Archivi tag: Hulton Clint

The Saucy Sailor Boy

Leggi in italiano

The nineteenth-century image of sailor is rather stereotypical: Jack Tar is a drunkard and a womanizer, perhaps a slacker and troublemaker, always ready to fight.
In sea songs from the female point of view sailor is often an unfaithful liar who has a girlfriend in every port even if he has a wife and children at home. Ridiculed and rejected by some, he is instead sought by others who absolutely prefer the love of a sailor (Sailor laddie)!
Sailor is watched more often with distrust by women, as in the sea song entitled “The Saucy Sailor Boy” where a young “saucy” sailor courts a country girl: it’s a “love contrast” that fits in a long popular tradition of bucolic argument, in which a man and a woman duet with amorous skirmishes; generally woman refuses man’s proposals, to preserve her virtue or to better stimulate his desire; man, on the other hand, promises seas and mountains, as well as eternal love, riches and the certainty of a comfortable life, just to conquer the woman’s graces.
In Saucy Sailor, however, she rejects the sailor with ill grace, because his clothes still smell of tar; the music changes when sailor shows his money but it’s too late and sailor doesn’ t want  to marry her anymore!

SAILOR’S CLOTHES

Clothes of Poor Jack, a British sailor of the late eighteenth century, are anything but poor: he is wearing a popular variant of the knee-length trousers, a sort of very wide trouser skirt. He wears a black tall round hat, and his long hair is loose on his neck, a white shirt with a stiff collar and a red neckcloth; characteristic yellow double-breasted waistcoat with narrow vertical red stripes, and an elegant blue short jacket with a long row of white buttons; light blue socks and black shoes with a beautiful metal buckles.

Poor Jack, Charles Dibdin, 1790-1791, British Museum.

But sailors like all the workers and men of the people also wore long trousers which became a standard of men’s clothing after the French revolution.

THE SAUCY SAILOR BOY

Text is found in many nineteenth-century collections and broadside especially in Great Britain and America, and probably it has eighteenth-century origins (William Alexander Barret in his “English Folksong” published in 1891 believes that this song appeared in print in 1781 and he cites its great popularity among girls who work in Eastern London factories.
The Tarry Sailor from trad archives (Andrew Robbie of Strichen, Aberdeenshire)  
Quadriga consort: early-music version
Harbottle & Jonas (from Cornwall): a swing version

Steeleye Span from Below the Salt, 1972 ( I, and from III to VIII): standard version in the repertoires of singers and folk groups

Wailin Jennys 

SAUCY SAILOR BOY
I
“Come, my dearest, come, my fairest,
Come and tell unto me,
Will you pity (fancy) a poor sailor boy,
Who has just come from sea?”
II
“I can fancy no poor sailor:
No poor sailor for me!
For to cross the wide ocean
Is a terror to me.
III
You are ragged, love, you are dirty, love,/And your clothes they smell of tar./So begone, you saucy sailor boy,
So begone, you Jack Tar(1)!”
IV
“If I’m ragged, love, if I’m dirty, love,
If my clothes they smell (much) of tar,
I have silver in my pocket, love,
And of gold a bright (great) store.”
V (2)
When she heard those words come from him, On her bended knees she fell./”To be sure, I’ll wed my sailor,
For I love him so well.”
VI
“Do you think that I am foolish?
Do you think that I am mad?
That I’d wed with a poor country girl
Where no fortune’s to be had?
VII
I will cross the briny ocean/Where the meadows they are green (3);
Since you have had the offer, love,
Another shall have the ring.
VIII
For I’m young, love, and I’m frolicksome, (4)
I’m good-temper’d, kind and free.
And I don’t care a straw (5), love,
What the world says (thinks)of me.

NOTES
1) Jack Tar is a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. Seamen were known to ‘tar’ their clothes before departing on voyages, in order to make them waterproof, in the eighteenth century they were usually used to tar their long hair in a ponytail to prevent it from getting wet or that the wind ruffled it
2)  Steeleye Span :
And then when she heard him say so
On her bended knees she fell,
“I will marry my dear Henry
For I love a sailor lad so well.”
3) Steeleye Span: I will whistle and sing
4) Steeleye Span :
Oh, I am frolicsome and I am easy,
Good tempered and free,
5) or “I don’t give a single pin”

SEA SHANTY VERSION: The Tarry Sailor

Stan Hugill in his Shantyman Bible (Shanties from the Seven Seas) tells us that The Tarry Sailor (Saucy Sailor Boy) in addition to being a forebitter song was occasionally sung during the boring hours of pumping water from the bilge when the pumps were operated by hand!  (see sea shanty)

Hulton Clint 

THE TARRY SAILOR
I
Come on my fair ones,
Come on my fan ones,
Come and listen unto me.
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
II
No, indeed, I’ll wed no sailor
For they smell too much of tar!
You are ruggy, you are sassy,
get you gone Jackie Tar.
III
I have ship on all the ocean,
I have golden great galore
All my clothes they may be all in rags,
but coin can buy me more
IV
If I am ruggy, if I am sassy
And may by a tarry smell
I had silver in my pockets
For they knew can every tell
V
When she heard him that distressed
down upon her knees she fell
Saying “Ruggy dirty saylor boy
I love more than you can tell”
VI
Do you think that I’m foolish,
Do you think that I’m mad?
That I’d wed the likes of you, Miss,
When there’s others to be had!”
VII
No indeed I’ll cross the ocean,
And my ships shall spread her wings,
You refused me, ragged, dirty,
Not for you the wedding ring.

Scottish sailors were excellent dancers and part of their training consisted of practicing Sailor’s Hornpipe


second part

LINK
https://www.britishtars.com/2014/01/poor-jack-1790-91.html
https://www.mun.ca/mha/mlc/articles/introducing-merchant-seafaring/jack-tar.php
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/saucysailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=133473
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16440

Dan Dan, sea shanty

Dan Dan è un sea shanty riportato da Stan Hugill che dice di averlo appreso dall’amico marinaio Barbados Harding, un canto utilizzato come hauling shanty o per lo scarico delle merci, diffuso nelle isole caraibiche e più in generale nelle Indie Occidentali.
Dalle ricerche di Hulton Clint apprendiamo che lo chanty “Dan Dan Oh” riportato da Roger D. Abrahams nel suo “Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore” (1974) ha un testo correlato. Il canto era tipico dei balenieri quando trascinavano la carcassa della balena sulla spiaggia.

ASCOLTA David Thomas in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint sulla versione di Stan Hugill

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint sulla versione di Roger D. Abrahams


My name, it is Dan Dan
My name, it is Dan Dan
Somebody stole my rum
He didn’t leave me none
That no good son of a gun
My name, it is Dan Dan
A sailor man I am
Somebody took my wife
Somebody took my knife
My name, it is Dan Dan
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
qualcuno mi ha fregato il rum
e non mi ha lasciato niente
quel figlio di buona donna!
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
e sono un marinaio
qualcuno mi ha preso la moglie
qualcuno mi ha preso il coltello
Il mio nome è Dan Dan

CONGO RIVER

Blow Bullies Blow, conosciuta anche con il titolo di “Blow boys blow”, “The Yankee Clipper” e “Congo River” è un canto marinaresco (sea shanty) classificabile sostanzialmente in due principali filoni testuali.
(Versione Yankee Clipper)

CLIPPER: nave a vela, con spiccate attitudini per la velocità (arrivavano anche a 18 nodi), usata tra gli anni venti e la fine del XIX secolo, per lunghi percorsi con carichi pregiati (tè con la Cina, lana con l’Australia, passeggeri come postali) clipper packets — i postali che con regolarità attraversavano l’oceano atlantico —in particolare i Black Baller , i postali della American Black Ball line, che derivava il nome dalla sua bandiera rossa con un disco nero al centro. Erano navi molto veloci e il percorso dall’Inghilterra all’America (tratta Liverpool – New York), per lo più contro vento, durava quattro settimane, mentre il ritorno, con il vento a favore, poteva durare meno di tre settimane. Il nome “packet” deriva dal fatto che i clipper svolgevano la funzione di “postini” ovvero trasportavano la corrispondenza tra le due sponde dell’Atlantico o anche tra Inghilterra-Australia (altro continente pieno di coloni inglesi, scozzesi e irlandesi)
“Nasceva così, intorno al 1820, un nuovo tipo di veliero che tradizionalmente si pone nelle coste nordorientali degli Stati Uniti d’America, nazione giovane e dinami­ca ben diversa dal mondo conservatore e consuetudinario inglese. Trattavasi di una nave ancora piccola, a due alberi, detta BALTIMORE CLIPPER perché nata a Baltimora, caratterizzata da forme di scafo molto stellate e molta vela, agile, manovriera e sopra tutto veloce. Buona pertanto al contrabbando e al trasporto di schiavi, perfino pirata.” (tratto da qui)

VERSIONE CONGO RIVER

Tra le merci pregiate imbarcate nei clipper c’erano anche gli schiavi africani, la tratta degli schiavi infatti perdurò ancora per buona parte dell’Ottocento (grosso modo un margine temporale tra il 1500 e il 1850), nonostante l’embargo inglese, e cessò con la spartizione dell’Africa in colonie. La prima nazione ad abolire lo schiavismo e a contrastare la tratta degli schiavi fu l’Inghilterra (per la verità la Francia rivoluzionaria rese liberi anche i neri, ma Napoleone ristabilì la schiavitù nelle colonie francesi).

slave-tradeLa tratta degli schiavi coinvolse tutta la costa atlantica  dell’Africa ma in particolare si concentrò nel territorio intorno alle foci del fiume Congo (si stima che da qui partirono quattro milioni di persone, circa un terzo del totale).  Portoghesi, inglesi, francesi e olandesi erano i mercanti principali, ma a dare una mano per le razzie nell’entroterra erano le stesse tribù africane in perenne lotta tra di loro. E il fiume Congo era un ottimo tracciato che attraversava la foresta vergine fino al mercato di Kinshasa, a trecento kilometri dalla costa.

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brotheres & Tommy Makem in Sing of the Sea 1968 (testo più esteso qui)

ASCOLTA The 97th Regimental String Band

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint variante proveniente da una fonte caraibica (in Folklore and the Sea di Horace Beck)
ASCOLTA Ivan Houston (una interpretazione decisamente caraibica)


I
Oh was you ever on the Congo River Blow, boys, blow!
Black fever makes the white man shiver
Blow, me bully boys, blow!
A Yankee ship came down the river
Her masts and yards they shone like silver
Chorus:
And blow me boys and blow forever
Blow, boys, blow!
Aye, blow me down the Congo River
Blow, me bullyboys, blow!
II
What do think she had for cargo
Why, black sheep that had run the embargo
And what do you think they had for dinner?
Why a monkey’s heart and a donkey´s liver.
III
Yonder comes the Arrow packet
She fires her guns can´t you hear the racket?
Who do you think was the skipper of her?
Why, Bully Hayes, the sailor lover
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Siete mai stati sul fiume Congo?
forza, ragazzi, forza!
Le febbre nera fa tremare gli uomini bianchi.
forza, miei bravacci, forza
Una nave yankee (1) discende il fiume,
albero e pennoni brillano come l’argento.
CORO
E forza (2), miei ragazzi, forza per sempre, forza, ragazzi, colpite!
Si, buttatemi giù nel fiume Congo
forza, miei bravacci, colpite!
II
Quale pensate che sia il suo carico?
Beh, sono pecore nere (3), sfuggite all’embargo.
E cosa pensate che abbiano mangiato a pranzo?
Beh, code di scimmia e fegato di manzo (4).
III
Da lontano arriva il postale Arrow (5),
spara i suoi cannoni non senti il baccano?
Chi pensate che sia il suo capitano?
Beh, Bully Hayes (6)  il beniamino dei marinai(7)!

NOTE
1) la Terra Yankee corrisponde alla Nuova Inghilterra, e yankees sono detti i suoi abitanti. Sembra che il termine sia la corruzione indiana del francese anglais.
2) il verbo to blow significa sia colpire che soffiare; ci si aspetterebbe un “pull” o “haul” ma trattandosi di velature potrebbe essere un incitazione perchè si alzi il vento. Ma anche nel significato di colpire, come monito della dura disciplina che vigeva sulle navi. Del resto in termino colloquiali anche in italiano “suonargliele” a qualcuno significa picchiarlo per bene!
3) il carico di “pecore nere” sta per gli schiavi africani deportati verso le Americhe.
4) il menù varia elencando cibo altrettanto insolito: “monkey’s arse and a sandfly’s liver”
5) clipper packets — i postali che con regolarità attraversavano l’oceano atlantico
6) il soprannome di Bully dato al capitano è da intendersi qui nel significato negativo di bullo, persona prepotente e crudele, non per niente era conosciuto come “Bully Hayes, the Down East bucko.” 
7) appellativo da intendersi in senso ironico “colui che è amato dai marinai” è ovviamente il più detestato

FONTI
Congo di David van Reybrouck
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17461
http://research.culturalequity.org/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=27276
http://anitra.net/chanteys/blow.html

HANDY ME BOYS

shanty_ballad“Be handy” è un espressione tipica nelle canzoni marinaresche (sea shanty): letteralmente si traduce in italiano come “essere a portata di mano” C’è anche una lieve di allusione sessuale. Possibili significati: rendersi utile ma anche trovarsi a portata di mano (come in handy), Charley Noble su Mudcat suggerisce “clever” o “nimble” piuttosto che “friendly” (ovvero in italiano amichevole, disponibile) Oh il fascino della traduzione si potrebbe stare delle ore per cercare di cogliere le sfumature!! La canzone è un tipico esempio delle composizioni improvvisate dallo shantyman, basate su “cliché verses of chanteying”

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint

ASCOLTA Tom Sullivan

ASCOLTA Assasin’s Creed

Why can’t ye be so handy-o!
Handy, me boys, so handy!
Oh, aloft this yard(1) must go.
Ooh! Up aloft from down below.
Growl ye may, but go ye must.
Growl too much an yer head they’ll bust.(2)
Oh, a bully ship an’ a bully crew.
Oh, we’re the gang for the kick’er through(3).
Yer advance has gone, yer at sea again.
Hey, bound round the horn through the hail an’ rain.
Sing an’ haul, an’ haul an’ sing.
Up aloft this yard we’ll swing.
Up aloft that yard must go.
For we are outward bound(4), ye know.
A handy ship an’ a handy crew.
A handy Mate(5) an Old Man too.

NOTE
1) yard= pennone; è l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge le vele e prende il nome dalla relativa vela. Per le manovre i marinai si assiepano sui pennoni come uccellini sui fili della luce (assolutamente vietato per coloro che soffrono di vertigini!)
2) “se brontoli troppo la tua testa scoppierà”
3) son un po’ perplessa sul significato probabilmente si tratta di un refuso
4) letteralmente diretti verso l’esterno
5) in questo caso lo shantyman sta facendo dell’ironia, il significato di “alla mano” diventa “manesco”, cioè uno che picchia forte per futili motivi

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Perchè non siete così alla mano, (alla mano ragazzi, così alla mano)? In alto questo pennone deve andare. Ooh! Su in alto da giù in basso, puoi ringhiare, ma devi andare, ringhia troppo e loro ti spaccheranno la faccia(2). Oh una nave cazzuta e un equipaggio cazzuto. Siamo la ganga per il calcio d’inizio, la paga è andata e di nuovo in mare. Ehi diretto per Capo Horn con la grandine e la pioggia, canta e tira, tira e canta In alto questo pennone faremo oscillare, in alto questo pennone deve andare perchè siamo fuori si sa, una nave alla mano e un equipaggio alla mano, un primo ufficiale alla mano e anche un Capitano

COASTS OF HIGH BARBARY

The George Aloe and the Sweepstake o (The Coasts of) High Barbary è considerata sia una sea shanty che una ballata (Child ballad #285) e di certo la sua versione originale è molto antica e probabilmente cinquecentesca. Così’ nella commedia seicentesca  “The Two Noble Kinsmen” leggiamo: “The George Alow came from the south, From the coast of Barbary-a; And there he met with brave gallants of war, By one, by two, by three-a. Well hail’d, well hail’d, you jolly gallants! And whither now are you bound-a? O let me have your company”

French_ship_under_atack_by_barbary_pirates

CORSARI BARBARESCHI

I pirati musulmani delle coste africane provenivano da quella che gli europei chiamavano Barberia (in inglese Barbary e in francese Côte des Barbaresques) ovvero Algeria Tunisia, Libia, Marocco (e più precisamente le città-stato di Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli, ma anche i porti di Salè e Tetuan). La definizione più corretta è corsari barbareschi perchè assalivano solo le navi dell’Europa cristiana (compiendo inoltre razzie anche nei paesi cristiani della costa atlantica e del mediterraneo per procacciare schiavi o per ottenere lauti riscatti). Nel termine barbareschi si comprendevano arabi, berberi, turchi nonché i rinnegati europei. “I più attivi e organizzati corsari musulmani furono quelli con base nelle città costiere del Maghreb, soprattutto Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli. Con i loro entroterra, queste città costituivano degli stati corsari pressoché indipendenti dal lontano potere dei sultani di Istanbul. La pirateria contro i cristiani era una lucrosa attività (da non dimenticare il commercio o il riscatto degli schiavi catturati) perfettamente legale, spesso incoraggiata dagli stessi sultani ottomani, specialmente quando questi erano in guerra contro paesi cristiani. Nonostante varie spedizioni punitive da parte di Stati europei e persino dei neonati Stati Uniti d’America (contro Tripoli), l’attività corsara delle reggenze maghrebine (talvolta con strane, ma non troppo, alleanze come ad esempio quella con la Francia) continuò per alcuni secoli”. (tratto da qui)
Nell’affare c’erano anche per buona misura i corsari cristiani, che compivano uguali razzie lungo le coste della Barberia (principalmente gli ordini cavallereschi e marinari dei Cavalieri di Malta e dei Cavalieri di Santo Stefano, ma ovviamente in questi casi si parlava di “crociata” e non di pirateria!!) “Se per le reggenze di Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli il prigioniero valeva essenzialmente il riscatto per i cristiani, invece, i prigionieri diventavano “schiavi” maghrebini – che raramente venivano richiesti indietro – i quali diventavano oggetto di commercio interno e venivano impegnati nel servizio pubblico (ad esempio come rematori sulle galere) o in ambito domestico (specie le donne), e particolarmente rilevante è il fenomeno degli schiavi africani utilizzati in Sicilia tra la fine del Quattrocento e l’inizio del Cinquecento per il lavoro nei campi. Da qui il famoso detto “Cu pigghia un turcu, è sou” (Chi arraffa un turco ne diventa proprietario) che fa da controcanto al più famoso “Mamma li turchi!” (Aiuto, arrivano i turchi!)”. (tratto da qui)

Per quanto le attività piratesche fossero endemiche nel Mar Mediterraneo il periodo di massima attività dei corsari barbareschi fu la prima metà del 1600.

PRIMA VERSIONE
Stan Hugill nella bibbia “Shanties From The Seven Seas” riporta due melodie una più antica quando la canzone era una forebitter e una più veloce come canto marinaresco (capstan chantey).
La versione più antica della ballata racconta di due navi mercantili The George Aloe, e The Sweepstake con la George Aloe che vendica l’affondamento della seconda nave usando la stessa “cortesia” alla ciurma delle nave pirata francese la quale aveva gettato in mare l’equipaggio della Sweepstake.

ASCOLTA Pete Seeger

There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low(1)
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin’ down the coast
Of High Barbary
“Aloft there, aloft there”
Our jolly bosun cried
“Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an’ a-lee”
“There’s naught upon the stern, sir
There’s naught upon our lee
But there’s a lofty ship to wind’ard
An’ she’s sailin’ fast and free”
“Oh hail her, oh hail her”
Our gallant captain cried
“Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?” cried he
“Oh, I’m not a man-o-war
Nor privateer,” said he
“But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee”
For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
‘Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate’s mast away
“Oh quarter, oh quarter”
Those pirates they did cry
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank ‘em in the sea
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano due alteri  vascelli
provenienti dalla vecchia Inghilterra, (tira(1) forte, tira piano
che così salpiamo
)
Uno era il “Prince of Luther”
e l’altro il “Prince of Wales”,
entrambi a farsi un giretto per le coste della Barberia.
“A riva là
– il nostromo gridò –
guarda avanti, guarda a poppa,
guarda al tempo sottovento!”
“Non c’è niente a poppa, signore,
non c’è niente sottovento
ma c’è un vascello a sopravvento
e naviga veloce e spedito.”
“Maledizione
– il nostro capitano gridò –
siete un militare
o un corsaro?”
“Non sono un militare
e nemmeno un corsaro – disse lui –
ma sono un pirata del mare
in cerca del mio compenso”
Siamo stati a sparare bordate
per molto tempo
finchè alla fine la Prince od Luther
colpì l’albero maestro dei pirati “Mercede”
– gridarono quei pirati –
ma la grazia che gli demmo
fu di affondarli in mare

NOTE
1) il verbo to blow significa sia colpire che soffiare; ci si aspetterebbe un “pull” o “haul” ma il significato resta quello di “tira”

SECONDA VERSIONE
La ballata riprende popolarità negli anni tra il 1795 e il 1815 in concomitanza degli attacchi dei corsari barbareschi alle navi americane.

ASCOLTA Tom Kines in “Songs from Shakespeare´s Plays and Songs of His Time”,1960 un versione di come era cantata in epoca elisabettiana

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed Black Flag in versione sea shanty

ASCOLTA in versione sea shanty più estesa

ASCOLTA Joseph Arthur in  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006 (biografia e dischi qui) in versione rock

“Look ahead, look-astern
Look the weather in the lee!”
Blow high! Blow low!
And so sailed we.

“I see a wreck to windward,
And a lofty ship to lee!
A-sailing down along
The coast of High Barbary”
“O, are you a pirate
Or a man o’ war?” cried we.
“O no! I’m not a pirate
But a man-o-war,” cried he.
“We’ll back up our topsails
And heave vessel to.
For we have got some letters
To be carried home by you”. (2)
For broadside, for broadside
They fought all on the main;
Until at last the frigate
Shot the pirate’s mast away.
“For quarter, for quarter”,
the saucy pirates cried
But the quarter that we showed them
was to sink them in the tide
With cutlass and gun,
O we fought for hours three;
The ship it was their coffin
And their grave it was the sea
But O! ‘Twas a cruel sight,
and grieved us, full sore,
To see them all a drownin’
as they tried to swim to shore
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
“Guarda avanti, guarda a poppa,
guarda al tempo sottovento!”
(tira forte, tira piano
che così siamo salpati)
“Vedo un relitto a sopravvento
e una nave altera  sottovento
che naviga lungo
la costa di Barberia.”
“Siete un militare
o un pirata?”
“Non sono un pirata
ma un soldato” – disse lui “Ammaineremo le vele
per l’abbordaggio
perchè abbiamo delle lettere da farvi portare a casa”(2)
A bordate
si combatterono tutti sul mare
finchè alla fine la fregata
colpì l’albero maestro dei pirati “Mercede”
– gridarono quei pirati –
ma la grazia che gli demmo
fu di affondarli in mare.
Con sciabola e pistola
ci siamo battuti per tre ore
e la nave divenne la loro bara
e il mare la loro tomba.
Fu uno spettacolo crudele
che ci addolorò tanto
vedere il loro annegamento
mentre cercavano di nuotare fino alla riva.

NOTE
2) I pirati usano l’inganno per l’abbordaggio

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/barbary.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=137331 https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/barbaree.html http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/barbareschi.htm http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/pirati.htm
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_285

LEAVING OF LIVERPOOL

Il tema generale è un topico delle canzoni del mare, un uomo imbarcatosi come marinaio, lascia la città di Liverpool e dice addio alla sua ragazza sperando di ritornare presto da lei, già sapendo che soffrirà di nostalgia per la lontananza. Curiosamente sebbene sia stata molto famosa negli anni 60 durante il folk revival, la canzone non era un brano “popolare”, infatti nella tradizione orale si conoscono solo due distinte versioni, entrambe a cura di William Main Doerflinger (1910-2000) dalle voci di due marinai di New York city ormai in pensione: Richard Maitland e Patrick Tayluer (anni 1940).

La versione “Maitland” diffusa in Inghilterra, Irlanda e America deve la sua popolarità nel circuito folk alla trascrizione di Doerflinger che la pubblicò nel suo poderoso “Shantymen and Shantyboys” (1951).
Così scrive A.L. Lloyd (in Sailor’s garland 1962) “W. Doerflinger got this nostalgic song from a well-known shanty singer, ‘Captain’ Dick Maitland, who learnt it from a Liverpool man when he was bosun on the General Knox about 1885. It seemed to have disappeared from its own home town, but since Doerflinger printed it, it has taken a new lease of life, and is now not infrequently heard in the city folk song clubs.”
Tutto quello che si vorrebbe sapere sulla canzone è stato scritto da Stephen D.Winck nell’articolo “Sung With Gusto by the Men”:A Unique Recording of“The Leaving of Liverpool”in the AFC Archive” (in Folklife center news vol 30) in cui vengono riportate integralmente entrambi le versioni.

La diffusione della canzone nel circuito folk ha Louis Kelly come tramite per i Clancy Brothers e i Dubliners (la prima registrazione è quella di Ewan MacColl in Sailor’s garland 1962), lo stesso Bob Dylan, nel 1963, ne fece una rielaborazione testuale (stessa melodia) e la registrò con il titolo “Farewell” (la versione ha il copyright sebbene sia etichettata come A Bob Dylan rewrite of a traditional song). Siccome la canzone è stata interpretata da molti gruppi irlandesi alcuni ritengono che sia di origini irlandesi e che si stia parlando di un emigrante imbarcato sulla nave alla volta della California in cerca di fortuna (Golden Rush) e tuttavia la versione “Maitland” descrive più propriamente un marinaio imbarcato per lavoro su un american clipper.
Altri fanno notare la somiglianza della melodia con il brano irlandese “The Leaving of Limerick” che però è suonato in modo più meditativo. Per alcuni la melodia suonata più velocemente non è adatta al tema accorato dell’addio, tralasciando però che è il “mood” generale a trasmettere l’emozione più che il ritmo.

Ascoltiamo per prima la versione sea song che nella versione “Maitland” più che uno shanty era una tipica “forebitter” cioè un canto da “dopolavoro”
ASCOLTA Hulton Clint che riprende i versi e la sequenza della versione “Maitland”: IA, IIA, VA, IIIA, IVA, VIA, VIIA. L’accento è sul dolore della separazione dalla fidanzata e solo pochi cenni sono per la città di Liverpool

Date le premesse le variazioni testuali sono minime, e qui si propone un confronto tra le versioni dei gruppi anni 60-70 e quelle più recenti
ASCOLTA Dubliners (IA, IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA) versione 1964, con vecchie immagini di Liverpool

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers (IB, IIIA, IVA, VB): si devono molto probabilmente a loro le variazioni testuali della I^ e della V^ strofa che levano i riferimenti specifici alla località di Liverpool come l’attracco al molo, il fiume Mesery, le strade e Park Lane
ASCOLTA Spinner 1966 (IA, IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA)
ASCOLTA Pogues -e Shane MacGowan da giovane in Red Roses for Me 1984 (IB, IIIA, IVA, VB)

Ecco che alcune delle versione più recenti danno un’ulteriore accelerazione al ritmo dopo la versione Pogues, come i Gaelic Storm (che di solito tendono a mettere una marcia in più alle loro versioni) e i Young Dubliners in versione bluegrass
ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm in Special Reserve 2003 (IA, IIIA, IVA, VB)
ASCOLTA Young Dubliners in With All Due Respect – The Irish Sessions 2007 (IA, IIIA, VB) la versione con meno testo per lasciare molto spazio agli strumentali
ASCOLTA High Kings in Memory Lane 2010 (IA, IIIA, IVA, VB): con il loro consueto “stile” mixano malinconia e ritmo per una perfetta drinking song
ASCOLTA Shane MacGowan in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 (IA, IIA, IVA, VB) la versione più rockettara con una voce molto roca e l’intonazione da “sballato” di Shane (che alcuni critici hanno definito “da vecchio marinaio” a gruff sailors’ accent so authentic that it’s nearly incomprehensible -RollingStone) una voce da disperato!

IA
Fare thee well to Prince’s Landing Stage(1) River Mersey, fare thee well
I am bound for California
A place that I know right well
IB
Fare thee well to you, my own true love,
There were many fare thee wells
I am bound for California,
A place that I know right well (2)
CHORUS
So fare thee well, my own true love, (For) when I return, united we will be, It’s not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me,
But my darling when I think of thee
IIA
I’m bound to California
By way of the stormy Cape Horn. And I’ll write to you a letter, my love,
When I am homeward bound.
IIIA
I have bound(3) on the Yankee clipper ship Davy Crockett(4) is her name
And Burgess is the Captain of her(5) And they say that she’s a floating hell
IVA
Now I have sailed with (this) Burgess once before(6)
And I think that I know him (right) well if a man is a sailor, he can get along if not, (then) he’s sure in hell(7).
VA
Fare-well Lower Frederick Street, Anson Terrace, and Park Lane(8);  think it will be some long time(9) Before I see you again.
VB
Oh the sun(10) is on the harbour, love, And I wish I could remain,
For I know that it will be a long, long time,
Before I see you again
VIA
The tug is waiting at the pierhead
To take us down the stream.
Our sails are loose and our anchor secure,
So I’ll bid you good-bye once more.
VIIA
Oh I am bound away to leave you, Goodbye, my love, goodbye.
And there’s but one thing that grieves my mind
And it’s leaving you behind.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
IA
Addio Prince’s Landing Stage (1),
fiume Mesery, addio
mi tocca andare in California
un posto che conosco bene
IB
addio mio caro vero amore
mille volte addio
mi tocca andare in California
un posto che conosco bene (2)
CORO
allora ti saluto amore mio
quando ritornerò ci sposeremo,
non è partire da Liverpool che mi rattrista piuttosto,
mia cara, quando penso a te
IIA
Vado in California,
passando per il tempestoso Cape Horne
e ti scriverò una lettera, amore
quando sarò sulla via del ritorno
IIIA
Mi sono arruolato (3) su un veliero americano
che si chiama Davy Crockett (4)
e Burgess è il suo capitano (5)
e dicono che sia
un inferno galleggiante
IVA
Ho già navigato con Burgess altre volte (6)
e penso ormai di conoscerlo bene
se uno e’ un vero marinaio
se la cava altrimenti
e’ un vero inferno (7)
VA
Addio Lower Frederick Street,
Anson Terrace, e Park Lane (8)
perchè sò che passera proprio tanto tempo (9) prima che ti rivedrò di nuovo
VB
Ora il sole (10) e’ nella baia,
amore vorrei poter restare
perchè sò che passera proprio tanto, tanto tempo (9) prima che ti rivedrò di nuovo

VIA
Il rimorchiatore è in attesa al molo
per portarci verso la corrente,
le nostre vele sono sciolte e l’ancora alzata,
così ti dirò addio ancora una volta
VIIA
Mi tocca lasciarti
Addio amore, addio
c’è una sola cosa tuttavia che mi addolora
ed è lasciarti alle mie spalle

NOTE
1) Liverpool era un porto molto importante nel XIX secolo per le navi passeggeri con scalo in varie località americane. Prince’s Landing Stage è il nome della piattaforma costruita appositamente per far imbarcare i passeggeri che emigravano per l’America. La linea ferroviaria arrivava fino alla piattaforma
2) variante: “But I know that I’ll return someday” (in italiano=ma so che ritornerò un giorno)
3) anche scritto come “I am signed” oppure “I’ve shipped”: l’uomo non è un emigrante in cerca di fortuna in California ma un marinaio che si è imbarcato per lavoro su un clipper americano
clipper-davy-crockett4) “The three-skysail-yarder David Crockett of New York [is] the ship mentioned in this song. Her figurehead now hangs in the Marine Museum at Mystic, Connecticut, where she went down the ways in 1853. The David Crockett often called at Liverpool on her passages homeward from California. It was in 1863 that she first arrived in the port while under command of Captain John A. Burgess of Massachusetts, her skipper for many years. In 1874, on what was to have been his last voyage before retiring from the sea, Captain Burgess was lost overboard in a storm in the South Atlantic.” (Doerflinger)
In realtà il David Crockett comandato da Burgess era un mercantile che svolgeva la tratta New York- San Francisco
5) anche “And her Captain’s name it is Burgess”
6) “It’s my second trip with Burgess in the Crockett”
7) “If he’s not then he’s sure to tell”
8) Le strade sono il cuore della vecchia Sailortown (Salthouse Dock)
9) I Dubliners dicono “I am bound away for to leave you and I’ll never see you again”
10) a volte anche “ship”

FONTI
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOSLeavLiv.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/theleavingofliverpool.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=66662
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/Doe104.html
http://www.loc.gov/folklife/news/pdf/FCN_Vol30_3-4optimized.pdf

ILLUSTRAZIONE
http://www.vickeryart.com/vickery/brochure/brochure1.html

LOWLANDS AWAY

“Lowland away” è un canto marinaresco (sea shanty) che si è ritenuto influenzato da una ballata tradizionale (alcuni ipotizzano del Border inglese per quelle Lowlands sia nel versante scozzese che inglese) ed è datato molto genericamente al XVII secolo. Ma il collegamento sembra essere più una “ricostruzione” letteraria di fine ottocento! (per i dettagli vedere qui ). E’ più probabile, dalle testimonianza rese sul campo, che il brano sia nato nell’ambito della cultura americana e afro-americana.

PRIMA VERSIONE: IL LAMENT DELLA SIRENA

mermaid-drowned-sailorLa donna sogna il suo marinaio, ma lo vede come un annegato, così lei si taglia i capelli e porta il lutto per la sua morte. Sebbene non sia espressamente citata l’immagine rievoca l’abbraccio fatale di una sirena!

Il canto è stato reso come una ballata dal ritmo fluido come il respiro, per dirla con le parole di W.L. Alden the song is the sighing of the wind and the throbbing of the restless ocean translated into melody” .. sospiro del vento e onde dell’oceano.

La versione dal film “Moby Dick” cantata da Ali Darragh



ASCOLTA
Rufus Wainwright & Kate McGarrigle in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & chanteys, ANTI 2006

ASCOLTA Anne Briggs


I dreamed a dream the other night,
Lowlands, lowlands away, my John(1),
I dreamed a dream the other night,
My lowlands away.
I dreamed I saw my own true love,
I dreamed I saw my own true love,
He was green and wet with weeds so cold,
He was green and wet with weeds so cold,
I’ll cut away my bonny hair,
For no other man shall think me fair,
For my love lies drowned in the windy lowlands,
For my love lies drowned in the windy lowlands(2
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ho fatto un sogno l’altra notte
Lowlands, Lowands lontane, mio John(1)
Ho fatto un sogno l’altra notte
mie Lowlands lontane
Ho sognato di vedere il mio amore,
Ho sognato di vedere il mio amore
era verde e bagnato con alghe tanto fredde.
era verde e bagnato con alghe tanto fredde.
Ho tagliato i miei bei capelli
per nessun altro uomo mi farò bella perchè il mio amore giace annegato nelle pianure ventose.(2)

NOTE
1) la ciurma si una nave mercantile era detta in modo gergale “the Johns”, così in questo contesto my John può tradursi anche come “my lad”
2) nel Settecento-Ottocento con questo termine generico si indicavano le colonie olandesi, e più in generale molte terre e isole nelle Indie Occidentali, in questo contesto le terre basse diventano gli abissi del mare

SECONDA VERSIONE: IL LAMENT DEL MARINAIO

Qui è il marinaio a fare il sogno e vede la moglie vestita di bianco, ma il presagio è funesto perchè lei è morta.

ASCOLTA in una versione shanty dal film “Treasure Island” (inizia da 2:07)


VERSIONE in Stan Hugill
I
I dreamed a dream the other night,
(Ch: Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!)
I dreamed a dream the other night,
(Ch: Lowlands away!)
II
I dreamed my love came in my sleep,
Her eyes were wet, her eyes did weep.
III
She came to me as my best bride,
All dressed in white like some fair bride.
IV
An’ bravely in her bosom fair,
A red, red rose did my love wear.
V
She made no sound, no word she said,
An’ then I knew my love was dead.
VI
I bound the weeper round my head,
For now I knew my love was dead.
VII
An’ then awoke to hear the cry,
“Oh, watch on deck, oh, watch ahoy!”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ho fatto un sogno l’altra notte
Lowlands, Lowands lontane, mio John
Ho fatto un sogno l’altra notte
Lowlands lontane
II
Ho sognato che il mio amore veniva nel sonno,
gli occhi umidi di pianto
III
Veniva come la mia diletta sposa,
tutta vestita in bianco come una bella sposa
IV
E sul bel petto con orgoglio
una rosa, una rosa rossa portava il mio amore
V
Non fece alcun rumore, non disse una parola e allora seppi che il mio amore era morto
VI
Ho legato il fazzoletto intorno alla testa,
perchè adesso so che il mio amore è morto.
VII
E quando mi sono alzato ho sentito un grido “Guarda sul ponte, guarda!”

LA VERSIONE BLUES

Detta anche “My Dollar and a Half a Day” è la versione testuale più propriamente riscontrata sul campo. Anche la melodia è da intendersi in versione decisamente blues: sono in molti infatti a propendere per le influenze dei canti africani nelle sea shanties e in particolare i lamenti degli schiavi negri.

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint

Lowlands,
Lowlands,
 Away my John,
Lowlands, away,
 I heard them say,
My dollar and half a day.
A dollar half a day is a black man’s pay.
I thought I heard the old man(1) say
Oh a white man’s pay  is rather high
a black man’s pay is rather low
A dollar and half a day is a man low pay
A dollar and half a day want pay my way
Five dollars a day is a hugest pay
Five dollars a day is a hugest pay
Watch are we all a-screwing crew
We got no money and we can’t get home
I’ll pack my bag and I’ll bound away
I’ll bound away to Mobil Bay(2)
I’m bound away to Mobil Bay
We’re bound away at the break of day
Oh, was you never down Mobile Bay,
A-screwing cotton all the day
Oh heave her up and then we’ll go
Oh heave her up and then we’ll go
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Lowlands, Lowands lontane, mio John
li ho sentiti dire
il mio mezzo dollaro al giorno
Mezzo dollaro al giorno è la paga di un nero
la paga di un bianco è un po’ più alta
mezzo dollaro al giorno è una paga misera per un uomo, mi vogliono pagare un mezzo dollaro al giorno
Cinque dollari al giorno sono una paga più alta
guardaci siamo un equipaggio che stiva il cotone, non abbiamo soldi e non possiamo tornare a casa
prenderò la mia sacca e andò per mare
andrò a Mobile Bay
andrò a Mobile Bay
siamo in partenza all’alba
non sei mai stato a Mobile Bay
a caricare cotone tutto il giorno
la carichiamo e poi partiamo
la carichiamo e poi partiamo

NOTE
1) il capitano della nave
2) Mobile, città portuale dell’Alabama nel Golfo del Messico, già capitale della Louisiana francese. Mobile passò sotto il controllo britannico (Florida) e finì sotto il dominio spagnolo (dal 1780 al 1812) per poi diventare territorio degli Stati Uniti. “Tra il 1819 ed il 1822, con la creazione delle piantagioni, la popolazione aumentò a dismisura, inoltre, a favorire lo sviluppo cittadino vi era la sua posizione geografica, al centro delle tratte commerciali tra l’Alabama ed il Mississippi. Si sviluppò particolarmente il settore legato alla vendita ed al commercio del cotone, tanto che nel 1840, Mobile era seconda solo a New Orleans per esportazione del prezioso materiale.” (Wikipedia).

ASCOLTA Jeff Warner in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


Lowlands, lowlands hoora, my John
A dollar a day is a oozer’s pay (1),
(Lowlands, lowlands hoora, my John )
A dollar a day is a oozer’s pay,
(A dollar and a half a day)
A dollar a day is a black man’s pay
A dollar and a half is a shellback’s pay.
What shall we poor matelors do ?
What shall we poor matelors do ?
Was you ever in High keke (2)?
I’m bound around a bloody bay.
I thought I heard the old man say
that we would give a ??? today
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Lowlands, Lowands evviva, mio John
un dollaro al giorno è la paga di un ???
(Lowlands, Lowands evviva, mio John)
un dollaro al giorno è la paga di un ???
(mezzo dollaro al giorno)
Un dollaro al giorno è la paga di un nero, mezzo dollaro al giorno è la paga del marinaio.
Cosa possiamo fare noi poveri marinai?
Sei mai stato in ??
Sono diretto alla Bloody Bay
Credevo di aver sentito il vecchio dire
???

NOTE
1) scritto anche come Hoosier, nativo dello stato dell’Indiana
2) non capisco la pronuncia

FONTI
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/11/17-21-lowlands-away-my-dollar-and-half.html
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/PBB100.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/anne.briggs/songs/lowlands.html
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/11/17-21-lowlands-away-my-dollar-and-half.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm

http://www.jsward.com/shanty/lowlands/index.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=134132
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=123027

Saucy Sailor Boy Or Jack Tar In The Sea Shanty

Read the post in English

L’immagine ottocentesca del marinaio è piuttosto stereotipata: è Jack Tar, un ubriacone e donnaiolo, forse lavativo e piantagrane, sempre pronto a fare a pugni.
Nelle canzoni del mare dal punto di vista femminile il marinaio è spesso un bugiardo infedele che ha una ragazza in ogni porto anche se  tiene moglie e figli a casa. Ridicolizzato e respinto da alcune, è invece ricercato da altre che preferiscono in assoluto l’amore di un marinaio (vedi Sailor laddie)!
Il marinaio è guardato più spesso con diffidenza dalle donne, quando non proprio con disprezzo come nella sea song dal titolo “The Saucy Sailor Boy dove il giovane marinaio “insolente” corteggia una donna di campagna: assistiamo a quello che viene chiamato contrasto amoroso che si inserisce in una lunga tradizione popolare, per lo più di argomento bucolico, in cui un uomo e una donna duettano tra loro in una serie di schermaglie amorose; nel genere di questo filone poetico e/o canoro è sempre la donna a rifiutare le proposte dell’uomo, per preservare la sua virtù o per meglio stuzzicare l’appetito amoroso; l’uomo invece promette mari e monti, nonchè amore eterno, millanta ricchezze e la certezza di una vita agiata, pur di conquistare le grazie della donna.
In Saucy Sailor la donna però respinge il marinaio con mala grazia, perchè i suoi vestiti puzzano ancora di catrame; la musica cambia quando il marinaio tira fuori i soldi, così lei abbassa le sue arie da gran dama e gli promette di sposarlo; ora è la volta del marinaio a mostrarsi schizzinoso e a rifiutarla!

GLI ABITI DEL MARINAIO

I vestiti del Poor Jack, un marinaio britannico di fine Settecento sono tutt’altro che miseri: indossa una variante popolare delle braghe al ginocchio, una specie di gonna pantalone molto ampia. E’ probabile si tratti di una variante delle calzabraghe rinascimentali. Porta un cappello a cono nero con ampia falda, e ha i capelli lunghi sciolti sul collo, una camicia bianca dal colletto rigido  con una cravatta rossa annodata; caratteristico panciotto a doppio petto giallo a righine rosse, con una doppia fila di bottoni e un’elegante giacchetta corta blu con una lunga fila di bottoni bianchi; calze azzurrine e scarpe nere con una bella fibbia di metallo.

Poor Jack, Charles Dibdin, 1790-1791, British Museum.

Ma i marinai come tutti gli operai e gli uomini del popolo portavano i calzoni lunghi che diventarono uno standard dell’abbigliamento maschile dopo la rivoluzione francese.

THE SAUCY SAILOR BOY

Il testo si ritrova in molte collezioni ottocentesche e nei broadside soprattutto in Gran Bretagna e in America, e probabilmente ha origini settecentesche (William Alexander Barret nel suo “English Folksong” pubblicato nel 1891 ritiene che il brano sia comparso in stampa nel 1781 e cita la sua grande popolarità fra le ragazze che lavorano negli opicifi dell’Est London).
The Tarry Sailor dalle collezioni popolari (voce di Andrew Robbie di Strichen, Aberdeenshire)  
La versione più filologica è quella dei Quadriga consort
Quella più swing di Harbottle & Jonas (dalla Cornovaglia)

Steeleye Span in Below the Salt, 1972 (strofe I e da III a VIII), la versione che è diventata quella standard nei repertori dei cantanti e gruppi folk

Wailin Jennys 


I
“Come, my dearest, come, my fairest,
Come and tell unto me,
Will you pity (fancy) a poor sailor boy,
Who has just come from sea?”
II
“I can fancy no poor sailor:
No poor sailor for me!
For to cross the wide ocean
Is a terror to me.
III
You are ragged, love, you are dirty, love,/And your clothes they smell of tar./So begone, you saucy sailor boy,
So begone, you Jack Tar(1)!”
IV
“If I’m ragged, love, if I’m dirty, love,
If my clothes they smell (much) of tar,
I have silver in my pocket, love,
And of gold a bright (great) store.”
V (2)
When she heard those words come from him, On her bended knees she fell./”To be sure, I’ll wed my sailor,
For I love him so well.”
VI
“Do you think that I am foolish?
Do you think that I am mad?
That I’d wed with a poor country girl
Where no fortune’s to be had?
VII
I will cross the briny ocean/Where the meadows they are green (3);
Since you have had the offer, love,
Another shall have the ring.
VIII
For I’m young, love, and I’m frolicksome, (4)
I’m good-temper’d, kind and free.
And I don’t care a straw (5), love,
What the world says (thinks)of me.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Vieni mia cara, vieni mia bella
vieni e dimmi, ti potrebbe interessare un povero giovane marinaio,
appena arrivato dal mare?”
II LEI
“Non mi piace nessun povero marinaio,
nessun povero marinaio per me!
Perchè attraversare il vasto oceano
mi mette terrore
III LEI
Sei cencioso, cocco, e sporco,
i tuoi vestiti puzzano di catrame
così stai lontano, impertinente ragazzino, stai lontano Jack Tar(1)”
IV LUI
“Se sono cencioso, cara, e sporco
e i miei vestiti puzzano di catrame
ho argento nelle tasche, cara,
e oro in gran quantità”
V LEI
E allora quando lo sentì parlare così
sulle ginocchia piegate cadde
“Stanne certo, sposerò il mio marinaio
perchè lo amo così tanto”
VI LUI
“Credi che io sia scemo cara?
Credi che io sia pazzo?
A sposare una povera ragazza di campagna, dove non c’è fortuna da fare?
VII LUI
Attraverserò l’oceano salmastro
dove le terre sono verdi
e visto che tu hai rifiutato l’offerta, cara,
qualche altra ragazza porterà l’anello.
VIII LUI
Oh io sono giovane, cara
e un allegrone
di buon carattere, disponibile e libero
e non mi importa un fico secco, cara
di quello che il mondo pensa di me”

NOTE
1) Jack Tar è il termine comunemente usato, non necessariamente in senso dispregiativo, per indicare un marinaio delle navi mercantili o della Royal Navy. Probabilmente il termine è stato coniato nel 1600 alludendo al catrame (in inglese “tar”) con il quale i marinai impermeabilizzavano i loro abiti da lavoro. Erano anche soliti nel Settecento incatramare i capelli dopo averli racconti in una treccia o codino per impedire che si bagnassero e o che il vento li scompigliasse sul viso
2) la strofa negli Steeleye Span dice:
And then when she heard him say so
On her bended knees she fell,
“I will marry my dear Henry
For I love a sailor lad so well.”
3) vuol forse dire che il mare è come un prato verde? Negli Steeleye Span dice: I will whistle and sing
4) Negli Steeleye Span dice: Oh, I am frolicsome and I am easy,
Good tempered and free, (in italiano: Oh io sono uno allegro e disponibile,
di buon carattere e libero)
5) oppure “I don’t give a single pin” che è esattamente la stessa espressione

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY: The Tarry Sailor

Stan Hugill nella sua Bibbia degli Shantyman (Shanties from the Seven Seas) ci dice che la canzone The Tarry Sailor (Saucy Sailor Boy) oltre ad essere una forebitter song veniva occasionalmente cantata durante le noiose ore di pompaggio dell’acqua dalla sentina, quando le pompe si azionavano a mano! (vedere sea shanty)

Hulton Clint 

SAUCY SAILOR BOY
I
Come on my fair ones,
Come on my fan ones,
Come and listen unto me.
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
II
No, indeed, I’ll wed no sailor
For they smell too much of tar!
You are ruggy, you are sassy,
get you gone Jackie Tar.
III
I have ship on all the ocean,
I have golden great galore
All my clothes they may be all in rags,
but coin can buy me more
IV
If I am ruggy, if I am sassy
And may by a tarry smell
I had silver in my pockets
For they knew can every tell
V
When she heard him that distressed
down upon her knees she fell
Saying “Ruggy dirty saylor boy
I love more than you can tell”
VI
Do you think that I’m foolish,
Do you think that I’m mad?
That I’d wed the likes of you, Miss,
When there’s others to be had!”
VII
No indeed I’ll cross the ocean,
And my ships shall spread her wings,
You refused me, ragged, dirty,
Not for you the wedding ring.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Vieni mia bella,
vieni mia cara
vieni e dimmi, ti potrebbe interessare un povero giovane marinaio,
appena tornato a casa dal mare?”
Ti interesserebbe un povero giovane marinaio,  appena tornato a casa?”
II LEI
“No affatto, non sposerò nessun marinaio, perchè puzzano di catrame!
Sei cencioso, sei  sporco,
stai lontano Jack Tar”
III LUI
“Ho una nave sull’oceano
e ho una fortuna in oro;
i miei vestiti possono essere stracciati
ma i soldi ne possono comprare tanti
IV
“Se sono cencioso, se sono sporco
e se forse puzzo di catrame
ho argento nelle tasche,
perchè si sa quanto possa dire”
V LEI
Quando lo sentì così afflitto
cadde sulle ginocchia dicendo
“Cencioso e sporco marinaio
ti amo più di quanto tu possa dire”
VI LUI
“Credi che io sia scemo?
Credi che io sia pazzo?
A sposare una come te, signorina
quando ce ne sono altre da avere!
VII
Attraverserò l’oceano
e le mie navi dispiegheranno le vele
mi hai rifiutato, lacero e sporco
non è per te l’anello nunziale.”

I marinai scozzesi erano ottimi ballerini e parte del loro addestramento consisteva nell’esercitarsi nella Sailor’s Hornpipe


seconda parte

FONTI
https://www.britishtars.com/2014/01/poor-jack-1790-91.html
https://www.mun.ca/mha/mlc/articles/introducing-merchant-seafaring/jack-tar.php
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/saucysailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=133473
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16440

 

THE ROSABELLA SEA SHANTY

Una canzone marinaresca tipicamente inglese  (sea shanty) nota anche con il titolo “The Saucy Rosabella”. Del Rosabella si trova traccia tra gli anni 1837 e 1846 quando sembra che il vascello sia andato distrutto (o gravemente danneggiato) a Capo Cod (Massachusetts) nel 1846.

Ci sono tre registrazioni sul campo dalla voce di vecchi marinai, una collezionata da Cecil Sharpe nel 1914 dalla testimonianza di John Short e due da JM Carpenter 1928-9 (la prima dalla testimonianza di JS Scott e l’altra di John MaPherson – South Shields).

103244Drunken_SailorPer l’ascolto ho selezionato la versione “classica” per voce e concertina
ASCOLTA Robin Madge in The Harbour Wall 1986
e questa versione più particolare con voce, chitarra e violino del duo olandese dal suggestivo nome Drijfhout ossia il legno abbandonato dal mare.
ASCOLTA Drijfhout in Over Drijven En Stranden 2010 (il loro sito qui)
bravi per l’arrangiamento vocale e il riff del violino, anche il video è “poetico”


I
One Monday morning in the month of May, (x2)
I thought I heard the captain(1) say,
“The Rosabella” will sail today”.
CHORUS
And I’m goin'(2) on board the Rosabella(x2)
I’m goin’ on board, right down to board
“The Saucy(3) Rosabella”.
II
She’s a deepwater ship with a deepwater crew (x2)
You can stick to the coast but we’re damned if we do
On board “The Rosabella”.
III
All around Cape Horn in the Month of May  (x2)
Around Cape Horn is a bloody long way
Aboard “The Rosabella”.
IV
Them Bowery(4) girls will make me grieve, (x2)
They’ve spent all my money, they’ll make me leave
On board “The Rosabella”.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Un lunedì mattina nel mese di maggio
Mi parve di sentire il capitano(1) che diceva:
“Il Rosabella salperà oggi”
RITORNELLO
Vado a bordo(2) del Rosabella
proprio dritto a bordo
del “Saucy(3) Rosabella”
II
E’ una nave d’alto mare con una ciurma d’altomare
si può restare a vista della costa,
ma che sia dannato se lo facciamo
a bordo del Rosabella
III
Doppiare Capo Horn nel mese di maggio,
per Capo Horn è una lunga strada maledetta,
a bordo del Rosabella
IV
Ora le ragazze di Bowery(4) mi faranno disperare
spenderanno tutto il mio denaro
e poi mi lasceranno a bordo del Rosabella

NOTE
1) nella versione riportata da John McPherson è: I shipped e quindi nel terzo verso diventa “I’ve shipped on board, and I’ve signed on board
2) la versione con captain è quella riportata da John Short in altre versioni anche come old man
3) la versione con saucy è quella riportata da John Short.  Saucy è un aggettivo talvolta utilizzato nel nome di una nave per indicare un’eleganza impertinente
4) il nome della località varia a seconda delle versioni.

VERSIONE JOHN SHORT

Nel 1979 Tom e Barbara Brown hanno dato inizio al progetto Short Sharp Shanties e realizzato la prima versione revival dal materiale rilasciato da John Short.
I versi riportati da John Short erano solo due ovvero la strofa I e il coro, Tom e Barbara Brown hanno aggiunto un verso e gli altri sono stati aggiunti da Johnny Collins e Jim Mageen, che rilasciarono nel 1980 la prima versione standard della canzone, da allora ripresa da vari artisti e gruppi corali.

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor  vol 3 (2012) una versione che integra le varie strofe riportate dalle tre registrazioni sul campo collezionate negli anni 1914 e 1928-9 (su Spotify)


I
One Monday morning in the month of May,(x2)
I thought I heard the captain say,
The “Rosabella” will sail today.

And I’m goin’ on board the Rosabella,
And I’m goin’ on board the Rosabella

I’m goin’ on board, right down to board “The Saucy Rosabella”.
II
O the Rosabella’s a packet ship
A packet ship of great reknown
And if you’ve heard the old refrain
The song sung round the town
III
She’s a deepwater ship with a deepwater crew(x2)
You can stick to the coast but we’re damned if we do
On board the “Rosabella”.
IV
Now the Rosabella beat the Kinoda
The Kinoda beat the old Conductor
and the Boston Times says she beat them all
Sailin’ out from the old North River.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Un lunedì mattina nel mese di maggio
Mi parve di sentire il capitano che diceva:
“Il Rosabella salperà oggi”

Vado a bordo del Rosabella
Vado a bordo del Rosabella

proprio dritto a bordo del “Saucy  Rosabella”
II
Il Rosabella è un postale
una nave rinomata, se hai ascoltato il vecchio ritornello della canzone che si cantava per la città
III
E’ una nave d’alto mare con una ciurma d’altomare
è possibile restare a vista della costa, ma che sia dannato se lo facciamo a bordo del Rosabella
IV
Il Rosabella batte il Kinoda
il Kinoda batte il vecchio Conductor
e il Boston Times dice che li sconfigge tutti
veleggiando sul fiume Hudson

NOTE
II) strofa registrata da James M. Carpenter cantata da John McPherson, South Shields
Packet ship: una nave che trasportava la posta, il significato si estende a indicare un servizio di linea merci e passeggeri
IV) strofa registrata da James M. Carpenter 1928 cantata da J.S. Scott, Londra, il North River è l’Hudson River

VERSIONE CARAIBICA

E’ quella testuale riportata da Horace P. Beck in “Folklore and the Sea” (1973) collezionata nel Mar dei Caraibi forse a Bequia o Carriacou. Anche John Hutcheson (a bordo delle navi mercantili già dal 1871) testimonia di aver sentito i neri della Giamaica cantare “The Saucy Rosabella” nelle manovre di carico delle navi.
ASCOLTA Hulton Clint (del tutto non autentica ma verosimile!)

Come let me join Rosabella. “Heave away”(1)
Come let me join Rosabella. “Heave away”
Come let us join, Come let us join,
The saucy Rosabella. “Heave away.”
The Orinaca beart the Contractor, “Heave away”
The Orinaca beat the Contractor, “Heave away.”
He beat her once, he beat her twice
He beat her right down the Orinoco. “Heave away”

NOTE
1) sta per “tira”

FONTI
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2012/06/121-rollin-down-river-and-saucy.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62948
http://www.quantockonline.co.uk/news/2008/yankee_jack.html