Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

Leggi in italiano

FROM  OUTLANDER SAGA

Diana Gabaldon

“Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.”
(From DRAGONFLY IN AMBER, Chapter 34, “The Postman Always Rings Twice”. Copyright© 1992 by Diana Gabaldon.)
The Scottish women have developed a particular technique for the twisting of the tweed, that woolen fabric from Scotland, warm, resistant and almost indestructible, used by fishermen and shepherds to keep warmer in a climate so cold and windy.
Cloth were “mistreated” by a group of women sitting around a table with 4 beat: first, the fabric is banged on the table in front of you, then slammed towards the center of the table, then returned to the initial position and then is passed to the next woman (clockwise). To count the time and make the work less monotonous the women sang some songs, there was the ban dhuan (or the song-woman) that directed the song, while the others followed her in the refrain. After some songs the fabric was softer, thicker, and more tightly woven.

OUTLANDER TV, season I: “Rent”

In Outlander TV serie this glimpse of life in a scottish village of eighteenth-century, is developed in the Dougal Mackenzie’s journey, as he collects rents from the tenants of Castel Leoch. Claire goes on the road with Dougal, and almost by chance, she hears some voices and sees the women as they are waulking the tweeds.

Outlander I, episode 5: Mo Nighean Donn

English transaltion*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr (1)
[Sèist:]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark
thee
At the fair of the young women.
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
And we will walk hand in hand
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò  My brown haired girl hò gù.
Regardless of any living elders (2).

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

NOTES
1)  The Storr is a rocky hill on the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle of Skye in Scotland
2) Similar expressions are recurrent in popular songs when a young couple “swimmed against the tide” about courtship and don’t followed the tradition.  (celtic wedding)

Clair takes part in the fulling of the tweed and sings with the village women. The ban dhuan is Fiona Mackenzie

Two are the Wool Waulking Songs  in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” and “Mo Nighean Donn” (a tribute to Claire’s brown hair)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originally from the island of Barra “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh” (One day as I roamed the hills) is about a man roaming around the Highlands, who comes across a beautiful young girl gathering herbs; these accidental encounters on the moors (between the heather and the broom in bloom) are the subject of many traditional Scottish songs from ancient origins, and often man is not limited to the request for a kiss! The girl rejects him because she considers him a vagabond. As usual in the choice of musical tracks, the lyrics always have an affinity with the story told in the saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho

English translation*
One day as I was traveling a hill
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)


(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”


Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh!
A bhodachain ròmaich


(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

NOTES
1) or “Hoots toots!”
2) or ” you shaggy old man!”, a shaggy peasant

Mo Nighean Donn

“Mo Nighean Donn” (My brown-haired lass) does not have a real meaning, it seems more than the ban dhuan to report the gossip of the moment.  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
(a Celtic song with instrumental parts and male voice)

English translation*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
[choir]
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
(I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.)

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

Outlander: Wool Waulking Songs

Read the post in English

DALLA SAGA OUTLANDER

Diana Gabaldon

Nel libro “”Il ritorno” (capitolo 11) della saga Outlander scritta da Diana Gabaldon Claire è invitata dalle donne di Lallybroch a prendere un tè e assiste alla follatura del tweed che si svolge in un apposito capanno “riservato” alle donne della tenuta
““Hot piss sets the dye fast,” one of the women had explained to me as I blinked, eyes watering, on my first entrance to the shed. The other women had watched at first, to see if I would shrink back from the work, but wool-waulking was no great shock, after the things I had seen and done in France, both in the war of 1944 and the hospital of 1744. Time makes very little difference to the basic realities of life. And smell aside, the waulking shed was a warm, cozy place, where the women of Lallybroch visited and joked between bolts of cloth, and sang together in the working, hands moving rhythmically across a table, or bare feet sinking deep into the steaming fabric as we sat on the floor, thrusting against a partner thrusting back.” continua
Le donne scozzesi hanno elaborato una tecnica particolare per la follatura del tweed, quel tessuto di lana originario dalla Scozia, caldo, resistente e pressoché indistruttibile, utilizzato dai pescatori e pastori per tenersi più al caldo in un clima così freddo e ventoso.
Per infeltrire la lana ma in modo uniforme e migliorane le prestazioni  le pezze di stoffa venivano “maltrattate” da un gruppo di donne sedute introno ad un tavolo (precedentemente immerse in grandi tinozze piene di urina); il movimento della battitura consisteva in 4 tempi: prima si sbatteva il tessuto sul tavolo davanti a sé, poi si sbatteva verso il centro del tavolo, quindi si riportava alla posizione iniziale e infine lo si passava alla donna successiva (in senso orario). Per contare il tempo e rendere meno monotono il lavoro le donne cantavano delle canzoni, c’era la  ban dhuan (ovvero la donna-canzone) che dirigeva il canto, mentre le altre la seguivano nel ritornello. Dopo qualche canzone il tessuto diventava più morbido, ma anche più compatto e resistente.

OUTLANDER TV, stagione I: “Riscossione”

Nella serie televisiva questo scorcio di vita nei villaggi della Scozia settecentesca è sviluppato nel giro di Dougal  Mackenzie di Castel Leoch presso gli affittuari per la riscossione dei tributi. Quasi per caso Clarie sentento delle voci, si avvicina alle donne mentre infeltriscono il tweed.

Outlander I episodio 5: Mo Nighean Donn

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist:]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Mo nigh’n donn shònruich mi fhéin thu
ann an broad nam ban òg
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
[Sèist]
Hì rì rì hù lò Mo nigh’n donn hò gù 
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
My brown haired girl, I remark thee
At the fair of the young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù
Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta.
O mia brunetta, ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli (2)

NOTE
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna  (matrimonio celtico)

 

Clair partecipa alla follatura del tweed e canta insieme alle donne del villaggio. La ban dhuan è Fiona Mackenzie

Le Wool Waulking Songs sono due in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack) 
la prima più veloce “Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh“, la seconda vista nel video “Mo Nighean Donn” (un omaggio ai capelli castani di Claire)

Latha Siubhal Beinne Dhomh

Originaria dell’isola di Barra,  la canzone parla di un uomo in giro per le Highland che s’imbatte in una bella fanciulla intenta a raccogliere delle erbe, questi incontri fortuiti nelle brughiere (tra l’erica e la ginestra in fiore) sono il soggetto di molti canti tradizionali della Scozia dalle origini antiche e spesso l’uomo non si limita alla richiesta di un bacetto! La fanciulla lo respinge perchè lo reputa un vagabondo. Come consuetudine nella scelta delle tracce musicali i testi hanno sempre un’attinenza con la storia narrata nella saga.

Hi ill eo ro bha ho
Hi ill eo bhòidheach
‘S na hi ill eo ro bha ho
Latha siubhal beinne dhomh
Latha siubhal mòintich
Thachair orm gruagach
Dhualach, bhòidheach
Sgian bheag na làimh
‘S i ri buain neòinean
‘S i ri buain biolaire
Theann mi null rithe
Dh’ iarr mi pòg oirre
Ud! Ud! Ud-ag araidh! (1)
A bhodachain ròmaich
(‘S ann an taigh m’ athar fhèin
Gheibht’ an còmhlan
Fichead fear adadh ann
Dusan bean cleòca
Tubhailtean geal aca
Sgaoilt’ air bhòrdaibh
Cupannan crèadh’ aca
‘S glainneachan beòraich)

Traduzione inglese*
One day as I was traveling a mountain
A day of traveling moorland
I met a girl
beautiful, tresses in her hair
A little knife in her hand
As she was reaping daisies
As she was reaping watercress
I went over to her
And I asked her for a kiss
“Oh, oh, my! (1)
O hairy old man! (2)
(It’s in my own father’s house
That the company would be found:
Twenty hatted-men (3)
A dozen cloaked women
With white towels
Spread out on tables
With clay cups
And glasses full of beer)”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Un giorno che ero in viaggio per i monti
un giorno che ero in viaggio per la brughiera incontrani una ragazza
dalle belle trecce
con un piccolo pugnale tra le mani
stava tagliando delle margherite
e raccoglieva il crescione.
Mi sono avvicinato
e le ho chiesto un bacio.
“Smamma bello
Vattene zoticone!
(Nella mia dimora di famiglia
si trovano nobili genti
una ventina di uomini con il cappello
una dozzina di donne con il mantello
bianche tovaglie
stese sui tavoli
con tazze di percellana
e bicchieri pieni di birra.)”

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) l’espressione tradotta anche come “Hoots toots!”  è un modo colloquiale per respingere una persona sgradita
2) anche tradotto come ” you shaggy old man!” letteralmente “piccolo vecchio peloso” vecchio ha un significato colloquiale che non necessariemnte indica una persione anziana, nel contesto la frase è un appellativo rivolto a un vagabondo malandato, dai capelli lunghi e la barba incolta, anche bifolco
3) indossare il cappello è d’obbligo per un gentiluomo

Mo Nighean Donn

La canzone “Mo Nighean Donn” (la mia ragazza castana) non ha un vero e proprio significato, sembra più altro che la ban dhuan  riferisca i gossip del momento. La versione in  Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  è più lunga rispetto alla versione nelle riprese
Dougie MacLean in Whitewash 1990 
Negli anni 40-50 con il tramonto della lavorazione artigianale (in particolare dell’Harris Tweed) queste canzoni di lavoro sono diventate occasione di session dimostrative o sono passate nei repertori di alcuni gruppi di musica celtica con l’inserimento di parti strumentali e voci maschili.

Gur e mise tha fo ghruaim
‘S mi ‘n taobh tuath dhan an Stòr.
[Sèist]
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
Mo nigh’n donn hò gù
‘N-dràst’ an loch fada choill
‘S nach tig Oighrig nam chòir.
Thog iad a’ mhailisi suas
‘S bheir siud bhuainn gillean òg.
Cha bhi iad a-muigh ach mìos
‘S cha bhi ‘n cianalas oirnn.
Mo nighean donn choisinn cliù
Ann an cùirt nam ban òg.
Mo nighean donn choisinn geall
Far na champaich na seòid.
Tha mi sgìth cur mo lìon
Ann an iochdar gach òb.
Thèid mi null air a’ bheinn
Far eil loinn nam ban òg.
(‘S bidh mo làmh na do làimh
Dh’aindeoin èildeir tha beò.
‘S bhiodh mo làmh mud chùl bhàn
Gad a gheàrrt’ i mun dòrn.
Ach ma ruigeas mise null
Gheibh thu crùin na do dhòrn.
Gheibh thu sin is rud nas fheàrr
Maraiche math làidir òg.)

Traduzione inglese*
Oh how my mind is heavy
as I’m north west of the Storr
My brown haired girl hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
My brown haired girl hò gù.
Right now I’m in the loch by the forest
And Effie will not be joning me.
The militia has been risen
And that will take away the young lads from us.
They will be out for a month
This will not leave us full of sadness.
My brown haired girl who gained recognition
At the fair of the young women.
My brown haired girl won a bet
Where the warriors were encamped
I’m tired of setting my nets
In the lower parts of each cove.
I will head over the hill
Where there is the beautiful young women.
And we will walk hand in hand
Regardless of any living elders.
And my hand will be around you
Though I’d prefer to embrace you.
And if I manage to reach over to you
You’ll get a crown in your hand.
You’ll get that and something better
A good, young, strong sailor.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Oh quali pensieri tormentati
mentre sono a nord ovest di Storr (1)
la mia brunetta hò gù Hì rì rì hù lò
la mia bella brunetta hò gù
In questo momento sono al lago vicino alla foresta
e Effie non mi sta canzonando.
La milizia è stata ripristinata
e questo porterà via i giovani da noi.
Staranno fuori per un mese
questo  non mancherà di lasciarci pieni di tristezza.
O mia moretta , ti ho notata
al mercato delle belle fanciulle
La mia ragazza bruna ha vinto una scommessa
dove erano accampati i guerrieri
Sono stanco di gettare le reti
nelle parti basse di ogni baia.
Io andrò oltre la collina
dove ci sono le belle donne
giovani.
e cammineremo mano nella mano
nonostante tutti i pettegoli(2)
E la mia mano ti terrà stretta
anche se preferirei abbracciarti
E se riuscirò a raggiungerti (3)
ti metterò una corona tra le mani.
Avrai quella e ancor meglio
un bravo marinaio, giovane e forte

NOTE
il canto è stato tramandato in una versione più estesa  e le strofe mancanti sono state messe tra parentesi
1) il “vecchio uomo di Storr” (the Old Man of Storr) è un pinnacolo di basalto alto una cinquantina di metri che sorge sull’Isola di Skye, la più grande delle Ebridi Interne (Scozia)
2) letteralmente “nonostante tutti gli antenati” cioè a dispetto delle tradizioni. Espressioni simili sono ricorrenti nei canti popolari quando una giovane coppia andava “contro corrente” cioè non si seguivano le tradizioni in merito al corteggiamento: erano i genitori a combinare le unioni, in genere tra persone della stessa classe sociale e mezzi economici, i bei ragazzi ma senza arte ne parte, potevano ricevere il consenso solo in vista di un’improvvisa fortuna .
3) il ragazzo è partito per mare in cerca di un buon guadagno, al suo ritorno le chiederà di sposarlo

 

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/latha_siubhal_beinne_dhomh/
http://s3.spanglefish.com/s/10130/documents/songs/latha%20siubhal%20beinne%20dhomh.pdf
https://virtualgael.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/lathasiubhalbeinne.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39128/10
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/alltandubh/orain/Latha_Siubhal_Beinne.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/mo_nighean_donn/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97218/1;jsessionid=F3FF526DC4C88B40F544EE4E1332E1D6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/100031/1
http://totalsketch.com/shed-life/

Outlander: Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain

Leggi in italiano

Tune: Bear McCreary
Lyrics: Diana Gabaldon

“Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain” or “The Woman of Balnain”  is a scottish gaelic song  in the Outlander tv series.

In the “Outlander” book  Diana Gabaldon narrates the journey through time of Claire Randall who, crossing a circle of stones near Inverness (Scotland), is magically catapulted two hundred years back in the mid-eighteenth century. Runned into some highlanders, she is taken to Castel Leoch  to meet the chief clan, Colum McKenzie.
In the evening entertainment the Welsh bard Gwyllyn (Gillebrìde MacMillan) performs a tale about the wife of the Laird of Balnain, who returned through rocks on a fairy hill. In the Outlander Tv Series (I season, “The Way Out”) the story becomes a song.

Gillebrìde MacMillan in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack)

Karliene

I
“I am the lady of Baile An Àthain.
The folk have stolen me again, again,”
it is as if every stone is saying.
II
Suddenly then, the night darkened
And I heard a loud noise like thunder
And the moon came out
From the shadow of the clouds.
And it shone on the damsel.
III
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
Weary and worn as she had walked far.
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
But she couldn’t tell where she was
Nor even how she came [there].
I
“‘S mise bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain
Tha na Sìth air mo ghoid a-rithist, a-risthist,”
Tha mar g’eill gach clach ga ràdh.
II
Gu h-obann an sin, dhorchnaidh an oidhch’
‘S chualas fuaim àrd mar thàirneanach
‘S thàinig a’ ghealach a-mach
Fo sgàil nan neòil.
‘S bhoillsg ì air a’ chaileig
III
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
‘Sgìth ‘s claoidht mar gun d’shiubhail i fada.
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
Ach nach b’urrainn ins càite an robh i
No idir mar rinn i tighinn.

 

Outlander Season I, episode 3 “The Way Out”

In Castle Leoch hall Jamie Fraser, sitting near Claire, translates the text and in her immediately comes the hope of being able to return to her time (1945) and her husband Frank. But Jamie’s version used to explain the words is different from song


Jamie:  Now this one is about a man out late on a fairy hill on the eve of Samhain who hears the sound of a woman singing sad and plaintive from the very rocks of the hill.

I am a woman of Balnain.
The folk have stolen me over again, ‘
the stones seemed to say.
I stood upon the hill, and wind did rise,
and the sound of thunder rolled across the land.
I placed my hands upon the tallest stone
and traveled to a far, distant land,
where I lived for a time among strangers
who became lovers and friends.
But one day, I saw the moon came out,
and the wind rose once more.
so I touched the stones
and traveled back to my own land
and took up again with the man I had left behind.
ClaireShe came back through the stones?
JamieAye, she did. They always do.

In the television adaptation, Doune Castle was used as the exterior of the fictional Castle Leoch.

LINK
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-the-way-out-the-gathering-and-rent/
https://ancroiait.wordpress.com/2017/11/03/723-the-woman-of-balnain/

OUTLANDER SERIES: Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain

Read the post in English  

“Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain” ovvero “The Woman of Balnain”  (in italiano “La moglie di Balnain”) è un canto in gaelico per la serie TV Outlander, composto appositamente da  Bear McCreary (sul testo di Diana Gabaldon).
Nel primo libro della serie intitolato “Outlander” (in italiano La straniera) Diana Gabaldon narra del viaggio nel tempo di Claire Randall che attraversando un cerchio di pietre nei pressi di Inverness,  si ritrova magicamente catapultata duecento anni indietro nella Scozia di metà Settecento. Imbattutasi in un gruppetto di highlanders del clan McKenzie viene condotta a Castel Leoch dove conosce il capo clan Colum McKenzie.
L’intrattenimento serale ha come ospite d’onore il bardo gallese Gwyllyn (Gillebrìde MacMillan ) con musica, canti e racconti  in particolare sui Wee Folk (il piccolo popolo, vezzeggiativo con cui sono chiamate le creature magiche del folklore scozzese)

L’ESTRATTO DA LIBRO

Così scrivel Gabaldon nella parte seconda del libro sotto il titolo di “Intrattenimenti serali”:
“Una mi colpì in particolare, e cioè quella in cui si parlava di un uomo che , trovandosi su un colle incantato, udì il canto “triste e lamentoso” di una donna proveniente dalle stesse rocce della collina. Ascoltando più attentamente, udì queste parole
“Sono la moglie del Laird di Balnain.
i Folk mi han rapito di nuovo ahimè”
Così l’uomo si era precipitato a casa di Balnain, scoprendo che il proprietario non c’era più, così come il suo figlioletto e sua moglie. Andò subito a cercare un prete e lo portò sulla collinetta. Il prete benedisse le rocce del dun, spruzzandole di acqua santa. Tutto a un tratto calarono le tenebre e si udì un forte rombo simile al tuono. Poi la luna sbucò da una nuvola illuminando la donna, la moglie di Balnain, che giaceva esausta sull’erba con il bimbo tra le braccia. La donna era stanca come se avesse viaggiato da molto lontano, ma non sapeva dire dove fosse stata, nè in che modo fosse arrivata lì.”

Nella versione della serie televisiva Outlander (I stagione, III episodio “The Way Out”) il racconto diventa un canto.
Gillebrìde MacMillan che nella serie interpreta il ruolo di Gwyllyn the Bard in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack)

Karliene

I
“‘S mise bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain
Tha na Sìth air mo ghoid a-rithist, a-risthist,”
Tha mar g’eill gach clach ga ràdh.
II
Gu h-obann an sin, dhorchnaidh an oidhch’
‘S chualas fuaim àrd mar thàirneanach
‘S thàinig a’ ghealach a-mach
Fo sgàil nan neòil.
‘S bhoillsg ì air a’ chaileig
III
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
‘Sgìth ‘s claoidht mar gun d’shiubhail i fada.
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
Ach nach b’urrainn ins càite an robh i
No idir mar rinn i tighinn.


I
“I am the lady of Baile An Àthain.
The folk have stolen me again, again,”
it is as if every stone is saying.
II
Suddenly then, the night darkened
And I heard a loud noise like thunder
And the moon came out
From the shadow of the clouds.
And it shone on the damsel.
III
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
Weary and worn as she had walked far.
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
But she couldn’t tell where she was
Nor even how she came [there].
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto*
I
“Sono la moglie del Laird di Balnain, i Folk mi han rapito, rapito di nuovo”
è come se ogni roccia dicesse
II
Tutto a un tratto calarono le tenebre e udii un forte rombo simile al tuono
e la luna sbucò
dall’ombra delle nuvole
e illuminò la damigella.
III
Era la moglie stessa di Balnain
che era là
stanca e sfinita come se avesse viaggiato da molto lontano.
Era la moglie stessa di Balnain
che era là
ma non sapeva dire dove fosse stata, nè in che modo fosse arrivata lì

NOTE
* dalla versione in italiano del libro

LA SCENA DALLA SERIE TV OUTLANDER

Jamie Fraser al fianco di Claire le traduce il testo e in lei subito si accende la speranza di poter ritornare nuovamente alla sua epoca (il 1945) e al marito Frank.

La traduzione di Jamie è però diversa dal testo in gaelico
Jamie: Now this one is about a man out late on a fairy hill on the eve of Samhain who hears the sound of a woman singing sad and plaintive from the very rocks of the hill.


I
I am a woman of Balnain.
The folk have stolen me over again, ‘
the stones seemed to say.
I stood upon the hill, and wind did rise, and the sound of thunder rolled across the land.
II
I placed my hands upon the tallest stone and traveled to a far, distant land, where I lived for a time among strangers who became lovers and friends.
III
But one day, I saw the moon came out, and the wind rose once more.
so I touched the stones
and traveled back to my own land
and took up again with the man I had left behind.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Sono la moglie di Balnain,
i Folk mi han rapito di nuovo”
sembravano dire le rocce.
Stavo sulla collina
e s’alzò il vento
e il rombo del tuono squassò la terra
II
Misi le mano sulla pietra più alta
e viaggiai in una terra molto lontana
dove ho vissuto per molto tempo tra stranieri che divennero amanti e amici.
III
Ma un giorno, vidi sbucare la luna
e il vento alzarsi di nuovo,
così toccai le rocce
e ritornai indietro alla mia terra
e feci ritorno all’uomo da cui ero stata portata via.

Claire: She came back through the stones?
Jamie: Aye, she did. They always do.

Ed ecco la sequenza televisiva Outlander “The Way Out”

Sia Castel Leoch che il dun di pietre (Craigh na Dun) sono invenzioni dell’autrice di Outlander ma ovviamente l’adattamento TV è stato girato negli scenari della Scozia, perciò il Castello di Doune nei pressi di Stirling è il castello di Colum MacKenzie e del suo clan

FONTI
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-the-way-out-the-gathering-and-rent/
https://ancroiait.wordpress.com/2017/11/03/723-the-woman-of-balnain/

Dance of the Druids aka Duan na Muthairn serie Outlander

Read the post in English

Per i fan della serie Outlander la” Danza dei Druidi” (anche con il titolo The Summoning) è un brano composto per l’occasione da Bear McCreary su una preghiera in gaelico trascritta da Alexander Carmichael nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” (1900)- in formato digitale (qui) detta “Duan na Muthairne” (Rune of the Muthairn)
Un antico canto ancora ripetuto nell’isola di South Uist nel 1874, il testimone tale Duncan MacLellan lo aveva ascoltato da una vecchia dell’isola che ripeteva lunghe cantilene notte dopo notte accanto al fuoco (poi è arrivata la televisione!) Probabilmente la vecchina preferiva recitare la preghiera nel gaelico dei suoi padri invece del Padre Nostro della Chiesa cattolica! (continua)
All’apparenza una preghiera al Dio creatore ma  se al posto di  Rìgh na = “Re del” mettiamo una Rìghinn na = “Regina del” otteniamo la descrizione della Via Lattea

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbrough  canta solo la prima strofa in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) 

I
A Righ na gile (1)
A Righ na greine,
A Righ na rinne (2),
A Righ na reula,
A Righ na cruinne,
A Righ na speura (3),
Is aluinn do ghnuis,
A lub (4) eibhinn.
II
Da lub shioda
Shios rid’ leasraich
Mhinich, chraicich;
Usgannan buidhe
Agus dolach
As gach sath dhiubh


I
Thou King of the moon (1),
Thou King of the sun,
Thou King of the planets (2),
Thou King of the stars,
Thou King of the globe,
Thou King of the sky (3),
Oh! Lovely Thy countenance,
Thou beauteous Beam (4).
II
Two loops of silk
Down by thy limbs,
Smooth-skinned (5);
Yellow jeweIs
And a handful
Out of every stock of them (6).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Tu re  della luna
tu re  del sole
tu re  della creazione,
tu re  delle stelle
tu re  della Terra
tu re  del Cielo
amabile il tuo volto
tu meraviglioso raggio
II
Due giri di seta
ti avvolgono i lombi
dalla pelle levigata;
gioielli dorati
e una ricca
paroure 

NOTE
E’ risaputo che  Carmichael si prese delle libertà nella traduzione del gaelico, così Tom Thomson (gaelico scozzese come lingua madre) trae delle considerazioni che riporto nelle note lasciandole in inglese
1) “na gile” (of the whiteness)  e in senso lato Luna
2) I can’t see how “na rinne” (singular) can mean “of the planets” (plural) – it’s clearly singular and means either “of the world” or perhaps “of creation” or even “of the universe”
3) “na speura” (of heaven)
4) A lùb: tra i vari significati  che il dizionario riporta non c’è “beam” ma un “young man” che potrebbe fare al caso nostro
5) una pelle serica, soffice e luminosa come le raffinate vesti indossate
6) ai celti piaceva molto la chincaglieria (d’oro massiccio naturalmente): s’intende un assortimento di bracciali, anelli, collane, orecchini e ciondoli, in italiano si direbbe “un vasto abbinamento di gioielleria” ma così si perde l’asciuttezza del verso gaelico. 

LA SAGA OUTLANDER

Per chi ama i romanzi storici romance Diana Gabaldon con la sua serie Outlander è ormai diventata un punto di riferimento. Il suo successo è ormai planetario e in Italia e non solo non si contano più i siti e i forum dedicati a questa autrice e ai meravigliosi personaggi da lei creati. La serie Outlander, ancora in corso di pubblicazione, è composta da 7 libri; la casa editrice Corbaccio nell’edizione italiana ha scelto di dividere i 7 libri in due (escluso “La Straniera”) e fin’ora ne sono stati pubblicati 13. La notorietà si è ulteriormente amplificata con la produzione e la messa in onda di una serie televisiva  dal titolo “Outlander”.

Il romanzo è anche una storia romantica dell’amore nato tra Claire Randall e James Fraser ovvero James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser Lord di Broch Tuarach e le loro peripezie per l’Europa e le Americhe. La vicenda storica è calata nella Scozia della metà del 700 dilaniata dalle lotte giacobite e dai conflitti tra i clan, accuratamente ricreata dalla Gabaldon, attraverso le tradizioni e la vita del popolo scozzese, in uno stile ricco ed evocativo, mai lento o noioso.

IL CERCHIO DI PIETRE: IL PORTARE PER IL VIAGGIO NEL TEMPO

L’avvio della storia è apparentemente un po’ “sopra le righe”, con un viaggio nel tempo della protagonista che, in viaggio di nozze ad Inverness, si ritrova proiettata nel passato, dopo aver attraversato il cerchio di pietra di Craigh na Dun: dal 1945 nel 1743.
Il tema della Danza dei Druidi ribattezzato “Stones Theme” ritorna spesso nella versione della serie televisiva legato al mistero dei Cerchi di Pietre e ai rituali praticati nell’antica religione.

continua seconda parte

I Bardi delle Terre Celtiche (Bardic Music)

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/megalitismo.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/religione-celti.html?cb=1521975648601

http://www.carmichaelwatson.lib.ed.ac.uk/cwatson/en/catalogueentry/2126
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/corpus/Carmina/G9.html
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/archive/75760440?mode=transcription

To the Begging I Will Go

La protesta contro il “sistema” all’insegna del sex-drinks&piping s’incanala in uno specifico filone di canti popolari (britannici e irlandesi) sul mestiere di mendicante, uno spirito libero che vagabonda per il paese senza radici e vuole solo essere lasciato in pace. Molti sono i canti in gaelico in cui il protagonista rivendica l’esercizio della libera volontà, niente tasse, preoccupazioni e dispiaceri, ma la vita presa come viene affidandosi a lavori saltuari e alla carità della gente. (continua)

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE: To the Begging I Will Go

Esistono molte varianti della canzone a testimonianza della sua vasta popolarità e diffusione. Una vecchia bothy ballad che affonda nella materia medievale dei canti dei vaganti, quel vasto sottobosco di umanità un po’ artistoide, un po’ disadattata, un po’ morta di fame che si arrabattava a sbarcare il lunario esercitando i mestieri più improbabili e spesso truffaldini.
Probabilmente già lo stesso Richard Brome si ispirò  a questi canti dei mendicanti per la sua commedia “A Jovial Crew, or the Merry Beggars” (1640), in cui scrive il coro “The Beggar” detto anche The Jovial Beggar, con il refrain: 
And a Begging we will go, we’ll go, we’ll go,
And a Begging we will go.
Come sia la melodia raggiunge una notevole popolarità moltiplicandosi in tutta una serie di “clonazioni” A bowling we will go, A fishing we will go, A hawking we will go, and A hunting we will go e così via.

ASCOLTA l’arrangiamento strumentale di Bear McCreary “To the Begging I Will Go” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

PRIMA VERSIONE
Tae the Beggin’ / Maid Behind the Bar

ASCOLTA Ossian, la melodia che accompagna il canto è “Maid Behind the Bar”, un Irish reel


I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

II
And I’ll gang tae the tailor
wi’ a wab o’ hoddin gray,
and gar him mak’ a cloak for me
tae hap me night and day.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

III
An’ I’ll gang tae the cobbler
and I’ll gar him sort my shoon
an inch thick tae the boddams
and clodded weel aboun.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
IV
And I’ll gang tae the tanner
and I’ll gar him mak’ a dish,
and it maun haud three ha’pens,
for it canna weel be less.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

V
And when that I begin my trade,
sure, I’ll let my beard grow strang,
nor pare my nails this year or day
for beggars wear them lang.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VI
And I will seek my lodging
before that it grows dark –
when each gude man is getting hame, and new hame frae his work.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VII
And if begging be as good as trade,
and as I hope it may,
it’s time that I was oot o’ here
an’ haudin’ doon the brae.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VIII=I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for  when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
 
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri che conosco,
di sicuro il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
E andrò dal sarto
con una pezza di ruvida lana grigia
e gli chiederò di farmi un mantello
per ricoprirmi di notte e giorno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò, a mendicare andrò
III
Andrò dal calzolaio
e gli chiederò di risuolare le mie scarpe con del cuoio spesso
per camminare bene sulle zolle.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
IV
E andrò dal tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte perchè non si può fare con meno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

V
E quando poi inizierò il mio mestiere, di sicuro mi lascerò crescere la barba quest’anno o oggi, nè mi taglierò le unghie, perchè i mendicanti le portano lunghe. A mendicare andrò,
andrò, a mendicare andrò

VI
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cali la sera –
quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

VII
E se il mendicare sarà un buon affare, come spero lo sia,
è tempo che io vada via da qui e m’incammini per la collina.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

SECONDA VERSIONE: To the Beggin’ I Will Go

ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs

Chorus
To the beggin’ I will go, go
To the beggin’ I will go
O’ a’ the trades a man can try,
the beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s weary
he can just sit down and rest.
First I maun get a meal-pock
made out o’ leather reed
And it will haud twa firlots (1)
wi’ room for beef and breid.
Afore that I do gang awa,
I’ll lat my beard grow strang
And for my nails I winna pair,
for a beggar wears them lang.
I’ll gang to find some greasy cook
and buy frae her a hat(2)
Wi’ twa-three inches o’ a rim,
a’ glitterin’ owre wi’ fat.
Syne I’ll gang to a turner
and gar him mak a dish
And it maun haud three chappins (3)
for I cudna dee wi’ less.
I’ll gang and seek my quarters
before that it grows dark
Jist when the guidman’s sitting doon
and new-hame frae his wark.
Syne I’ll tak out my muckle dish
and stap it fu’ o’ meal
And say, “Guidwife, gin ye gie me bree,
I winna seek you kail”.
And maybe the guidman will say,
“Puirman, put up your meal
You’re welcome to your brose (4) the nicht, likewise your breid and kail”.
If there’s a wedding in the toon,
I’ll airt me to be there
And pour my kindest benison
upon the winsome pair.
And some will gie me breid
and beef and some will gie me cheese
And I’ll slip out among the folk
and gather up bawbees (5).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
Di tutti i mestieri che un uomo può fare, il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare.
Per prima cosa prenderò una bisaccia
fatta di cuoio
e conterrà due staia
con un posto per carne e pane.
Prima di andare via
mi farò crescere la barba lunga
e non mi taglierò le unghie
perchè il mendicante le porta lunghe.
(Andrò a cercare un grassa cuoca
e comprerò da lei un cappello
con la falda di due o tre pollici
tutto scintillante di grasso.)
E andrò da un tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte
perchè non posso fare con meno.
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cada il buio
– quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
Poi tirerò fuori il mio grande piatto
e lo riempirò di farina d’avena
e dico “Buona donna, se mi date del brodo, non vi chiedo del cavolo”
E forse il padrone di casa dirà
“Poveruomo, metti da parte la tua farina, saluta il tuo brose di stasera
come pure il pane e cavolo”
Se ci sarà un matrimonio in città
mi recherò là
ed elargirò la mia più cara benedizione
su quella bella coppia.
E qualcuno mi darà il pane
e manzo e qualcuno mi darà del formaggio e mi aggirerò tra la gente
a raccogliere delle monetine

NOTE
1) unità di misura scozzese
2) il senso della frase mi sfugge
3) vecchia misura scozzese per liquidi equivalente e mezza pinta
4) il brose è il porrige preparato alla maniera scozzese. Se ho capito bene il senso del discorso , il mendicante chiede alla padrona di casa un po’ di brodo caldo per prepararsi il suo brose a base di farina d’avena, ma il padrone di casa lo invita a mangiare alla sua tavola cibi ben più sostanziosi
5) bawbees: half pennies

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

E’ la versione del Lancashire riportata in “Folk Songs of Lancashire” (Harding 1980). Leggiamo nelle note ” This version was collected from an old weaver in Delph called Becket Whitehead by Herbert Smith and Ewan McColl.”
ASCOLTA Ewan McColl


I
Of all the trades in England,
a-beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s tired,
he can sit him down to rest.
And to a begging I will go,
to the begging I will go
II
There’s a poke (1) for me oatmeal,
& another for me salt
I’ve a pair of little crutches,
‘tha should see how I can hault
III
There’s patches on me fusticoat,
there’s a black patch on me ‘ee
But when it comes to tuppenny ale (2),
I can see as well as thee
IV
My britches, they are no but holes,
but my heart is free from care
As long as I’ve a bellyfull,
my backside can go bare
V
There’s a bed for me where ‘ere I like,
& I don’t pay no rent
I’ve got no noisy looms to mind,
& I am right content
VI
I can rest when I am tired
& I heed no master’s bell (3)
A man ud be daft to be a king,
when beggars live so well
VII
Oh, I’ve been deef at Dokenfield (4),
& I’ve been blind at Shaw (5)
And many the right & willing lass
I’ve bedded in the straw
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri in Inghilterra
il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
Ho una tasca per la farina d’avena
e un’altra per il sale
ho un paio di stampelle, dovreste vedere come riesco a zoppicare!
III
Ci sono toppe sul mio cappotto frusto e una toppa nera sul mio occhio ma quandosi tratta di birra da due penny, riesco a vedere bene quanto te!
IV
I miei pantalono non hanno che buchi
ma il mio cuore è libero dall’affanno
finchè ho la pancia piena
il mio fondoschiena può andare nudo
V
C’è un letto per me ovunque mi piaccia
e non pago l’affitto
non ho pensieri fastidiosi in testa
e sono proprio contento
VI
Mi riposo quando sono stanco
e non ascolto la campana del padrone
è da pazzi voler essere un re 
quando i mendicanti vivono così bene!
VII
Sono stato sordo a Dokenfield
e sono stato cieco a Shaw
e più di una ragazza ben disposta
ho portato a letto nella paglia

NOTE
1) poke è in senso letterale un sacchetto ma in questo contesto vuole dire pocket
2) tippeny ale è la birra a buon mercato bevuta normalmente dalla gente comune
2) non ha un padrone o un principale da cui correre appena sente suonare il campanello/sirena
3) Dukinfield è una cittadina nella Grande Manchester
4) Shaw and Crompton, detta comunemente Shaw è una cittadina industriale nella Grande Manchester

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: The Beggarman’s song

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://www.spiersfamilygroup.co.uk/Tae%20the%20Beggin%20I%20will%20go.pdf
https://tullamore.band/track/1238160/tae-the-beggin-maid-behind-the-bar
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/thebeggingsong.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/tothe.htm
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=49513&lang=it
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82650
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/gd/fullrecord/60319/9
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/126.html
http://www.kitchenmusician.net/smoke/beggin.html

An Fhìdeag Airgid

“Cò Sheinneas an Fhìdeag Airgid” o più semplicemente  “an Fhìdeag Airgid” è una waulking song probabilmente ricavata da un frammento di una jacobite song presumibilmente composta nel 1745 per esortare a seguire in battaglia il Principe Charles Edward Stuart. Un canto risalente allo sbarco del giovane pretendente nelle isole Ebridi, certo di trovare sostenitori disposti a prendere le armi in suo nome.
Il venticinquenne Charles sbarcò insieme a sette compagni sull’isola di Eriskay e una manciata di spade, poi si spostò verso Glenfinnan e restò in attesa che i clan arrivassero! E così nel canto ci si domanda quali saranno i clan a imbracciare il loro “fhideag airigid” (silver whistle) ossia gli spadoni degli Highlanders per rimettere il giovane pretendente sul trono (d’Inghilterra, Irlanda e Scozia).
E’ la versione di Flora MacNeil dell’isola di Barra ad essere la più completa  (in Peter Kennedy, Folk Songs of Britain and Ireland, Cassell, 1975) – (vedi qui)
ASCOLTA http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/22363/1

Karen Matheson in An Fhideag Airgid 2013 gia con i Capercaille in Glenfinnan 1995

The Moors

ASCOLTA Gillebrìde MacMillan Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

La versione waulking song

ancora il canto dagli archivi della tradizione
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/93660/1 (Captain Donald Joseph MacKinnon)
http: //www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/30346/1 (Nan MacKinnon)

Versione gaelico Karen Matheson
Co a sheinneas an fhideag airigid
Ho ro hu a hu il o
Hi ri hu o, hi ri hu o
Mac mo righ air tighinn a dh’Alba
Air lang mhar nar tri chrann airgid
Air long riomhach nam ball airgid
Tearlach og nan gorm shuil mealach
Failte, failte mian is clui dhuit
Fidhleireachd is ragha a’uil dhuit
Co a sheinneadh? Nach seinninn fhin i?
Co a sheinneas an fhideag airigid

traduzione inglese (da qui)
Who will play the silver whistle?
the son of my King is coming to Scotland
On a great ship with three masts of silver
On the handsome vessel with the silver rigging
Young Charles with the blue bewitching eyes
Welcome, Welcome, may you be desired and famous
May there be fiddling the choicest music before you
Who will play the silver whistle?
Who’d say that I’d not play it myself?
Who will play the silver whistle?
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento[1]
mentre il figlio del mio re sta ritornando in Scozia?
Su un grande vascello con tre alberi d’argento
su un bel vascello con sartiame d’argento
il giovane Carlo dagli azzurri occhi seducenti!
Ben venuto, benvenuto che tu sia desiderato e rinomato,
che per te sia suonata la musica di violino più raffinata![2]
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento?
Chi ha detto che non lo farei io stesso?
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento?

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: Silver whistle

ASCOLTA Silly Sisters 1976 , June Tabor e Maddy Prior cantano la versione da Flora MacNeil di Barra versificata in inglese


I
O who will play the silver whistle
When my king’s son to sea is going?
To Scotland prepares, prepares his coming
Upon a large ship o’er the ocean
II
The ship it has three masts of silver
With ropes so light of french silk woven
Upon each end are fixed golden pulleys
To bring my king’s son ashore and landed.
III
When my king’s son he comes back home
No girdle scones will food be for him
But loaves of bread, bread will be baking
For Charles with blue eyes so enticing.
IV
O welcome to you, fame and honour
Fiddles and choice tunes attend you
I will be dancing, I will be singing
And I will play the silver whistle.
Traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Chi suonerà la canna d’argento
mentre il figlio del mio re è per mare?
In Scozia si prepari, si prepari il suo arrivo, su di un grande vascello attraverso l’oceano (1).
II
La nave ha tre alberi d’argento,
con sartiame  intessuto di seta francese così fine, ad ogni estremità sono fissate pulegge dorate,
per portare il figlio del mio re a riva e sbarcare
III
Quando il figlio del mio re ritorna a casa
nessun pane in padella (2) sarà il suo cibo, ma filoncini di pane saranno cotto nel forno
per Carlo dagli azzurri occhi seducenti
IV
Ben venuto a te, fama e onore
violini e le melodie più raffinate ti attendono, ballerò e canterò
e suonerò la canna d’argento

NOTE
1) sembrerebbe chissa quale traversata ma si tratta semplicemente del viaggio in mare dalla Francia alle Ebridi scozzesi
1) girdle scones: è il pane cotto su una piastra di ghisa riscaldata direttamente sul fuoco, in irlanda questa piastra-padella si chiama griddle, in Scozia girdle in Galles bake stone.
E’ lo spartano pane preparato nei bivacchi  chiamato più comunemente bannock: la preparazione di questa alternativa del pane cotto in forno è antichissima, perchè per ottenere il primo pane probabilmente si schiacciarono tra due pietre i chicchi dei primi cereali coltivati,  e con l’aggiunta di acqua si cossero in strati sottili su delle pietre piatte poste sul fuoco (o tra la cenere). L’ulteriore variante fu poi la cottura nella padella in ghisa dei traveiller e dei primi pionieri d’oltreoceano. Le farine d’un tempo erano quelle d’avena o d’orzo che meglio si adattano ai climi estremi del Nord, un pane preparato in fretta e senza lasciarlo lievitare continua

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/matheson/anfhideag.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/fhideag.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/silverwhistle.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20712
http://carmichaelwatson.blogspot.it/2011/08/jacobite-song-silver-whistle.html

CHARLIE, HE’S MY DARLING

Bannocks of Barley

E LA BARCA VA: IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA, THE SKYE BOAT SONG

Read the post in English  

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e flora
Flora e il Bel Carletto

Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi.
Flora MacDonald aveva 24 anni quando incontrò  il Bonnie Prince e lo aiutò a lasciare le Ebridi, li vediamo raffigurati su una barchetta in balia delle onde, lei si avvolge nello scialle e guarda l’orizzonte, mentre il sole tramonta,  lui rema con foga.
(ecco com’è andata in realtà: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

LA TRAVERSATA IN MARE: LA FUGA DI CHARLES STUART

Il momento della fuga dalle Ebridi Esterne, per quanto “eroicomico”, è ricordato nella canzone “Skye boat song” (in italiano “La barca per Skye” ma anche” la barca per il cielo”) scritta da Sir Harold Boulton nel 1884 su di una melodia tradizionale che si dice sia stata arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod; una decina di anni prima Anne  stava facendo un’escursione sul Loch Coruisk, guarda caso proprio sull’isola di Skye e la sentì cantare da un gruppo di marinai; la canzone era “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in inglese “The Cuckoo in the Grove”) comparsa in stampa nel 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, di Alfred Moffat, con un testo attribuito a William Ross (1762 – 1790). La melodia è pertanto quantomeno risalente al tempo della vicenda.

LO IORRAM
Il brano è comparso nel libro Songs of the North pubblicato da Sir Harold Boulton e Anne Campbell MacLeod a Londra nel 1884. Nelle ristampe ed edizioni successive nel commento si fa riferimento alla melodia come a un “iorram” ossia a una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle Ebridi come valzer.

La canzone è stato un successo: fin da subito circolarono voci che spacciavano il testo come traduzione di una antico canto in gaelico e presto divenne un brano classico della musica celtica e in particolare della musica tradizionale scozzese inserito immancabilmente nelle compilation anche per matrimoni, fatto e rifatto in tutte le salse (dal beat al liscio, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), innumerevoli le versioni strumentali (da un solo strumento – arpa, cornamusa, chitarra, flauto – o due fino all’orchestra) con arrangiamenti classici, tradizionali, new age, per bande anche militari e corali. Su Spotify è possibile trovare moltissime versioni del brano e proprio per tutti i gusti! Tra quelle strumentali le mie preferite sono quelle con la chitarra di Greg Joy, Pete Lashley, Tom Rennie, ma anche una versione con arpa e flauto di Anne-Elise Keefer e una versione “insolita” (con tanto di basso-tuba o oboe) dei Leaf!

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
Over the sea to Skye
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head
III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
RITORNELLO
Veloce, bella barca,
come un uccello sulle ali

Avanti! Gridano i marinai!
Porta il ragazzo nato per essere re (1)
oltre il mare a Skye (2)
I
Forte ulula il vento,
forte ruggiscono le onde,
nubi minacciose riempiono il cielo;
frastornati i nostri nemici si fermano a riva e non osano seguirci
II
Benchè i flutti si accavallino,
il tuo sonno sarà docile
e l’oceano il letto del re
cullato dal mare (3),
Flora (4) vigilerà
vegliando sulla tua testa stanca
III
In molti combatterono quel giorno,
brandendo bene le spade, quando la notte venne in silenzio, giacevano morti  sul campo di Culloden (5).
IV
Bruciate le nostre case, esilio o morte,
dispersi gli uomini leali (6),
tuttavia prima che la spada si raffreddi nel fodero,
Carlo verrà di nuovo (7)


NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlandscontinua
2) L’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne, ma suona come “cielo” e quindi una metafora, l’autore lo impalma come eroe nel firmamento
3)  “rocked” è da intendersi, come in molte sea song e sea shanty (e in qualche lullaby), nel senso di dondolio (della culla in particolare)
4) Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790) che aiutò il principe nella fuga  continua
5) per l’approfondimento ho dedicato un’intera pagina ai Giacobiti vedi
6) la repressione inglese contro i giacobiti e i simpatizzanti fu brutale
7) nel 1884 Charles Stuart era ormai polvere, ma la letteratura romantica manteneva ancora vive le aspirazioni giacobite e i canti infiammavano ancora gli animi

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)Nel 1896 lo scrittore scozzese Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) scrisse una variante con nuove parole, evidentemente non soddisfatto di quanto scritto da un baronetto inglese.

Stevenson mette il canto in bocca allo stesso Charles, vecchio e disfatto nel suo esilio “dorato” tra Roma e Firenze. L’Alfieri ce lo descrive come irragionevole e sempre ubriaco padrone, ovvero querulo, sragionevole e sempre ebro marito (ma doveva avere il dente avvelenato essendo stato per anni l’amante della molto più giovane e bella moglie Luisa di Stolberg-Gedern contessa d’Albany). Il Principe sempre più amareggiato e dedito all’alcol, morì a Roma il 31 gennaio 1788 (abbandonato anche dalla moglie quattro anni prima).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
di Robert Louis Stevenson
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
OLTRE IL MARE PER SKYE
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Cantami del ragazzo del passato
dici, “Potrei essere io quello?”
con l’avventura nel cuore(1), salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Mull era a poppa, Rum era a babordo, Eigg sulla prua a dritta.
Gloria di gioventù brillava nel suo spirito, dov’è quella gloria ora?
III
Dammi ancora tutto ciò che fu,
dammi il sole che risplendeva
dammi la visione (2), dammi l’anima
dammi il ragazzo del passato
IV
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari
montagne di pioggia e di sole;
tutto ciò che era buono e giusto
tutto quello che ero, è morto

NOTE
1) “merry of soul” inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice” (per esempio She’s a merry little soul)
2) letteralmente dammi gli occhi

LA VERSIONE OUTLANDER

Più recentemente la canzone “Over the Sea to Skye” è stata ripresa nella serie “The Outlander” dalla saga di Diana Gabaldon ed è subito skyemania..
Il testo è modellato sulla versione di Robert Louis Stevenson anche se ogni riferimento al bel Carletto è stato sostituito dal “viaggio nel tempo” della bella Claire Randall  (dal 1945 nel 1743)

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbroug


I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul, she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Cantami di una ragazza del passato,
dici, “Potrei essere io quella?”
con l’avventura nel cuore (1) lei salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari,
montagne con la pioggia e il sole
Tutto ciò  che era bello e buono,
tutto quello che ero è morto.

NOTE
1 ) “merry of sou” viene inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice”
la strofa in francese
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye

Versione ulteriormente riarrangiata da Bear McCreary in seguito al successo della serie e completata con le strofe di Robert Louis Stevenson
Outlander -The Skye Boat Song(Extended)

Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song La versione francese

Per l’ambientazione nel Mar dei Caraibi Bear McCreary ha ulteriormente arrangianto la vecchia melodia tradizionale scozzese sviluppando l’elemento percussivo e melodico
Outlander Season III

 FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

COMIN THRO’ THE RYE

“Camminando in un campo di segale” è una nursery rhyme che nasce però come canzone a doppio senso (e della quale esistono versioni decisamente sconce).
Il testo oggi fa sorridere ma all’epoca in cui circolava (sicuramente il settecento ma potrebbe anche essere antecedente) era decisamente sconveniente: un tempo nei campi non solo si lavorava, ma ci si scambiavano effusioni più o meno spinte, e solo i due interessati potevano sapere fino a che punto si fossero fermati (o a quale conclusione fossero addivenuti).

LA MELODIA

Per i fans di Diana Gabaldon e la serie televisiva Outlander che ha debuttato negli States nel 2014 (la prima Tv in Italia risale all’estate 2015)
ASCOLTA l’arrangiamento strumentale di Bear McCreary in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) ascolta su Spotify (qui)

Coming Through The Rye  è anche un Scottish country dance

LA VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS (1796)

W. Napier scrive a proposito : “The original words of “Comin’ thro’ the rye” cannot be satisfactorily traced. There are many different versions of the song. The version which is now to be found in the Works of Burns is the one given in Johnson’s Museum, which passed through the hands of Burns; but the song itself, in some form or other, was known long before Burns” (Napier 1876 in Notes and Queries)
Nello “Scots Musical Museum” Volume V ci sono due versioni del testo, il primo (#417) è attribuito a Robert Burns il secondo (#418) non ha attribuzioni.

Se la donna non grida “al lupo” nessuno può sapere quello che accade tra la segale, ma l’autore aggiunge: il fatto non deve essere di pubblico dominio bensì è una faccenda personale; è implicita la polemica verso i pettegolezzi e i giudizi dei puritani (o bigotti) sempre pronti a condannare come immorali le pulsioni sessuali che la Natura richiama.

ASCOLTA Ian Bruce

Scots Museum vol V # 417
Robert Burns
I
O Jenny’s a’ weet, poor body,
Jenny’s seldom dry:
She draigl’t(1) a’ her petticoatie,
Comin thro’ the rye(2)!
II
Comin thro’ the rye, poor body,
Comin thro’ the rye,
She draigl’t a’ her petticoatie,
Comin thro’ the rye!
III
Gin(3) a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the rye,
Gin a body kiss a body,
Need a body cry(4)?
IV
Gin a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the glen,
Gin a body kiss a body,
Need the warld(5) ken(6)?
V (strofa aggiuntiva)
Gin a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the grain,
Gin a body kiss a body,
The thing’s a body’s ain(7).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oh Jenny è tutta bagnata poverina
Jenny sta raramente all’asciutto
sta inzuppando (infangando) le sue sottovesti camminando in un campo di segale
II
camminando in un campo di segale, poverina
camminando in un campo di segale
sta infangando le sue sottovesti
camminando in un campo di segale
III
Se una persona incontra una persona
che cammina in un campo di segale
se una persona bacia una persona
deve una persona piangere?
IV
Se una persona incontra una persona
che cammina nella valle
se una persona bacia una persona
lo debbono sapere tutti?
V (strofa aggiuntiva non in Burns)
Se una persona incontra una persona
che cammina in un campo di grano
se una persona bacia una persona
sono affari suoi

NOTE
1) draigl’t – draggled: ‘covered with mud’ o ‘drenched’.
2) rye è la segale, ma un’altra interpretazione, pubblicata nel Glasgow Herald del 1867 suggerisce che il Rye è un fiume dell’Ayrshire e che la canzone si riferisce ad un guado  a nord di Drakemyre (non lontano dalla confluenza del fiume Rye con il River Garnock).
3) gin – if, should
4) cry – call out [for help] nel senso di chiedere aiuto
5) warld – world
6) ken – know
7) ain – own; tradotto letteralmente: la cosa riguarda la persona stessa

Traduzione Inglese
di Michael R. Burch
I
Oh, Jenny’s all wet, poor body,
Jenny’s seldom dry;
She’s draggin’ all her petticoats
Comin’ through the rye.
II
Comin’ through the rye, poor body,
Comin’ through the rye.
She’s draggin’ all her petticoats
Comin’ through the rye.
III
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the rye,
Should a body kiss a body,
Need anybody cry?
IV
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the glen,
Should a body kiss a body,
Need all the world know, then?
V
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the grain,
Should a body kiss a body,
The thing is a body’s own

Ma la canzone ha molte varianti tramandati dalla tradizione orale, come questa

ASCOLTA Blialam

I
Gin a body meet a body
Comin through the rye
Gin a body kiss a body
Need a body cry?
Chorus
Ilka lassie has her laddie
Nane, they say, hae I
Yet aa the lads they smile at me
When comin through the rye
II
Gin a body meet a body
Comin through the toon,
Gin a body greet a body
Need a body froon?
III
Amang the train there is a swain
I dearly loe masel
But what’s his name
an where’s his hame
I dinna care to tell
IV
Gin a body meet a body
Comin frae the well
Gin a body kiss a body
Need a body tell?

Nelle versioni americane Jenny diventa Sally, una melodia old-time
ASCOLTA The Ephemeral Stringband
La versione cantata dai The Real McKenzies aggiunge ulteriori variazioni

 
CHORUS
Gin a body meet a body,
Comin’ thro’ the rye,
Gin a body meet a body,
Nae a body cry!
Ilka lassie ha’e ha laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I,
When all the lassies smile at me,
We’re comin’ thro’ the rye!
I
Gin a body meet a body,
Comin’ thro’ the town,
Gin a body meet a body,
Nae a body frown!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Se una persona incontra una persona
che cammina in un campo di segale
se una persona incontra una persona
deve una persona piangere?
Ogni ragazza ha il suo ragazzo
ma io non ne ho nessuno, dicono
quando tutte le ragazze mi sorridono
camminiamo in un campo di segale
I
Se una persona incontra una persona
che cammina in città
se una persona incontra una persona
nessuno deve disapprovare!
E infine la versione come nursery rhymes
I
If a body meet a body,
Comin’ through the rye;
If a body kiss a body,
Need a body cry?
II
Every lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I;
Yet all the lads they smile on me,
When comin’ through the rye!
III
If a body meet a body,
Comin’ through the town;
If a body greet a body,
Need a body frown?
IV
Every lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I;
Yet all the lads they smile on me,
When comin’ through the rye!

FONTI
http://musicofyesterday.com/sheet-music-c/comin-thro-rye-burns/
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-v,-song-417,-page-430-comin-thro-the-rye.aspx
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-v,-song-418,-page-431-comin-thro-the-rye.aspx
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4555472.asp
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/CominThroughTheRye.html
http://milwburnsclub.virtualimprint.com/songs/throrye.htm
https://daeandwrite.wordpress.com/tag/catcher-in-the-rye-book-club-menu/
http://discoveryholden.blogspot.it/2010/03/catcher-in-rye-cosa-si-nasconde-dietro.html
http://stooryduster.co.uk/draiglet/

Bonnie banks of Loch Lomond

From “Drums of Autumn” of the Outlander saga written by Diana Gabaldon chapter 4.
In the future Roger sings many popular airs at the Celtic Festival in New England (Outlander Season 4, episode 3)
“And for the last, an old favorite that you’ll know. This song is said to have been sent by a Jacobite prisoner, on his way to London to be hanged, to his wife in the Highlands…” 

“By yon bonnie banks, and by yon bonnie braes, 
Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomond, 
Where me and my true love were ever wont to gae…” 
But me and my true love will never meet again 
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.
[In “Tamburi d’Autunno” della saga “La Straniera” di Diana Gabaldon, capitolo 4.
Nel futuro Roger canta molti brani popolari al Festival Celtico nel New England (Outlander stagione 4, terzo episodio)
“E per finire una vecchia canzone che conoscete bene. Si dice che fosse stata inviata a sua moglie nelle Highlands da un prigioniero giacobita mentre veniva condotto a Londra per essere impiccato”

THE LOVERS LETTER
[LA LETTERA D’AMORE DI DONALD MACDONALD]

Loch Lomond is the largest lake in Great Britain and is located in the Lowlands, in southern Scotland, between the counties of Stirling, Argyll and Bute and West Dunbartonshire, dotted with thirty or so islands, has preserved its most natural aspect in the eastern part .
The lake is the background of a hugely popular ballad with uncertain origins The Bonnie Banks or ‘Loch Lomond which holds a romantic and tragic love story of two young lovers separated by the war.
Il Loch Lomond è il più grande lago della Gran Bretagna e si trova nelle Lowlands, nella Scozia meridionale, tra le contee di Stirling, Argyll e Bute e West Dunbartonshire, punteggiato da una trentina di isolette ha conservato nella parte orientale l’aspetto più naturale.
Il lago è lo sfondo di una popolarissima ballata dalle incerte origini The Bonnie Banks o’ Loch Lomond che custodisce una romantica e tragica storia d’amore di due giovani innamorati separati dalla guerra.

Loch Lomond

THE LOVERS LETTER
[LA LETTERA D’AMORE DI DONALD MACDONALD]

He is a MacDonald, a jacobite who supported the 1745 uprising and fighted for Scotland’s freedom. This is the Jacobite version, probably the oldest version of the song written in 1746 or a few years later. After Culloden the defeated Scots not executed on the battlefield were taken to Carlise’s prison waiting to be hanged as traitors. Legend has it that one of them, Donald MacDonald, wrote this song in a love letter for his Moira who lived by Lake Lomond. History tells us that Donald MacDonald (or Macdonnell) of Tiendrish (or Tirnadrish) cousin of the Keppoch was taken prisoner in Falkirk and hanged in Carlisle in 1746 (see)
Lui è un MacDonald che non può esimersi di partire con i suoi uomini per sostenere la rivolta del 1745 e combattere per la libertà della Scozia. Questa è la versione in chiave giacobita, probabilmente la versione più antica scritta nel 1746 o circolata qualche hanno più tardi. Gli scozzesi sconfitti non giustiziati sul campo di battaglia furono portati nella prigione di Carlise in attesa di essere impiccati come traditori. La leggenda narra che uno di essi, Donald MacDonald scrisse questa canzone in una lettera d’amore per la sua Moira che viveva presso il lago Lomond. La storia ci dice che Donald MacDonald (o Macdonnell) di Tiendrish (o Tirnadrish) cugino dei Keppoch fu preso prigioniero a Falkirk e impiccato a Carlisle nel 1746 (vedi)

“Legend of Loch Lomond” (2001) – Mike Slee 

FIRST VERSION: an Aisling

Tune= Robin Cushie (“King Robin ashe”, “Kind Robin Loves Me”), in McGibbons Scots Tunes Vol I ( 1742).

In this ballad the protagonist is Moira, this version reported by Matt Mcginn also presents some obscure passages: it is probably a dialogue between two people, the afflicted woman who wanders in the places where she had lived her happy moments of love and a “vision “. In the third stanza the “voice” tries to console her by telling her that her love will return from the battle as a hero, but she is desperate because she dreamed of an omen of death and saw her Ronald covered in blood; and we arrive at the sixth stanza on which everything has been said on the net and more.
In my opinion, the meaning is this: she wants to die for welcome his hero who’ll arrive in Heaven along the high road. But we know that the lyrics of the ballads are a cut and sew and every singer embroider on the story as he sees fit!
Nella ballata la protagonista è Moira, questa versione riportata da Matt Mcginn presenta peraltro dei passaggi oscuri: probabilmente è un dialogo tra due persone, la donna afflitta che si aggira nei luoghi in cui aveva vissuto i suoi felici momenti d’amore e una “visione” . Nella terza strofa la “voce” cerca di consolarla dicendole che il suo amore ritornerà dalla battaglia come un eroe, ma lei si dispera perchè ha sognato un presagio di morte e ha visto il suo Ronald ricoperto di sangue; e si arriva alla VI strofa su cui in rete si è detto di tutto e di più.
A mio avviso il significato è questo: lei ha preso la decisione di lasciarsi morire per poter accogliere il suo amante quando anche lui arriverà in Cielo percorrendo la strada maestra (la strada degli eroi). Ma si sa che i testi delle ballate sono un taglia e cuci e ogni cantore ricama sulla storia come meglio crede!

Matt Mcginn in “Little Ticks of Time” 1969

The Corries live (I, IV, II, V, VII)

DONALD MCDONNELL
I
Whither away  (1)
my  bonnie, bonnie May
Sae late an’ sae far in the gloamin’
The mist gathers grey
o’er moorland and brae
O whither alane art thou roamin’?
CHORUS (the Corries version)
Oh! Ye’ll take the high road,
and I’ll take the low road,
And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye,
for me and my true love
will never meet again,
On the bonnie, bonnie
banks of Loch Lomond.

II
I trysted my ain love
last night in the broom
My Ranald (Donald) wha’ loves me sae dearly
For the morrow he marches
for Edinburgh toon
Tae fecht for the King and Prince Charlie (2)
III
Yet, why weep you sae,
my bonnie, bonnie May
Your true love from battle returning
His darling (3) will claim
at the height o’ his fame
And change into gladness
her mourning (4)
IV
O well may I weep for yestreen in my sleep
we stood bride and bridegroom together
But his lops (arms) and his breath
were as chilly (cold) as the death
And his heart’s bluid
was red on the heather
V
Oh, dauntless in battle
as tender in love
He’d yield ne’er a foot toe the foeman
and never again frae the field o’ the slain
Tae Moira he’ll come and Loch Lomond
VI
He’ll tak’ the high road (5)
and I’ll tak’ the low
And I’ll be in Heaven afore him
For my bed is prepared
in yon mossy graveyard
‘Mang the hazels o’ green Inverarnan 6)
VII
The thistle shall bloom,
the King hae his ain
And fond lovers
meet in the gloamin’
But I and my true love
shall never meet again
By the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Dove vai
mia bella, bella May
così tardi e ancora nel crepuscolo?
La nebbia si addensa grigia
sulla brughiera e sulla collin
Oh dove vai in giro tutta sola?”
RITORNELLO
Oh, tu prenderai la via maestra
ed io quella comune
e io arriverò in Scozia prima di te
ma il mio vero amore ed io
non ci incontreremo mai più
sulle belle, belle rive
del Lago Lomond

II
“Incontrai il mio unico amore,
l’altra notte nella brughiera,
il mio Ranald che mi ama teneramente
perchè al mattino marcerà
per la città di Edimburgo
per combattere per il re e il principe Carlo”
III
“Perchè piangi così, 
mia bella bella May?
Il tuo vero amore dalla battaglia ritornerà,
la sua innamorata lo acclamerà
all’apice della fama
e muterà in allegria
il lamento.”
IV
“Oh piango perchè nel sogno di ieri notte
noi fummo insieme come marito e moglie
ma le sue braccia e il suo fiato
erano freddi come la morte
ed il sangue del suo cuore
scorreva rosso sull’edera!
V
Tanto temerario in battaglia
come tenero in amore
affrontava il nemico faccia a faccia,
ma mai più dal campo di battaglia
tornerà dalla sua Moira presso Loch Lomond.
VI
Lui prenderà la via maestra
ed io quella comune,
io sarò in paradiso per prima
perchè il mio letto è pronto
in quella tomba coperta di muschio,
tra i noccioli del verde Inverarnan.
VII
Il cardo fiorirà
ed il re avrà ciò che si merita,
e gli amanti appassionati
si ritroveranno al crepuscolo,
ma io ed il mio amore
non ci incontreremo mai più
sulle belle rive di Loch Lomond!”

NOTE
1) adv. In comb. whidder awawhither, to what place (from DSL)
2) The Old Pretender and The Yung Pretender -about Jacobites
3) qui inizia il bello ci sono due donne May e Moira? Molto probabilmente i versi sono stati elaborati da un lungo processo di trasmissione orale che li ha mischiati e confusi
4) il lamento funebre
5) The heads of the executed rebels were set upon pikes and exhibited in all of the towns between London and Edinburgh along the “high road” [le teste dei ribelli giustiziati, erano infilate su delle picche ed esibite in tutte le città tra Londra ed Edimburgo lungo la via maestra] 
6) Inverarnan is the village where Moira lives on the banks of the Falloch River that flows into the lake [Inverarnan è il paese dove vive Moira sulle rive del fiume Falloch che si immette nel lago]

STANDARD VERSION

This is the most widespread and well known version of the ballad written by Lady John Scott or Alicia Scott Spottiswoode (1810-1900) who collected it in the streets of Edinburgh.
[Questa è la versione più diffusa e conosciuta della ballata scritta da Lady John Scott ovvero Alicia Scott Spottiswoode (1810-1900) che la raccolse nelle strade di Edimburgo.]

Ella Roberts

Irish Roses

Chanticleer (over dose of sugar!)

LADY JOHN SCOTT
in Vocal Melodies of Scotland, 1841  
I
By yon bonnie banks
and by yon bonnie braes (1),
Where the sun shines bright
on Loch Lomond
Where me and my true love
were ever wont to gae (2),
On the bonnie bonnie banks
of Loch Lomond.
CHORUS
Oh! Ye’ll take the high road,
and I’ll take the low road,
And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye,
for me and my true love
will never meet again,
On the bonnie, bonnie
banks of Loch Lomond.

II
‘Twas then that we parted,
In yon shady glen,
On the steep, steep side
of Ben Lomond,
Where, in purple hue,
The highland hills we view,
And the moon coming out in the gloaming.
III
The wee birdies sing,
And the wild flowers spring,
And in sunshine the waters are sleeping.
the broken heart it kens (3),
Nae second spring again,
Though the waeful may cease
frae their greeting

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Su quelle belle rive
e per quelle belle colline
dove il sole brilla luminoso
sul lago Lomond
dove io e il mio vero amore
eravamo soliti andare,
sulle belle, belle rive
del Lago Lomond
RITORNELLO
Oh, tu prenderai la via maestra
ed io quella comune
e io arriverò in Scozia prima di te
ma il mio vero amore ed io
non ci incontreremo mai più
sulle belle, belle rive
del Lago Lomond

II
Fu allora che ci separammo
in quella valle rigogliosa
sugli scoscesi, scoscesi versanti
di Ben Lomond
dove in sfumature viola
si vedono le montagne degli altopiani
e la luna che spunta nel crepuscolo
III
Gli uccellini cantano
e i fiori selvatici sbocciano
e sotto i raggi del sole le acque sonnecchiano;
ma si sa che il cuore spezzato
non fiorirà di nuovo
anche se coloro che sono tristi
smettessero di piangere

NOTE
1) braes: hills
2) gae: go
3) kens: knows

Andrew Lang poem

The Scottish poet and folklorist Andrew Lang in 1876 wrote his version of the story which remained however in the form of poetry
[Il poeta scozzese e folklorista Andrew Lang  nel 1876 ha scritto la sua versione della storia che è rimasta però in forma di poesia]

Andrew Lang (1844-1912)
I
There’s an ending o’ the dance,
and fair Morag(1)’s safe in France,
And the Clans they hae paid the lawing (2),
And the wuddy (3) has her ain,
and we twa are left alane,
Free o’ Carlisle gaol in the dawing (4).
II
So ye’ll tak the high road,
and I’ll tak the laigh road,
An’ I’ll be in Scotland before ye:
But me and my true love
will never meet again,
By the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomond.
III
For my love’s heart brake in twa,
when she kenned the Cause’s fa’,
And she sleeps where there’s
never nane shall waken,
Where the glen lies a’ in wrack,
wi’ the houses toom and black,
And her father’s ha’s forsaken.
IV
While there’s heather on the hill
shall my vengeance ne’er be still,
While a bush hides
the glint o’ a gun, lad;
Wi’ the men o’ Sergeant Môr (5)
shall I work to pay the score,
Till I wither on the wuddy
in the sun, lad!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’è un finale della danza e il coraggioso Carlo è al sicuro in Francia,
e i Clan hanno pagato alla resa dei conti ,
e la corda del boia ha il suo da fare,
e noi due siamo rimasti soli,
libertà o il carcere di Carlise all’alba
II
Così tu prenderai la via maestra,
e io quella comune,
e sarò in Scozia prima di te:
ma il mio amore ed io
non ci incontreremo mai più
sulle belle rive del Lago Lomond
III
Ma il cuore del mio amore si è spezzato in due, quando capì che la Causa era perduta,
e lei dorme dove nessuno
la potrà mai più svegliare,
dove la valle si trova tutta in rovina,
con le case vuote e nere,
e la dimora di famiglia è abbandonata.
IV
Finchè c’è l’erica sulla collina
la mia vendetta non avrà mai fine,
mentre il cespuglio nasconde
lo scintillio di un moschetto, ragazzo;
con gli uomini del Sergente Môr
combatterò per saldare il conto
fino a quando io avvizzirò al sole
dalla corda del boia, ragazzo!

NOTE
1) morag in Gaelic means “great one” referring to the Bonnie Prince who fled to France after Culloden [morag in gaelico significa “il grande” riferendosi al Bonnie Prince]
2) Lawing= reckoning
3) wuddy= hangman’s rope
4) dawing= dawn
5) John Du Cameron, Prince Charles’s supporter, continued fighting as an outlaw against the English until he was hanged in 1753 [John Du Cameron sostenitore del Principe Carlo continuò a combattere come fuorilegge contro gli inglesi fino a che fu impiccato nel 1753]

Bear McCreary in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack): Castle Leoch

LINK
http://www.bletherskite.net/2013/05/24/the-sonny-sonny-banks-of-loch-lomond/
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/l/lolomond.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9274
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2785
http://www.janson.com/rights/2009/06/26/legend-of-loch-lomond/
https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/html/1807/4350/poem2530.html

The Irish variant