Archivi tag: Peggy Seeger

Windy old weather (Fishes Lamentation)

Leggi in italiano

The songs of the sea run from shore to shore, in particular “Windy old weather”, which according to Stan Hugill is a song by Scottish fishermen entitled “The Fish of the Sea”, also popular on the North-East coasts of the USA and Canada.
TITLES: Fishes Lamentation, Fish in the Sea, Haisboro Light Song (Up Jumped the Herring), The Boston Come-All-Ye, Blow Ye Winds Westerly, Windy old weather

A forebitter sung occasionally as a sea shanty, redating back to 1700 and probably coming from some broadsides with the title “The Fishes’ Lamentation“. “This song appears on some broadsides as The Fishes’ Lamentation and seems to have survived as a sailor’s chantey or fisherman’s song. Whall (1910), Colcord (1938) and Hugill (1964) include it in their chantey books. We also recorded it from Bob Roberts on board his Thames barge, The Cambria. It also appears in the Newfoundland and Nova Scotia collections of Ken Peacock and Helen Creighton“. (from here)

A fishing ship is practicing trawling on a full moon night, and as if by magic, the fishes start talking and warning sailors about the arrival of a storm. The fishes described are all belonging to the Atlantic Ocean and are quite commonly found in the English Channel and the North Sea (as well as in the Mediterranean Sea).
The variants can be grouped into two versions

FIRST VERSION  Blow the Man down tune

In this version the fish warn (or threaten) the fishermen on the arrival of the storm, urging them to head to the ground. The text is reported in “Oxford Book of Sea Songs”, Roy Palmer

Bob Roberts, from Windy old weather, 1958

David Tinervia · Nils Brown · Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · David Gossage from Assassin’s Creed – Black Flag
“Windy Old Weather”

Dan Zanes &  Festival Five Folk from Sea Music 2003 a fresh version between country and old time.

I
As we were a-fishing
off Happisburgh(1) light
Shooting and hauling
and trawling all night,
In the windy old weather,
stormy old weather
When the wind blows
we all pull together
II
When up jumped a herring,
the queen (king) of the sea(2)
Says “Now, old skipper,
you cannot catch me,”
III
We sighted a Thresher(3)
-a-slashin’ his tail,
“Time now Old Skipper
to hoist up your sail.”
IV (4)
And up jumps a Slipsole
as strong as a horse(5),
Says now, “Old Skipper
you’re miles off course.”
V
Then along comes plaice
-who’s got spots on his side,
Says “Not much longer
-these seas you can ride.”
VI
Then up rears a conger(6)
-as long as a mile,
“Winds coming east’ly”
-he says with a smile.
VII
I think what these fishes
are sayin’ is right,
We’ll haul up our gear(7)
now an’ steer for the light.

NOTES
1) Happisburgh lighthouse (“Hazeboro”) is located in the English county of ​​Norfolk, it was built in 1790 and painted in white and red stripes; It is managed by a foundation that deals with the maintenance of more than one hundred lighthouses throughout Great Britain. 112 are the steps to reach the tower that still works without the help of man. The headlights at the beginning were two but the lower one was dismantled in 1883 due to coastal erosion. The two lighthouses marked a safe passage through the Haagborough Sands
2) In the Nordic countries herrings (fresh or better in brine or smoked) are served in all sauces from breakfast to dinner. “It is a fish that loves cold seas and lives in numerous herds.The herring fishing in the North Seas has been widespread since the Middle Ages.It is clearly facilitated by the quantity of fish and the limited range of their movements. trawlers and start the fishing season on May 1, to close it after two months.In all the countries of North America and Northern Europe this fishing has an almost sacred character, because it has been for years the providence of fishermen and is a real natural wealth In the Netherlands and Sweden, for example, the first day of herring fishing is organized in honor of the queen and is proclaimed a national holiday ” (from here)
3) Thresher shark thresher, thrasher, fox shark, alopius vulpinus.with a characteristic tail with a very elongated upper part (almost as much as the length of the body) that the animal uses as a whip to stun and overwhelm its prey. The name comes from Aristotle who considered this fish very clever, because he was skilled in escaping from the fishermen
4) the mackerel stanza is missing:
then along comes a mackerel with strips on his back
“Time now, old skipper, to shift yout main tack”
5) perhaps refers to halibut or halibut, of considerable size, has an oval and flattened body, similar to that of a large sole, with the eyes on the right side
6) the “conger” is a fish with an elongated body similar to eel but more robust, can reach a length of two or three meters and exceeds ten kilos of weight. It is a fundamental ingredient in the Livorno cacciucco dish!
7) another translation of the sentence could be: we recover our networks

SCOTTISH VERSION, Blaw the Wind Southerly tune

In this version the fish take possession of the ship, it seems the description of the ghost ship of “Davy Jone”, the evil spirit of the waters made so vividly in the movie “Pirates of the Caribbean”. An old Scottish melody accompanies a series of variations of the same song.
davy-jones

 

Quadriga Consort from Ship Ahoy, 2011 ♪ 

Michiel Schrey, Sean Dagher, Nils Brown from, Assasin’s Creed – Black Flag  titled “Fish in the sea” (stanzas from I to III and VIII)

I
Come all you young sailor men,
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish in the sea;
(Chorus)
And it’s…Windy weather, boys,
stormy weather, boys,
When the wind blows,
we’re all together, boys;
Blow ye winds westerly,
blow ye winds, blow,
Jolly sou’wester, boys,
steady she goes.
II
Up jumps the eel
with his slippery tail,
Climbs up aloft
and reefs the topsail.
III
Then up jumps the shark
with his nine rows of teeth,
Saying, “You eat the dough boys,
and I’ll eat the beef!”
IV
Up jumps the lobster
with his heavy claws,
Bites the main boom
right off by the jaws!
V
Up jumps the halibut,
lies flat on the deck
He says, ‘Mister Captain,
don’t step on my neck!’
VI
Up jumps the herring,
the king of the sea,
Saying, ‘All other fishes,
now you follow me!’
VII
Up jumps the codfish
with his chuckle-head (1),
He runs out up forward
and throws out the lead!
VIII
Up jumps the whale
the largest of all,
“If you want any wind,
well, I’ll blow ye a squall(2)!”

NOTES
1) literally “stupid head” is a common saying among the fishermen that the cod is stupid, because it does not recognize the bait and lets himself hoist docilely on board.
2) the fishermen were / are very superstitious men, in all latitudes, it takes little or nothing to attract misfortune in the sea, it is still a widespread belief that the devil or the evil spirit has power over the sea and storms.

AMERICAN VARIANT: THE BOSTON COME-ALL-YE

Of the second version, the best-known in America bears the title “The Boston as-all-ye” as collected by Joanna Colcord in her “Songs of American Sailormen” which she writes”There can be little doubt that [this] song, although it was sung throughout the merchant service, began life with the fishing fleet. We have the testimony of Kipling in Captains Courageous that it was a favourite within recent years of the Banks fishermen. It is known as The Fishes and also by its more American title of The Boston Come-All-Ye. The chorus finds its origin in a Scottish fishing song Blaw the Wind Southerly. A curious fact is that Captain Whall, a Scotchman himself, prints this song with an entirely different tune, and one that has no connection with the air of the Tyneside keelmen to which our own Gloucester fishermen sing it. The version given here was sung by Captain Frank Seeley.”

Peggy Seeger from  Whaler Out of New Bedford, 1962

I
Come all ye young sailormen
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish of the sea.
Then blow ye winds westerly,
westerly blow;
we’re bound to the southward,
so steady she goes
.
II
Oh, first came the whale,
he’s the biggest of all,
he clumb up aloft,
and let every sail fall.
III
Next came the mackerel
with his striped back,
he hauled aft the sheets
and boarded each tack(1).
IV
The porpoise(2) came next
with his little snout,
he grabbed the wheel,
calling “Ready? About!(3”
V
Then came the smelt(4),
the smallest of all,
he jumped to the poop
and sung out, “Topsail, haul!”
VI
The herring came saying,
“I’m king of the seas!
If you want any wind,
I’ll blow you a breeze.”
VII
Next came the cod
with his chucklehead (5),
he went to the main-chains
to heave to the lead.
VIII
Last come the flounder(6)
as flat as the ground,
saying, “Damn your eyes, chucklehead, mind how you sound”!

NOTES
1) In sailing, tack is a corner of a sail on the lower leading edge. Separately, tack describes which side of a sailing vessel the wind is coming from while under way—port or starboard. Tacking is the maneuver of turning between starboard and port tack by bringing the bow (the forward part of the boat) through the wind. (from Wiki)
2) porpoise is often considered as a small dolphin, has a distinctive rounded snout and has no beak like dolphins
3) it  is the helmsman shouting
4 ) smelt it (osmero) is a small fish that lives in the Channel and in the North Sea; its name derives from the fact that its flesh gives off an unpleasant odor
5) literally “stupid head” is a common saying among the fishermen that the cod is stupid, because it does not recognize the bait and lets himself hoist docilely on board.

Blow the Wind Southerly

LINK
http://www.pubblicitaitalia.com/ilpesce/2013/1/12262.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/fishes.html
http://moodpoint.com/lyrics/unknown/song_of_the_fishes.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/windy-old-weather.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/windyoldweather.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149445
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49498
https://thesession.org/tunes/11479
http://bestpossiblejob.blogspot.it/2008/09/come-all-ye-young-and-not-so-young.html

MAID GAED TAE THE MILL

Ci sono professioni nelle ballate popolari che richiamano di per sé una certa promiscuità sessuale: così il soldato e il marinaio per la loro condizione girovaga, ma anche l’aratore, il fabbro, o il calzolaio o ancora il mugnaio (un po’ come per le professioni odierne dell’idraulico o il postino!) . Così le canzoni su calzolai e mugnai hanno spesso un che di boccaccesco (continua prima parte)

LA VARIANTE DEL MUGNAIO: MAID GAED TAE THE MILL

“The Maid gaed to the Mill” (The Maid went to the Mill) è un brano tradizionale sulla scia della serie  “The Shoemaker’s kiss” basta scambiare il calzolaio con il mugnaio e il mattino presto con la sera che il succo della storia è lo stesso. Tuttavia la fanciulla è questa volta tutt’altro che ingenua, anzi viene definita “wanton” che tra i vari significati in riferimento alla sessualità indica un comportamento voglioso e lascivo.
Per il suo approccio gioioso a una sessualità “spensierata” è classificabile tra le bothy ballads.

La canzone è comparsa in stampa verso la fine del 1700 (Ancient And Modern Scottish Songs, David Herd 1776 e “The Scots Musical Museum” Vol.5 no. 481, 1796 con la melodia “I Am A Miller To my Trade” – che a sua volta è suonata come “Johnny I hardly knew ye”).

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger, Ewan imparò la canzone dal padre scozzese e così la restituisce in scots


I
The maid gaed tae
the mill ae nicht
Hech hey(1) sae wanton(2),
The maid gaed tae
the mill ae night
And hey sae wanton she
She swore by a’ the stars sae bricht
That she’ld hae her corn grun'(3)
She’ld hae her corn grun’
Mill and multure(4) free
II
Then oot an’ cam’ the miller’s man
Then oot an’ cam’ the miller’s man
He swore he’ll dae
the best he can
Fir tae get her corn grun’
tae get her corn grun’
Mill and multure free
III
He put his haund upon her neck
He put his haund upon her neck
He dang her doon(5) upon a sack
And there she got her corn grun’
she get her corn grun’
Mill and multure free
IV
When a’ the rest
gaed tae their play
When a’ the rest
gaed tae their play
She sighed and said
and wuldna stay
Because she’d got her corn grun’
she get her corn grun’
Mill and multure free
V
When forty weeks
were passed an’ gane
When forty weeks
were passed an’ gane
This lassie had a braw lad bairn
For gettin’ a’  her corn grun’
gettin’ a’ her corn grun’
Mill and multure free
VI
Her mither bade cast it oot
Her mither bade cast it oot
It was the miller’s dusty clout
For gettin’ a’  her corn grun’
gettin’ a’ her corn grun’
Mill and multure free
VII
Her faither bade her keep it in
Her faither bade her keep it in
It was the chief o’ all her kin
Because he has her corn  grun’
he has her corn  grun’
Mill and multure free (6)

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
La fanciulla andò
al mulino la scorsa notte
ahimè così sfacciata
La fanciulla andò
al mulino la scorsa notte
ahimè così sfacciata
giurò per le stelle molto luminose
che avrebbe avuto il suo raccolto del grano, avrebbe avuto il suo raccolto del grano, macinato gratis
II
Allora uscì il mugnaio
Allora uscì il mugnaio
e giurò che avrebbe
fatto del suo meglio
per avere il suo grano,
per avere il suo grano
macinato gratis

III
Le mise la mano intorno al collo
Le mise la mano intorno al collo
e la buttò giù su di un sacco
ed ebbe il suo grano,
ebbe il suo grano,
macinato gratis

IV
Quando finirono
di fare i loro comodi,
Quando finirono
di fare i loro comodi
lei sospirò e disse
che non poteva rimanere
perchè aveva il suo grano,
aveva il suo grano,
macinato gratis

V
Quando nove mesi
furono passati e andati
Quando nove mesi
furono passati e andati
la fanciulla ha avuto un bel bambino
per aver avuto tutto il suo grano
aver avuto tutto il suo grano
macinato gratis
VI
Sua madre le ordinò di mandarlo via
Sua madre le ordinò di mandarlo via
il marchio polveroso del mugnaio
per aver avuto tutto il suo grano
aver avuto tutto il suo grano
macinato gratis
VII
Suo padre le ordinò di tenerlo
Suo padre le ordinò di tenerlo
fu il capo di tutto il clan
perchè aveva il raccolto del grano
aveva il raccolto del grano
macinato gratis

NOTE
1) Hech hey: traducibile con ahimè
2) Wanton: sessualmente disinibita
3) Grund: ground letteralmente campo di grano ma nel contesto si tratta ovviamente del grano raccolto e messo nei sacchi per essere macinato
4) Multure: parte lasciata al mugnaio per il pagamento della macinatura
5) Dang her doon: pushed her down with force
6) essendo il figlio del mugnaio!

Traduzione inglese Cattia Salto
I
The maid went to the mill last night
Hey-hey, so wanton!
The maid went to the mill last night
Hey, so wanton she!
She swore below the stars so bright
That she should have her corn ground,
She should have her corn ground
The miller grinds so free!

II
Then out come miller’s man
He swore he’d do the best he can
For to get her …
III
He put his hand about her neck
He flung her down upon a sack
And there she got her …
IV
When all the rest went to their play
She sighed and said she would not stay
Because she got her …
V
When nine months were passed and gone
This lassie had a brawling child
For getting all her …
VI
Her mother bade her cast it out
It was the miller’s dusty clout
For getting all her …
VII
Her father bade her keep it in
It was the chief of all her clan
Because he has her

continua I MUGNAI NELLE BALLDS

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/maidgaedtaethemill.htm
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiMAIDMILL;ttMAIDMILL.html
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.music.folk/he5wXYSUW34
http://www.penultimateharn.com/music/millmaid.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=3815

Dirty Old Town by Ewan MacColl

Scritta da James Miller (alias Ewan MacColl) ‎ nel 1949 “Dirty Old Town” è ambientata a Salford (nel distretto della “Grande Manchester”): cresciuto nell’Inghilterra del Nord ma di origini scozzesi Ewan, attore, cantante, cantautore, produttore discografico, fa della sua città natale un embelma della rivoluzione industriale inglese ottocentesca.
Una triste e fumosa città-dormitorio inglese descritta da Marx e Engels come “un enorme quartiere operaio…una città assai malsana, sporca e degradata“.
Così note del suo songbook leggiamo: This superb song was written to cover a scene-change in a play which was set in Salford, Lancashire, the city which provided the philosopher Friedrich Engels with most of the information for his book ‘The condition of the working class in 1844’.
Oggi l’area dei moli è diventata una luccicante e moderna vetrina di architettura post-moderna.

L’area dell’Old Canal riqualificata architettonicamente

La canzone passa per tradizionale irlandese essendo stata divulgata prima dai Dubliners e dai Pogues poi.

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl con la moglie Peggy Seeger con un arrangiamento jazz (nel video immagini di Salford negli anni 50-60) e li vediamo giovani innamorati lungo le rive del canale che passeggiano


I
I met my love
by the gas works [1] wall [2]
Dreamed a dream
by the old canal[3]
Kissed my girl
by the factory wall
Dirty old town[4]
Dirty old town
II
Clouds a drifting
across the moon
Cats a prowling on their beat
Spring’s a girl[5]
in the streets at night
III
I heard a siren[6]
from the docks
Saw a train[7]
set the night on fire
Smelled the smoke
on the Salford wind[8]
IV
I’m going to make me
a good sharp axe
Shining steel
tempered in the fire
Will chop you down
like an old dead tree[9]
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Incontravo il mio amore
accanto al muro dell’officina del gas, facevo progetti
dal vecchio canale,
baciavo la mia ragazza
contro il muro della fabbrica
Sporca vecchia città
Sporca vecchia città
II
Nuvole alla deriva
davanti alla luna
gatti furtivi a caccia
primavera è una bambina
nelle strade di sera
III
Udivo la sirena
dai moli
vedevo un treno
mettere a fuoco la notte
annusavo il fumo
nel vento di Salford
IV
Sto andando ad affilare
bene l’ascia
d’acciaio luccicante
temprato nel fuoco
e ti abbatterò
come un vecchio albero morto

NOTE
1) Nell’ottocento il gas che serviva per l’illuminazione pubblica e per la forza motrice veniva prodotto in un impianto industriale, erano le officine del gas con mastodontici gasometri che richiamano immagini di carri ricolmi di carbone affluire dai porti e lungo i canali fino alle Officine. La fabbrica del gas di Salford è stata la prima in Inghilterra, e Salford è stata la prima città al mondo ad avere le strade illuminate a gas. La richiesta di approvvigionamento di gas continuò ad aumentare finendo ad alimentare anche gli apparecchi domestici, (i fornelli per cuocere il cibo e le caldaie per produrre acqua calda). Il coke veniva cotto nei forni e il gas prodotto mandato nei grossi serbatoi in attesa della distribuzione. L’aria era pestilenziale e molto alto l’indice di mortalità degli operai fuochisti a causa delle esalazioni dei gas. Con l’uso del gas naturale tutte le officine del gas sono state dismesse e smantellate.
2) scritto anche come croft: è il terreno incolto delle aree di risulta urbane
3) il Manchester Ship Canal: evidentemente l’unico posto un po’ romantico dove andare a passeggiare con la ragazza a Salford era quel canale sebbene fiancheggiato dalle fabbriche. Il contrasto è stridente soprattutto se paragonato ai romantici incontri campestri descritti nelle canzoni tradizionali.
4) una old town emblematica: la città industralizzata con il quartiere operaio sovravvollato, malmesso e malsano, costruito nella zona più degradata della città.
5) sono i bambini che giocano nelle strade ai primi raggi di sole, perchè la strada era il loro salotto buono
6) la sirena delle navi
7) “un treno a vapore con il focolare che brillava nella notte” si tratta di uno Staem train, il treno con la locomotiva a vapore, alimentato con il carbone dal fuochista: più che le fiamme la caratteristica della locomotiva a vapore sono gli sbuffi di fumo oggetto di diversi studi e raffigurazioni nei quadri di Claude Monet, ma senz’altro con un po’ d’immaginazione i treni potevano essere paragonati a macchine infernali che mettevano a ferro e fuoco la notte. La cabina aperta del conducente lasciava intravedere la bocca del focolare quando i macchinisti lo caricavano di carbone e dal comignolo sprizzavano anche scintille che spesso incendiavano il sottobosco accanto alla linea ferroviaria.
8) Il verso non piacque alle autorità municipali di Salford e MacColl lo cambiò  in ‎‎“smelled the spring on the smoky wind”, in italiano: annusavo la primavera nel vento pieno di fumo; un verso però che sembra molto ironico, l’odore portato dal vento era quello dell’aria inquinata, un fumo grigio che sporcava di fuliggine tutta la città. Una volta entrato nel circuito folk il verso ha subito ulteriori rielaborazioni passando per sulphured e fino a diventare un Dublin wind
9) in effetti il porto di Salford è stato smantellato e il quartiere operaio abbattuto per costruirvi un moderno polo direttivo, ma non credo che sia quello che Ewan avesse in mente. Avrebbe voluto distruggere il sistema di sfruttamento dei lavoratori asserviti al mostro-fabbrica alimentato dalla logica del profitto di pochi capitalisti, l’ascia è quindi l’emblema del socialismo e di un diverso sistema di gestire il lavoro senza sfruttare l’uomo.
L’imagine poetica però è quella che accosta le alte ciminiere di mattoni e cemento che buttano fuori il fumo a dei vecchi alberi morti (al posto delle chiome verdi, il grigio dele polveri)

FONTI
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=45136&lang=it
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=25048
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48907

Fair Ellender

Una tra le ballate più popolari nella Balladry anglo-americana (seconda solo a Barbara Allen) è classificata dal professor Child nella sua raccolta al numero 73, con il titolo di “Lord Thomas and Annet“. La bella della storia è però più spesso chiamata Ellinor (Eleanor, Elinor). Si tratta di un triangolo amoroso, con l’uomo che, seguendo il consiglio della famiglia, sposa la donna bruna invece di quella bionda. Come da copione shakespeariano nella tragedia i morti ammazzati diventano subito tre. (prima parte con plot della storia)

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA

Nota anche con il titolo “The Brown Girl (Lord Thomas and Fair Ellender)” la ballata proviene dalla famiglia Seeger.
La melodia è risolta in chiave bluegrass con un tempo tipo valzer.

ASCOLTA Peggy & Mike Seeger 1967

ASCOLTA Jerry Garcia & David Grisman in Shady Grove 1996


I
“Father, oh father, come riddle to me,
Come riddle it all in one,
And tell me whether to marry Fair Ellender
Or bring the Brown girl home.”
II
The Brown girl she has house and land,
Fair Ellender she has none,
And there I charge you with the blessing
To bring the Brown girl home.
III
He got on his horse and he rode and he rode,
He rode ‘til he came to her home,
And no one so ready as Fair Ellender herself
To rise and bid him in.
IV
What news have you brought unto me, Lord Thomas?
What news have you brought unto me?
I’ve come to ask you to my wedding,
A sorrowful wedding to be.
V
Oh mother, oh mother, would you(4) go or stay?
Fair child, do as you please,
I’m afraid if you go you’ll never return
To see your mother any more.
VI
She turned around and dressed in white
Her sisters dressed in green,
And every town that they rode through
They taken her to be some queen.
VII
They rode and they rode ‘til they came to the hall,
She pulled at the bell and it rang
And no one so ready as Lord Thomas himself
To rise and welcome her in.
VIII
He taken her by her lily white hand
and leading her through the hall
Saying fifty gay ladies are here today
But here is the flower of all.
IX
The Brown girl she was standing by
With knife ground keen and sharp,
Between the long ribs and the short,
She pierced Fair Ellender’s heart.
X
Lord Thomas he was standing by
With knife ground keen and sharp,
Between the long ribs and the short
He pierced his own bride’s heart.
XI
By placing the handle against the wall,
The point against his breast,
Saying, “This is the ending of three true lovers,
God sends us all to rest.
XII
Oh father, oh father, go dig my grave,
Go dig it wide and deep,
And place fair Ellender in my arms
And the Brown girl at my feet.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Padre (1) oh padre risolveresti un dilemma, una volta per tutte?
Dimmi se devo sposare la bionda(2) Ellender
o portare a casa la ragazza mora (3)
II
La ragazza mora possiede case
e terre
e la bionda Ellender non ha niente
ed ecco ti affido la mia
benedizione
per portare a casa la ragazza mora
III
Egli prese il suo cavallo e cavalcò, cavalcò
cavalcò finchè raggiunse la casa di lei
e fu la bionda Ellender
in persona
ad alzarsi e a farlo entrare.
IV
Che novità mi hai portato,
Lord Thomas?
Che novità mi hai portato?
Sono venuto a invitarti al mio matrimonio;
che sarà un triste sposalizio
V
O madre, madre, dovrei(4) andare o restare?
Bella bambina, fai come credi,
temo che se andrai non ritornerai più
a rivedere tua madre

VI
Tornò indietro e si vestì
in bianco (5)
le sorelle si vestirono in verde
e in ogni città che
attraversavano
la prendevano per una regina
VII
Cavalcarono e cavalcarono finchè arrivarono al castello
lei si attaccò al campanello e lo tirò
e fu Lord Thomas
in persona
ad alzarsi e ad accoglierla.
VIII
La prese per la mano bianco giglio
guidandola per la sala (del banchetto)
dicendo “Cinquanta belle dame sono qui oggi, ma ecco la bella tra le belle” (6)
IX
La ragazza mora che stava lì accanto,
con lo stiletto (7) aguzzo e tagliente.
tra le costole dello sterno
trafisse il cuore della bionda Ellender
X
Lord Thomas che stava lì accanto,
con lo stiletto aguzzo e tagliente.
tra le costole dello sterno
trafisse il cuore della propria moglie.
XI
Poi mise il manico contro il muro
e la punta rivolta verso il proprio petto
dicendo “Questa è la fine di tre veri innamorati,
che Dio ci conceda il riposo
XII
O padre padre vai a scavare la mia tomba, falla larga e profonda
e metti la bionda Ellender tra le mie braccia e la ragazza mora ai miei piedi

NOTE
1) nelle versioni scozzesi è la madre ad essere interrogata in merito alla fanciulla da sposare, ma in una società patriarcale è il padrone di casa a prendere tali decisioni
2) in questa ballata preferisco tradurre l’aggettivo nel suo significato primario, mentre in genere lo traduco con bella
3) dai neri capelli
4) you in questo contesto è impersonale, letteralmente “si dovrebbe andare o restare?”
5) il bianco come colore per l’abito da sposa diventa di moda solo nell’Ottocento dopo che la regina Vittoria ha sposato il suo amato principe Alberto con un sontuoso abito in satin e pizzo (vedi)
6) in questa versione è Thomas ad offendere la sposa preferendole pubblicamente la bella Ellender, sarà lei a volere tra le braccia nel sepolcro
7) knife ground è un tipo di pugnale particolarmente diffuso nel Medioevo, l’arma prediletta da assassini (e dalle donne) perché facile da nascondere sotto il mantello o nella manica dell’abito. La descrizione di come viene usato è appropriata in quanto è fatto penetrare con forza nello sterno per trafiggere il cuore.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=3725
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-seeger-family/the-brown-girl-lord-thomas-and-fair-ellender/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/recordings–info-73-lord-thomas-and-fair-annet.aspx
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/lord-thomas-and-fair-ellinor-a-preliminary-study.aspx
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/us–canada-versions-73-lord-thomas–fair-annet.aspx
http://ingeb.org/songs/lordthom.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17932

DEATH OF QUEEN JANE

Forse la regina più amata da Enrico VIII e senza dubbio, la più remissiva, Jane Seymour regnò un anno appena al fianco del consorte, per morire di parto (1537) dopo aver dato alla luce il tanto sospirato erede maschio. Un Edoardo VI che, di salute cagionevole, morirà 15 enne.
La ballata popolare “Death of the Queen Jane” sembra descrivere proprio il  parto della regina e intavola un dialogo  privato e intimo tra le due Maestà.

dalla serie televisiva “I Tudors” terza stagione

Della ballata il professor Child riporta una ventina di versioni: si descrive il momento in cui la Regina Jane chiede a varie persone di tagliarle il fianco per far uscire il bambino, ma di volta in volta tutti rifiutano per timore di nuocerle. In alcune versioni alla fine il re cede ed esegue l’operazione, la donna muore ma il bambino è salvo. Nel finale la gioia per la nascita del tanto atteso erede si accompagna al dolore per il lutto della regina.

Molto probabilmente la ballata è stata scritta poco dopo l’avvenimento, anche se si rintraccia  solo qualche secolo più tardi nei manoscritti di Thomas Percy (1776): ecco un resoconto “ufficiale” dell’avvenimento con il  titolo ‘The Wofull Death of Queene Jane‘ (in “A Crowne-Garland of Golden Roses” 1612-1692) attribuito a  Richard Johnson (1592-1622).

E’ nella versione riportata da Agnes Strickland (1796-1874) che leggiamo  la ballata nella forma più condensata, attribuita dallo studioso al poeta di corte Thomas Churchyard (1523?-1604): con buona probabilità  è proprio questa la versione più antica riadattata a in parte ampliata da Richard Johnston per la sua Crowne-Garland (vedi)

I
When as king Henry ruled this land
He had a queen, I understand,
Lord Seymour’s daughter, fur and bright;
Yet death, by his remorseless power,
Did blast the bloom of this fair flower.
Oh! mourn, mourn, mourn, fair ladies,
Your queen, the flower of England’s dead
II
The queen in travail pained sore,
Full thirty woeful hours and more;
And no ways could relieved be,
As all her ladies wished to see;
Wherefore the king made greater moan
Than ever yet his grace had done.
III
Then, being something eased in mind,
His eyes a troubled sleep did find;
Where, dreaming he had lost a rose,
But which he could not well suppose:
A ship he had, a Rose by name,
Oh no, it was his royal Jane!
IV
Being thus perplexed with grief and care,
A lady to him did repair,
And said, ‘0 King, show us thy will,
The queen’s sweet life to save or spill?’
Then, as she cannot saved be,
0, save the flower though not the tree.’
Oh! mourn, mourn, mourn, fair ladies,
Your queen, the flower of England’s dead.

La trasmissione orale della ballata ha però fatto emergere dei punti salienti della vicenda, non necessariamente veritieri quanto piuttosto ritenuti tali, come il parto con il taglio cesareo e la morte della regina subito dopo.

QUESTIONE DI PROPAGANDA

Cosa sia realmente accaduto nella stanza della partoriente  si presta a varie ipotesi, ben più significativo è l’uso propagandistico dei fatti: sembrerebbe che a diffondere le voci di un avvenuto taglio cesareo sia stata una cospirazione cattolica allo scopo di screditare il Re. Ma quando si tratta di trame a così alti livelli non è nemmeno azzardata l’ipotesi che sia stata la propaganda anti-cattolica ad attribuire ai cattolici la propalazione del fatto come bugia.

La pratica del taglio cesareo era già nota ai medici medievali (e  praticata sporadicamente nei tempi più antichi come estrema ratio per salvare il bambino quando la madre era impossibilitata a partorire naturalmente); la mancata applicazione nel Medioevo riguardava più una questione morale che di tecnica (anche se gli esiti erano decisamente mortali per la donna): “The sixteenth-century French doctor Ambroise Pare criticized attempts to undertake surgery on living mothers because he thought that it could not succeed, after which the practice became increasingly taboo across Europe.  It was also widely considered to be immoral, and superstition held it to be a bad omen that could bring curses upon those who employed it.  But it did occur, and it is documented that as early as 1500, thirty-seven years before the birth of Prince Edward, the operation was undertaken successfully by a Swiss piggelder on his own wife.  A sixteenth-century surgeon in Bruges is also reported to have performed the operation seven times, again on his wife.”  (tratto da qui)

Significativo l’epitaffio sulla tomba di Edoardo che accredita la madre come fenice immolatasi per la dinastia 

Here a Phoenix lieth, 
whose death
To another Phoenix gave breath:
It is to be lamented much,
The World at once ne'er knew two such.

Così tirando le somme ecco come è andata: Enrico VIII per garantirsi l’erede maschio tanto atteso costringe Jane  a partorire con il taglio cesareo (ben consapevole che l’operazione portava normalmente alla morte della madre) e infatti la donna muore dopo dodici giorni dal parto.
Nel Medioevo davanti alla scelta tra la vita della madre e quella del bambino si propendeva 1) a non fare niente perchè quella era la volontà di Dio 2) a salvare la madre, in quanto “maior ius“.
Nel caso di Jane prevale la ragion di stato.
Da notare che la Chiesa cattolica era nel Medioevo contraria al parto cesareo e lo riteneva necessario solo post mortem per la salvezza spirituale del feto; muta opinione però a partire dal 1600 -vedasi il trattato “De ortu infantium contra naturam per sectionem caesaream tractatio” del gesuita francese Theophile Raynaud – solo da allora vige l’obbligo morale della madre in virtù dei principi di carità e amore, di offrire la propria vita in cambio di quella del figlio: “A favore della madre, rifacendosi alla classica teoria di Tertulliano (160ca-†220), egli [Theophile Raynaud] scriveva di un feto aggressore il cui sacrificio doveva essere interpretato come azione di legittima difesa da parte della donna, iscrivibile sul piano della giustizia. Accanto a questa riproposizione del principio di giustizia, egli inseriva, però, quello di carità: se la giustizia poteva consentire che si sacrificasse il feto, la carità, al contrario, chiedeva che si privilegiasse la sua vita e sebbene la madre potesse, senza commettere ingiustizia, preferire se stessa, essa non poteva farlo senza mancare al comandamento più importante: quello dell’amore.” (Carmen Trimarchi tratto da qui)

LE MELODIE

La ballata circolò in molte versioni nelle isole Britanniche e in America con vari testi e melodie.
ASCOLTA Peggy Seeger 1962

ASCOLTA Joan Baez 1964 (I, IV, VI, VII, VIII, IX, XI)


I
Queen Jane lay in labor
For six weeks and more
her women grew weary
And the midwife gave o’er
II
O, women, kind women,
as I know you to be;
Pray cut my side open
and save my baby.
III
“O, no,” said the women,
“That never might be,
We’ll send for King Henry
in the hour of your need.
IV
King Henry, he was sent for
On horse back and speed
King Henry came to her
In the time of her need
V
King Henry he come in
and stood by her bed;
What ails my pretty flower,
her eyes look so red.
VI
Oh Henry, good King Henry
If that you do be (1)
Please pierce (2) my side open
And save my baby
VII
Oh no Jane, good Queen Jane (3)
That never could be
I’d lose my sweet flower
To save my baby
VIII
Queen Jane she turned over
She fell all in a swoon
Her side was pierced open
And the baby was found
IX (4)
How bright was the morning
How yellow was the moon
How costly the white coat
Queen Jane was wrapped in
X
Six followed after,
six bore her along,
King Henry come after,
his head hanging down.
XI
King Henry he weeped
He wrung his hands ‘til they’re sore
The flower of England
Will never be (5) no more
XII
The baby was christened
the very next day,
His mother’s poor body
lay moldering away.
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
La Regina Giovanna era in travaglio
da più di sei giorni
le ancelle erano stanche,
e l’ostetrica si arrese.
II
“O donne, buone donne,
se siete delle buone ancelle
vi prego di aprire il mio fianco destro
e salvare il mio bambino”
III
“Oh no,” esclamarono le donne,
“non è cosa da farsi
Manderemo a cercare re Enrico
nel momento del bisogno”
IV
Mandarono a cercare Re Enrico
di gran corsa a cavallo
Re Enrico arrivò
nel momento del bisogno
V
Re Enrico arrivò
e si mise accanto al letto
“Cosa ti fa soffrire mio bel fiore?
I tuoi occhi sembrano così arrossati”
VI
“Oh Enrico, buon re Enrico,
faresti una cosa per me?
Taglia il mio fianco destro
e salva il bambino “
VII
“Oh no Giovanna, buona regina Giovanna, non è cosa da farsi
perderei il mio dolce fiore,
per salvare il mio bambino”
VIII
La Regina Giovanna si voltò
e cadde in deliquio
e il suo fianco destro fu aperto
e il bambino trovato
IX
Che chiaro era il mattino
e che gialla era la luna
e che prezioso era il bianco drappo
in cui la regina Giovanna fu avvolta
X
Sei uomini andarono davanti
e sei la portavano a fianco
re Enrico veniva dietro
con il capo piegato
XI
Re Enrico pianse
e si torse le mani fino a farsi male
” il fiore d’Inghilterra,
non fiorirà più”
XII
Il bambino venne battezzato
il giorno dopo
mente il cadavere della sua povera madre stava a decomporsi

NOTE
1) Peggy dice: pray listen to me
2) Peggy dice cut
3) Peggy dice “O, no!” said King Henry
4) Peggy dice “How black was the mourning, how yellow her bed,
How white the bright shroud Queen Jane was laid in” in una frase che ha molto più senso di quella di Baez: che nero era il lutto e che giallo il letto,  che bianco il sudario in cui la regina fu avvolta
5) Peggy dice “is blooming”

Andreas Scholl
: “King Henry”


I
King Henry, was sent for
all in the time of her need
King Henry he came
In the time of her need
II
King Henry he stooped
and kissed her on her lips;
What’s the matter with my flower,
makes her eyes look so red?.
III
King Henry King Henry
will you take me to thee
to pierce  my side open
And  to save my baby?
IV
Oh no Queen Jane
such thing shall never be
to lose my sweet flower
for to save my baby
V
Queen Jane she turned over
and fell in a swound
Her side it was pierced
And her baby was found
VI
How bright was the morning
How yellow her bed
How costly was the shroud
Queen Jane was wrapped in
X
There’s six followed after,
and six carried her along,
King Henry be followed,
with his blak mourning on.
XI
King Henry he wept
and wrung his hands ‘til they’re sore
The flower of England
shall never be  no more
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
Mandarono a cercare Re Enrico
nel momento del bisogno
Re Enrico arrivò
nel momento del bisogno
V
Re Enrico si fermò
e le baciò le labbra
“Che succede al mio fiore?
I tuoi occhi sembrano così arrossati”
VI
“ re Enrico, re Enrico
faresti una cosa per me?
Taglia il mio fianco destro
e salva il bambino “
VII
“Oh no regina Giovanna,
non è cosa da farsi
perderei il mio dolce fiore,
per salvare il mio bambino”
VIII
La Regina Giovanna si voltò
e cadde in deliquio
e il suo fianco destro fu aperto
e il bambino trovato
IX
Che chiaro era il mattino
e che giallo il letto
e che prezioso era il drappo
in cui la regina Giovanna fu avvolta
X
Sei uomini andarono davanti
e sei la portavano a fianco
re Enrico veniva dietro
nel suo lutto
XI
Re Enrico pianse
e si torse le mani fino a farsi male
” il fiore d’Inghilterra,
non fiorirà più”

LA MELODIA STANDARD

Il chitarrista e cantante irlandese Dáithí Sproule nel 1971 ha composto la melodia che è diventata quella standard, la prima registrazione è dei Bothy Band  in After Hours (1979)

ASCOLTA Oscar Isaac nel film “A proposito di Davis” 2013.
Il successo del film ha rinverdito la canzone presso gli interpreti folk contemporanei. Nella scena del film Davis si esibisce con la chitarra davanti ad un importante agente musicale, la scelta cade su “The death of Queen Jane”, un brano che gli lacera l’anima dato che Jean, la madre di suo figlio, ha appena deciso di abortire. (L’incongruenza balza subito all’occhio come poteva LLewyn Davis cantare nel 1961  una melodia scritta nel 1971?)

ASCOLTA Méav arrangia la melodia in chiave rinascimentale con tanto di clavicembalo e liuto

Anche Loreena McKennitt registra il brano in “The wind that shakes the barley” (da ascoltare su Spotify)


I
Queen Jane lay in labor
full nine days or more
‘Til her women grew so tired,
they could no longer there
They could no longer there
II
“Good women, good women,
good women that you may be
Will you open my right side
and find my baby?”
III
“Oh no,” cried the women,
“That’s a thing that can never be
We will call on King Henry
and hear what he may say”
IV
King Henry was sent for,
King Henry did come
Saying, “What does ail you my lady?
Your eyes, they look so dim”
V
“King Henry, King Henry,
will you do one thing for me?
That’s to open my right side
And find my baby”
VI
“Oh no”, cried King Henry,
“That’s a thing I never can do
If I lose the flower of England,
I shall lose the branch too”
VII
There was fiddling, aye,and dancing
on the day the babe was born
But poor Queen Jane beloved
lay cold as the stone
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
La Regina Giovanna era in travaglio
da più di nove giorni (1)
e anche le sue ancelle erano stanche,
da non resistere più
da non resistere più
II
“Buone donne, buone donne,
se siete delle buone ancelle
aprirete il mio fianco destro
per prendere il bambino?”
III
“Oh no,” esclamarono le donne,
“non è cosa da farsi
Manderemo a cercare re Enrico
e sentiremo la sua opinione”
IV
Re Enrico fu mandato a chiamare,
Re Enrico arrivò dicendo: “Cosa ti fa soffrire mia signora?
I tuoi occhi sembrano così appannati”
V
“Re Enrico, Re Enrico,
farai una cosa per me (2)?
Aprimi il  fianco destro
e prendi il bambino “
VI
“Oh no”, esclamò il re Enrico,
”non è cosa da farsi
Se perdo il fiore d’Inghilterra (3),
perderò l’intero ramo”
VII
C’era musica, sì, e danza
il giorno in cui il bambino nacque, ma la povera Regina Giovanna beneamata
era stesa fredda come la pietra (4)

NOTE
1) il periodo del travaglio varia nelle varie lezioni da alcune ore a parecchi giorni
2) la fantasia popolare è rimasta colpita dall’esecuzione della procedura chirurgica, e la trasforma in un atto di supremo sacrificio per amore del bambino, l’interesse dinastico non viene quindi assunto come prioritario (scagionando così l’esecutore materiale della procedura da ogni colpa o interesse). La responsabilità della scelta per l’operazione chirurgica (che a quei tempi significava per lo più la morte della partoriente) viene trasferita in toto alla volontà di Jane (in alcune versioni Enrico afferma che piuttosto preferisce perdere il bambino che la sua regina o che il taglio avrebbe causato la morte del bambino) e alla fine l’operazione viene eseguita quando Jane è praticamente moribonda.
3) qui Jane è il fiore del Regno (per descriverne la bellezza) e il bambino il ramo mentre nelle versioni “ufficiali” la regina è l’albero da cui sboccia il virgulto o fiore. Viene espresso l’antico principio della “priorità dell’albero sul frutto”
4) nelle versioni popolari della ballata la morte della regina è concomitante al parto: la regina però morì dodici giorni dopo il parto. In alcune versioni della ballata viene descritto il corteo funebre della regina (Child 170 B, C e D)

Ancora un’altra versione testuale e un’altra melodia
ASCOLTA Karine Polwart in “Fairest Floo’er”  2007


I
Queen Jane lay in labor full
six days or more
While the women grew weary
and the midwives gave o’er
And they sent for King Henry
to come with great speed
To be with Queen Jane
in her hour of need
II
King Henry came to her
and he sat by her bedside
Saying, “What ails thee, my Jeannie?
What ails thee, my bride?”
“Oh Henry, oh Henry,
do this one thing for me
Rip open my right side
and find my baby”
III
“Oh Jeannie, oh Jeannie,
that never will do
It would lease thy sweet life
and thy young baby, too”
Well, she wept and she wailed
‘til she fell into a swoon
And her right side was opened
and her baby was found
IV
Well, that baby was christened
the very next day
While his poor dead mother
a-mouldering lay
And six men went before her
and four more travelled on
While loyal King Henry
stood mourning alone
V
He wept and he wailed
until he was sore
Saying, “The flower of all England
shall flourish no more”
He sat by the river
with his head in his hands
Saying, “My merry England
is a sorrowful land”
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
La Regina Giovanna era in travaglio
da sei giorni o più
anche le sue ancelle erano esauste
e le ostetriche impotenti
così mandarono a cercare
re Enrico con grande premura
perchè fosse con la Regina Giovanna
nel momento del bisogno
II
Re Enrico arrivò
e le si sedette accanto:
“Cosa ti fa soffrire mia Gianna?
Cosa ti fa soffrire moglie mia”
“Oh Enrico, oh Enrico,
faresti una cosa per me?
Taglia il mio fianco destro, apri
e prendi bambino “
III
“Oh Gianna, Gianna
non è cosa da farsi
potrebbe ipotecare la tua cara vita
e anche quella del tuo bambino”
Beh lei pianse e si lamentò
fino a cadere in deliquio
e il suo fianco destro fu aperto (1)
e il bambino preso
IV
Beh quel bambino venne battezzato
il giorno dopo
mente la sua povera madre morta
stava a decomporsi
e sei uomini andarono davanti
e altri quattro dietro
mentre re Enrico
stava solo in lutto
VII
Pianse e si lamentò
fino a starci male
Dicendo ” il fiore d’Inghilterra,
non fiorirà più”
Si sedette accanto al fiume
con la testa tra le mani
dicendo “La mia bella Inghilterra
è la terra del dolore”

NOTE
1) in questa versione  l’operazione si presume sia affidata ad un chirurgo

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch170.htm
https://www.thefreelibrary.com/The+death+of+Queen+Jane%3a+ballad%2c+history%2c+and+propaganda-a0321683005
https://motherhoodinprehistory.wordpress.com/2015/10/16/the-gruesome-origins-of-the-c-section/
http://ww2.unime.it/donne.politica/materialedidattico/02_03_04ottobre/saggio_trimarchi.pdf
http://venividigossip.blogspot.it/2014/10/jane-seymour-la-moglie-noiosa-di-enrico.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/deathofqueenjane.html
https://kimtrainorblog.wordpress.com/2014/04/15/the-death-of-queen-jane-2/
http://folksongcollector.com/kinghenry.html
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-QueenJane.html
http://www.ilsussidiario.net/News/Cinema-Televisione-e-Media/2014/2/6/A-PROPOSITO-DI-DAVIS-L-arte-controcorrente-in-un-film-dall-anima-musicale/464382/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/polwart/death.htm
https://tudorstuff.wordpress.com/2009/03/21/the-death-of-jane-seymour-a-midwifes-view/
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=1326
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17304
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=4836

CAMBRIC SHIRT

Il “contrasto” tra innamorati, basato sui “compiti o enigmi impossibili” ha come modello la ballata “The Elfin Knight“, passa per il titolo “Cambric shirt” e diventa nel giro di qualche secolo la popolarissima “Scarborough fair“:  la ritroviamo con il titolo “Humours of Love” pubblicata nella collezione delle Madden Ballads (Cambridge Biblioteca Universitaria) databile al 1780
If you will bring me one Cambrick Shirt,
Sweet savory grows, rosemary and thyme,
Without any Needle, or Needle-work,
And you shall be a true Lover of mine.

Un’ulteriore variante è contenuta nel libro di canti e filastrocche Gammer Gurton’s Garland compilato da Joseph Ritson (1752-1803) e pubblicato nel 1783 o 1784 (vedi) e poi ancora in numerose altre ristampe a testimoniarne la popolarità.
Can you make me a cambrick shirt,
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme,
Without any seam or needle work?
And you shall be a true lover of mine.

Jürgen Kloss sempre in “Tell Her To Make Me A Cambric Shirt” From The “Elfin Knight” to “Scarborough Fair” (al quale si rimanda per l’analisi più approfondita vedi) identifica una terza variante della ballata pubblicata in Scots Magazine nel luglio del 1807 che potrebbe essere l’anello di congiunzione tra la ballata “The Elfin Knight” e le versioni inglesi. E’ interessante in particolare la prima strofa che non inizia più con la richiesta di fare una camicia (senza cucirla) ma con il luogo d’incontro dei due innamorati in questo caso ancora una “yonder hill”
I
[He:]
As I gaed up to yonder hill,
(Saffron, sage, rue, myrrh,and thyme,)
I met my mistress her name it was Nell,
” And lass gin ye be a true lover o’ mine.
II
“Ye’ll mak’ to me a camric sark,
“(Saffron, sage, rue, myrrh,and thyme,)
“Without either seam or needlewark,
“And that an’ ye be a true lover o’ mine.

L’AMORE IMPOSSIBILE

L’uomo chiede alla donna di dargli delle prove d’amore, e anche lei a lui, sono “compiti impossibili”, in cui il contrasto si trasforma in una ripicca fra innamorati; un’altra lettura però è quella dell’amore impossibile così come lo sono le prove da superare, ovvero paradossali, quasi un ossimoro: così il loro amore è finito (o non può continuare per un impedimento sopraggiunto o scoperto) e i due si sono lasciati, ma il congedo è poetico.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: WHITTINGHAM FAIR

Il testo che invece è quasi identico alla Scarborough ottocentesca è quello di “Whittingham Fair” pubblicato in “Northumbrian Minstrelsy” di J. Stokoe  -1882. Whittingham è un paesello del Northumberland, ma per il resto si tratta dello stesso fraseggio di Scarborough e quindi delle versione della ballata così com’era diffusa nello Yorkshire.

ASCOLTA Joel Frederiksen in “The Elfin Knight – Ballads and Dances” 2007 Il canto si interrompe a metà della storia


I
Are you going to Whittingham Fair
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
For once she was a true love of mine
II
Tell her to make me a cambric shirt,
Without any seam or needlework
III
Tell her to wash it in yonder well,
Where never spring-water nor rain ever fell
IV
Tell her to dry it on yonder thorn,
Which never bore blossom since Adam was born
V
Now he has asked me questions three,
I hope he will answer as many for me;
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Andate alla fiera di Whittingham ?”
Prezzemolo, salvia, rosmarino e timo
Salutatemi una di quelle parti
un tempo era la mia innamorata
II
Ditele di farmi una camicia di batista
senza lavoro d’ago e filo
III
Ditele di lavarla in quel pozzo,
dove l’acqua mai sgorga e la pioggia mai cade
IV
Ditele di stenderla su quello spino
che non è mai fiorito dai tempi di Adamo
V
Lui mi ha affidato tre compiti
e spero che risponderà ad altrettanti per me

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA

Questa melodia allegra è più vicina allo spirito reale del contrasto tra innamorati proviene dagli Stati Uniti, dove la ballata e le sue varianti sono documentate da trascrizioni e testimonianze per tutto l’Ottocento, in particolare la versione cantata da Peggy Seeger è quasi identica a quella registrata nel 1931 dalla signora Helen Hartness Flanders (1890-1972) dalla famiglia Perkins del Vermont (la famiglia era di origine scozzese e si stabilì nel New Hampshire nella seconda metà del Settecento).
ASCOLTA Peggy Seeger in “Matching Songs Of The British Isles And America” 1957

Nella descrizione dei “compiti impossibili” c’è un che di allucinato, un residuo di visioni medievali alla Bosch o fantasie alla John Anster Fitzgerald


I
“Oh, where are you   going?”
“I’m going to Lynn(1)”
“Remember me to a lady whitin
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme(2)
for one she was a true love of mine
II
Tell her to make me a cambric shirt
Without any seam or yet needle work
Tell her to wash it in yonder dry well
Where water ne’er stood nor rain ne’er fell
III
Tell her to hang it on yonder thorn
One that had stood since Adam was born
And if the young lady did well her work
Tell her to bring me my cambric shirt.”
IV
“Oh where are you going?”
“I’m going to Cape Ann(3)”
“Take my love to this same young man.
Tell him to buy me an acre of land
Between the salt sea and the sea sand.
V
Tell him to plow it with with an old horse’s horn
Sow it all over with one peppercorn.
Tell him to reap it with a sickle of leather,
Bind it up with a peacock’s feather
VI
Thresh it with his wooden leg,
and fan it up in the skin of an egg,
tell him to cart it on a cake of ice,
cart it in with a yoke of mice
VII
And when this young man had finished his work,
tell him to come for his cambric shirt.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Oh, dove andate?”
“Vado a Lynn” (1)
” Salutatemi una di quelle parti
Prezzemolo, salvia, rosmarino e timo  (2) che un tempo era la mia innamorata
II
Ditele di farmi una camicia di batista
senza lavoro d’ago e filo
ditele di lavarla in quel pozzo asciutto, dove l’acqua mai sgorga e la pioggia mai cade
III
Ditele di stenderla su quello spino
che è rimasto dai tempi di Adamo
e se la fanciulla farà bene il suo lavoro
ditele di portarmi la mia camicia di batista.”
IV
“Oh, dove andate?”
“Vado a Cape Ann (3)”
“Portate il mio amore a questo stesso giovanotto.
Ditegli di comprarmi un acro di terra, tra l’acqua del mare e la spiaggia sabbiosa.
V
Ditegli di ararlo con il corno di un vecchio cavallo
e di seminarlo con un  grano di pepe. Ditegli di mietere con  un falcetto di cuoio, e di legare i covoni con una piuma di pavone
VI
Di trebbiarlo con la sua gamba di   legno, e di stendere (i chicchi) sul guscio di un uovo, ditegli  di trasportarli su una torta di  ghiaccio, e con un giogo di topi
VII
E quando questo giovanotto avrà finito il suo lavoro, ditegli di venire per la sua camicia di batista.”

NOTE
1) Lynn o Linn deriva da Lyne in Scozia, nel primo verso è il ragazzo a chiedere a un passante di andare a salutare la sua ex fidanzata che vive a Lynn
2) nella versione della signora Flanders il verso dice “Every globe goes merry in time“, mentre in Child 2F dice “So sav’ry was said, come marry in time”
3) Cape Ann località aggiunta per contestualizzare la ballata nel Nord America. In Helen Hartness Flanders è scritto come Japan: è la volta ora della ragazza a chiedere al passante di andare a salutare l’ex-fidanzato che vive a Cape Ann

terza parte: Scarborough fair

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/captain-wedderburn.html
http://www.justanothertune.com/html/cambricshirt.html

http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/us–canada-versions-2-the-elfin-knight.aspx

HOME DEARIE HOME

Secondo Stan Hugill “Home dearie home” era la capstan shanty favorita dai marinai sulle navi inglesi nella rotta di ritorno a casa. Il coro ha sicuramente origine dalle ballate tradizionali (Scozia, Nord Inghilterra) risalenti al 600-700 mentre la storia sviluppata nelle strofe, riprende la ballata tradizionale inglese Rosemary Lane.

HOMEWARD BOUND

C’erano dei canti speciali che i marinai intonavano quando levano l’ancora per l’ultima volta prima di salpare diretti a casa! Per l’occasione si svolgeva anche una piccola cerimonia con cui la nave avvisava tutte le altre che stava per ritornare a casa! (continua)

Il tono è scanzonato e non necessariamente amaro, anche se la ragazza dopo nove mesi diventa mamma di due gemelli! In alcune versioni viene a mancare la strofa finale di ammonimento in si mette in guardia le fanciulle di una gravidanza fuori dal matrimonio.

ASCOLTA The Dubliners (voce di Luke Kelly)

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem – 1968

VERSIONE CLANCY BROTHERS
Chorus:

And it’s home boys home
Home I’d like to be, home for awhile in my old count-a-ry(1)
Where the oak and the ash and the bonny elm tree(2)
They’re all a-growing greener in my old count-a-ry
I
There was an apprentice lived in Strawberry Lane(3)
Loved by her master and her mistress the same
Until a young sailor lad came sailing o’er the sea
And that was the beginning of her misery(4)
II
This young maid being innocent she thought it was no harm
To go into bed for to keep his back warm
He hugged her and he kissed her and he called her his dear
He said ‘I wish, my love this night had been as long as a year’
III
‘Twas early next morning the sailor lad arose
And into her apron he put handfuls of gold
‘Take this my dear for the mischief that I’ve done
Last night I may have left you with a daughter or a son’
IV
‘And if it be a girl child dandle her on your knee
And if it be a male child call him after me
And when he is a man, you can dress him up in blue
He’ll go skipping up the rigging like his daddy used to do’

VERSIONE THE DUBLINERS
I
Oh well who wouldn’t be a sailor lad a-sailing on the main
To gain the good will of his captain’s good name
He came ashore one evening for to be
And that was the beginning of my own true love and me(4)
Chorus
And it’s home, boys, home,
home I’d like to be

Home for a while in my own country(1)
And where the oak and the ash and the bonny rowan tree
Are all a-growing green in the north country(2)
II
Well I asked for a candle(5) to light my way to bed
Likewise for a handkerchief to tie around my head(6)
She tended to my needs like the young maid ought to do
So then I says to her ‘Now won’t you leap in with me too?’
III
Well she jumped into bed making no alarm
Thinking a young sailor lad to do to her no harm
I hugged her, I kissed her the whole night long
Till she wished the short night had been seven years long(7).
IV
Early next morning the sailor lad arose
And into Mary’s apron threw a handful of gold(8)
Saying, “Take this, my dear, for the mischief that I’ve done
For tonight I fear I’ve left you with a daughter or a son
V
Well, if it be a girl child, send her out to nurse
With gold in her pocket and with silver in her purse
And if it be a boy child, he’ll wear the jacket blue
And go climbing up the rigging like his daddy used to do”
VI(9)
Come all of you fair maidens, a warning take by me
And never let a sailor lad an inch above your knee
For I trusted one and he beguiled me
He left me with a pair of twins to dangle on my knee
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Ah, beh, chi non vorrebbe essere un marinaio che salpa a vele spiegate sul mare, per mantenere alto il buon nome del suo capitano?
Egli sbarcò una sera per una visita e questo fu l’inizio tra il mio vero amore e me(4)!
Coro: A casa, ragazzi a casa,
casa mi piacerebbe stare,
a casa per un po’ nel mio paese(1) ,
dove la quercia e il frassino e il sorbo stanno rifiorendo,
nel Nord del Paese(2)

II
Chiesi una candela(5) per rischiarare la strada verso il letto
e anche un fazzoletto da legare intorno alla testa(6)
si atteneva ai miei bisogni,
come una giovane cameriera dovrebbe fare, così le dico “Perché non ci fai un salto anche con me?”
III
Lei saltò sul letto
senza protestare,
pensando che un giovane marinaio non potesse farle alcun danno
l’abbracciai, la baciai, per tutta la notte per farle desiderare che la breve notte fosse stata lunga sette anni(7)
IV
La mattina dopo il marinaio si alzò
e nel grembo di Maria, gettò una manciata d’oro(8)
dicendo ‘”Prendi questo, mia cara, per i danni che ho fatto stanotte,
ho paura di averti lasciato con una figlia o un figlio.”
V
E se sarà una bambina, mandala a balia
con l’oro in tasca e con l’argento nella borsetta
e se sarà un bambino indosserà la giacca blu e salirà sul sartiame come è abituato a fare suo padre”
VI(9)
Allora venite tutte voi belle fanciulle,
e prestatemi ascolto,
non concedete mai ad un marinaio un centimetro sopra il vostro ginocchio perchè mi fidavo di uno che mi ha ingannato e mi ha lasciato con una coppia di gemelli da dondolare sulle ginocchia

NOTE
1) versi attribuiti a Allan Cunningham (1784-1842) “Hame, Hame, Hame” (in ‘”Remains of Nithsdale and Galloway Song”, Cromeks 1810): “Hame, hame, hame, hame fain wad I be, O hame, ham hame, to my ain countrie“,
2) versi contenuti in “The Northern Lasses lamentation” (nota anche come The oak and the ash) 1672-84 “O the oak, the ash and the bonny ivy tree, Doth flourish at home in my own country
3) il nome ricorda quello di Rosemary Lane
4) oppure “of the whole calamity“. Nella versione dei Dubliners il verso diventa “the beginning of my own true love and me” perchè la storia è raccontata dal punto di vista del marinaio e non della cameriera: è infatti solo per lei la calamità della gravidanza!
Un tempo la gestione delle conseguenze della sessualità era lasciata esclusivamente alle donne, erano loro che dovevano provvedere a salvaguardarsi dalle gravidanze inopportune e facevano ricorso a erbe e pozioni nonchè a spugnette imbevute di varie sostanze come l’aceto da posizionare al collo dell’utero.
Erano loro che si procuravano degli aborti con tragiche conseguenze sulla loro salute e che come ultima risorsa uccidevano il bambino appena nato pur sapendo che rischiavano l’impiccagione.
5) sembra un linguaggio in codice, ovviamente la richiesta della candela è per illuminare il percorso fino al letto, ma nello stesso tempo allude a una sorta di complicità sessuale
6) legare una bandana come fascia per i capelli era un vezzo diffuso tra i marinai (fa molto “rogues gallery”)
7) un vanto delle prodezze amorose; tra l’altro la capacità di un uomo di mettere incinta una donna era considerata una forma di potenza sessuale!
8) probabilmente le ha lasciato qualche soldo (come pagamento per la prestazione, trattandola come una prostituta) ben misera contropartita alle prospettive di una gravidanza fuori del matrimonio che sarebbe costata alla servetta il posto di lavoro e l’avrebbe spinta verso la miseria e nella spirale della prostituzione
9) strofa di avvertimento aggiunta dal cantante che ammonisce le giovani e ingenue fanciulle a non fidarsi delle promesse di un marinaio: è la cameriera a parlare.

Chocolate-Girl-JE-LiotardDAL PUNTO DI VISTA FEMMINILE

Una variante di “Home, dearie home”  dà voce alla fanciulla che ingenuamente non si rende conto della gravità di quanto accaduto a causa di una notte di passione.  Anche se scopo di queste ballate era quello di convincere le fanciulle a mantenersi caste emerge qui una figura di donna più indipendente che cerca di badare a sè stessa con l’emancipazione economica.

ASCOLTA Peggy Seeger in “Bring me home” 2008


I
The sailor being weary, he hung down his head,
Called for a candle to light him to bed
She lit him to bed as a maiden ought to do
He vowed and declared she should come to him too.
Chorus
And it’s home, dearie, home,
and it’s home you ought to be

Home once again in your own country
Where the oak and the ash and the fine willow tree are all a-growing greener in the North Amerikee.
II
She jumped in beside him to keep herself warm
Thinking, now, a sailor couldn’t do her any harm.
He hugged her and he kissed and he called her his dear
Till she wished the short night had been as long as a year(7).
III
Early next morning the sailor arose
Into her apron he put hands full of gold(8)
Saying, ‘Take this, my dear, it will pay for milk and bread,
It may pay for the lighting of a sailor to bed.’
IV
“If I have a baby, what am I the worse?
I’ve gold in my pocket, I’ve silver in my purse,
I’ll buy me a nurse and I’ll pay the nurse’s fee
And I’ll pass for a maiden in my own country.
V
If it be a girl, she can wear a gold ring
If it be a boy, he can fight for the king
With his little quartered shoes and the roundabout so blue
He can walk the quarterdeck the way his daddy used to do”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Essendo stanco, chinò la testa e il marinaio chiese una candela(5) per rischiarare la strada verso il letto
lei lo portò a letto proprio come una cameriera dovrebbe fare,
e pregò e chiese che anche lei andasse con lui
Coro:
A casa, dolce casa,
casa mi piacerebbe stare,
a casa per un po’ nel proprio paese,
dove la quercia e il frassino
e il bel salice
stanno rifiorendo, nel Nord America

II
Lei saltò accanto a lui per tenersi al caldo
pensando che un giovane marinaio non potesse farle alcun danno
lui l’abbracciò, la baciò, e la chiamò “mia cara”
finchè lei desiderò che la breve notte fosse stata lunga un anno(7)
III
La mattina dopo il marinaio si alzò
e in grembo le mise una manciata d’oro(8)
dicendo ‘”Prendi questo, mia cara, basterà per il latte e il pane,
per aver fatto luce a un marinaio verso il letto.”
IV
“Se avrò un bambino, che cosa andrà storto?
Ho l’oro in tasca, ho l’argento
nella borsetta
prenderò una balia e le pagherò il dovuto
e nel mio paese passerò per una fanciulla
V
E se sarà una bambina, indosserà un anello d’oro
e se sarà un bambino combatterà per il re con le sue polacchine e la giacca blu
camminerà sul cassero come è abituato a fare suo padre”

AMBLETOWN

05185-dante_gabriel_rossetti_lady_anne_bothwells_lamentUn ulteriore sviluppo di   “Home dearie home” è quando è la moglie a partorire un bambino, sono loro gli affetti e la “dolce casa” del marinaio il porto sicuro a cui ritornare dopo ogni viaggio: il marinaio, venuto a conoscenza di essere diventato padre, si imbarca con la prima nave per Amble (o Boston in altre versioni) per andare a conoscere suo figlio.
Le strofe sono molto simili a quelle della poesia “O Falmouth Is a Fine Town,” di William E. Henley (1878).
In questo contesto il riferimento esplicito è alla casa coniugale e agli affetti di una famiglia di cui il marinaio è orgoglioso!

ASCOLTA Bob Conroy & Norm Pederson versione country


I
O Amble is a fine town with ships about the bay
It’s fain and very fain to be there myself today
I’m wishing in my heart I was far away from here
Sitting in my parlor and talking with my dear
CHORUS
And it’s home, dearie, home,(1)
it’s home I want to be

My topsails are hoisted
and I am out to sea

The oak and the ash
and the bonnie birchen tree

Are all a-growing green in the North country(2)
And it’s home, dearie, home
II
A letter came today, but somehow I cannot speak
And the proud and happy tears are a-rolling down my checks
There’s someone here, she says, you’ve been waiting for to see
With your merry hazel eyes, looking up from off my knee
III
But the letter never said if we have a boy or girl
Got me so confused that my heart is all a whirl
So I’m going back to port, where I’ll quickly turn around
And take the fastest ship, which to Ambletown is bound
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Amble è una bella città con navi nella baia,
starei molto volentieri là oggi,
desidero con tutto il cuore di essere lontano da qui,
seduto nel mia salotto a chiaccherare con la mia cara
CORO
Ed è a casa, dolce casa,
è a casa che vorrei essere

-le vele sono alzate
e sono per mare-

dove la quercia e il frassino
e il bel sorbo

stanno rifiorendo, nel Nord del Paese
ed è casa, dolce casa.
II
Una lettera è arrivata oggi ma per qualche motivo non posso parlare
e lacrime di orgoglio e felicità scorrono sulle mie guance
“C’è qualcuno qui, – dice lei-
che stai aspettando di vedere,
con i tuoi occhi di un bel nocciola, che alzano lo sguardo dalle mie ginocchia”
III
Ma la lettera non diceva se avevamo un bambino o una bambina
e mi ha lasciato così confuso che la mia testa è tutta una trottola,
così ritornerò al porto dove mi guarderò intorno rapidamente
e prenderò la nave più veloce diretta per la città di Amble

NOTE
1) Boston

FONTI
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/HomeDearieHome/ http://www.rampantscotland.com/poetry/blpoems_hame2.htm http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=139 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52935
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14518
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5079 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5238 http://www.folkorc.co.uk/uploads/1/9/3/9/19390139/home_boys_home_complete.pdf http://mainlynorfolk.info/anne.briggs/songs/rosemarylane.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/114.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8855

THE BEGGAR LADDIE

beggar-laddie
Edward Burne-Jones – King Cophetua and the Beggar-maid (1884)

Per conoscere tutte le sfaccettature della storia esaminata in The Gaberlunzie man dobbiamo fare ricorso ad un’altra ballata che sempre il professor Child classifica al numero 280 con il titolo di “The Beggar Laddie”. La fanciulla abbandona la sua famiglia per seguire il mendicante per le strade del mondo (ad un certo punto anche un po’ pentendosi della scelta), e infine lui le rivela le sue nobili origini portandola nella vera casa. La storia richiama un’altra ballata dal titolo “Lizie Linsday

Non dimentichiamoci che le fiabe sono piene di storie simili in cui per l’appunto una fanciulla, bella ma di poche sostanze, preferisce seguire il suo istinto, ovvero viene messa alla prova, e dopo essere stata costretta a subire una serie di umiliazioni, o a superare una serie di ostacoli (o sfide impossibili), ottiene il premio!

Così scrive A.L. Lloyd :This ballad is related to The Jolly Beggar (Child 279) by reason of the “beggar in disguise” theme. The Beggar Laddie is less ribald, however, and has a romantic ending. Here the young lady is rewarded for her belief in the pretended beggar by becoming his bride after he reveals his high station to her.
Outside of Scotland, the ballad appears to be unknown in tradition. This version sung by
 MacColl was learned in fragmentary form from his mother, with additional lines collated from Greig and Keith[‘s Last Leaves of Traditional Ballads and Ballad Airs (Aberdeen, 1925)]. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Peggy Seeger & Ewan MacColl in Traditional Song and Ballads 1964 ( trovo adorabile la loro pronuncia)

I)
‘Twas in the pleasant month of June
When gentle ladies walk their lane,
When woods and valleys a’ grow green
And the sun it shines sae clearly.
II)
Doon in yon grove I spied a swain,
A shepherd sheep-club in his hand,
He was drivin’ yowes oot ower the knowes,
And he was a we’el-faurd laddie.
III)
“Come tell to me what is your trade,
Or by what airt you win your bread,
Or by what airt you win your bread
When herding ye give over?”
IV)
“Makin’ spindles is my trade,
And fighting’ sticks in time o’need,
For l’m a beggar tae my trade;
Noo, lassie, could ye love me?”
V)
“l could love ye as many fold
As Jacob loved Rachel(1) of old,
As Jesse(2) loved his cups of gold,
My laddie, if ye’ll believe me.”
VI)
“Then ye’ll tak’ aff your robes o’reid,
And ye’ll pit on the beggin’weed,
And ye’ll follow me hard my back
And ye’ll be the beggar’s dawtie.”
VII)
And when they come to yonder toon
They bocht a loaf and they both sat doon,
They bocht a loaf and they both sat doon,
And the lassie ate wi’ her laddie.VIII)
But the lassie’s courage began to fail,
And her rosie cheeks grew wan and pale
And the tears cam’ trinkling doon like hail
Or a heavy shower in summer.
IX)
“Oh, gin I were on yon high hill
Whaur my faither’s flocks do feed their fill,
I would sit me doon and greet a while
For the followin’ o’ my laddie.
X) (4)
When they cam’ tae yon marble gate,
Sae boldly as he knocked thereat,
He rappit(3) loud and he rappit late,
And he rappit there sae rudely.
XI)
Then fower and twenty gentlemen
Cam’ oot to welcome the beggar hame,
And just as mony ladies gay
To welcome the young knicht’s lady.
XII)
His brither John stood next the wa’,
He laughed till he was like to fa’:
“O brither, I wish we had beggit a’
For sic a bonnie lassie.”
XIII)
“Yestreen I was the beggar’s bride,
This nicht I’ll lie doon by his side,
l’ve come to guid by my misguide,
For noo l’m the young knicht’s lady.”

NOTE
1) il paragone biblico vuole richiamare la pazienza e l’importanza dell’attesa Giobbe attese 7 anni per poter sposare Rachele di cui era innamorato servendo presso la casa del padre.
2) Jesse è il padre del Re Davide con lui inizia l’albero genealogico di Gesù, non mi è chiaro il paragone con le coppe dorate. In effetti andando a confrontare le versioni in Child # 280 la confusione aumenta
A 33, As Jason loied his flice of gould
B 43, As Jessie loved the cups o gold,
C 51, As Judas loved a piece of gold,
D 33, As Jesse lovd the fields of gold;
Il Giasone biblico (Jason) è quello che Dante mise nel girone infernale dei simoniaci, Giuda è l’apostolo che tradì Gesù per denaro.. il mistero si infittisce
3) to rap, rapped (bussare alla porta)
4) finalmente arriva il lieto fine!

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Era nel bel mese di giugno quando le giovani donne vanno per strada, quando i boschi e le valli diventano verdi e il sole splende così luminoso. Giù in quel boschetto vidi un campagnolo con un bastone da pastore in mano, stava guidando il gregge sulle colline ed era un piccolo guardiano “Vieni a dirmi quali sono i tuoi affari, o con quale arte ti guadagni il pane quando hai finito con la pastorizia?” “Fare fusi è il mio lavoro e combattere con i bastoni alla bisogna
, perchè il mio mestiere è quello del mendicante, adesso ragazza mi puoi amare?” “Potrei amarti in molti modi come Giacobbe amava Rachele(1) un tempo, come Jesse (2)amava le sue coppe d’oro, mio ragazzo, se tu mi amerai” “Allora ti toglierai i tuoi abiti rossi e ti metterai i panni del mendicante, e mi seguirai appresso e sarai la favorita del mendicante.”E quando andavano in città mendicavano una pagnotta e entrambi si sedevano a terra e la ragazza mangiava con il suo ragazzo, ma il coraggio della ragazza iniziò a venir meno e le sue rosee guance diventavano smorte e pallide e le lacrime cadevano giù come grandine o come pioggia d’estate “Se fossi in cima a quella collina dove le greggi di mio padre pascolano mi siederei e piangerei un po’ per aver seguito il mio ragazzo” (4) Quando furono al cancello del palazzo bussò così forte, bussò forte e a ora tarda e bussò così sgarbatamente, allora 24 gentiluomini uscirono per accogliere a casa il mendicante e anche molte signore belle per salutare la signora del giovane cavaliere. Suo fratello John stava accanto al muro rideva fino a scoppiare “O fratello tutti vorremmo mendicare per una tale bella ragazza” “Ieri ero la sposa del mendicante, questa notte mi stenderò accanto a lui, sono stata indotta all’errore, ma adesso sono la signora di un giovane cavaliere”

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/oabeggar.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_279
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_280
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C279.html
http://www.contemplator.com/child/gaberlunz.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/beggar.html
http://www.waterbug.com/calhoun/lyrics/beggarman.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thebeggarman.html
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/JollyBeggarman.html
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/
secondary/genericcontent_tcm4554493.asp

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1954
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118078
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54744
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thebeggarladdie.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5884
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/280-the-beggar-laddie.aspx

Windy old weather (Fishes Lamentation)

Read the post in English

Le canzoni del mare si rincorrono da sponda a sponda, in particolare “Windy old weather“, che secondo Stan Hugill è una canzone dei pescatori scozzesi dal titolo “The Fish of the Sea, popolare anche sulle coste Nord- Est degli USA e del Canada.
TITOLI: Fishes Lamentation, Fish in the Sea, Haisboro Light Song (Up Jumped the Herring), The Boston Come-All-Ye, Blow Ye Winds Westerly, Windy old weather

Una forebitter song cantata occasionalmente come canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) risalente al 1700 e proveniente con tutta probabilità da alcuni broadsides con il titolo di “The Fishes’ Lamentation“. “Questa canzone appare su dei broadsides comeThe Fishes’ Lamentation potrebbe essere il resto di una canzone marinaresca o canzone dei pescatori. Whall (1910), Colcord (1938) e Hugill (1964) la includono nelle loro raccolte di shanty. E’ stata registrasta da Bob Roberts a bordo della sua chiatta sul Thames, The Cambria. La troviamo anche nelle raccolte di Terranova e Nuova Scozia di  Ken Peacock e Helen Creighton“. (tratto da qui)

Una nave di pescatori sta praticando la pesca a strascico in una notte di luna piena, e come per magia i pesci si mettono a parlare per avvisare i marinai dell’arrivo di una tempesta. I pesci descritti sono tutti appartenenti all’oceano atlantico e si trovano abbastanza comunemente nel Canale della Manica e nel Mare del Nord (come pure nel Mar Mediterraneo).
Le varianti si possono raggruppare in due versioni

PRIMA VERSIONE Melodia Blow the Man down

In questa versione i pesci avvisano (o minacciano) i pescatori  sull’arrivo della tempesta esortandoli a dirigersi verso terra. Il testo è riportato in “Oxford Book of Sea Songs”, Roy Palmer

Bob Roberts, in Windy old weather, 1958

David Tinervia · Nils Brown · Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · David Gossage in Assassin’s Creed – Black Flag con il titolo di “Windy Old Weather”

Dan Zanes &  Festival Five Folk in Sea Music 2003 una piacevole versione tra il country e l’ Old Time.


I
As we were a-fishing
off Happisburgh(1) light
Shooting and hauling
and trawling all night,
In the windy old weather,
stormy old weather
When the wind blows
we all pull together
II
When up jumped a herring,
the queen (king) of the sea(2)
Says “Now, old skipper,
you cannot catch me,”
III
We sighted a Thresher(3)
-a-slashin’ his tail,
“Time now Old Skipper
to hoist up your sail.”
IV (4)
And up jumps a Slipsole
as strong as a horse(5),
Says now, “Old Skipper
you’re miles off course.”
V
Then along comes plaice
-who’s got spots on his side,
Says “Not much longer
-these seas you can ride.”
VI
Then up rears a conger(6)
-as long as a mile,
“Winds coming east’ly”
-he says with a smile.
VII
I think what these fishes
are sayin’ is right,
We’ll haul up our gear(7)
now an’ steer for the light.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre eravamo a pescare
al largo del faro di Happisburgh
calando e recuperando
le reti da strascico per tutta la notte
con un tempo ventoso
un vento di tempesta,

quando il vento soffia
allora tiriamo tutti insieme.
II
Ecco che saltò in alto un’aringa,
la regina del mare
“Vecchio capitano
non riesci a prendermi!”
III
Avvistammo uno squalo volpe
che dimenava la coda
“E’ tempo vecchio capitano
di issare la vela”
IV
Salta su una sogliola
forte come un cavallo
“Vecchio capitano
sei fuori rotta”
V
Poi arrivò una platessa
con le macchie sul fianco
“Per non molto ancora
potrai solcare questi mari”
VI
Poi salta su un grongo
lungo un miglio
“I venti provengono da est”
dice con un sorriso.
V
Credo che questi pesci
dicano la verità
dispieghiamo le vele ora
e dirigiamoci verso la luce !

NOTE
1) il faro di Happisburgh (“Hazeboro”) si trova nella conta inglese di Norfolk, costruito nel 1790 è verniciato a righe bianche e rosse; è gestito da una fondazione che si occupa del mantenimento di più di cento fari in tutta la Gran Bretagna. 112 sono gli scalini per raggiungere la torre che funziona tutt’ora senza l’ausilio dell’uomo. I fari all’inizio erano due ma quello più basso è stato smantellato nel 1883 a causa dell’erosione costiera. I due fari segnavano un passaggio sicuro attraverso le Haagborough Sands
2) Nei paesi nordici (Scozia in testa of course) le aringhe (fresche o meglio in salamoia oppure affumicate)  sono servite in tutte le salse dalla prima colazione alla cena. “E’ un pesce che ama i mari freddi e vive in branchi numerosi. La pesca dell’aringa nei mari del Nord è diffusa sin dal Medioevo. È chiaramente facilitata dalla quantità dei pesci e dal raggio limitato dei loro spostamenti. I pescatori adoperano la rete a strascico e iniziano la stagione di pesca il primo maggio, per chiuderla dopo due mesi. In tutti i paesi del Nord America e del Nord Europa questa pesca ha un carattere quasi sacro, perché è stata per anni la provvidenza dei pescatori ed è una vera e propria ricchezza naturale. In Olanda e in Svezia, per esempio, il primo giorno di pesca all’aringa viene organizzato in onore della regina e viene proclamata festa nazionale. (tratto da qui)
3) Thresher shark thresher, thrasher, fox shark, alopius vulpinus. In italiano è lo “squalo volpe” dalla caratteristica coda con la parte superiore molto allungata (quasi quanto la lunghezza del corpo) che l’animale utilizza come scudiscio per stordire e sopraffare le prede. Il nome gli viene da Aristotele che considerava tale pesce molto furbo, perchè abile nello sfuggire ai pescatori
4) manca la strofa dello sgombro
then along comes a mackerel with strips on his back
“Time now, old skipper, to shift yout main tack”
5) forse si riferisce all’ippoglosso o halibut, di dimensioni notevoli, ha corpo ovale e schiacciato, simile a quello di una grande sogliola, con gli occhi sul lato destro
6) il “conger” (grongo) è un pesce dal corpo allungato simile all’anguilla ma più robusto, può arrivare alla lunghezza di due o tre metri e supera i dieci chili di peso. E’ un ingrediente fondamentale nel cacciucco livornese!
7)un’altra traduzione della frase potrebbe essere: recuperiamo le nostre reti

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE Melodia Blaw the Wind Southerly

In questa versione  i pesci s’impossessano della nave, sembra la descrizione della nave-fantasma di “Davy Jone”, lo spirito maligno delle acque reso così vividamente nel film “I pirati dei caraibi”.
davy-jones

Una vecchia melodia scozzese accompagna una serie di varianti della stessa canzone.

Quadriga Consort in Ship Ahoy, 2011 (versione completa)

Michiel Schrey, Sean Dagher, Nils Brown in Assasin’s Creed – Black Flag  con il titolo di “Fish in the sea” (da I a III e VIII)


I
Come all you young sailor men,
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish in the sea;
(Chorus)
And it’s…Windy weather, boys,
stormy weather, boys,
When the wind blows,
we’re all together, boys;
Blow ye winds westerly,
blow ye winds, blow,
Jolly sou’wester, boys,
steady she goes.
II
Up jumps the eel
with his slippery tail,
Climbs up aloft
and reefs the topsail.
III
Then up jumps the shark
with his nine rows of teeth,
Saying, “You eat the dough boys,
and I’ll eat the beef!”
IV
Up jumps the lobster
with his heavy claws,
Bites the main boom
right off by the jaws!
V
Up jumps the halibut,
lies flat on the deck
He says, ‘Mister Captain,
don’t step on my neck!’
VI
Up jumps the herring,
the king of the sea,
Saying, ‘All other fishes,
now you follow me!’
VII
Up jumps the codfish
with his chuckle-head (1),
He runs out up forward
and throws out the lead!
VIII
Up jumps the whale
the largest of all,
“If you want any wind,
well, I’ll blow ye a squall(2)!”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti voi, giovani marinai, ascoltatemi,
vi canterò una canzone
sui pesci del mare,
(coro)
è tempo ventoso, ragazzi,
tempo di tempesta,

quando il vento soffia,
stiamo tutti insieme.
Soffiate voi venti occidentali
soffiate venti, soffiate
vivaci (venti) di sud-ovest, ragazzi,

la barca dritta va.
II
A bordo salta l’anguilla
con la sua coda scivolosa
si arrampica in alto
e fa scendere le vele di gabbia.
III
Poi salta dentro lo squalo
con la sua chiosa di denti
dicendo ” Mangiatevi la pasta ragazzi che io mi mangio l’arrosto”
IV
Salta dentro l’aragosta
con le sue pesanti chele
morde il boma
proprio con le ganasce
V
Salta dentro l’ippoglosso
e si appiattisce sul ponte
dice “Singor Capitano
non pestarmi il collo!”
VI
Salta dentro l’aringa
il re del mare
dicendo ” Che tutti gli altri pesci
mi seguano!”
VII
Salta dentro il merluzzo
con la sua testina
corre avanti e indietro
e getta fuori i pesi!
VIII
Poi salta dentro la balena,
il pesce più grosso di tutti
“Se volete vento,
bene vi darò una burrasca!”

NOTE
1) letteralmente “testa da stupido”  è un detto comune tra i pescatori che il merluzzo sia stupido (minchione) perchè non riconosce le esche e si lascia issare docilmente a bordo.
2) i pescatori erano/sono uomini molto superstiziosi, a tutte le latitudini, ci vuole poco o niente per attirarsi la sfortuna in mare, è infatti ancora una credenza molto diffusa che il diavolo ovvero lo spirito maligno abbia potere sul mare e sulle tempeste.

LA VARIANTE AMERICANA: THE BOSTON COME-ALL-YE

Della seconda versione quella più conosciuta in America porta il titolo “The Boston come-all-ye” come collezionata da Joanna Colcord nel suo “Songs of American Sailormen” che così scrive “Non c’è dubbio che [questa] canzone, sebbene fosse cantata sulle navi mercantili, era nata sulle flotte dei pescatori. Abbiamo la testimonianza di Kipling in Capitani Coraggiosi che sia stata una delle preferite negli ultimi anni dei pescatori sui Banchi [di Terranova]. È conosciuta come The Fishes e anche con il titolo più americano di The Boston Come-All-Ye. Il coro trova la sua origine in una canzone di pesca scozzese Blaw the Wind Southerly. Un fatto curioso è che il Capitano Whall, proprio uno scozzese, stampò questa canzone con un motivo completamente diverso, senza collegamento con la melodia delle chiatte sul Tyneside con cui i nostri pescatori di Gloucester la cantano. La versione data qui è stata cantata dal capitano Frank Seeley.”

Peggy Seeger in  Whaler Out of New Bedford, 1962


I
Come all ye young sailormen
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish of the sea.
Then blow ye winds westerly,
westerly blow;
we’re bound to the southward,
so steady she goes
.
II
Oh, first came the whale,
he’s the biggest of all,
he clumb up aloft,
and let every sail fall.
III
Next came the mackerel
with his striped back,
he hauled aft the sheets
and boarded each tack(1).
IV
The porpoise(2) came next
with his little snout,
he grabbed the wheel,
calling “Ready? About!(3”
V
Then came the smelt(4),
the smallest of all,
he jumped to the poop
and sung out, “Topsail, haul!”
VI
The herring came saying,
“I’m king of the seas!
If you want any wind,
I’ll blow you a breeze.”
VII
Next came the cod
with his chucklehead (5),
he went to the main-chains
to heave to the lead.
VIII
Last come the flounder
as flat as the ground,
saying, “Damn your eyes, chucklehead, mind how you sound”!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti voi,  giovani marinai
ascoltatemi
vi canterò una canzone
sui pesci del mare,
allora soffiate voi venti occidentali
occidentali soffiate
siamo diretti a sud

così la barca dritta va.
II
Prima venne la balena
che è la più grande
si arrampicò in alto
e fece scendere ogni vela.
III
Poi venne lo sgombro
con il suo dorso a strisce
alò a poppa le vele e virò di bordo per cambiare di mura.
IV
La focena venne poi
con il suo piccolo muso
afferrò il comando del timone
“Pronti a virare”
V
Poi arrivò lo sperlano
il più piccolo di tutti
saltò a poppa
urlando”tira le vele di gabbia”
VI
Venne l’aringa dicendo
“Sono il re dei mari!
Se vuoi del vento,
ti soffierò una brezza”
VII
Poi venne il merluzzo
con la  sua testina,
si recò all’ancora
per tirare la cima.
VIII
Per ultimo venne la passera
piatta come una suola
dicendo ” Dannati i tuoi occhi,
stupido, bada a come parli!”

NOTE
1) in termini nautici tack = mure indica il lato della barca a vela da cui arriva il vento; virare, manovrare per cambiare di mura, vale a dire per ricevere il vento da un’altra direzione in modo da cambiare l’andatura;
2) la focena è considerato spesso come un delfino piccolo, ha un caratteristico muso arrotondato e non ha il becco come i delfini
3) è il timoniere a gridare “Pronti a virare” (to go about)
4) lo sperlano (osmero) è un piccolo pesce che vive nella Manica e nel Mare del Nord; il suo nome deriva dal fatto che le sue carni emanano un odore sgradevole
5) “testa da stupido” è un detto comune tra i pescatori che il merluzzo sia stupido (minchione) perchè non riconosce le esche e si lascia issare docilmente a bordo. Tutti i pescatori desiderano un mare pescoso e una preda ingenua!

Blow the Wind Southerly

FONTI
http://www.pubblicitaitalia.com/ilpesce/2013/1/12262.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/fishes.html
http://moodpoint.com/lyrics/unknown/song_of_the_fishes.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/windy-old-weather.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/windyoldweather.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149445
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49498
https://thesession.org/tunes/11479
http://bestpossiblejob.blogspot.it/2008/09/come-all-ye-young-and-not-so-young.html

SCOTTISH SONGS AMONG THE HEATHER: GLASGOW PEGGY

(c) National Galleries of Scotland; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation La ballata “Glasgow Peggie”, anche nota con il titolo “Hieland Lads” o “Hielan’ Lads Are Brisk and Braw” è riportata dal professor Child al #228: è ancora oggi diffusa in Scozia e tratta di un’usanza non insolita un tempo per ottenere il consenso dei genitori in caso di diniego alle nozze, la fuitina d’amore.
Il “corteggiatore” è un rude giovanotto delle Terre Alte di Scozia che rapisce una fanciulla delle Terre Basse di nome Peggy; evidentemente lei è d’accordo con lui, ma lo crede per lo più un affascinante straniero di poche sostanze..
Solo dopo la notte passata nel bosco (in cui i due si abbandonano alla passione) lui le rivela di essere il proprietario di vaste terre; in alcune versioni viene identificato come Laird di Skye (la più grande isola delle Ebridi Interne) se non addirittura il Lord delle Isole.

Un sotto gruppo della storia è quello che si sofferma solo sull’incontro tra i due mentre lei custodisce il gregge di pecore del padre e lui la spia e decide di farla sua, e rientra più genericamente nel novero dei contrasti d’amore a sfondo bucolico così di moda nel Settecento (continua seconda parte)

GLASGOW PEGGY

Della ballata esistono diverse versioni testuali che possono essere raggruppate in due filoni (versione A e B di Child) peraltro piuttosto simili, a testimonianza della  diffusione più localizzata e quasi limitata alla sola Scozia.

PRIMA VERSIONE

Quella che racconta un po’ tutta la storia è la seguente: un giovane highlander straniero mentre si trova a Glasgow, si innamora di una ragazza delle Lowland: gli basta un’occhiata, mentre lei, solitaria, custodisce il gregge del padre.
Prima chiede la sua mano ai genitori (seguendo la prassi) ma il padre non ne vuole saperne di separarsi dalla figlia, così il rude highlander minaccia di rapirla, (e lei in verità è ben contenta di seguirlo!)
In questa versione il giovanotto, per convincere la fanciulla,  millanta di letti di piume e lenzuola di raso e seta (dichiarando implicitamente di essere un possidente), ma la notte della fuga, la prende su di un letto d’erba tra le felci della brughiera.
Il giorno dopo lei sembra quasi essersi pentita di averlo seguito, ma lui la porta su un’alta collina e le mostra tutti i suoi possedimenti che si perdono a vista d’occhio. Un lieto fine degno di una fiaba.

ASCOLTA Darby O’Gill in Waitin‘ for a ride 1996


I
First when I came to Glasgow town
The highland hills were all behind me
And the Bonniest lass that ever I spied
She lived in Glasgow, they called her Peggy
II
Oh highland lads are brisk young lads
Highland lads are young and bonnie
And I’m away to Glasgow town
To steal away the Bonnie Peggy
III
Her father he’s got word of this
And oh but he was wondrous angry
“You can take my oxen and all of my cows/
But Ye’ cannot take my Bonnie Peggy”
IV
“Ah, hold yer tongue, ye silly old man
For I’ve got cows and yowes already
I’ll no’ steal yer oxen or your cows
But I will take your Bonnie Peggy”
V
I said, “braw lass, why roam ye there
Why roam ye ‘lone among the heather”
She said: “My father’s away from home
And I’m herdin’ all his cows together”
VI
So I said “Braw lass if ye’ll be mine
And ye care to lie in a bed of feathers
In silks and satins you shall lie
Ye’ll be my queen among the heather”
VII
She’s mounted on his milk white steed
And he himself on his wee grey naggie
They rode away at the break of the day
He’s run away with his Bonnie Peggy
VIII
Well they rode o’er hills and they rode o’er dales
they rode through the moors and the mosses many
Until they came to a little glen
He’s lighted down with his Bonnie Peggy
IX
Their bed was of the gay green turf
Their blankets of the bracken bonnie
His laid his plaid beneath her head
And she’s lien down with her highland laddie
X
He’s taken her up, Yon high, high hill
When that the sun was shinin’ clearly
Says “all that ye see Belongs to thee
For lien down with a highland laddie”
XI
“For all that ye have left behind
Is a wee cot house(2) and a wee kale yardie
Now your the lady of the Isle of Skye
For lien down with a highland laddie”
XII
When first I came to Glasgow town
The highland hills were all behind me
And the bonniest lass that ever I spied
She lives in Skye now we called her Peggy
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
La prima volta che andai a Glasgow
e mi lasciai alle spalle le colline delle Highland, la più bella ragazza mai vista
viveva a Glasgow e si chiamava
Peggy.
II
I ragazzi delle Highland sono svegli(1),
I ragazzi delle Highland sono giovani e allegri e io sono venuto nella città di Glasgow per rapire la mia bella Peggy.
III
Il padre diceva parole come queste
ed era tanto arrabbiato
“Prendi il mio bue e le
mie mucche
ma lasciami la mia bella Peggy”
IV
“O frena la tua lingua, vecchio sciocco,
perchè ho già mucche e pecore; non vengo a rubare il tuo bue e le vacche, ma prenderò la tua bella Peggy”
V
Dissi “Coraggiosa fanciulla perchè passeggi da sola per la brughiera”
Disse lei “Mio padre è lontano da casa
e io custodisco tutte le sue mucche”
VI
Così dissi “Coraggiosa ragazza se sarai mia potrai dormire in un letto di piume,
tra seta e raso giacerai
e sarai la mia regina della brughiera!”
VII
La fece montare sul suo destriero bianco e si mise lui stesso sul bel stallone grigio, e galopparono fino al tramonto, lui scappò via con la bella Peggy.
VIII
Galopparono per le colline, galopparono  per  le valli,
galopparono per brughiere e anche paludi finchè arrivarono ad una valletta lontana
e lui si distese con la sua bella Peggy
IX
Il letto era un soffice tappeto erboso,
le coperte delle belle felci,
stese il plaid a sotto la testa di lei
e lei giacque con il suo ragazzo delle Highland
X
La portò sulle colline più alte
e mentre il sole splendeva forte disse
“Tutto ciò che vedi ti appartiene
per aver giaciuto con il ragazzo delle Highland”
XI
“E ciò che ti sei lasciata alle spalle
sono un casotto e un campetto di cavoli, ora sei la signora dell’Isola di Skye per aver giaciuto con il ragazzo delle Highland”
XII
La prima volta che andai nella città di Glasgow e mi lasciai alle spalle le colline delle Highland,
la più bella ragazza mai vista
adesso viveva a Skye e si chiamava Peggy.

NOTE
1) si tratta di un gruppo di border reivers andati a fare una razzia?
2) una cothouse (cotter house o kotten) è una piccola casa di contadini deriva il nome da cotter un contadino proprietario o affittuario di un piccolo appezzamento di terreno

SECONDA VERSIONE

Questa versione testuale è quella contenuta in “Singing Tradition of Child’s Popular Ballads” di Bronson

ASCOLTA Avalon Rising in “Storming Heaven” 2011

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger (banjo)


I
Highland lads are brisk and brave
Highland lads are young and merry
And all the way to Glasgow town
To steal away me bonnie Peggy
II
Her father he’s got word of this
Oh but he was wondrous angry
Take my oxen and my kye
But leave to me my bonnie Peggie
III
You can keep your oxen and your kye
For I’ve cows and ewes already
I won’t take your oxen and your kye
But I’ll steal away your bonnie Peggy
IV
He’s mounted up on his milk-white steed/ And she is on his wee gray nagie /And they rode away till the break of day
He’s taken away the bonnie lassie
V
They rode o’er hills and they rode o’er dales
They rode through moors and mosses many
Until that they met the Earl o’Argyle
Who was riding out with his young son Johnny
VI
And now did speak the Earl o’Argyle
And oh but he was wondrous sorry
The fairest lass in Glasgow town
An she’s away with a highland Johnny
VII
They rode o’er hills, they rode through dales
They rode through moors and mosses many
Until that they came to the yonder glen/ And she’s laid down with her highland Johnny
VIII
Her bed was of the gay green turf
Her blankets of the brak and sponny
Her tarsin lie beneath her head,
And she’s laid down with her highland Johnny
IX
There is blankets and sheets in my father’s house
Sheets and blankets all made ready(3)
And oh, wouldn’t he be angry at me
For lying down with a Highland Johnny
X
He’s taken her yon high high hills
But yet the sun was shining clearly
Says all you see belongs to thee
For lying down with a Highland Johnny
XI
All that she had left behind
Was a wee-cot house and a wee kail yardie
But thy’s not a lady of all my land.
For lying down with the Highland Johnny
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
“I ragazzi delle montagne sono svegli e coraggiosi, giovani e allegri e (vanno) fino alla città di Glasgow,
per rapire la mia bella Peggy.”
II
Il padre diceva parole come queste
ed era tanto arrabbiato
“Prendi il mio bue e le pecore
ma lasciami la mia bella Peggy”
III
“Puoi tenerti il tuo bue e le pecore
perchè ho già mucche e pecore
non voglio rubare bue e pecore
ma prenderò la tua bella Peggy”
IV
Montò sul suo destriero bianco
e mise lei sul suo bel stallone grigio,
e galopparono fino
al tramonto
e lui si portò via la bella Peggy.
V
Galopparono per colline e galopparono per valli,
galopparono per brughiere e anche paludi
finchè incontrarono il conte di Argyle
che andava a cavallo con il giovane figlio Johnny
VI
E così parlò il conte d’Argyle
ed era tanto dispiaciuto
“La più bella fanciulla di Glasgow
è fuggita con Johnny
della Montagna”
VII
Galopparono per colline e galopparono per valli,
galopparono per brughiere e anche paludi
finchè arrivarono alla valletta lontana
e lei giacque con il suo Johnny
della Montagna
VIII
Il letto era un soffice tappeto erboso,
le coperte delle belle felci
il suo plaid arrotolato sotto la testa
e lei giacque con il suo Johnny
della Montagna
IX
“Ci sono coperte e lenzuola nella casa di mio padre,
lenzuola e coperte
tutte ricamate(3)
oh se non fosse arrabbiato con me
per essere giaciuta con Johnny
della Montagna”
X
La portò sulle colline più alte
e ancora il sole splendeva forte
disse “Tutto ciò che vedi ti appartiene
per aver giaciuto con Johnny della Montagna”
XI
E ciò che lei si era lasciata alle spalle
era una piccola casetta e un campo di cavoli
“Ma ora sei la signora di tutta la mia terra per aver giaciuto con Johnny della Montagna”

NOTE
3) tutte pronte nel senso che aveva ricamato tutto il corredo,  la fanciulla è senza dote non avendo ottenuto il consenso paterno alle nozze

TERZA VERSIONE

Silly Wizard in “Caledonia’s Hardy Sons” 1978 così scrivono nelle note di copertina: “This version of the ballad was collated by Andy and retains the story while using, we think, the best verses available from other versions. It tells the story of a highly successful abduction of a young lady by Lord Donald MacDonald of Skye.” (tratto da qui) Andy Stewart voce; Johnny Cunningham mandolino, violino; Bob Thomas chitarra; Martin Hadden basso; Phil Cunninghan sintetizzatore


I
As when I come tae Glasgow toon;
The hillen trips were right before me,
And the bonniest lass that e’er I saw,
She lived in Glasgow, they called her Peggy
II
Their chief(1) did meet her father soon,
And O! but he was wondrous angry;
He said, Ye may tak my owsen and kye,
But ye maunna tak my bonnie Peggy.
III
‘O haud your tongue, ye gude auld man,
For I’ve got coos and ewes already;
I come na to see your owsen or kye,
But I will tae your bonny Peggy.
IV
He set her on his jet-black horse,
And he himsel had a fine grey naigie,
And they are on mony miles to the north,
And nane wi them but the bonny Peggy.
V
I got now a thousand sheep,
A’ grazin on yon hills sae bonny,
And ilka hundred a shepherd has,
Altho I be but a Hieland laddie.
VI
Ox and sheep are bidden good enough
but corn stacks are mickel better
they will stand in the drift and the snow
when the sheep will di wi the wind and the weather.
VII
Ah, but I got fifty acres of land,
It’s a’ plowd and sawn already;
I am Lord Donald o the isles(4),
And why sud na Peggy be calld ma lady?
VIII
And seein’ all yon castles and towers
The sun shines down sae bright an bonny
I am Lord Donald o the isles,
And surely my Peggy will be ca’d a lady!”
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Quando andai nella città di Glasgow,
le colline delle Lowland erano proprio davanti a me, la più bella ragazza mai vista viveva a Glasgow e si chiamava Peggy.
II
Il loro capo si incontrò subito con il padre di lei, ma lui era decisamente arrabbiato; “Potete rubare i miei cavalli e il mio bestiame,
ma non potrete rapire la mia bella Peggy”
III
“O frena la tua lingua, vecchio buonuomo,
perchè ho già mucche e pecore;
non vengo a rubare i tuoi cavalli e il bestiame,
ma prenderò la tua bella Peggy”
IV
Lui la mise sul cavallo nero come corvo,
e lui stesso aveva un bello stallone grigio,
e andarono per molte miglia verso il Nord,
e con loro c’era la bella Peggy.
V
“Io ho adesso un migliaio di pecore,
che pascolano tutte su quelle valli così belle,
e altre cento ha un pastore,
eppure non sono un signore delle Highland.
VI
Buoi e pecore vanno abbastanza bene,
ma i covoni di grano sono ancora meglio
sopportano la tempesta e la neve
come le pecore faranno con il vento e il tempo
VII
Ho cinquanta ettari di terreno,
già arati e seminati;
sono Lord Donald delle Isole,
e perché Peggy non dovrebbe essere chiamata Lady?
VIII
E guardando tutti quei castelli e torri
il sole splende così luminoso e bello
“Sono Lord Donald delle Isole
e di certo la mia Peggy sarà chiamata Lady”

NOTE
4) Il Signore delle Isole era il padrone di tutte le Isole Ebridi

continua The Highland Laddie

FONTI
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/89746/1 http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_228 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72182 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2277 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2278 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2276