind while at sea
Bound down for Newfoundland

NOTES
1) Halifax (Nova Scotia): with the sick captain who knew the coast the ship had lost its points of reference
2) Arichat small village on the Isle Madame with two lighthouses, one at the entrance to the harbor and the other at Jerseyman Island

transportation song
working on a  fisher ship
the Eastern Light
captain’s death (american ballad)
shipwreck and rescue on the Banks (Canadian ballad)

 

LINK
http://gestsongs.com/02/bound2.htm
http://gestsongs.com/02/bound1.htm
http://gestsongs.com/21/bound3.htm
http://disastersongs.ca/bound-down-for-newfoundland-schooner-mary-ann/
http://www.sssa.llc.ed.ac.uk/whalsay/2015/02/03/bound-down-for-newfoundland/
https://www.8notes.com/scores/3609.asp
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/932-the-banks-of-newfoundland-1
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/irish-songs-ballads-lyrics/bound_down_for_newfoundland.htm
https://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/16A-06.htm
http://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD2/20-6_51.htm
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LD22.html

Bound down for Newfoundland

Read the post in English

Ci sono parecchie  sea songs dal titolo “the Banks of Newfoundland”,  da non considerarsi propriamente come variazioni su una stessa melodia, anche se condividono un tema comune, i pericoli della pesca o della navigazione al largo di Terranova.

Una lunga tradizione narrativa a Terranova s’ispira a eventi e persone di importanza locale così le ballate del mare parlano di naufragi e calamità . (vedi)
Un filone in particolare si presenta con vari titoli (The Schooner Mary Ann, Banks of Newfoundland) e varianti a partire da una ballata americana del tardo 1800 attribuita al capitano Cale White dal titolo Bound Down To Newfoundland (Roud n ° 647) e diffusa parimenti in Nuova Scozia.

Graham Herbert ~ Off To Sea (Canada)

On St. Patrick’s Day, the seventeenth from New York we set sail

Anche con il titolo “Bound down for Newfoundland” la ballata narra della morte del capitano colpito dal vaiolo, a bordo della goletta americana Mary Ann (oppure il brigantino l’Eveline): si tratta probabilmente di una nave di pescatori diretta ai Banchi di Terranova per la stagione di pesca.
Questa versione in particolare è stata raccolta da Helen Creighton [1899-1989] e pubblicata in Songs And Ballads From Nova Scotia.
Per raccontate una storia triste, che piange la morte del giovane capitano, la melodia abbinata è fin troppo allegra. La canzone è talvolta classificata come una irish ballad.

The Corries in Bonnet, Belt & Sword 1967

Ryans Fancy  in Sullivan’s Gypsies 1970 (strofe I, III, IV, V)


I
On St. Patrick’s Day, the seventeenth
From New York we set sail
Kind fortune did favour us
Wi’ a sweet and a pleasant gale
We bore away from Americay
The wind bein’ off the land
And wi’ courage brave we ploughed the wave Bound down for Newfoundland
II
Our Captain’s name was Nelson
Just twenty years of age
As true and brave a sailor lad
As ever ploughed the wave
The Eveline our brig (1) was called
Belonging to McLean
And wi’ courage brave we ploughed the wave
Bound down for Newfoundland
III
When three days out to our surprise
Our Captain he fell sick
He shortly was not able
To take his turn on deck
The fever raged which made us think
That death was near at hand
So we bore away from Halifax (1)
Bound down for Newfoundland
IV
At three o’clock we sighted a light
That we were glad to see
The small-pox bein’ ragin’
That’s what it proved to be
At four o’clock in the afternoon
As sure as God’s command
He passed away in Arichat (2)
Bound down for Newfoundland
V
All that night long we did lament
For our departed friend
And we were prayin’ unto God
For what had been his end
We prayed that God would guide us
And keep us by his hand
And send us fair wind while at sea
Bound down for Newfoundland
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Il giorno di San Patrizio, il diciassette (marzo) da New York  siamo salpati
la fortuna gentile ci ha favorito
con un vento forte dolce e piacevole
siamo partiti dall’America
il vento che veniva da terra
e armati di coraggio abbiamo solcato l’onda diretti a Terranova
II
Il nome del nostro Capitano era Nelson
e aveva solo vent’anni
da vero e coraggioso giovane marinaio
che mai solcò il mare
l’Eveline si chiamava il brigantino
che apparteneva a McLean
e armati di coraggio abbiamo solcato l’onda
diretti a Terranova
III
Quando mancavano tre giorni al nostro arrivo, il capitano si è ammalato
e in breve non è stato capace
di prendere il suo posto sul ponte,
la febbre imperversava da farci pensare che la morte era vicina
così ci allontanvamo da Halifax
diretti a Terranova
IV
Alle tre in punto avvistammo un faro
che eravamo felici di vedere
Il vaiolo stava infuriando
-ecco cos’era.
Alle quattro del pomeriggio
secondo la volontà di Dio
è morto ad Arichat
diretti a Terranova
V
Tutta la notte ci siamo lamentati
per il nostro amico defunto
pregavamo Dio
per ciò che è stata la sua fine.
Abbiamo pregato che Dio ci guidasse
e ci tenessenella sua mano
per mandaci il vento giusto mentre in mare (eravamo) diretti a Terranova

NOTE
1) Halifax  (Nuova Scozia): con il capitano ammalato che conosceva la costa la nave aveva perso i suoi punti di riferimento
2) Arichat piccolo villaggio sull’Isle Madame con due fari, uno all’ingresso del porto e l’altro a Jerseyman Island

transportation song
la pesca sui Banchi
the Eastern Light
morte del capitano (ballata americana)
naufragio e soccorso sui Banchi (ballata canadese)

 

FONTI
http://gestsongs.com/02/bound2.htm
http://gestsongs.com/02/bound1.htm
http://gestsongs.com/21/bound3.htm
http://disastersongs.ca/bound-down-for-newfoundland-schooner-mary-ann/
http://www.sssa.llc.ed.ac.uk/whalsay/2015/02/03/bound-down-for-newfoundland/
https://www.8notes.com/scores/3609.asp
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/932-the-banks-of-newfoundland-1
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/irish-songs-ballads-lyrics/bound_down_for_newfoundland.htm
https://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/16A-06.htm
http://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD2/20-6_51.htm
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LD22.html