Archivi tag: Maddy Prior

Lark in the Morning

Leggi in italiano

The irish song “The Lark in the Morning” is mainly found in the county of Fermanagh (Northern Ireland): the image is rural, portrayed by an idyllic vision of healthy and simple country life; a young farmer who plows the fields to prepare them for spring sowing, is the paradigm of youthful exaltation, its exuberance and joie de vivre, is compared to the lark as it sails flying high in the sky in the morning. Like many songs from Northern Ireland it is equally popular also in Scotland.
The point of view is masculine, with a final toast to the health of all the “plowmen” (or of the horsebacks, a task that in a large farm more generally indicated those who took care of the horses) that they have fun rolling around in the hay with some beautiful girls, and so they demonstrate their virility with the ability to reproduce.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners

Alex Beaton with a lovely Scottish accent

The Quilty (Swedes with an Irish heart)

CHORUS
The lark in the morning, she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy, she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy, he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing, over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,, she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing, then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home, from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green, and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble, all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”,  this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks, they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice, how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble, all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy as a prince or a king
NOTES
1) The lark is a melodious sparrow that sings from the first days of spring and already at the first light of dawn; it is a terrestrial bird which, however, once safely in flight, rises almost vertically into the sky, launching a cascade of sounds similar to a musical crescendo.
Then, closed the wings, he lets himself fall like a dead body until he touches the ground and immediately rises again, starting to sing again . see more
2) blade= boy, term used in ancient ballads to indicate a skilled swordsman
3) The story’s backgroung is that of the season of haymaking, starting in May, when farmers went to make hay, that is to cut the tall grass, with the scythe, putting it aside as fodder for livestock and courtyard’s animals . While hay cutting was a mostly masculine task, women and children used the rake to collect grass in large piles, which were then loaded onto the cart through the use of pitchforks.. see more

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, from Paddy Tunney (only I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), the most extensive version comes from the Sussex Copper family, but Lisa further changes some verses.

I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may

 

THE ENGLISH VERSION

This version was collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1904 as heard by Ms. Harriet Verrall of Monk’s Gate, Horsham in Sussex, but already circulated in the nineteenth-century broadsides and then reported in Roy Palmer’s book “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Became into the English folk music circuit in the 60s the song was recorded in 1971 by the English folk rock group Steeleye Span with the voice of Maddy Prior.

The refrain is similar to that of the previous irish version, but here the situation is even more pastoral and almost Shakespearean with the shepherdess and the plowman who are surprised by the morning song of the lark, but with the reversed parts: he who tells her to stay in his arms, because there is still the evening dew, but she who replies that the sun is now shining and even the lark has risen in flight. The name of the peasant is Floro and derives from the Latin Fiore.

Steeleye Span from Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior  from Arthur The King – 2001

I
“Lay still my fond shepherd and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro, it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows where the grass is all cut down.

NOTES
1)plow the field but also plow a complacent girl

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

“Lark in the morning” is a jig mostly performed with banjo or bouzouki or mandolin or guitar, but also with pipes, whistles or flutes, fiddles ..
An anecdote reported by Peter Cooper says that two violinists had challenged one evening to see who was the best, only at dawn when they heard the song of the lark, they agreed that the sweetest music was that of the morning lark. Same story told by the piper Seamus Ennis but with the The Lark’s March tune

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely uilleann pipes with Alan Murray guitar

Peter Browne uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

LINK
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62

Sailor’s farewell: on the sailor’s side!

Leggi in italiano

A further variant of “Sailor’s Farewell” is titled “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy” (aka “Swansea Town,” and “The Holy Ground”) found in England, Ireland, Australia, Canada, and the United States. It’s developed on twice directions, on the one hand it’s the typical and cheerful sea shanty, sometimes rough and with a lot of drink, and on the other it becomes a more intimate and fragile vein, which reflects on the solitude and danger of the sea. In these versions the sailor is enlisted in the Royal Navy.

Copper Family: Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy

Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy is one of the best-known songs from the repertoire of the Copper Family. It was published in the first issue of the Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol. 1, No. 1, in 1899, a version also released in Australia and entitled “Lovely Nancy”, in which it is only the handsome sailor who speaks during the separation on the shore.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 from Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger from a free session in front of the pub for “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”

ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) In the part of dialogue ometted Nancy wants to dress up as a sailor to go with him.
3) the reference is always to broadside ballad version in which our johnny (slang term for sailor) has enlisted in the Royal Navy and wants Nancy to stay home waiting for him.

AMERICAN/ IRISH VERSION: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan from American Stranger 1997 “I learned this version from the Max Hunter Collection. Hunter was a traveling salesman and amateur folksong collector from Springfield, Missouri, who amassed an impressive number of field recordings from the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks. When I was a teenager I learned many songs from the cassette tapes of his collection that were housed in the Springfield Public Library.
Hunter recorded this song in 1959 from Bertha Lauderdale, of Fayetteville, Arkansas. She had learned the song from her grandfather, who, in turn, had learned it from his grandmother, when “he was a young child in Ireland.” Since I recorded the song on American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, and Pete Coe have all added it to their repertoires.”

Altan from Local Ground, 2005

ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) hearts of oak rerefers to the wood from which British warships were generally made during the age of sail. The “Heart of oak” is the strongest central wood of the tree.

000brgcf
Sailor’s farewell

Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

Fair Annie and Gregory

La ballata tradizionale conosciuta comunemente con il titolo di Lord Gregory appartiene ad una family songs cioè un gruppo di canzoni dalla matrice comune in cui il tema si svolge sfaccettandosi in varie angolature.
Nella tragica ballata si narra di un amore abbandonato con tre protagonisti e alcuni risvolti magici: lei (Anna, a volte figlia di re), lui (Lord Gregory) e la madre di lui, con Anna o la madre di Lord Gregory nel ruolo di una fata-strega incantatrice.  La ballata riprende un racconto popolare di origine medievale detto “accused queen” (vedi parte introduttiva)

VERSIONE SCOZZESE: THE LASS OF ROCH ROYAL

Il gruppo principale riporta il titolo “The Lass of Roch Royal” ma anche i titoli alternativi “Lord Gregory”, “Fair Annie and Gregory”, “Love Gregor”, “Anne Gregory”.
La versione più antica (Child # 71 versione A, Libro di canzoni manoscritto di Elizabeth Cochrane), ha una storia preliminare in cui Isabella di Rochroyal in sogno vede il luogo dove si trova Lord Gregory, al mattino fa sellare il suo cavallo e galoppa fino al castello del suo amante. Durante il tragitto incontra una comitiva con la quale scambia una conversazione apparentemente enigmatica
VI
‘O whether is this the first young may,
That lighted and gaed in;
Or is this the second young may,
That neer the sun shined on?
Or is this Fair Isabell of Roch Royall,
Banisht from kyth and kin.’
VII
‘O I am not the first young may,
That lighted and gaed in;
Nor neither am I the second young may,
That neer the sun shone on;
VIII
‘But I’m Fair Isabell of Roch Royall
Banisht from kyth and kin;
I’m seeking my true-love Gregory,
And I woud I had him in.’

Secondo David C. Fowler nel suo “An Accused Queen in “The Lass of Roch Royal”” in The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 71, No. 282 (Oct. – Dec., 1958)
“Are you the young maid,” they ask, “that visits Gregory openly during the day? Or are you the one that slips in to see him at night? Or are you the one [i.e., Isabell of Rochroyall] that he got into trouble?” Understanding the questions in this way, it is immediately apparent 1) that Gregory is (at least allegedly) a ladies’ man, 2) that the three maids represent steps up (or down) the ladder to his affections, and 3) that Isabell’s plight is well known. But what motivates the company to ask such questions? On the assumption that they recognize her as Isabell, which seems likely in context, the most that can be said is that they do not appear to be favorably disposed toward the girl.

Sempre nella Versione A della storia la madre vuole allontanare la fanciulla con l’inganno
“Love Gregory, he is not at home
But he is to the sea;
If you have any word to him,
I pray you leave ‘t with me.”

Appena viene a sapere dalla ragazza che è incinta afferma di volere prendersene cura solo se lei non rivelerà a nessun il nome del padre fino al ritorno di Lord Gregory, ma la fanciulla risponde
“I’ll set my foot on the ship-board,
God send me wind and more!
For there’s never a woman shall bear a son
Shall make my heart so sore.”

La versione in ‘The Bonny Lass of Lochroyan, or Lochroyen,’ Manuscripts e Scottish Songs di Herd 1776 (Child # 71 versione B) è abbastanza simile alla Versione D (Jamieson-Brown Manuscript, fol. 27; Jamieson’s Popular Ballads, I, 36), quella più diffusa ovvero la versione standard.

Nella versione più estesa della ballata veniamo a sapere già dalle prime strofe che a rispondere alle richieste di Anna è la madre (chiamata false mother). Eppure Anna risponde come se avesse parlato Lord Gregory e quindi è presumibile che la madre abbia impersonato Lord Gregory (un’imitazione? Un incantesimo?)

Gericault-shipwreck

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl in The English and Scottish Popular Ballads Vol. 2 Child Ballads

La versione originale (vedi) è di 32 strofe ridotte da Ewan a 18 (vedi).


I
“Oh wha will lace my shoes sae sma’(1)
And wha will glove my hand?
And wha will lace my middle sae jimp
Wi’ my new-made linen band?
II
“Wha will kaim my yellow hair
Wi’ my new siller kaim
And wha will faither my young son
Till Lord Gregory come hame?
III
“But I will get a bonnie boat
And I will sail the sea
For I maun gang to Lord Gregory
Since he canna come hame to me
IV
“Oh row ye boat, my mariners
And bring me to dry land
For yonder I see my love’s castel
Close by the saut sea strand
V
“Oh open the door, Lord Gregory
Open and let me in
For the wind blows through my yellow hair
And I am shivering to the chin”
VI
“Awa’, awa’ ye wile woman
Some ill death may ye dee
Ye’re but a witch or a wild warlock
Or mermaid o’ the sea”
VII
“I’m neither a witch nor a wild warlock
Nor mermaid o’ the sea
But I’m fair Annie o’ Roch Royal
then, open the door to me
VIII
“Oh dinna ye mind, Lord Gregory(2)
When ye sat at the wine
We changed the rings frae our fingers
And I can show thee thine
IX
“Oh, dinna ye mind, Lord Gregory
When in my faither’s ha’
‘Twas there ye got your will o’ me
And that was worst o’ a’(3)”
X
“Awa’, awa’, ye wile woman
For here ye sanna win in
Gae droon ye in the saut sea
Or hang on the gallow’s pin”
XI
When the cock did craw and the day did daw’
And the sun began to peep
Then up did rise Lord Gregory
And sair, sair did he weep
XII
“I dreamt a dream, my mither dear
The thocht o’t gars me greet
I dreamed fair Annie o’ Roch Royal
Lay cauld deid at my feet”
XIII
“Gin it be Annie o’ Roch Royal(4)
That gars ye mak’ this din
She stood a’ nicht at our ha’ door
But I didna let her in”
XIV
“Oh wae betide ye, ill woman
Some ill death may ye dee
That ye wadna be letten poor Annie in
Or else hae waukened me”
XV
He’s gane doon tae yon sea shore
As fast as he could fare
he saw fair Annie in her boat
And the wind it tossed her sair
XVI
The wind blew loud and the sea grew rough
And the boat was dashed on shore
Fair Annie floated upon the sea
But her young son rose no more
XVII
Lord Gregory tore his yellow hair
And made his heavy moan
Fair Annie lay deid at his feet
But his bonnie young son was gane
XVIII
“Oh wae betide ye, cruel mither
and ill death may ye dee
That ye couldna hae letten fair Annie in
When she came sae far tae me”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Oh chi allaccerà le mie scarpine (1)
e chi mi metterà i guanti?
Chi mi allaccerà bene il busto
con nuove fasce di lino?
II
Chi mi pettinerà i biondi capelli
con il mio nuovo pettine d’argento
e chi sarà il padre di mio figlio
finchè Lord Gregory ritornerà a casa?”
III
“Ma io preparerò una bella barca
e salperò per il mare
per andare da Lord Gregory
poichè  lui non può venire da me”
IV
“Oh vogate, miei marinai
e portatemi sulla terra ferma
che laggiù vedo il castello del mio amore, avvicinatevi alla battigia”
V
“Oh apri la porta, Lord Gregory
apri e fammi entrare
che il vento soffia tra i miei
biondi capelli
e io sbatto i denti”
VI
“Via, via o donna incantatrice
che puoi fare ammalare fino alla morte,
sei una strega del mare o una maga oscura, o una sirena del mare”
VII
“Non sono una strega del mare o una maga oscura, nè una sirena del mare,
io sono la bella Annie di Roch Royal
così aprimi la porta”
VIII
“Ti ricordi, Lord Gregory (2)
quando eri seduto a bere vino
ci siamo scambiati gli anelli
alle dita e posso mostrarti il tuo”
IX
“Ti ricordi, Lord Gregory
quando nella sala di mio padre
hai fatto ciò che hai voluto di me e quella fu la cosa peggiore tra tutte (3)”
X
“Via vattene donna incantatrice
che tu non vincerai qui,
vai ad annegarti nel mare
o ad appenderti sulla forca”
XI
Quando il gallo cantò
spuntò l’alba
e il sole fece capolino
allora si alzò Lord Gregory
e triste si mise a piangere
XII
“Ho fatto un sogno, cara madre,
e al solo pensiero piango
ho sognato la bella Annie di Roch Royal
che giaceva morta ai miei piedi”
XIII
“Se è Annie di Roch Royal (4)
che ti ha dato questo dolore
è stata tutta la notte fuori dalla porta
ma io non l’ho fatta entrare”
XIV
“Oh guai a te, donna pazza
che tu possa ammalarti fino alla morte
che non hai lasciato entrare la povera Annie e nemmeno mi hai svegliato”
XV
Egli andò fino alla riva del mare
più velocemente che potè
e vide la bella Annie sulla sua barca
e il vento che scuoteva le sue vele
XVI
Il vento soffiava forte e il mare s’ingrossò
e la barca naufragò sulla riva
la bella Annie galleggiava sul mare
ma il suo bambino non riemerse più.
XVII
Lord Gregory si strappava i biondi capelli e gridava il suo triste lamento
la bella Annie era morta ai suoi piedi e il suo bel bambino era scomparso.
XVIII
“Oh guai a te, madre crudele
che ti possa ammalare fino alla morte
perchè non hai lasciato entrare la bella Annie
quando è venuta da me”

NOTE
1) Anna si chiede “Chi si prenderà cura di me?” ma il montaggio di questa parte è alterato rispetto alle prime versioni della ballata (e in particolare in The lass of Ocram), in cui la fanciulla prima si reca al castello, poi chiede di entrare e alla richiesta di dimostrare la sua identità cita i tre pegni scambiati con Lord Gregory. Quando la madre viene a sapere che la ragazza è incinta (o che ha partorito un bambino) la scaccia in malo modo. Allora Anna chiede chi si prenderà cura di lei e del bambino e ottiene come risposta che saranno i suoi parenti ad occuparsi di lei mentre per il figlio:
And let God be father of your child,
For Lord Gregory is none
2) in questa versione siamo portati a credere che sia Lord Gregory a rispondere ad Anne e invece apprendiamo che è stata la madre solo nella XI strofa
3) la frase può essere più compiutamente compresa alla luce di quanto riportato nella The Lass of Ocram” (vedi) in cui la fanciulla ricorda a Lord Gregory dei tre “pegni” (three tokens) che si sono scambiati: il primo una camicia di preziosa tela Olandese contro quella di tela scozzese donata da lui; il secondo gli anelli quello di lei di oro fino, quello di lui di stagno; il terzo la verginità
One night in my fathers hall,
Where you stole my maidenhead,
Which was the worst of all.
Si tratta simbolicamente di una contrapposizione tra vero e falso amore
4) nella versione la madre risponde al figlio per giustificare il suo comportamento
XXIII
‘O there was a woman stood at the door,
Wi a bairn intill her arms,
But I woud na lat her within the bowr,
For fear she had done you harm.’

Dalle registrazioni sul campo: ASCOLTA

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: LORD GREGORY

In questa versione della ballata, diffusa anche in diverse versioni testuali da Maddy Prior, Anna diventa la figlia del re di Cappoquin o Capelkin (Irlanda sud contea di Waterford). All’ingresso del castello, le viene detto che Lord Gregory non c’è, perchè è andato in Scozia a portare a casa la sua nuova sposa.
ASCOLTA Fiona Kelleher (strofe I, II, VI e ripete I) intensa e sussurrata l’interpretazione di Fiona intrecciata con ossessive note di pianoforte e le cupe ombre del  contrabbasso suonato con l’archetto


I
I am a King’s daughter come
straight from Cappoquin(1),
In search of Lord Gregory,
pray God I’ll find him.
The rain beats at my yellow locks,
the dew wets me still,
The babe is cold in my arms, love,
Lord Gregory let me in.
II
Lord Gregory is not here
and he henceforth can’t be seen,
For he’s gone to bonny Scotland
to bring home his new queen.
Leave now these windows
and likewise this hall,
For it’s deep in the sea
you will find your downfall.
III
“Who’ll shoe my babe’s little feet?
Who’ll put gloves on her hand?
Who will tie my babe’s middle
With a long linen band?
Who’ll comb my babe’s yellow hair
With an ivory comb?
Who will be my babe’s father
Till Lord Gregory comes home?
IV
Do you remember, love Gregory,
That night in Callander
Where we changed pocket handkerchiefs,
And me against my will?
For yours was pure linen, love,
And mine but coarse cloth;
For yours cost a guinea, love,
And mine but one groat(2).
V
Do you remember, love Gregory,
That night in Callander
Where we changed rings on our fingers,
And me against my will?
For yours was pure silver, love,
And mine was but tin;
For yours cost a guinea, love,
And mine but one cent.”
VI
Do you remember, love Gregory,
that night in Cappoquin?
You stole away my maidenhead
and sore against my will.
And I’ll leave now these windows
and likewise this hall,
For it’s deep in the sea
I will find my downfall.
VII
“And my curse on you, Mother,
My curse being sore!
Sure, I dreamed the girl I love
came a-knocking at my door.”
“Sleep down you foolish son,
Sleep down and sleep on:
For it’s long ago that weary girl
Lies drownin’ in the sea.”
VIII
“Well go saddle me the black horse,
The brown, and the gray;
Go saddle me the best horse
In my stable to-day!
And I’ll range over mountains,
Over valleys so wide,
Till I find the girl I love
And I’ll lay by her side.”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Sono la figlia del re arrivata direttamente da Cappoquin (1)
a cercare Lord Gregory
e per Dio lo troverò.
La pioggia cade sui miei riccioli biondi
e anche la rugiada mi bagna,
il bambino ha freddo tra le mie braccia,
Lord Gregory, fammi entrare.
II
Lord Gregory non è qui
e non può ricevere visite,
perchè è andato nella bella Scozia
per portare a casa la sua nuova sposa.
Allontanati adesso dalle finestre
e anche da questo castello
perchè nel fondo del mare
troverai la tua rovina.
III
“Chi allaccerà le scarpe alla mia bimba?
Chi le metterà i guanti?
Chi fascerà bene il busto della bimba
con lunghe fasce di lino?
Chi pettinerà i biondi capelli della bimba con un pettine d’avorio?
Chi sarà il padre di mia figlia
finchè Lord Gregory ritornerà a casa?
IV
Ti ricordi Lord Gregory
quella notte a Callander
quando ci siamo scambiati
i fazzoletti da taschino
contro la mia volontà?
Perchè il tuo era di puro lino, amore
e il mio solo di tela grossolana,
però  il tuo costava una ghinea, amore
e il mio solo pochi penny (2)
V
Ti ricordi, Gregory caro,
quella notte a Callander
quando ci siamo scambiati gli anelli al dito
contro la mia volontà?
Il tuo era di argento puro, caro
e il mio solo di latta,
il tuo costava una ghinea
e il mio solo un centesimo.
VI
Ti ricordi, Gregory caro,
quella notte a Cappoquin?
Hai preso la mia verginità
e contro la mia volontà
e mi allontanerò adesso dalle finestre
come pure da questo castello
perchè nel fondo del mare
troverò la mia rovina.”
VII
“Ti maledico, madre,
ti maledico con dolore!
Ho sognato la donna che amo
che veniva a bussare alla mia porta.”
“Dormi figlio, sogni pazzie,
rimettiti a dormire
è da un pezzo che quella ragazza sventurata è annegata in fondo al mare”
VII
“sellatemi il cavallo nero
quello baio e il grigio
sellatemi il cavallo migliore
che c’è oggi nella stalla
e io cercherò per i monti
e le ampie vallate
finchè troverò la donna che amo
e mi stenderò al suo fianco”

NOTE
1) anche Callander
2) goat= moneta inglese d’argento dal valore di quattro penny.
FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/lordgregory.html

BRING US IN GOOD ALE

Bring Us in Good Ale è un wassail song di origine medievale.
Trascrizioni del brano risalgono al 1460 (fonte Bodleian Library di Oxford), il canto era nel repertorio medievale dei menestrelli girovaghi che intrattenevano il pubblico dei villaggi durante le feste e i matrimoni, ed è stato incluso in una raccolta di canti e carols di Natale al tempo di re Enrico VI stampato nel 1847dalla Percy Society di Londra “Songs and Carols”  a cura di Thomas Wright.

E’ un’evidente parodia di The Salutation Carol (carol dell’Annunciazione) i menestrelli infatti  iniziavano in tono serio con “Nowell, Nowell, Nowell this is the salutation of the Angel Gabriel” (eventualmente con qualche strofa del carol) e poi proseguivano con l’invocazione “Portaci della buona birra per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!“, una dimostrazione delle licenziosità che si prendevano i questuanti dopo aver bevuto troppa buona birra, ma anche del clima festoso e godereccio delle più antiche feste del Solstizio d’Inverno (Midwinter o Yule e i Saturnalia). I questuanti non vogliono carne, pane, uova o dolci, ma chiamano a gran voce della buona birra, indirettamente così facendo rendono grazie alla Madonna per l’abbondanza di cibo della stagione.

Ascoltiamo la versione medievale dei Night Watch con “The Salutation Carol” come incipit (continua)

Maddy Prior ha registrato diverse verioni del brano sia con Tim Hart  che con la Carnival Band

Green Matthews (Chris Green & Sophie Matthews) in A Medieval Christmas 2012 (vedi)Maddy Prior & Tim Hart in Summer Solstice 1996 e in Haydays 2003 con la sola voce di Maddy in una versione più lenta e con diversi versi saltati

Young Tradition in The Holly Bears the Crown 1995


Bring us in good ale (1),
and bring us in good ale;
For our Blessed Lady’s sake,
bring us in good ale.
I
Bring us in no brown bread,
for that is made of bran,
Nor bring us in no white bread,
for therein is no game(2);
Bring us in no roastbeef,
for there are many bones(3),
But bring us in good ale,
for that goes down at once
II
Bring us in no bacon,
for that is passing fat,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us enough of that;
Bring us in no mutton,
for that is often lean,
Nor bring us in no tripes,
for they be seldom clean
III
Bring us in no eggs,
for there are many shells,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us nothing else;
Bring us in no butter,
for therein are many hairs;
Nor bring us in no pig’s flesh,
for that will make us boars
IV
Bring us in no puddings,
for therein is all God’s good;
Nor bring us in no venison,
for that is not for our blood(4);
Bring us in no capon’s flesh,
for that is often dear(5);
Nor bring us in no duck’s flesh,
for they slobber in the mere
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Portaci della buona birra,
portaci della buona birra
per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!
I
Non portarci del pane nero
perché è fatto di crusca,
non portarci del pane bianco
perché non è dei nostri.
Non portarci del manzo
perché ci sono troppe ossa,
ma portaci della buona birra,
che vada giù d’un fiato.
II
Non portarci della pancetta,
perché contiene molto grasso,
ma portaci della buona birra
e daccene abbastanza.
Non portarci del montone,
perché è spesso magro,
non portarci la trippa
perché raramente è pulita bene.
III
Non portarci uova
perché ci sono troppi gusci,
ma portaci della buona birra
e non darci altro.
Non portarci il burro
perché ci sono troppi peli,
non portarci carne di maiale
per quello che ci rendono i cinghiali.
IV
Non portarci dolci,
perché sono un bene di Dio,
non ci portare del cervo,
perché non è per la gente comune. Non portarci carne di cappone
per quello che ci è più caro,
non portarci carne di anatra
perché sguazza nel fango

NOTE
1) Nelle Isole Britanniche  si producevano birre non luppolate dette ALE; erano infatti le birre provenienti dal “continente” a contenere luppolo e quindi distinte con una parola diversa BEER! continua
2) trovato scritto anche come gain o grain, nella versione manoscritta invece come game: oltre a gioco, partita in senso colloquiale il termine si usa per dire “essere dei nostri” qui da intendersi come cibo che non si trova alla mensa della gente comune.
3) la carne di manzo non era consumata abitualmente nel Medioevo perché i bovini erano utilizzati nel lavoro dei campi e non allevati per la carne, quindi l’animale era ucciso e macellato solo una volta diventato molto vecchio e ossuto con la carne dura
4) our blood: letteralmente “nostro sangue”, la caccia al cervo era riservata al re e quindi la carne di cervo era mangiata solo dalla gente di sangue nobile.
5) il cappone è un gallo castrato per renderlo più grasso e più tenero

FONTI
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/bring_us_in_good_ale.htm
https://www.traditioninaction.org/Cultural/Music_P_files/P036_Ale.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/goodale.html

HIND HORN FROM EDINBURGH TOWN

Hind Horn è un’antica ballata che nasce dal romance “King Horn”  scritto alla fine del XIII secolo in proto-inglese in cui si narra dell’eroico re Horn, originariamente un feroce e sanguinario incursore vichingo, trasformato in un tipico cavaliere medievale, imbevuto di virtù cavalleresche.
Nella ballata invece prevale il tema amoroso, il quale inaugurerà uno specifico filone delle ballate popolari detto “broken token ballad“: l’uomo andato in guerra, ritorna dopo molti anni e incontra (sotto mentite spoglie) la fidanzata o la moglie, e la sottopone ad un test per avere la prova della sua fedeltà. Il modello archetipo è probabilmente quello di Ulisse e Penelope. (vedi prima parte)

L’ANELLO MAGICO

Un giovane uomo, spesso uno scozzese, Hind Horn, ha servito il re andando per mare per sette anni, nel frattempo si innamora di Jean, la figlia del re. Il re ad un certo punto e per motivi non chiariti, allontana da corte Hind Horn mandandolo a combattere oltremare per altri sette anni. Prima della separazione l’innamorata gli dona un anello che contiene una pietra magica, la quale diventa opaca in caso d’infedeltà. Quando la pietra perde la sua brillantezza il giovane corre a corte e scopre che Jane si è sposata con un altro; travestendosi e camuffandosi da mendicante con la scusa di brindare per la sposa getta nel bicchiere l’anello avuto in dono. Subito Jean lo riconosce e  scappa via con Hind Horn.
La ballata, nota anche sotto i titoli di “The Pale Ring” o “The Jeweled Ring”, è stata preservata nelle versioni più complete in Scozia e Irlanda ma, grazie agli emigranti irlandesi, è approdata anche nel New Brunswick (Canada).
Le versioni sono molte come pure le melodie associate, non si trovano tuttavia molte registrazioni in merito.

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

In Dan Milner and Paul Kaplan Songs of England, Ireland and Scotland, 1983 Oak, New York è così riportato: “Source: Text collated from various sources; tune from G. Greig and and A. Keith, Last Leaves of the Traditional Ballad and Ballad Airs.
Questa versione ambientata in Scozia è contraddistinta dall’intercalare delle frasi nonsense e dal ritornello And the birk and the broom blooms bonnie-O

ASCOLTA Rosaleen Gregory (da qui)
ASCOLTA
 su Spotify Ewan MacColl  in Ballads 1956


Near Edinburgh town was a young child born
(With a high loo low and a high loo  land)
His name was called young Hind Horn
(And the birk and the broom(1) blooms bonnie-O)
Seven years he served the King,
All for the sake of his daughter Jean.
The King an angry man was he
And he sent young Hind Horn to the sea,
She’s given to him a golden ring
With seven diamonds set therein.
“When this ring grows pale and wan
You may know that my love is gone”.
One day he looked his ring upon
And he knew she loved another man.
He’s left the sea and come to land
And there he’s met an old beggar man.
“What’s news, what news doth thee betide?”
“No news but the Princess Jean’s a bride.”
“Will you give me thy begging tweed
And I’ll give you my riding steed?”
The beggar he was bound for to ride
And Hind Horn he was bound for the bride.
When he came to the King’s own gate
He sought a drink for Hind Horn’s sake(2).
He drank the wine and dropped the ring
And bade them take it to the Lady Jean.
“Got you this ring by sea or land
Or got you this from a dead man’s hand?”
“Not from sea and not from land
But I got it from thy milk-white hand.”
“I’ll cast off my gown of brown
And I’ll follow you from town to town.”
“You needn’t cast off your gowns of brown,
For I’ll make you the lady of many a town.”
“I’ll cast off my dress of red(3)
And I’ll follow you and beg my bread.”
“You needn’t cast off your dress of red,
For I’ll maintain you with wine and bread.”
The bridgegroom had the bride first wed
But young Hind Horn took her first to bed.(4)
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
Vicino a Edimburgo nacque un bambino
(With a high loo low and a high loo  land)
che venne chiamato giovane Hind Horn. (e la betulla e la ginestra (1) fioriscono belle)
Servì il Re per sette anni
per amore verso la figlia Jean.
Il re si arrabbiò
e mandò il giovane Hind Horn per mare,
lei gli diede un anello d’oro
con sette diamanti incastonati.
“Quando l’anello è pallido e opaco,
tu saprai che il mio amore è svanito.»
Un giorno egli guardò l’anello
e seppe che lei amava un altro uomo.
Riprese il mare e approdò a terra
dove incontrò un vecchio mendicante.
«Che notizie, quali sono le notizie di oggi?»
«Solo che la Principessa Jean si è sposata.»
«Mi darai il tuo vestito da mendicante e io ti darò il mio destriero?»
Il mendicante era pronto per cavalcare
e Hind Horn era pronto per
la sposa.
Quando arrivò al cancello del Re
cercò da bere alla salute di Hind Horn (2),
bevve il vino e lasciò cadere l’anello
e ordinò che venisse portato a Lady Jean
«Lo hai trovato navigando o viaggiando per terre?
O lo hai preso dalla mano di un uomo morto?»
«Non lo presi né per mare né per terra,
ma lo ottenni dalla tua bianca mano»
«Metterò l’abito marrone
e ti seguirò di porta in porta.»
«Non c’è bisogno che ti metta l’abito marrone
perchè ti renderò la signora di molte città.»
«Metterò l’abito rosso (3)
e ti seguirò a mendicare il pane.»
«Non c’è bisogno che tu ti metta l’abito rosso
perchè ti manterrò con pane e vino.»
Lo sposo sposò per primo la sposa,
ma il giovane Hind Horn se la portò per primo a letto (4).

NOTE
1) la ginestra con la sua rigogliosa fioritura dorata ha spesso una precisa allusione sessuale nelle ballate. Forse per la forma del fiore che richiama la vulva femminile. Con la ginestra si facevano le scope nel Medioevo così con il termine inglese “broom” si indica entrambi: sulle scope volavano le streghe e la ginestra allude a una sessualità diabolica o quantomeno selvaggia, libera da regole. In genere nelle ballate quanto l’argomento è di natura sessuale vengono utilizzati nomi di erbe e fiori nel ritornello, proprio per avvertire l’ascoltatore. La brughiera è come il “greenwood” è un luogo “fuori legge” fuori dalla società civile dove accadono incontri fatati e illeciti, ma vissuti con una primitiva o primordiale innocenza. Una leggenda, di origine scozzese racconta di un uomo che richiese la “prova d’amore” prima di sposarsi. La ragazza su consiglio di una vecchia saggia, accettò la prova, ma solo se avesse avuto luogo tra i cespugli di ginestra. Accadde che il ragazzo stordito dal profumo dei fiori, cadde ben presto in un sogno profondo. Al risveglio, convinto di aver posseduto la ragazza come voleva, acconsentì alle nozze.
2) in altre versioni (come quella dei Bandoggs) più coerentemente è scritto: He’s sought there a drink for the bridegroom’s sake: al mendicante veniva offerto da bere per brindare alla salute della sposa
3) la principessa è convinta che il suo cavaliere sia caduto in disgrazia e viva come un mendicante. Così dichiara di voler indossare gli abiti del popolo per andare in giro a mendicare con lui. Nelle ballate il marrone e il rosso vengono considerati colori adatti ai mendicanti.  Nei tempi antichi però il rosso era il colore nunziale degli sposi, indossato per evocare la fertilità, poi il Cristianesimo ha voluto che la donna si vestisse di blu, colore che simboleggia la verità e la purezza, e solo a partire dalle nozze della Regina Vittoria nel 1840 iniziò a consolidarsi la tradizione dell’abito bianco per la sposa.
4) Hind Horne è arrivato durante il banchetto nunziale i due si erano già sposati ma non avevano ancora consumato..

Un’ulteriore variante testuale riporta ancora meno strofe e il ritornello è completamente senza senzo con mera funzione d’intercalare:  Hey lililo and a ho lo la seguito da  Hey down and a hey diddle downy
ASCOLTA Bandoggs in Bandoggs 1978

ASCOLTA Maddy Prior in Flesh an Blood 1998 (per il testo qui)

ASCOLTA The Furrow Collective in At Our Next Meeting 2014 (i quali modificano ulteriormente il testo)


Young Hind Horn to the King is gone,
Hey lililo and a ho lo la,
And he’s fell in love with his daughter Jean, Hey down and a hey diddle downy.
She gave to him a golden ring
With three bright diamonds set therein.
“When this ring grows pale and wan
It’s then that you’ll know my love is gone.”
Now the king has sent him o’er the sea
For seven long years in a far country.
One day his ring grew pale and wan
And he knew that she’d loved another man.
So he’s left the sea for his own land
And it’s there that he’s met with a beggar man.
“What news, what news old man doth befall?”
“It’s none save the wedding in the king’s own hall.”
“Cast off, cast off your beggar’s weeds
And I’ll give you my good grey steed.”
Oh it’s when he came to the king’s own gate
He’s sought there a drink for the bridegroom’s sake.
And the bride gave him a glass of wine
And when he’s drunk he’s dropped in the ring.
“Oh got ye this by the sea or the land
Or took ye this from a dead man’s hand?”
“I got it neither by sea nor land
For you gave it to me with your own hand.”
“Oh, I’ll cast off my gown of red
And along with thee I’ll beg my bread.”
“Oh, you need not leave your bridal gown
For I’ll make you the lady of many’s the town.”
Her own bridegroom had her first wed
But young Hind Horn had her first to bed.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
Il giovane Hind Horn è andato dal Re
Hey lililo and a ho lo la,
e si è innamorato di Jean sua figlia.
Hey down and a hey diddle downy.
Lei gli diede un anello d’oro con tre diamanti incastonati.
“Quando l’anello è pallido e opaco,
tu saprai che il mio amore è svanito.”
Il re lo mandò per mare per sette lunghi anni in un paese lontano.
Un giorno il suo anello divenne pallido e opaco
e lui seppe che lei amava un altro uomo.
Riprese il mare e approdò a terra
dove incontrò un vecchio mendicante. «Che notizie, quali sono le notizie di oggi?»
«Solo il matrimonio nel castello del re.» «Togliti il vestito da mendicante e io ti darò il mio valente destriero grigio»
Quando arrivò al cancello del Re
cercò da bere alla salute della sposa,
e la sposa gli diede una coppa di vino
e mentre bevve lui lasciò cadere l’anello.
«Lo hai trovato navigando o viaggiando per terre?
O lo hai preso dalla mano di un uomo morto?»
«Non lo presi né per mare né per terra ma lo ottenni dalla tua bianca mano»
«Mi leverò l’abito rosso
e ti seguirò a mendicare il pane.»
«Non c’è bisogno che ti levi l’abito da sposa
perchè ti farò signora di molte città»
Lo sposo la sposò per primo,
ma il giovane Hind Horn se la portò per primo a letto.

continua la versione irlandese

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/tony.rose/songs/hindhorn.html
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/17-hind-horn.aspx
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=58972
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20082
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/301.html
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/english-and-other-versions-17-hind-horn-.aspx

Sailor’s farewell: dalla parte del marinaio!

Read the post in English  

Un’ulteriore variante del “Sailor’s Farewell” è intitolata “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy”ma anche “Swansea Town,” e “The Holy Ground”, ed è diffusa  in Inghilterra, Irlanda, Australia, Canada e Stati Uniti.
Si sviluppa su un duplice registro, da una parte è la tipica e allegra canzone marinaresca, a volte sguaiata e inneggiante alle colossali bevute, e dall’altra assume una vena più intimista e fragile, che riflette sulla solitudine e il pericolo del vita in mare. In queste versioni il marinaio è al servizio della Royal Navy.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY

Dal repertorio tradizionale della Famiglia Copper del Sussex la ballata è stata trascritta nel primo numero del Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol.1, No.1, nel 1899. Una versione diffusa anche in Australia e intitolata “Lovely Nancy”, in cui è solo il bel marinaio a parlare durante la separazione.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 in Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger in una session davanti al pub per la serie “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”


I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
vado in giro per l’oceano, amore
a cercare l’avventura.
Vieni a scambiare l’anello
con me mia cara ragazza,
scambia l’anello con me,
perchè sarà un pegno di vero amore mentre sarò per mare.
II
Quando sarò lontano sul mare
e non saprai dove sono,
dolci lettere ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera,
i segreti del tuo cuore, cara ragazza
sono in cima ai miei pensieri,
perciò resta al sicuro dove
il mio cuore potrà stare di nuovo con te.
III
C’è una forte tempesta in arrivo,
vedi come si raduna tutt’intorno,
mentre noi povere anime sul vasto oceano combattiamo per la corona.
Non ci sarà nulla a proteggerci, amore
o a tenerci lontani dal freddo, nel vasto oceano che dobbiamo affrontare da allegri e coraggiosi marinai.
IV
Ci sono calderai, sarti e calzolai
che dormono russando,
mentre noi povere anime
sul vasto oceano solchiamo
gli abissi.
I nostri ufficiali ci comandano
e perciò dobbiamo ubbidire
aspettandoci in ogni momento
di essere spazzati via.
V
Ma quando le guerre saranno finite
ci sarà la pace in ogni terra
torneremo dalle nostre mogli e famiglie e dalle ragazze che amiamo,
ordineremo da bere allegamente
e spensieratamente  spenderemo i nostri soldi, e quando i soldi saranno finiti riprenderemo il mare con coraggio.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) letteralmente ” tieni il tuo corpo dove il mio cuore potrà stare con te ancora”; manca la parte di dialogo in cui lei dice di voler travestirsi da marinaio per poter andare con lui. Ma il bel Johnny la dissuade dicendole di restare a casa dove lui la saprà al sicuro
3) il rimando è sempre alla versione della broadside ballad il cui il nostro johnny (termine gergale per marinaio) si  si è arruolato nella Royal Navy e vuole che Nancy resti a casa ad aspettarlo.

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA/ IRLANDESE: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan in American Stranger 1997leggiamo nelle note “Ho imparato questa versione dalla raccolta di Max Hunter. Hunter era un venditore ambulante e un collezionista amatoriale di canzoni folk da Springfield, Missouri, che ha raccolto un numero impressionante di registrazioni sul campo dal  Missouri all’ Arkansas Ozarks. Da ragazza ho imparato molte canzoni dalle cassette delle sue registrazioni catalogate nella Biblioteca pubblica di Springfield.
Hunter ha registrato questa canzone nel 1959 da Bertha Lauderdale, di Fayetteville, Arkansas. Aveva imparato la canzone dal nonno che a sua volta l’aveva appresa dalla nonna quando “era un bambino in Irlanda.” Da quando ho registrato la canzone in American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, e Pete Coel’hanno aggiunta nel loro repertorio.”

Altan in Local Ground, 2005


I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
penserò al mio vero amore,
penserò mia cara, a te
II
Scambierai l’anello
con me, amore mio
scambierai l’anello con me?
Sarà un pegno del nostro amore
mentre starò lontano per mare.
III
Quando sarò lontano da casa
e non saprai dove sono,
lettere d’amore ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera.
IV
Quando i contadini
ritornano a casa la sera
racconteranno alle loro ragazze delle belle storie di ciò che hanno fatto
tutto il giorno nei campi
V
Del grano e del fieno
che hanno tagliato
certo, è tutto quello che sanno fare,
mentre noi poveri allegri,
allegri cuori di quercia
dobbiamo navigare  per tutti i mari
VI
E quando ritorneremo di nuovo, amore mio, alla nostra cara terra natia
delle belle storie vi racconteremo
su come abbiamo navigato per gli oceani
VII
E faremo risuonare le birrerie
e rimbombare le taverne
e quando i soldi saranno tutto finiti
torneremo di nuovo per mare.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) hearts of oak espressione marinaresca per le navi costruite nell’età della vela con il legno più forte nella parte più interna dell’albero

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

SHEATH AND KNIFE OR THE LEESOME BRAND

courtly love“Fodero e Coltello” (in italiano) è una ballata sull’incesto dalle remote origini medievali e dal finale tragico. La ballata ha una certa assonanza con  “The Bonnie Hind” dove però l’incesto era accidentale. (vedi)
Nella sua versione più tarda a pagare per la colpa è sempre e solo la donna (come se implicitamente fosse solo lei la vera responsabile). Sia morta di parto o per la freccia scoccata dal fratello, la donna deve in ogni caso sparire per non disonorare il nome della famiglia.

L’incesto, un tema ballatistico non infrequente e generalmente considerato antichissimo (a partire da Edipo e Giocastra), è visto dalla gente come un crimine talmente ignominioso ed orrendo da dover essere punito in modo altrettanto atroce; nonostante ciò, coloro che lo commettono accidentalmente (ad esempio, per non saper affatto che la persona con la quale si giacciono è in realtà dello stesso sangue) sono trattati con simpatia e grande comprensione. Persino il terrificante peccatore di una ballata (Child,II,16), che confessa di avere avuto due bambini da sua madre e cinque da sua sorella, è salvato miracolosamente dalla Madonna. In tutto questo ci dev’essere stato un fondo di (terribile) realtà, dato che tali fatti non sono purtroppo infrequenti neanche nel mondo moderno, e non solo nelle comunità più arretrate.
Il “fodero e il coltello” della nostra ballata (da Motherwell, Minstrelsy, p. 286) sembrano avere solo la funzione esoterica di simboleggiare una madre che ha partorito un bambino morto, ma alcuni vi hanno visto degli (ovvi) riferimenti sessuali. Nonostante il tema assai ostico, perché in questa ballata l’incesto non è affatto accidentale e, anzi, viene brutalmente dichiarato fin dal secondo verso, Sheath and Knife, assieme forse a Corpus Christi e a Bessy Bell and Mary Gray una delle migliori ballate brevi del corpus Childiano, con la sua atmosfera cupa e magica sottolineata anche dal ritornello, che ci riporta alle nebbiose brughiere d’epoche remote. (Riccardo Venturi)

Diversa è però la versione seicentesca in cui la storia tra i due è narrata come una tragica storia d’amore! E’ come se la ballata anticamente più articolata e psicologicamente complessa si fosse scissa in due: Sheath and Knife (Child Ballad # 16) e The Leesome Brand (Child Ballad # 15)

THE BROOM BLOOMS BONNIE

La prima versione in stampa risale al 1796 (in Scots Musical Museum) anche conosciuta con il titolo “The broom blooms bonnie”

ASCOLTA Christina Harrison in “Lassie Wi’ the Lint-white Locks” in versione integrale su Spotify (tra parentesi i versi saltati)
ASCOLTA Maddy Prior live
TESTO “Minstrelsy: Ancient and Modern” 1827, William Motherwell

Child # 16 VERSIONE A


It is talked about the warld all over(1),
The brume(2) blooms bonnie an says it is fair
That the king’s dochter gaes wi’ child to her brither,
An’ we’ll never gang doun(3) to the brume onie mair(4)
He’s taen his sister doun to her father’s deer park,
Wi’ his yew-tree bow and arrows fast slung to his back.
(“Now whan that ye hear me gie a loud cry,
Shoot frae thy bow an arrow an there let me lye(5).
“An whan that ye see I am lyin deid,
Then ye’ll pit me in a grave, wi’ a turf at my heid.”)
Now whan he heard her gie a loud cry
His siller(6) arrow frae his bow he suddenly let fly.
Now they’ll never gang doun to the brume onie mair
He has made a grave that was lang an’ was deip(7),
An’ he has buried his sister, wi’ her babie at her feit.
An’ whan he came to his father’s court ha’
There was music an’ minstrels and dancin’ ana’.
“O Willie, o Willie, what makes thee in pain?”
“I hae lost a sheath an’ knife(8) that I’ll never see again.”
“There is ships o’ your father’s sailing on the sea
That will bring as guid a sheath and a knife unto thee.”
“There is ships o’ my father sailing on the sea,
Bit sic a sheath and a knife they can never bring to me.
TRADUZIONE  DI RICCARDO VENTURI
Lo sanno tutti nel mondo intero
Fiorisce la bella brughiera e si dice che è bella
che la figlia del re aspetta un figlio dal fratello.
Ma non andremo mai più nella bella brughiera
Ha portato sua sorella alla riserva di caccia di suo padre,
Col suo arco di legno di tasso e una freccia ben appesa dietro.
“E quando mi sentirai lanciare un grido acuto,
Scocca una freccia dall’arco e lasciami giacere a terra.
“E quando vedrai che sono a terra morta
Mettimi in una tomba, con una zolla d’erba alla testa.”
E quando la sentì lanciare un grido acuto
Scoccò dall’arco all’istante la sua freccia d’argento.
Ma ora non andranno mai più nella bella brughiera
Ha scavato una fossa, era lunga e profonda,
E l’ha seppellita col bambino ai suoi piedi.
E quando è arrivato alla corte di suo padre
C’eran musica e balli, menestrelli e ogni cosa.
“O Willie, o Willie, che cos’è che ti dà tanta pena?”
“Ho perso un fodero e un coltello, e non li riavrò mai più.”
“Le navi di tuo padre navigano sul mare,
Ti porteranno un fodero e un coltello altrettanto belli.”
“Le navi di mio padre navigano sul mare,
Ma un fodero e un coltello del genere non li avrò mai più.”

NOTE
1) in alcune versioni diventa ” It’s whispered in the kitchen, it’s whispered in the hall”
fiore-ginestra_m2) la ginestra con la sua rigogliosa fioritura dorata ha spesso una precisa allusione sessuale nelle ballate. Forse per la forma del fiore che richiama la vulva femminile. Con la ginestra si facevano le scope nel Medioevo così con il termine inglese “broom” si indica entrambi: sulle scope volavano le streghe e la ginestra allude a una sessualità diabolica o quantomeno selvaggia, libera da regole. In genere nelle ballate quanto l’argomento è di natura sessuale vengono utilizzati nomi di erbe e fiori nel ritornello, proprio per avvertire l’ascoltatore. La brughiera è come il “greenwood” è un luogo “fuori legge” fuori dalla società civile dove accadono incontri fatati e illeciti, ma vissuti con una primitiva o primordiale innocenza.
3) Gang doon = go down
4) onie mair=no more
5) secondo Child la donna dice al fratello che quando la sentirà gridare per le doglie del parto allora dovrà scoccare una freccia nel bosco, là dove la freccia si conficcherà quella sarà la sua sepoltura. La frase è tuttavia controversa ed è altrettanto plausibile ritenere che il fratello uccida la sorella appena dopo il parto. Nella versione più antica però (quella seicentesca) non c’è questa ambiguità.
6) se il legno dell’arco è di tasso, albero collegato alla morte e ai sepolcri la freccia è invece d’argento, così Ruth Perry nel suo commento (*) vede la nobiltà del metallo come segno di morte regale (un po’ come la catena d’oro per impiccare Geordie!)
7) nelle ballate tutte le tombe sono “long and deep”
8) il fodero è la sorella, il coltello è il bambino.

Una riscrittura testuale più moderna è stata fatta dai Broadside Electric (gli “Steeleye Span di Philadelphia”) nel 1996 sempre a partire dal testo in Child Ballad # 16 A. La melodia, come precisato dal gruppo, è un madrigale francese anonimo del XVI secolo, la danza finale (che rievoca l’atmosfera allegra della festa a corte) dal titolo Dospatsko Horo viene dalla tradizione bulgara.

ASCOLTA Broadside Electric in “More Bad News” 1996 Ma anche qui per maggiori info sul gruppo

ASCOLTA Ellie Bryan in “Am I born to die” 2012: impropriamente definisce il brano come “traditional Minneapolis” avendolo preso pari pari dalla versione dei Broadside Electric

VERSIONE BROADSIDE ELECTRIC
It is talked the world all over,
The king’s daughter goes with child to her brother.
Go down to the broom no more.
He’s brought his sister to the deer park,
Brought his bow and arrows fast to his back.
She said: “When you hear me loudly cry,
Shoot your arrow and there let me lie.”
“And when you see I am lying dead,
Bury me with a turf at my head.”
Now when he heard his sister cry
His silver arrow he did let fly.
He’s dug a grave that was long and deep,
And buried his sister with her babe at her feet.
When he came to his father’s hall
There were music and minstrels and dancing and all.
“Son, oh son, what makes you so sad?
At such a meeting you might be glad.”
“Father, oh father, I’ve lost a knife
I loved as dear as I loved my life.”
“And I have lost a finer thing,
I lost the sheath that the knife was in.”
“Hold your tongue and make no din.
I’ll buy you a sheath and a knife therein.”
“All the ships e’er sailed the sea
Won’t bring such sheath and a knife to me.”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
Lo sanno tutti nel mondo intero
che la figlia del re aspetta un figlio da suo fratello.
Ma non andremo mai più nella bella brughiera
Ha portato sua sorella alla riserva di caccia di suo padre,
Col suo arco di legno di tasso e una freccia ben appesa dietro.
“E quando mi sentirai lanciare un grido acuto,
Scocca una freccia dall’arco e lasciami giacere a terra.
“E quando vedrai che sono a terra morta
Mettimi in una tomba, con una zolla d’erba alla testa.”
E quando la sentì lanciare il grido della sorella
Scoccò dall’arco la sua freccia d’argento.
Ha scavato una fossa, era lunga e profonda,
E l’ha seppellita col bambino ai suoi piedi.
Quando è arrivato alla corte di suo padre
C’eran musica e balli, menestrelli e ogni cosa.
“Figlio, che cos’è che ti dà tanta pena?
A un tale convivio dovresti essere allegro”
“Padre, ho perso un coltello,
mi era caro come la mia vita.
E ho perso una cosa più preziosa
persi il fodero e il coltello che era dentro.”
“Taci e non lamentarti
ti comprerò un fodero e con dentro un coltello.”
“Tutte le navi che mai navigarono sul mare,
non mi porteranno un fodero e un coltello del genere.”

VERSIONE SEICENTESCA

Il testo cantato da Ewan MacColl è tratto (ed estratto) dal ben più lungo testo risalente al 1630 e trascritto nel “Dalhousie manuscript” di Robert Edward. (vedi *).
Qui i due amanti si stanno preparando per partecipare alla festa che si terrà al castello in onore del padre, ma mentre la ragazza cerca di indossare i vestiti, i lacci si rompono per via dello stato avanzato della sua gravidanza, il fratello vorrebbe nasconderla agli occhi del mondo così i due scappano a cavallo, e mentre si trovano poco lontani lei entra in travaglio. In questa versione il fratello non uccide la sorella ma semplicemente si mette a cacciare nell’attesa e quando la sente urlare accorre ma la trova morta. Il bambino sopravvive però al parto e viene messo a balia; il frutto dell’incesto non è dannato perchè non porta la colpa di chi l’ha generato! Anche il fratello muore infliggendosi un colpo mortale con la spada e giunge fino a casa per chiedere alla madre di preparargli il letto funebre. In questa versione i due amanti sono legati tra di loro da un affetto profondo sebbene incestuoso, così il loro rapporto assume un carattere tragico, come amanti fuggono nel bosco e il fratello preferisce ferirsi a morte dopo la morte per parto della sorella.

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl in “Black And White” (1984)

DALHOUSIE MANUSCRIPT 1630
There was a sister and her brither
The sun gaes tae oot owre the wood (1)
Wha maist(2) and tightly loved each other,
God gif(3) we had never been sib(4)
“O sister we’ll gang tae the broom(5)
O sister, I would lay thee doon. ”
“Brither alas would ye dae sae(6)
I sooner would my deith gang tae(7)”
A’ the folk they talk through ither(8)
The lassie’s wi’ bairn(9) tae her brither
“Oh brither ye hae done me ill
We will baith(10) burn on yon hill
Ye’ll gang tae my faither’s stable
And tak twa horses stout and able”
She’s up on the white horse, he’s on the black
With his yew tree bow slung fast tae his neck
They had nae rode a mile but ain(11)
Ere’ her pains they did come on
“I would gie all my faither’s land
For a good midwife at my command(12)
Ye’ll gang tae yon hill sae high
And tak’ your bow and arrows wi’ ye
When ye hear me loud, loud cry
Bend your bow and let me die”
When ye heard her loud loud cry
He bent his bow and let her die
When he cam’ to her beside
The babe was born, the lady died
Then he has ta’en his young young son
And bore him tae a milk-woman
He’s gien himsel’ a wound fu’ sair(13)
We’ll never gand tae the broom nae mair(14)
“Oh mither I hae tint(15) my knife
I lo’ed(16) it better than my life
But I hae tint a better thing
The bonnie sheath my knife was in
Is there nae a cutler intae Fife
That could mak’ tae thee a better knife
There’s nae a cutler in a’ the land
Could mak’ sic(17) a knife tae my command”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
C’era una sorella e suo fratello
il sole cala sul bosco (1)
e si amavano l’un l’altro più di ogni cosa
O Dio se non fossimo così consanguinei!
“O sorella andremo nella brughiera (5)
o sorella ti sdraierò giù”
“Fratello ahimè se lo farai
presto mi porterai alla morte”
La gente sparla della fanciulla che porta il bambino di suo fratello.
“Fratello tu hai fatto del male
bruceremo entrambi su quella collina.
Andrai alla stalla di mio padre
a prendere due cavalli forti e veloci”
Lei montò sul cavallo bianco e lui su quello nero
con il suo arco di legno di tasso a tracolla
Non avevano cavalcato che per un miglio, quando lei ebbe le doglie
“Darei tutta la terra di mio padre
per una brava levatrice ai miei ordini (12)
Andrai fino a quella collina così alta
e prenderai il tuo arco e le frecce con te. Quando mi sentirai lanciare un grido acuto,
tendi il tuo arco e lasciami morire.”
E quando la sentì lanciare un grido acuto, scoccò il suo arco e la lasciò morire.
Quando le venne accanto
il bambino era nato e la donna morta.
Allora si è preso il piccolo figliolo
e l’ha portato da una balia,
(poi) si colpì a morte (13)
“Non andremo mai più per la brughiera”
“O madre ho perso il mio coltello
che amavo più della mia vita.
Ma ho perso una cosa anche meglio,
il bel fodero che lo conteneva.
Non c’è un coltellaio in tutta Fife
che potrebbe fabbricare un coltello migliore
Non c’è un coltellaio in tutta la terra
che possa fare un coltello tale su ordinazione”

NOTE
1) gaes tae =goes to; in alcune versioni la frase viene scritta come “The sun (or son) gaes tae your tower there wi'” probabilmente per aver mal inteso la frase pronunciata da Ewan. Ruth Perry in (*) rileva come la frase sia molto antica e quantomeno citata già del 1200 “Nou goth sonne under wode” essendo Cristo il figlio di Dio e “wode” il legno della Croce, così il verso indica il tramonto sul bosco ma anche la crocefissione, la perdita della luce per il mondo.
2) wha maist =who most
3) gif =if oppure give nel senso di grant. Nel Dalhousie manuscript il verso è scritto come “god give we had nevir beine sib”
4) sib =kin, related; oppure ‘sin’, in entrembi le possibili traduzioni il senso della frase non cambia “Dio se non fossimo stati fratelli!” oppure “Dio se non avessimo peccato”: il legame di parentela trasforma il rapporto sessuale in un grave peccato
5) “Going to the broom” assume il significato di “andare in camporella” o per dirla all’inglese “going for a roll in the hay”! Qui la frase è decisamente esplicita: i due si sono rotolati di nascosto tra le ginestre durante l’accoppiamento! La stagione dell’accoppiamento doveva essere la primavera, stagione della fioritura della ginestra.
6) dae sae =do so
7) my deith gang tae =go to my death
8) through ither =together
9) wi’ bairn =with child
10) baith= both
11) ain =one
12) il parto che la ragazza ha voluto fare di nascosto nel bosco, per celare agli occhi di tutti il frutto della colpa, si rivela critico e difficoltoso e ora lei invoca, inutilmente, la presenza di una buona levatrice che la possa aiutare. Il periodo del parto doveva essere l’autunno così come il momento del giorno, il calar della sera, sembra voler sottolineare il finale tragico che si conclude con la morte.
13) nel manoscritto il verso è “he dreu his suord him wonding sore” qualcuno intende la frase in senso più mirato, come una vera e propria evirazione così si spiega la perdita del coltello che in questa versione non è il bambino; in senso più lato la perdita è inerente all’atto sessuale tra fratello (coltello) e sorella (fodero) come un’intesa e un piacere assoluto inteso come vero amore, che non potrà mai più verificarsi.
14) nae mair =no more
15) tint =lost
16) lo’ed =loved
17) sic = such

FONTI
http://www.8notes.com/scores/6274.asp
http://mainlynorfolk.info/tony.rose/songs/sheathandknife.html
http://broadsideelectric.bandcamp.com/track/sheath-and-knife
http://elliebryan.bandcamp.com/track/sheath-and-knife
http://www.itma.ie/inishowen/video/broom_blooms_bonny_maureen_jelks
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5281
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48317
* http://lit.mit.edu/publications/BrotherTrouble_MurderAndIncestInScottishBallads.pdf
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiLEEBRAND.html

DAL WASSAILING AL CAROLING: THE SUSSEX CAROL

Le wassail songs sono canti di questua di natura non religiosa che risalgono sia al solstizio d’inverno che ai riti di primavera dalla remota origine. Dalla iniziale questua accompagnata con molti brindisi a base di bevande alcoliche si passa al “caroling” ossia ai canti di Natale di natura religiosa, cantati  per le strade e davanti alle case, da gruppi di bambini o mendicanti-suonatori ambulanti. L’usanza del caroling era già diffusa presso le comunità rurali e venne rinverdita nel 1800 in epoca vittoriana, con la stampa di raccolte di vecchie e nuove carols.

THE SUSSEX CAROL

Conosciuto anche come On Christmas Night True Christians Sing o On Christmas Night All Christians Sing il canto natalizio “Sussex Carol” è stato pubblicato da un vescovo irlandese di nome Luke Wadding in una raccolta di canti nel 1684 –A Small Garland of Pious and Godly Songs– ma non è dato sapere se il brano avesse avuto un’origine più antica.
Dall’Irlanda (contea di Wexford) il brano si è diffuso in tutta l’Inghilterra (Shropshire, Gloucestershire, Surrey, Sussex, Herefordshire e Hampshire) probabilmente in seguito alla ripubblicazione a Londra della A Small Garland nel 1728 e 1731 (peraltro il canto è comparso anche in numerose altre raccolte natalizie e broadside).
La grande diffusione del carol ha praticamente portato a infinite varianti testuali, e anche altrettanti variazioni melodiche.
Il testo e la melodia attuali sono stati collezionati dalla tradizione popolare da due ricercatori Cecil Sharp a Buckland, Gloucestershire, e da Ralph Vaughan Williams, a Horsham, Sussex – da qui il suo nome, The Sussex Carol.
La melodia con cui è generalmente cantato oggi questo canto di natale è quella pubblicata nel 1919 da Ralph Vaughan Williams, così come arrangiata dalla versione ascoltata da Harriet Verrall (inizi novecento). La melodia è nota come “On Christmas Night
ASCOLTA Allan Alexander al liuto

Ecco una deliziosa scenetta del caroling dei bambini, tratto dal film su Beatrix Potter “Tailor of Gloucester“: infreddoliti sotto la neve, ad aspettare una dolce ricompensa!

angeli When sin departs before His grace,
Then life and health come in its place: (x2)
Angels and men with joy may sing
All for to see the new-born King.
All out of darkness we have light
Which made the angels sing this night (x2)
Glory to God and peace to men
Now and forevermore, amen!

Il testo assomiglia tutto sommato ad un sermone: tutti i Cristiani cantano, la notte di Natale quando nasce Gesù per manifestare la grande gioia che sgorga nei loro cuori alla vista del Redentore.

ASCOLTA Maddy Prior


I
On Christmas night all Christians sing
To hear the news the angels bring.
News of great joy, news of great mirth,
News of our merciful King’s birth.
II
Then why should men on earth be so sad,
Since our Redeemer made us glad?
When from our sin he set us free,
All for to gain our liberty?
III
When sin departs before His grace,
Then life and health come in its place:
Angels and men with joy may sing
All for to see the new-born King.
IV
All out of darkness we have light,
Which made the angels sing this night:
“Glory to God and peace to men,
Now and for evermore, Amen!”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
La notte di Natale tutti i cristiani cantano e ascoltano la novella degli Angeli.
Novella di grande gioia e di grande allegria, novella della nascita del nostro Re misericordioso.
II
Perchè dovrebbero gli uomini sulla terra essere così tristi
visto che il nostro Redentore ci ha reso felici? Quando dal nostro peccato ci ha liberato, per raggiungere la libertà?
III
Quando il peccato si allontana davanti alla Sua grazia, allora la vita e la salute subentrano al suo posto: angeli e uomini possano cantare con gioia
tutti per vedere il Re appena nato.
IV
Dalle tenebre è spuntata la luce,
che ha fatto cantare gli angeli questa notte:
Gloria a Dio e pace agli uomini
ora e sempre, Amen!

FONTI
http://www.patrickcomerford.com/2011/12/christmas-poems-1-wexford-carol.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/sussexcarol.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/sussex_carol.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/Images/On%20Christmas%20Night/on_christmas_night_notes.htm

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

Read the post in English

La irish song “The Lark in the Morning”  è diffusa principalmente nella contea di Fermanagh (Irlanda del Nord): l’immagine è agreste, ritratto di una visione idilliaca della sana e semplice vita di campagna; un giovane contadino che ara i campi per prepararli alla semina primaverile, è il paradigma dell’esaltazione giovanile, la sua esuberanza e gioia di vivere, viene paragonata all’allodola mentre s’invola cantando alta nel cielo al mattino. Come molte canzoni del Nord Irlanda è altrettanto popolare anche in Scozia.
Il punto di vista è maschile, con tanto di brindisi finale alla salute di tutti gli “aratori” (o dei cavallanti, mansione che in una grande fattoria indicava più genericamente coloro che si prendevano cura dei cavalli) che se la spassano rotolandosi nel fieno con le belle ragazze, e così dimostrano la loro virilità con la capacità di procreare.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners dalla melodia gioiosa e allegra in sintonia con il testo

Alex Beaton (con un adorrrabile accento scozzese)

ASCOLTA The Quilty (svedesi con il cuore irlandese!)


CHORUS
The lark in the morning
she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy
she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy
he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing
over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,
she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing
then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home
from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green
and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble
all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”, this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks
they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice
how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,
-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble
all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass
a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy
as a prince or a king
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ritornello
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore
lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
I
O Roger l’aratore
è un ragazzo affascinante
fischiettando e cantando si avvicina laggiù all’ombra delle fronde
e s’incontra con la dolce Susan,
che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente
di tutti gli uccelli del cielo
II
Una sera tornando a casa
dalle taverne della città
essendo tutti i prati verdi
e l’erba essendo stata appena falciata
ebbi l’occasione di rotolare
in tutto il fieno appena tagliato
“Oh baciami ora o mai più amore”,
disse questa bella fanciulla.
III
Quando venti lunghe settimane
erano finite e passate
sua madre iniziò a notare
come lei si arrotondasse in vita
“E’ stato il bell’aratore”,
le disse la ragazza
“che ci fece cadere in tutto il fieno appena falciato.”
IV
Ecco alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che amano avere una graziosa fanciulla
seduta sulle ginocchia
con un boccale di buona e forte birra scura, fischiettate e cantate
perché un aratore è felice
proprio come un principe o un re

NOTE
1) L’allodola è un passerotto dal canto melodioso che risuona nell’aria fin dai primi giorni della primavera e già alle prime luci dell’alba; è un uccello terricolo che però una volta sicuro nel volo si innalza quasi verticalmente nell’alto del cielo lanciando una cascata di suoni simili a un crescendo musicale.
Poi, chiuse le ali, si lascia cadere come corpo morto fino a sfiorare la terra e subito risorge ricominciando a cantare. continua
2) blade= boy, termine usato nelle antiche ballate per indicare un abile spadaccino
3) il contasto dell’amoreggiamento è quello della stagione della fienagione, a partire da maggio, quando si andava a fare il fieno, cioè a tagliare l’erba alta con la falce, per metterla da parte come foraggio per il bestiame e gli animali da cortile. Mentre il taglio del fieno era un compito per lo più maschile, le donne e i fanciulli utilizzavano il rastrello per raccogliere l’erba in grossi mucchi, che venivano poi caricati sul carro mediante l’uso dei forconi. continua

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, dalla registrazione di Paddy Tunney di cui però abbiamo solo due strofe (I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), la versione più estesa viene dalla famiglia Copper del Sussex, ma Lisa modifica ulteriormente alcuni versi.

Trascrizione di Cattia Salto
I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may
(traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’allodola al mattino si alza dal nido
e fischietta e canta,con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
II
Roger l’aratore è un bel ragazzo
va fischiettando e cantando per quella verde radura
e s’incontra con  Susan dagli occhi scuri, che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente degli uccelli nel cielo
III
Una sera tornando a casa dalle taverne della città
con i prati verdi che erano tutti verdi e l’erba appena tagliata
lei si rotolò  nel  fieno appena falciato
“Amami adesso o mai più”, disse questa bella fanciulla.
IV
Quindi alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che prenderanno  una graziosa fanciulla per farla sedere sulle ginocchia
..
non c’è vita migliore di quella dell’aratore nel bel mese di Maggio

 

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Questa versione invece è stata collezionata da Ralph Vaughan Williams nel 1904 come ascoltata dalla signora Harriet Verrall di Monk’s Gate, Horsham nel Sussex, ma circolava già nei broadsides ottocenteschi e quindi riportata nel libro di Roy Palmer “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Entrata nel circuito della musica folk inglese negli anni ’60 è stata registrata nel 1971 dal gruppo inglese folk rock Steeleye Span con la voce di Maddy Prior.

Il ritornello è simile a quello della versione precedente, ma qui la situazione è ancora più pastorale e quasi shakespeariana con la pastorella e l’aratore che sono sorpresi dal canto mattutino dell’allodola ma con le parti invertite: lui che dice a lei di restare ancora tra le sue braccia, perché c’è ancora la rugiada della sera, ma lei gli risponde che il sole ormai risplende e anche l’allodola si è alzata in volo. Il nome del contadinello è Floro e deriva dal latino Fiore.

Steeleye Span in Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior nel Cd “Arthur The King” – 2001


I
“Lay still my fond shepherd
and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love
and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro
and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro,
it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining
and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning
she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air
with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy
she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return
to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done
all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows
where the grass is all cut down.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Giaci ancora mia appassionata pastorella e non alzarti
è una bella mattina fresca ma, amore mio, c’è la rugiada”
“Non è poi così umido, amore mio,
e nemmeno così freddo,
mi alzerò mio amato Fiore
e andrò via con il gregge.
Oh no mio bel Fiore,
non è cosa da niente
c’è il sole luminoso che risplende
e l’allodola è in  volo”
II
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e s’innalza in aria
con la rugiada sul petto
e come il bell’aratore
lei fischietterà e canterà
e la sera ritornerà
di nuovo nel suo nido
Quando l’aratore ha fatto
tutto quanto doveva fare (1),
balla nei prati
dove l’erba è tutta falciata.

NOTE
1) frase a doppio senso: arare il campo ma anche arare una fanciulla compiacente

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

La melodia “Lark in the morning” è una jig per lo più eseguita con il banjo o il bouzouki o il mandolino o la chitarra, ma anche con le pipes, i whistles o i flutes, i fiddles..
Un aneddoto riportato da Peter Cooper racconta che due violinisti si erano sfidati una sera per vedere chi fosse il migliore, solo all’alba nel sentire il canto dell’allodola, convennero che la musica più dolce fosse quella dell’allodola del mattino. Stessa storiella raccontata dal piper Seamus Ennis ma con la melodia The Lark’s March

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely alla uilleann pipes accompagnato alla chitarra da Alan Murray

Peter Browne alla uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

FONTI
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62