Archivi tag: Capercaillie

Fear a’ bhàta

Leggi in italiano

“Fear a ‘bhata” is a Scottish Gaelic song probably from the end of the 18th century and the legend (an anecdotal addition to the nineteenth century versions printed) says it was written by Sine NicFhionnlaigh (Jean Finlayson) of Tong, a small village on the Isle of Lewis (Hebrides) for a young Uig fisherman, Domhnall MacRath (Donald MacRae) who eventually married.
‘Fear’ translates as “man” and “Bhata” with “boat”: the man of the boat, or the boatman. Also written as Fear A Bhata, Fear Ah Bhata, Fhear A Bhata, Fhear Ni Bhata, Fhir A’ Bhata, Fir Na Fhata, O(h) My Boatman.

Homer Winslow
Homer Winslow

The song appears first published in The Scottish Gael byJames Logan, 1831 (with its score) in which it is classified as a slow and an iorram (the song to the oars that had the function of giving rhythm to the rowers, but at the same time it was also a funeral lament). “Fhir a bhata, or the boatmen, the music of which is annexed, is sung in the above manner, by the Highlanders with much effect. It is the song of a girl whose lover is at sea, whose safety she prays for, and whose return she anxiously expects.

The melody is a lament, sometimes played as a waltz (in instrumental versions) that lends itself to delicate and smooth arrangements

Maire Breatnach on fiddle (live at Dougie MacLean‘ s house)

There are many text versions of the song composed of about ten verses although in the most current recordings only the first three stanzas are sung mostly.

For the full text see

Scottish gaelic version

The girl is waiting for a visit of the handsome boatman who seems instead to prefer other girls! But she waits for him and frowns worried about the health of her handsome boatman.

Capercaillie from Get Out 1996

Superb and masterly recording a voice and the waves of the sea
 Talitha Mackenzie from “A Celtic Tapestry” vol. 2 1997

Alison Helzer  from Carolan’s Welcome, 2010.



English translation
Chorus:
Oh my boatman, na hóro eile
Oh my boatman, na hóro eile
Oh my boatman, na hóro eile
My farewell to you wherever you go
I
I often look from the highest hill
To try and see the boatman
Will you come today or tomorrow If you don’t come at all I will be downhearted
II
My heart is broken and bruised
With tears often flowing from my eyes
Will you come tonight or will I expect you
Or will I close the door with a sad sigh?
III
I often ask people on boats
Whether they see you or whether you are safe,
Each of them says
That I was foolish to fall in love with you.

Scottish Gaelic
Séist:
Fhir a’ bhàta, sna hóro eile
Fhir a’ bhàta, sna hóro eile
Fhir a’ bhàta, sna hóro eile
Mo shoraidh slàn leat ‘s gach àit’ an tèid thu
I
‘S tric mi sealltainn on chnoc as àirde
Dh’fheuch am faic mi fear a’ bhàta
An tig thu ‘n-diugh no ‘n tig thu màireach
‘S mur tig thu idir gur truagh a tha mi
II
Tha mo chridhe-sa briste brùite
‘S tric na deòir a’ ruith o m’ shùilean
An tig thu ‘n nochd no ‘m bi mo dhùil riut
No ‘n dùin mi ‘n doras le osna thùrsaich?
III
‘S tric mi foighneachd de luchd nam bàta
Am faic iad thu no ‘m bheil   thu sàbhailt
Ach ‘s ann a tha gach aon dhiubh ‘g ràitinn
Gur gòrach mise, ma thug mi  gràdh dhut

Irish Gaelic version

The Irish version appears for the first time in print in the Sam Henry collection entitled ‘Songs of the People‘. The songs were collected within 20 miles of Coleraine (Northern Ireland) from 1929 to 1939. It is an Irish Gaelic coming from Rathlin Island and more generally  widespread in Ulster, therefore with much resemblance to the Scottish Gaelic.

Niamh Parsons live and from Gaelic Voices 1999 (I, II, IV, V)

And why not! Let’s listen to this celtic-metal version of the German group founded by Ben Richter in 2001!
Thanateros ( I, II, V)

 

 

English translation (from here)
Chorus:
O Boatman and another “horo”! [i.e. welcome] /A hundred thousand welcomes everywhere you go
I
I went up on the highest hill
To see if I could see the boatman
Will you come tonight or will you come tomorrow?
If you do not come, I will be wretched
II
My heart is broken and crushed.
Frequent are the tears that run from my eyes. /Will you come today or when I’m longing for you, /Or shall I close the door with a tired sigh?
III
I gave you my love, and I cannot change that.
Not love for a year, and not just words of love,
But love from the beginning, when I was a child, /And I will never cease, even when my death bell tolls.
IV
My love promised me a dress of silk
He promised me that and a gray tartan
A gold ring where I’d see my reflection
But I’m afraid he has forgotten
IV
My heart is lifting
Not for the tailor or the harper
But for the navigator of the boat
If you don’t come, I’ll be very sad
Irish Gaelic (from here)
Chorus:
Fhir an bháta ‘sna hóró éile (1)
Fhir an bháta ‘sna hóró éile
Fhir an bháta ‘sna hóró éile
Ceád mile failte gach ait a te tú (2)
I
Théid mé suas ar an chnoic is airde,
Féach an bhfeic mé fear an bháta.
An dtig thú anoch nó an dtig thú amárach?
Nó muna dtig thú idir is trua atá mé.
II
Tá mo chroí-se briste brúite.
Is tric na deora a rith bho mo shúileann.
An dtig thú inniu nó am bidh mé dúil leat,
Nó an druid mé an doras le osna thuirseach?
III
Thúg mé gaol duit is chan fhéad mé ‘athrú.
Cha gaol bliana is cha gaol raithe.
Ach gaol ó thoiseacht nuair bha mé ‘mo pháiste,
Is nach seasc a choíche me ‘gus claoibh’ am bás mé.
IV
Gheall mo leanann domh gúna den tsioda
Gheall é sin, agus breacan riabhach
Fainne óir anns an bhfeicfinn íomha
Ach is eagal liom go ndearn sé dearmad
V
Tá mo croíse ag dul in airde
Chan don fidleir, chan don clairsoir
Ach do Stuirithoir an bhata
Is muna dtig tú abhaile is trua atá mé

NOTES
1) basically a non-sense phrase that some want to translate “and no one else” ie as “mine and no other”
2) or “mo shoraidh slán leat gach áit a dté tú”

My Boatman (english version)

LINK
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/foghlam/beag_air_bheag/songs/
song_03/index.shtml

http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Scottish/FearABhata.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=121195
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2463
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/compilations/fear.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/fear.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/8919
http://blueloulogan.wordpress.com/2012/10/15/songs-of-logan-6-fear-a-bhata-the-boatman/

Aileen Duinn, Brown-haired Alan

Leggi in italiano

“Aileen Duinn” is a Scottish Gaelic song from the Hebrides: a widow/sweetheart lament for the sinking of a fishing boat, originally a waulking song in which she invokes her death to share the same seaweed bed with her lover, Alan.
According to the tradition on the island of Lewis Annie Campbell wrote the song in despair over the death of her sweetheart Alan Morrison, a ship captain who in the spring of 1788 left Stornoway to go to Scalpay where he was supposed to marry his Annie, but the ship ran into a storm and the entire crew was shipwrecked and drowned: she too will die a few months later, shocked by grief. His body was found on the beach, near the spot where the sea had returned the body of Ailein Duinn (black-haired Alan).

 The song became famous because inserted into the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy and masterfully interpreted by Karen Matheson (the singer of the Scottish group Capercaillie who appears in the role of a commoner and sings it near the fire)

Here is the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy: Ailein Duinn and Morag’s Lament, (arranged by Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in which the second track is the opening verse followed by the chorus

FIRST VERSION

The text is reduced to a minimum, more evocative than explanatory of a tragic event that it was to be known to all the inhabitants of the island. The woman who sings is marked by immense pain, because her black-haired Alain is drowned at the bottom of the sea, and she wants to share his sleep in the abyss by a macabre blood covenant.

Capercaillie from To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, the voice ‘kissed by God’ switches from the whisper to the cry, in the crashing waves blanding into bagpipes lament.

Meav, from Meav 2000 angelic voice, harp and flute

Annwn from Aeon – 2009 German group founded in 2006 of Folk Mystic; their interpretation is very intense even in the rarefaction of the arrangement, with the limpid and warm voice of Sabine Hornung, the melody carried by the harp, a few echoes of the flute and the lament of the violin: magnificent.

Trobar De Morte  the text reduced to only two verses and extrapolated from the context lends itself to be read as the love song of a mermaid in the surf of the sea (see also Mermaid’s croon)

It is the most reproduced textual version with the most different musical styles, roughly after 2000, also as sound-track in many video games (for example Medieval II Total War)

english translation
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go (1) with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(2)
I would drink(3), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
Scottish Gaelic
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\
shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,

NOTES
1) to die, to follow
2) for the inhabitants of the Hebrides Islands the seals are not simple animals, but magical creatures called selkie, which at night take the form of drowned men and women. Considered a sort of guardians of the Sea or gardeners of the sea bed every night or only on full moon nights, they would abandon their skins to reveal their human form, to sing and dance on the silver cliffs (here)
3) refers to an ancient Celtic ritual, consisting in drinking the blood of a friend as a sign of affection (the covenant of blood), a custom cited by Shakespeare (still practiced by all the friends of the heart who exchange blood with a shallow cut and joining the two cuts; it was also practiced for the handfasting in Scotland: once the handfasting was above all a pact of blood, in which the right wrist of the spouses was engraved with the tip of a dagger until the blood spurts, after which the two wrists were tied in close contact with each other with the “wedlock’s band” (see more.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECOND VERSION

Here is the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) from “Songs of the Hebrides“, see also Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) in his “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake from “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  from “Ships Ahoy !” 2011  

(english translation Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(scottish gaelic)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn,
o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat

Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart
an talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

Another translation in English with the title “Annie Campbell’s Lament”
Estrange Waters from Songs of the Water, 2016

Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..

THIRD VERSION

The most suggestive and dramatic version is that reported by Flora MacNeil who she has learned  from her mother. Born in 1928 on the Isle of Barra, she is a Scottish singer who owns hundreds of songs in Scottish Gaelic. “Traditional songs tended to run in families and I was fortunate that my mother and her family had a great love for the poetry and the music of the old songs. It was natural for them to sing, whatever they were doing at the time or whatever mood they were in. My aunt Mary, in particular, was always ready, at any time I called on her, to drop whatever she was doing, to discuss a song with me, and perhaps, in this way, long forgotten verses would be recollected. So I learned a great many songs at an early age without any conscious effort. As is to be expected on a small island, so many songs deal with the sea, but, of course, many of them may not originally be Barra songs”

A different story from Flora MacNeil’s family: the woman is married to Alain MacLeann who dies in the shipwreck with all the other men of her family: her father and brothers; the woman turns to the seagull that flies high over the sea and sees everything, as a witness of the misfortune; the last verse traces poetic images of a funeral of the sea, with the bed of seaweed, the stars like candles, the murmur of the waves for the music and the seals as guardians.

Flora MacNeil from  a historical record of 1951.


English translation
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
Scottish Gaelic
Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

NOTES
(1) Tuesday is still the day on which traditionally marriages are celebrated on the Island of Barra

FOURTH VERSION

Still a version set just like a waulking song and yet a different text, this time the ship is a whaler and Allen is shipwrecked near the Isle of Man.

Mac-Talla, from Gaol Is Ceol 1994, only the female voices and the notes of a harp, but what immediacy …

English translation
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi, I would go with thee.
I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

CHORUS
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
Scottish Gaelic
S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

LINK
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm

Aodann Srath Bhain  (The Slopes of Strath Ban)

Leggi in italiano

The Gaelic name Srath Bhàthain translates to English as “the valley of the Blane”, with reference to the Blane Water is ‘The Braes of Strathblane’ ballad, also sung in Scottish Gaelic, may have originated in Stirlingshire; it is however widespread in the Hebrides and in Ireland like “The Banks of Strathdon”
‘The Braes of Strathblane’ is a song which is firmly based in the oral tradition. As a result it is difficult to pinpoint its origins and author. It is, however, one of many folksongs which feature the braes of a village and young love. This song, indeed, an identical match to the lyrics of ‘The Braes of Strathdon’, which lies in Aberdeenshire. On other broadsides the suggested to tune to these lyrics is often ‘As I stood at my cottage door’.see)

SCOTTISH GAELIC VERSION

lavandaiaWidespread in the Hebrides and sung in Scottish Gaelic ballad’s history is a bit unusual compared to the “courting songs”: a young washerwoman refuses the proposal of marriage of her suitor (apparently a idle lad and not liked by her parents) and he instead to wander desperately and disconsolate for some distant valley (as would happen in an Irish song) goes to woo some other more available girl. In the last verses the girl complains about having let slip the opportunity to get married (with the fear of being a spinster forever)!

Capercaillie in “Delirium”, 1991.

Aodann Srath Bhain  (The Slopes of Strath Ban)

English translation *
I
Walking out early alone
on a morning in May
Among green fields,
an outcast and purposeless,
I saw a maiden
who lived some way above me
As she washed her clothes
out on the slopes of Strath Ban.
II
I then climbed upwards
to the maiden I loved was
And courteously and mildly
I spoke to her
“It’s over a year
since our love began,
And if you are willing
we shall marry at once.”
III
“Marry? To Marry
I’m too young
Your sort has tongue
that could cause trouble anywhere;
My father and mother
would scold me forever more
If I were to marry the likes of you,
you feckless young man.’
IV
But you young girls everywhere
who are still unmarried,
Don’t go turning young men down through pride or contempt.
How sad for me
to be unmarried forever more-
I’ll have to live alone,
out on the slopes of Strath Ban.

I
‘S mi ri imeachd nam aonar
Anns an òg-mhadain Mhàigh
Feadh lèantaichean uaine
Mar fhear-fuadain gun stàth
Nuair a chunnaic mi a’ ghruagach
An taobh shuas dhiom a’ tàmh
‘S i ri nigh’a cuid aodaich
Mach air aodann Srath Bhàin
II
An sin dhìrich mi suas
Far ‘n robh gruagach mo ghràidh
Is labhair mi rithe
Gu sìobhalta tlàth
“Tha bliadhn’agus còrr
Bhon a thòisich an gràdh
Is ma bhitheas tu deònach
Nì sinn pòsadh gun dàil”
III
“Gu pòsadh, gu pòsadh
Ro òg tha mi ‘n dràsd’
Gu bheil teang’aig do sheòrsa
Dhèanadh fògradh ‘s gach àit
Gum biodh m’athair ‘s mo mhàthair
Gam chàineadh gu bràth
Nam pòsainn do leithid
O fhleasgaich gun stàth”
IV
Ach a nìonagan òga
Tha gun phòsadh ‘s gach àit’
Na diùltaibh fir òga
Le mòrchuis no tàir
Nach muladach dhòmhsa
Bhith gun phòsadh gu bràth
‘S fheudar fuireach nam aonar
Mach air aodann Srath Bhàin

NOTES
(1) The Blane Water has also been referred to as Beul-abhainn  meaning “mouth-river” after the numerous burns merging.One of its tributaries, the Ballagan Burn passes over the waterfall the Spout of Ballagan which shows 192 alternate strata of coloured shales and limestone (including pure alabaster) (from Wiki)

Gary Ellis “Balloch”

SCOTTISH AND IRISH VERSIONS

LINK
http://glasgowpictures.blogspot.it/2010/02/high-ballagan-waterfall.html
https://www.visitscotland.com/info/towns-villages/strathblane-p240461
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/20794
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/aodann.htm

Outlander: Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh

Leggi in italiano

The “lost portrait” of Charles Edward Stuart is a portrait, painted in late autumn 1745 by Scottish artist Allan Ramsay,

“Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa”  (= Song to the Prince) or “Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh” was written 1745 by Alexander McDonald (Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)  Highlands bard and fervent Jacobite, to be addressed as a letter to Prince Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart, known as Bonnie Prince Charlie or The Young Pretender.

The Prince was in France in the vain expectation of a favorable sign by King Louis XV to help him to recover the throne of England and Scotland. But the question dragged on for long, Louis never received his poor relative at court, so the boy was also snubbed by the Parisian Nobility and certainly the words of encouragement of the supporters in Scotland could not but comfort him.
The original text of “Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa” is written in Scottish Gaelic, a language that the prince could not understand (having been born and raised in Rome ).

In “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 By Elizabeth Jane Ross” (see) lyrics and tune  (#113) and the notes of the published edition for the School of Scottish Studies Archives, Edinburgh 2011 are “This stirring Jacobite song has been attributed to Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald, c.1698–c.1770). The text and translation here are adapted from JLC, which has 17 couplets plus refrain. That text is derived from the 1839 edition (p.85) of Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair’s collection (ASE); the 1839 edition is identical with the 1834 edition, but the fact that the song does not appear in the first edition (1751) raises doubts as to the ascription (see JLC 42, n.1): in fact the text was almost certainly lifted into the 1834 edition from PT, where it is headed simply ‘LUINNEAG’ and is not ascribed. The 1834 or 1839 text of the Ais-Eiridh is doubtless the source of that in AO 102, which ascribes the song to Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair. Campbell prints the tune in 3/4 time (JLC 301).
JLC = CAMPBELL, John Lorne, ed.(1933, Rev.1984) Highland Songs of the Forty-Five … [With thirteen melodies] (Edinburgh: John Grant, 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press for the Scottish Gaelic Texts Society).

Capercaillie in “Glenfinnan (Songs Of The ’45)” (1998) album entirely dedicated to the scottish gaelic songs that have been preserved in the Hebrides on the ruinous parable of the Jacobite rebellion led by Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1745

Dàimh in “Moidart to Mabou” 2000, a new generation group from the West Coast of Scotland, formed by musicians from Ireland, Scotland, Cape Breton and California
https://daimh.bandcamp.com/track/oran-eile-don-phrionnsa

Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh

The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript
I
Early as I awaken
Great my joy, loud my laughter
Since I heard that the Prince (1) comes
To the land of Clanranald(2)
II
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
III
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
IV
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
V
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird

I
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
II
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
III
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
IV
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
V
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite

NOTES

My hope is constant in thee

1) Prince Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart
2) The Macdonalds of Clanranald, are one of the branch clans of Clan Donald—one of the largest Scottish clans. in which “king of the isles and king of Argyll” was elected. At the time of the 1745 rebellion, the old chieftain was not in favor of the Stuard, but did not prevent his son from allying with the Young Pretender. The two met in Paris. The young Ranald was among the first to join the Jacobite cause by proselytizing the other clans.

OUTLANDER TV SERIES: “THE FOX’S LAIR”

The song has been brought back to popularity with the inclusion in Outlander TV series – second season- following in the footsteps of the great editorial success of the series written by Diana Gabaldon, as underlined by the artistic director Bear McCreary this is one of the few songs written just in the making of the Scottish rebellion.
To properly underscore these episodes, I needed a song that was written during the Jacobite uprising as opposed to after it, a song that makes no comment about loss, only promises of victory.
I turned to famed Scottish composer and music historian John Purser, who was gracious with his time and assembled a collection a historically-accurate songs for me. I was immediately drawn to the soaring melody in “Moch Sa Mhadainn,” a song composed by Alasdair mac Mghaighstir Alasdair. A celebrated poet of the Jacobite era, Alasdair composed this song upon hearing the news that Prince Charles Edward Stuart had landed at Glenfinnan. That was perfect!  When Jamie opens the letter in “The Fox’s Lair” and learns he has been roped into the revolution, this song was actually being composed somewhere in Scotland at that very moment.” (see).

Griogair Labhruidh in Outlander: Season 2, (Original Television Soundtrack) : “It is always difficult negotiating the gap between tradition and innovation but it is something I am becoming increasingly used to, “I performed the song at a much slower tempo than it would normally be performed traditionally but I think it worked to great effect with the rich string voicings and the percussive elements of the piece. I was also very pleased to work with my friend John Purser who helped direct my performance of the song to suit the arrangement.’

Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Hùg hó o ró nàill i
Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Seinn oho ró nàill i.

I
Early in the morning as I awaken
Great is my joy and hearty laughter
Since I’ve heard of the Prince’s coming
To the land of Clanranald
II
Thou’rt the choicest of all rulers,
Here’s a health to thy returning,
His the royal blood unmingled,
Great the modesty in his visage.
III
With nobility overflowing,
And endowed with all good nature;
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird.
IV
And thy friends would be joyful
If the crown were placed on thee,
And Lochiel (3), as he should be
Would be leading the Gaëls.
I
Moch sa mhadainn is mi dùsgadh,
Is mòr mo shunnd is mo cheòl-gáire;
On a chuala mi am Prionnsa,
Thighinn do dhùthaich Chloinn Ràghnaill.
II
Gràinne-mullach gach rìgh thu,
Slàn gum pill thusa Theàrlaich;
Is ann tha an fhìor-fhuil gun truailleadh,
Anns a’ ghruaidh is mòr nàire.
III
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle,
Dh’ èireadh suas le deagh nàdar;
Is nan tigeadh tu rithist,
Bhiodh gach tighearna nan àite.
IV
Is nan càraicht an crùn ort
Bu mhùirneach do chàirdean;
Bhiodh Loch Iall mar bu chòir dha,
Cur an òrdugh nan Gàidheal.

NOTE

Let Us Unite

3) Donald Cameron of Lochiel (c.1700 – October 1748) among the most influential chieftains traditionally loyal to the Stuart House. He joined Prince Charles in 1745 and later Culloden fled to France where he died in exile.
The family was rehabilitated and reinstated in the title with the amnesty of 1748.

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.ed.ac.uk/files/imports/fileManager/RossMS.pdf
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie1.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie2.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-return-to-scotland/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/63749/3
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/94215/5;jsessionid=40262AAD448EC6A5BD09862C091AD047

Capercaillie, dalla new wave scozzese al folk crossover

In un post avevo già diffusamente parlato del volatile a cui il nome gaelico del gruppo fa riferimento (Capercaillie deriva da Capull coille letteralmente “cavallo della foresta”): non si tratta della comune pernice bianca di Scozia bensì del Gallo Cedrone che contrariamente alla prima è ridotto a pochi esemplari in Scozia.
E’ un grosso gallo dalle dimensioni, nel maschio, pari a quelle di un tacchino  (arrivato in Europa solo dopo la “scoperta” dell’America) la cui caratteristica è il canto spettacolare nel rito amoroso. Esprime così simbolicamente qualcosa di raro e prezioso, il canto in gaelico dal cuore (rocce e acqua) delle Highlands, le isole Ebridi.

CELTIC NEW WAVE

Il gruppo scozzese fondatosi agli inizi degli anni 80 ha diffuso con le sue registrazioni moltissimi canti in gaelico delle Highlands arrangiandoli in un alchemico equilibrio tra tradizione e sonorità contemporanee, accostando i più tipici strumenti acustici della tradizione musicale scozzese ai sintetizzatori e al basso elettrico.
Sono acclamati come la formazione più rappresentativa del moderno suono gaelico di Scozia diventati un’icona con l’album Beautiful Wasteland (1997).

Ma incomincio dalle origini, il trio sui banchi di scuola di Taynuilt vicino a Oban (a un centinaio di chilometri da Glasgow), Karen Matheson (voce), Donald Shaw (organetto e tastiere) e Marc Duff (flauto dolce, whistle) diventa un sestetto (violino, bouzouki-chitarra e basso elettrico) incide il primo album autoprodotto nel 1984 dal titolo Cascade. L’anno successivo vincono il Pan Celtic Festival in Irlanda e passano alla Green Linnet e al lancio in America: una frenetica attività concertistica li porta da un estremo all’altro del globo e al secondo disco Crosswinds  (1987 ) .  Ma è con l’album Sidewaulk che siglano il loro primo capolavoro (1989) -da ascoltare tutto nella playlist di Caledonian Music qui- nella formazione è entrato Mànus Lunny (chitarra e bouzouki), le atmosfere si fanno eteree ma mai stucchevoli, i set di dance tune sono incalzanti, i brani in gaelico si scolpiscono graniticamente nella memoria, basti citare la wauliking song Alasdair Mhic Cholla Ghasda riprodotta in un’infinità di celtic compilations.
Il successo viene bissato con il successivo album “Delirium” (1991) che ne celebra la popolarità internazionale, osannati dalla critica come i “Clannad scozzesi” (due gli hits “Coisich A’ Ruin‘ e “Breisleach” finiti in Tv, il secondo come spot ad una nota marca di whisky). Nell’album sono inclusi alcuni brani in inglese composti dai componenti del gruppo. Brani moderni o se vogliamo pop con batteria e percussioni suonate da Ronnie Goodman ma vecchi di 400 anni in un gaelico così arcaico e di ardua trascrizione fonetica.

Poi il gruppo occhieggia al pop e smarrisce un po’ la sua strada, o a seconda dei punti di vista diventa il massimo esponente della musica pop di origine celtica (vedasi “Secret People” e “To the Moon” l’ultimo prodotto da Donald Lunny), finchè nel 1997 esce “Beautiful Wasteland“: un pregevole equilibrio tra celtic e world music con rifiniture techno, subito assunto dalla critica come esempio perfetto di global celtic o world celtic music; alcuni ritocchi nella formazione, le percussioni sono ampliate con l’arrivo di David “Chimp” Robertson che supporta Wilf Taylor, Michael McGoldrick è al flauto, whistle e uillieann pipes.
Con “Nàdurra” (2000) il gruppo sembrano voler però ritornare sui propri passi

e poi esce “Choice Language” (2003) con una robusta sezione ritmica (Che Beresford batteria, David ‘Chimp’ Robertson percussioni e Ewen Vernal basso), con Karen e Donald , Mànus LunnyMichael McGoldrick e Charlie McKerron violino, che per me è il loro disco più maturo, la loro cifra stilistica sublimata.

IL CANTO DEL CIGNO

Passano cinque anni e registrano “Roses and Tears” all’apparenza il loro canto del cigno .. e poi  nel 2013  esce “At The Heart Of It All”, sono passati 30 anni dal loro primo cd e loro festeggiano invitando degli special guess dell’odierna scena scozzese e ritornando a dare concerti ospiti dei principali festivals internazionali: che classe!!

Karen Matheson

Una voce “sicuramente baciata da Dio” come ebbe a dire Sean Connery, Karen – classe ’63, è una cantante straordinaria che ha intrapreso anche la carriera solista seppur continuando ad essere l’anima dei Capercaille. Il talento arriva geneticamente dalla nonna materna Elisabeth Mac Neill cantante dell’isola di Barra. Nel 1996 pubblica il suo primo solo prodotto dal compagno Donal Shaw “The Dreaming Sea” (di sapore più new age con sax, armonica a bocca, archi, pianoforte) partecipa anche all’Heritage Des Celts di Dan Ar Braz (in cui canta “Ailein Duinn” per cui era comparsa l’anno prima in un cameo nel film Rob Roy); le collaborazioni continuano con grandi musicisti della scena musicale di tutto il mondo tant’è che ormai la sua musica e quella dei Capercaillie viene definita folk crossover.
Seguono un paio di altre incisioni e nel 2015 “Urram” interamente in gaelico da sfogliare come un album di sbiadite fotografie, un omaggio alle bardesse delle isole Ebridi, il rispetto (in gaelico  “urram”) da tributare alle voci della tradizione, a partire dai genitori e di chi è vissuto prima di loro: racconti di vite dure, storie di emigrazione e di guerra, scrive Karen (qui“Le vecchie fotografie di famiglia sono state l’ispirazione di questo album. La perdita recente dei miei genitori mi ha portato a un percorso di riscoperta e di guarigione . I racconti di vite dure, le perdite della guerra o dell’emigrazione sono ancora più coinvolgenti se si collega il volto a un nome.”
Canzoni che aveva imparato da bambina dalla nonna nativa di Barra o raccolti dagli archivi delle tante registrazioni etnografiche collezionate con i primi cilindri fonografici sul finire dell’Ottocento

tutto da ascoltare su https://karenmatheson.bandcamp.com/

li trovate nel blog seguendo il tag Capercaillie

FONTI
http://www.capercaillie.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/Sidetaulk-Capercaillie-Fanzine-1118615481514128/
http://www.karenmatheson.com

ORAN EILE DON PHRIONNSA

Read the post in English

Il Bonny Prince (Carlo Edoardo Stuart) ritratto da Allan Ramsay subito dopo la marcia su Edimburgo

Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa,  “Canzone per il Principe” (= Song to the Prince) ma anche dal primo verso “Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh” (in italiano “Appena mi sveglio”) venne scritta nel 1745 da Alexander McDonald (Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)  bardo delle Highlands e fervente giacobita, perché fosse indirizzata come missiva al Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart, noto più semplicemente come il Bonnie Prince Charlie o The Young Pretender. All’epoca il Principe si trovava in Francia nella vana attesa di un cenno di favore da parte del Re Luigi XV affinchè lo aiutasse a riprendersi il trono d’Inghilterra e Scozia. Ma la questione si trascinava per le lunghe, Luigi non ricevette mai a Corte il suo parente povero, così il ragazzo venne snobbato anche dalla Nobiltà parigina e di certo le parole d’incoraggiamento dei sostenitori in Scozia non potevano che dargli conforto. continua
Il testo originale di Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa ( anche “Moch Sa Mhadainn”, “Hùg Ò Laithill Ò” “Hùg Ò Laithill O Horo”), è scritto in gaelico scozzese, lingua che il principe non capiva (essendo nato e cresciuto a Roma).

Ne “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 By Elizabeth Jane Ross” (qui) sono riportati testo e melodia (#113) così nelle note dell’edizione pubblicata per lo School of Scottish Studies Archives, Edimburgo 2011 leggiamo “Questa toccante canzone giacobita è stata attribuita a Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald, c.1698–c.1770). Il testo e la traduzione di  JLC [John Lorne CAMPBELL(1933, Rev.1984)], riporta 17 strofe più il ritornello. Il testo deriva dall’edizione del 1839  (p.85) dalla collezione di Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (ASE); l’edizione del 1839 è identica a quella del 1834, ma il fatto che la canzone non appaia nella prima edizione (1751) solleva dubbi sull’attribuzione (vedi JLC 42, n.1): in effetti il testo è stato quasi certamente preso dall’edizione 1834 da PT, dov’è semplicemente intitolato ‘LUINNEAG’ senza alcuna attribuzione.

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in “Glenfinnan (Songs Of The ’45)” (1998) album interamente dedicato ai canti in gaelico che si sono conservati nelle Isole Ebridi sulla rovinosa parabola della ribellione giacobita capeggiata dal Bonnie Prince Charlie nel 1745

ASCOLTA Dàimh in Moidart to Mabou 2000, un gruppo di nuova generazione dalla West Coast della Scozia formato da musicisti  dall’Irlanda, Scozia, Capo Bretone e California.

Chi canta dopo aver impostato la prima strofa, prosegue riprendendo gli ultimi due versi come i primi della strofa successiva, e aggiunge altri due nuovi versi
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh
I
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
II
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
III
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
IV
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
V
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite

The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript
I
Early as I awaken
Great my joy, loud my laughter
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
III
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
IV
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
V
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Da quando seppi che il Principe verrà nella terra del Clanranald
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno
III
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
IV
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
V
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.

NOTE
1) Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart
2) il Clan dei Macdonald di Clanranald (Clan RanaldClan Ronald) è uno dei rami più grandi dei clan scozzesi in cui si eleggeva il Re delle Isole e di Argyll. All’epoca delle ribellione del 1745 il vecchio capo clan non era favorevole agli Stuard, ma non impedì al figlio di allearsi con il Giovane Pretendente. I due si conobbero a Parigi. Ranald il giovane fu tra i primi ad aderire alla causa giacobita facendo proseliti presso gli altri clan.

LA SERIE OUTLANDER

Il brano è stato riportato alla popolarità con l’inserimento nella seconda stagione della serie televisiva Outlander (sulle orme del grandissimo successo editoriale dell’omonima serie scritta da Diana Gabaldon), come sottolinea lo stesso direttore artistico Bear McCreary questo è uno dei pochi canti scritti proprio nel farsi della ribellione scozzese.
“Quando Jamie apre la lettera nell’episodio  “The Fox’s Lair” e scopre di essere stato invischiato nella rivoluzione, questa canzone era contemporanea essendo stata composta da qualche parte in Scozia  proprio in quel preciso momento.” (qui).

ASCOLTA Griogair Labhruidh in Outlander: Season 2, (Original Television Soundtrack) il brano ha un andamento marziale  e Griogair racconta
“È sempre difficile mediare il divario tra tradizione e innovazione, ma è qualcosa a cui mi sto abituando sempre più spesso, ho eseguito la canzone ad un ritmo molto più lento di quello tradizionale, ma penso che abbia raggiunto un grande effetto con i ricchi cori dei violini e gli elementi percussivi. Sono stato anche molto contento di lavorare con il mio amico John Purser che ha contribuito a dirigere la mia esecuzione della canzone per adattarla all’arrangiamento.

Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Hùg hó o ró nàill i
Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Seinn oho ró nàill i.
I
Moch sa mhadainn is mi dùsgadh,
Is mòr mo shunnd is mo cheòl-gáire;
On a chuala mi am Prionnsa,
Thighinn do dhùthaich Chloinn Ràghnaill.
II
Gràinne-mullach gach rìgh thu,
Slàn gum pill thusa Theàrlaich;
Is ann tha an fhìor-fhuil gun truailleadh,
Anns a’ ghruaidh is mòr nàire.
III
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle,
Dh’ èireadh suas le deagh nàdar;
Is nan tigeadh tu rithist,
Bhiodh gach tighearna nan àite.
IV
Is nan càraicht an crùn ort
Bu mhùirneach do chàirdean;
Bhiodh Loch Iall mar bu chòir dha,
Cur an òrdugh nan Gàidheal.


I
Early as I awaken,
Great my joy, loud my laughter,
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Thou’rt the choicest of all rulers,
Here’s a health to thy returning,
His the royal blood unmingled,
Great the modesty in his visage.
III
With nobility overflowing,
And endowed with all good nature;
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird.
IV
And thy friends would be joyful
If the crown were placed on thee,
And Lochiel, as he should be
Would be leading the Gaëls.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
III
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.
IV
I vostri amici saranno pieni di gioia
se sarete incoronato,
e Lochiel (3), come si conviene, farà arrivare i Gaeli per la battaglia

NOTE

Fedeli agli amici

3) Donald Cameron di Lochiel (c.1700 – Ottobre 1748) tra i più influenti capoclan tradizionalmente fedele alla Casa Stuart. Si unì al Principe Carlo nel 1745 e dopo Culloden fuggì in Francia dove morì in esilio.
La famiglia fu riabilitata e reintegrata nel titolo con l’amnistia del 1748.

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.ed.ac.uk/files/imports/fileManager/RossMS.pdf
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie1.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie2.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-return-to-scotland/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/63749/3
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/94215/5;jsessionid=40262AAD448EC6A5BD09862C091AD047

I WILL SET MY SHIP IN ORDER

Una canzone tradizionale scozzese (da “Bothy Songs and Ballads”  di John Ord, 1930) dal titolo “I Drew My Ship” sul fecondo tema delle night visiting songs, inizia con una nave che salpa per dirigersi verso un porto tranquillo. Il modello a cui si fa riferimento è la ballata ‘The Drowsy Sleeper‘ e le melodie che si accompagnano al testo sono diverse (Allan Moore ne ha contate otto).

ASCOLTA dagli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais una registrazione sul campo del 1952 dalla voce di Willie Mathieson (1879- 1958). Nato a Ellon, Aberdeenshire, fu un bracciante agricolo in diverse fattorie del Banffshire. Raccolse e trascrisse un grande numero di canti popolari scozzesi che si trovano ora depositati presso “the School of Scottish Studies” -Università di Edimburgo.

Così Shirley Collins la registrò nel 1958 e Alan Lomax scrisse nelle note “I Drew My Ship was collected by John Stokoe in Songs and Ballads of Northern England [1899] with no source mentioned. Though it is similar in form and content to many other aubades or dawn serenades, we have not been able to find another song to which this is precisely akin. The listener who cares to compare the recorded version with that published by Stokoe will see how Miss Collins has breathed life back into the print and made something lovely and alive out of an unimpressive folk fragment.” (tratto da qui)

Per l’ascolto ho però scelto la versione dell’irlandese  Fiona Kelleher (con bellissime scene portuali crepuscolari e notturne come la melodia della canzone)

Il testo è ripreso da June Tabor in I Will Put My Ship in Order dal  CD A Quiet Eye 1999, fermandosi però alla V strofa. In questa versione la ragazza indugia troppo ad aprire e il ragazzo credendosi rifiutato, ritorna alla sua nave.


I
Oh, I will set my ship in order,
And I will set it to the sea;
And I will sail to yonder harbour
To see if my love minds on me.
II
I drew my ship into the harbour,
I drew her up where my true love lay.
And I did listen all at the window
To hear what my true love did say.
III
“Who’s there, all on my window?
Who raps so loud and would be in?”
“Oh, it is I, your own true lover,
I pray you rise, love, and let me in.”
IV
Slowly, slowly rose she up
And slowly, slowly came she down,
But when she had the door unlocked
Her true love had both been and gone.
V
“Come back, come back, my own true lover,
Come back, come back, all to my side.
I never left you nor yet deceived you
And I will surely be your bride.”
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Metterò a posto la mia barca
e la porterò in mare
navigherò fino a quel porto
per vedere se il mio amore mi pensa.
II
Guidai la mia nave nel porto,
la guidai fin dove il mio amore stava.
E mi misi in ascolto alla finestra
per sentire ciò che il mio amore diceva.
III
“Chi è là, alla finestra
che bussa così forte e vuole entrare?”
“Sono io, il tuo vero amore
ti prego alzati, cara e fammi entrare”
IV
Piano, piano lei si alzò
e piano, piano scese giù
ma quando aveva la porta sbloccato,
il suo vero amore se n’era già andato
V
“Ritorna, ritorna il mio solo vero
amore
ritorna, ritorna da me.
Non ti lascerò e nè t’ingannerò mai
e di certo sarò tua moglie”

I WILL SET MY SHIP IN ORDER

Un’altra melodia però accompagna la canzone ed è quella scritta da Tony Cuffe per il gruppo di musica folk scozzese Ossian. In questa versione testuale l’indifferenza della ragazza è dovuta al rifiuto dei genitori di accogliere il ragazzo come corteggiatore. Il finale è tragico, la ragazza si getta in mare per essere stata abbandonata.

ASCOLTA Ossian –in “Borders” 1984 formazione quintetto Tony Cuffe (voce e chitarra), George Jackson (cittern), Iain MacDonald (flauto), Billy Jackson (arpa bardica), John Martin (violino)

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in “Choice Language” 2003 con la coppia con Karen Matheson (voce) e Donald Shaw (organetto e tastiere), una robusta sezione ritmica (Che Beresford batteria, David ‘Chimp’ Robertson percussioni e Ewen Vernal basso),  Mànus Lunny (chitarra e bouzouki)Michael McGoldrick (flauto, whistle e uillieann pipes) e Charlie McKerron (violino), uno tra i migliori album del gruppo

ASCOLTA Catriona Evans


I
Oh, I will set my ship in order,
I will sail her on the sea;
I’ll go far over yonder border
To see if my love minds on me.
II
And he sailed East, and he sailed West,
He sailed far, far, seeking land,
Until he cam’ to his true love’s window
And he knocked loud and would be in.
III
“Oh, who is that at my bedroom window
Who knocks so loud and would be in?”
“‘Tis I, ‘Tis I, your ain true lover
and I am drenched untae my skin.”
IV
“So go and go, and ask your faither
See if he’ll let you marry me;
And if he says no, come back and tell me
And it’s the last time I’ll trouble thee.”
V
“My father’s in his chamber writing,
Setting down his merchandise;
And in his hand he holds a letter
And it speaks much in your dispraise.
VI
“My mother’s in her chamber sleeping
And words of love she will not hear;
So you may go and court another
And whisper softly in her ear.”
VII
Then she arose put on her clothing,
It was to let her true love in;
But e’er she had the door unlockit
His ship was sailing on the main.
VIII
“Come back, come back, my ain dear Johnnie,
Come back, come back, and marry me.”
“How can I come back and marry you, love?
Oor ship is sailing on the sea.”
IX
“The fish may fly, and the seas run dry,
The rocks may melt doon wi’ the sun,
And the working man may forget his labour
Before that my love returns again.”
X
She’s turned herself right roun’ about
She’s flung herself intae the sea;
“Farweel for aye, my ain dear Johnnie
Ye’ll ne’er hae tae come back to me.”
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Metterò a posto la mia barca (1)
e la porterò in mare
andrò lontano verso l’orizzonte
per vedere se il mio amore mi pensa.
II
E navigò a Est e navigò
a Ovest
Navigò alla ricerca di terre lontane
finchè ritornò alla finestra del suo vero amore
e bussò forte per poter entrare
III
“Oh chi è alla finestra della
mia camera
che bussa così forte e vuole
entrare?”
“Sono io, sono io il tuo vero amore
e sono inzuppato fino alle ossa (2).
IV
Allora vai, vai e chiedi a tuo padre
vedi se ti lascerà sposare con me;
e se dice no, ritorna da me a dirmelo
e sarà l’ultima volta che ti disturberò”
V
“Mio padre è nella sua stanza a scrivere
seduto accanto alla sua mercanzia
e in mano tiene una lettera
che è più di calunnie verso di te.
VI
Mia madre è nella sua stanza a dormire
e parole d’amore non sentirà;
così puoi andare e corteggiare un’altra
e sussurrare dolcemente nel suo orecchio”
VII
Allora lei si alzò e si vestì e stava per far entrare il suo vero amore,
ma non aveva la porta sbloccato,
che la nave salpò per il mare!
VIII
“Ritorna, ritorna mia caro
Johnny
ritorna ritorna e sposami”
“Come posso tornare indietro e sposarti amore?
La nostra nave è salpata in mare”
IX
“I pesci voleranno e i mari si prosciugheranno
Le rocce si fonderanno al sole
e l’uomo che lavora dimenticherà il suo lavoro
prima che il mio amore ritorni di nuovo”
X
Senza tanti indugi prese la decisione
e si gettò nel mare
“Addio per sempre, mio caro Johnny
non dovrai più ritornare da me”

NOTE
1) la frase è una metafora
2) un classico del genere: lo spasimante è infreddolito sotto la neve, il gelo o zuppo di pioggia!

FONTI
http://allanfmoore.org.uk/approcelt.pdf
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/idrewmyshipintotheharbour.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120478

OSSIAN’S LAMENT

Ossian’s Lament, anche conosciuta come “Cumhadh Fhinn“, “Ossian’s Lament for his Father“, “Oisin’s Lament” è una melodia antica con cui si dice Ossian abbia accompagnato i suoi canti.
Ossian è un bardo leggendario dell’antica Scozia o Irlanda, paragonato ad Omero e a Shakespeare, grazie al presunto ritrovamento dei suoi poemi in Scozia. Le sue leggende si rincorrono in Irlanda, Isola di Man e Scozia, ma la sua popolarità crebbe solo nella metà del 1700 quando James MacPherson scrisse “I Canti di Ossian” affermando di aver ritrovato suoi manoscritti e frammenti nelle Highlands scozzesi, tra i quali un poema epico su Fingal, il padre, che disse di aver “semplicemente” tradotto, in realtà inventando di sana pianta: la moda ossianica divampò per tutta Europa dando vita al Romanticismo.

Ossian Singing, Nicolai Abildgaard, 1787 (by Wiki)

OISIN DEI FIANNA

Gli studiosi identificano Ossian con l’Oisin (pronunciato Osciin) guerriero dei Fianna, che visse in Irlanda secondo alcuni nel VII secolo a.C. e secondo altri nel II o IV secolo, di cui si narrano molte leggende. Suo padre era Finn Mac Coll (Fionn Mac Cumhaill) il più famoso degli eroi irlandesi e sua madre nientemeno che la dea Sadb (Sava). Tuttavia un racconto scozzese riportato da Alexander Carmicheal nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” (1900) ci racconta invece che la fata era l’amante tradita avendo Finn preferito sposare ua donna della terra degli uomini (continua).
Oisin Mac Finn fu un guerriero-poeta, amante delle belle donne. Dalla sua moglie terrena Eobhir dai capelli di lino ebbe Oscar, un prode guerriero, l’ultimo comandante dei Fianna o Feniani e dalla compagna divina Niamh una figlia, Plur na mBan (il fiore delle donne), la fanciulla di Beltane.

Oisin a caccia incontra Niamh sul suo bianco cavallo

La bella Niamh dai Capelli d’Oro figlia di Manannan ovvero il dio del Mare lo portò sulla sua Isola di Tír na nÓg (l’Altro Mondo, la Terra dell’Eterna Giovinezza), insieme vissero trecento anni che a Oisin parvero solo pochi giorni (vedi); quando ebbe il desiderio di ritornare a visitare la sua terra Niamh gli donò un cavallo, il quale magicamente lo avrebbe riportato sulla terra: ma il padre era morto da centinaia d’anni, le grandi fortezze dei Fianna erano in rovina e i luoghi che lui ricordava erano cambiati. Amareggiato, sulla via del ritorno, Oisin cadde di sella e divenne improvvisamente vecchio: i tre anni trascorsi nell’AltroMondo corrispondevano a trecento anni sulla terra!
Secondo una versione della storia Oisin non morì ma sopravvisse magicamente fino all’arrivo in Irlanda di San Patrizio, al quale ebbe modo di narrare le gesta dei Fianna, guerrieri e cacciatori della mitologia irlandese.

IL CICLO FENNIANO

Questi racconti mitologici dell’antica Irlanda vengono anche chiamati “Ciclo Ossianico” perchè si ritenne fossero stati in buona parte scritti da Ossian. Iniziano con l’ascesa di Fionn, il Biondo a capo dei Fianna e si concludono con la sua morte. (e se volete sapere perchè Fionn sia stato soprannominato il Bianco ecco un’altro racconto su in incontro fatato con la Cailleach Biorar  sullo Slieve Gullion !
I fianna furono una milizia che conduceva incursioni guerresche per proprio conto, ma non necessariamente erano dei fuorilegge o predoni. Si trattava spesso di uomini espulsi dal clan di appartenenza, figli di re in contrasto con i padri, individui che volevano vendicare torti privati facendosi giustizia da soli, occasionalmente potevano diventare una milizia al servizio dei diversi re d’Irlanda, per i quali raccoglievano le imposte, ristabilivano l’ordine in caso di necessità, difendevano il regno dalle incursioni dei nemici.
Per essere ammesso nel gruppo ogni candidato doveva superare prove di resistenza e di agilità, ma doveva anche dimostrare di conoscere la poesia e quindi la magia e la sapienza.
I Fenniani vennero annientati dal re supremo Cairbre Mac Cormac “Lifechair” nella battaglia di Gabhra (Cat Gabhra) in cui Caibre venne ucciso da Oscar il quale morì anch’egli poco dopo per le ferite riportate.

Manifattura di Giovanni Volpato (Roma, 1785-1803) Galata morente, 1786-1789 biscuit, Collezione privata © Foto Giuseppe Schiavinotto
Manifattura di Giovanni Volpato (Roma, 1785-1803) Galata morente, 1786-1789 biscuit, Collezione privata © Foto Giuseppe Schiavinotto

L’intero ciclo presenta molte analogie con il ciclo britannico di re Artù e molto probabilmente le leggende di Finn e di Artù derivano entrambe dalla comune tradizione celtica insulare di una confraternita di cacciatori-guerrieri guidati da un formidabile capo che difendeva il reame contro le incursioni provenienti dall’esterno.

il mio amore è figlio della collina. Insegue il cervo che fugge
i suoi cani grigi ansimano intorno a lui; la corda del suo arco risuona nella foresta. (frammento Ossian)

La melodia è stata abbinata ad un testo in gaelico scozzese all’epoca delle “Highland clearances” (1750 -1880) con il titolo “Ó mo dhùthaich“: il brano contenuto nel “Folksongs and Folklore of South Uist”, 1955 è stato raccolto nell’isola di South Uist (isole Ebridi) da Margaret Fay Shawe scritto originariamente da un nativo isolano, Allan MacPhee di Loch Carnan.

Se avete un po’ di tempo per guardatevi questo reportage dall’isola..

LA MELODIA: Oran an Fheidh

“The air, according to Neil (1991), is thought to be the original melody popular in Lochaber and environs as “Oran an Fheidh” (Song of the Deer). It commemorates the legendary warrior Fingal, Ossian’s father, a brave and shrewd Highland warrior chieftain who was “a faithful friend but an awesome and unforgiving foe as was illustrated when he showed no mercy towards his nephew Diarmid, who had eloped with his beautiful Queen Grainne.” O’Neill (1913) is of the opinion that this ancient lament “makes no appeal to modern ears” and points out that old laments as a genre display much diversity in composition. Paul de Grae finds O’Neill’s air to be a near-duplicate of “Cumhadh Fion: Ossian’s Lament for his Father,” printed in The Scottish Gael, vol. 2 (London, 1831), by James Logan. ” (tratto da qui)
Secondo la leggenda Fionn non è morto realmente, ma dorme in una caverna in attesa di essere richiamato.

ASCOLTA David Tomlinson &Kate Liddell

ASCOLTA William Jackson

Ó MO DHÙTHAICH

Ascoltiamo tutto il brano nella versione del gruppo scozzese Capercaillie (registrato in

I
Ó mo dhùthaich, ‘s tu th’air m’aire,
Uibhist chùmhraidh ùr nan gallan,
Far a faighte na daoin’ uaisle,
Far ‘m bu dual do Mhac ‘ic Ailein.
II
Tìr a’ mhurain, tìr an eòrna,
Tìr ‘s am pailt a h-uile seòrsa,
Far am bi na gillean òga
Gabhail òran ‘s ‘g òl an leanna.
III
Thig iad ugainn, carach, seòlta,
Gus ar mealladh far ar n-eòlais;
Molaidh iad dhuinn Manitòba,
Dùthaich fhuar gun ghual, gun mhòine.
IV
Cha ruig mi leas a bhith ‘ga innse,
Nuair a ruigear, ‘s ann a chìtear,
Samhradh goirid, foghar sìtheil,
Geamhradh fada na droch-shìde.
V
Nam biodh agam fhìn do stòras,
Dà dheis aodaich, paidhir bhrògan,
Agus m’fharadh bhith ‘nam phòca,
‘S ann air Uibhist dheanainn seòladh.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
I
Oh my country, of thee I am thinking,
Fragrant fresh Uist of the handsome youths(1),
Where may be seen young noblemen,
Where once was the heritage of Clanranald(2).
II
Land of bent grass, land of barley,
Land of all things in plenty,
Where there are young men and youths,
A place of songs and drinking ale.
III
They come to us, cunning and deceitful,
From our homes they would entice us;
To us they praise Manitoba(3),
A cold country without coal or peat.
IV
To tell you of it I need not trouble,
For when one arrives it may be seen,
A short summer, a peaceful autumn,
And a long winter of bad weather.
V
If I was in possession of the wealth,
Of two suits of clothes and a pair of shoes,
And if the fare was in my pocket,
Then for Uist I would be sailing.(4)
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Isola mia a te penso
fragrante e fresca Uist della giovinezza(1)
dove si trova la giovane nobiltà
che un tempo fu fedele al Clanranald(2)
II
Terra di erba frusciante, terra d’orzo,
terra ricca di ogni cosa
dove ci sono uomini giovani
e nobili
un posto di canzoni e bevute.
III
Vennero da noi, con l’astuzia e l’inganno
dalle nostre case ci illusero
e ci lodarono Manitoba(3) un paese freddo, senza carbone o torba
IV
Per raccontarti di ciò, non ho bisogno di darmi tanta pena, perchè quando si arriva si può  vedere una breve estate, un autunno tranquillo e un lungo inverno di maltempo
V
Se fossi ricco e avessi due vestiti eleganti e un paio di scarpe
e cibo nelle mie tasche
allora per Uist vorrei salpare(4).

NOTE
1) nel ricordo l’isola diventa Tír na nÓg (l’Altro Mondo, la Terra dell’Eterna Giovinezza) continua
2) Clan Ranald è un ramo del Clan Donald, uno dei clan scozzesi più numeroso ed articolato in numerose suddivisioni.
3) Manitoba è una provincia del Canada occidentale, nelle Praterie canadesi.
4) evidentemente il signor Allan MacPhee riuscì a ritornare nella sua amata isola e morì a Loch Caman

FONTI
https://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Fingal_poema_epico_di_Ossian/Ossian_(Giacomo_Macpherson)
http://www.cima-asso.it/2009/10/i-canti-di-ossian/
http://www.timelessmyths.com/celtic/ossian.html
https://sites.google.com/site/finscealtanaheireann/home/introduction-oisin
http://guide.supereva.it/musica_celtica_/interventi/2003/12/146119.shtml
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Cumhadh_Fhinn
http://www.ceolsean.net/content/CeolMead/Book01/Book01%208.pdf
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/farewell-to-fiunary/ http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ohmodhuthaich.htm
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/omodhuthaich.asp
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/o_mo_dhuthaich_s_tu_th_air_m_aire/
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/1004/cd04_04.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/38295/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/person/4814

AN GILLE BAN – AN T IARLA DIURACH

The Earl of Jura” (in italiano “Il Conte di Jura”) è una slow air delle isole Ebridi che ben si adatta al lament di una ragazza tradita (o non corrisposta) la quale, affranta dal dolore, invoca il riposo della tomba. Ella paragona l’indifferenza del suo innamorato ai freddi monti dell’isola di Jura  (soprannominati Paps of Jura perchè richiamano la forma dei seni femminili)

Nelle note di Fiddler’s Companion leggiamo: “Scottish, Canadian; Slow Air. Canada, Cape Breton. D Minor. Standard. One part. Angus Grant identifies the tune as the air to an old song said to have been composed by a lass who was in love with the Earl, a Campbell, although her love was unrequited. Atlantica Music 02 77657 50222 26, Lloyd MacDonald – “Atlantic Fiddles” (1994)”

On the Isle of Jura null William Daniell 1769-1837 Presented by Tate Gallery Publications 1979 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02789
On the Isle of Jura – William Daniell 1769-1837

ASCOLTA  Justyna Jablonska (violoncello) &  Simon Thacker (chitarra acustica) polacca lei scozzese lui  – in “Karmana”, 2016 (e (quando suona il violoncello cala il silenzio)

Il gruppo dei Capercaillie ha realizzato due diverse versioni dello stesso brano la prima nel 1984 con il titolo di AN T-IARLA DIURACH e la seconda nel 1995 con il titolo di AN GILLE BAN

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in Cascade 1984, -il primo album del gruppo, un canto secondo il vecchio stile, con la voce di Karen piena di pianto appena sottolineato dalle tastiere di Donald Shaw e un etereo sviluppo strumentale di Mac Duff (flauto dolce) (strofe I, II, III, IV)

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in The blood is strong 1995 (strofe I, II, IV) più arrangiata strumentalmente

GAELICO SCOZZESE
I
Ma’s ann ‘gam mhealladh, a ghaoil, a bha thu
Ma’s ann ‘gam mhealladh as deigh do gheallaidh
‘Se luaidh do mholaidh ni mi gu brath
Ma’s ann ‘gam mhealladh, a ghaoil, a bha thu
II
Righ, gur mise tha gu tursach
Gaol an iarla ‘ga mo chiurradh
Tha na deoir a’sior-ruith o m’ shuilean
‘S mo chridhe bruite le guin do ghraidh
Ma’s ann ‘gam mhealladh, a ghaoil, a bha thu
III
Bha mi raoir leat ‘na mo bhruadar
Thall an Diura nam beann fuara
Bha do phogan mar bhiolair uaine
Ach dh’fhalbh am bruadar is dh’fhan an cradh
Ma’s ann ‘gam mhealladh, a ghaoil, a bha thu
IV
Thig, a ghaoil agus duin mo shuilean
‘S a’ chiste-chaoil far nach dean mi dusgadh
Cuir a sios mi an duslach Diurach
Oir ‘s ann ‘s an uir a ni mise tamh
Ma’s ann ‘gam mhealladh, a ghaoil, a bha thu

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
If deceiving me, oh love, thou wert
If deceiving me despite thy vow(1)
Yet chant thy praise I ever will
If deceiving me, oh love, thou wert
II
Oh King, I am the sorrowful one
And the love of the Earl a-hurting me
The tears are ever running from mine eyes/And my heart is bruised with the sting of thy love
If deceiving me, oh love, thou wert
III
Last night I was with thee in my dream/Across in Jura of the cold bens(2)/Thy kisses were like the green water-cresses(3)
Fled the dream, remained the pain
If deceiving me, oh love, thou wert
IV
Come, oh love, and close my eyes
In the narrow kirst where I shall never awake
Lay me down under earth from Jura
In the grave alone is there rest for me
If deceiving me, oh love, thou wert

tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Anche se tu, amore, mi avessi tradito
se tu m’avessi tradito nonostante i voti non smetterò mai di tessere le tue lodi, Anche se tu, amore, mi avessi tradito
II
O Re io sono colei che è addolorata
e l’amore del Conte mi ferisce
sgorgano lacrime copiose dai miei occhi
e il mio cuore è ferito dalla freccia del tuo amore
Anche se tu, amore, mi avessi tradito
III
L’altra notte ero con te in sogno
sui freddi monti di Jura
i tuoi baci erano come il fresco crescione,
svanito il sonno è rimasto il dolore
Anche se tu, amore, mi avessi tradito
IV
Vieni, amore a chiudermi gli occhi
nella piccola chiesa dove non mi sveglierò più
affidami alla terra di Jura
solo là nella tomba c’è il mio riposo
Anche se tu, amore, mi avessi tradito

NOTE
1) con vow si intendono promesse o voti tra una coppia uniti con il rito dell’handfasting
2) the Bens of Jura  ovvero Paps of Jura, sono tre montagnole raggruppate sui 2400-2500 metri nell’isola di Jura. Come riporta Saverio Sepe nel suo blog ” Una meta che vi farà immergere in questa ancestrale selvaticità della Scozia è l’isola di Jura: 200 persone, 5000 cervi, un numero variabile ma imponente di specie di uccelli.. Per chi ama il vento, per chi lo insegue in giro per il mondo, per chi si sente in armonia con questo elemento sa perché venire in questa isola. Per vedere le tre cime del Paps of Jura, un paradiso per escursionisti ad esempio.  Salendo verso le cime e guardandosi intorno si ha la sensazione di essere soli al mondo. Qui la parola panorama si trasfigura diventa qualcosa che si tocca, che si sente fisicamente. ” (qui)
3) come scrive  Kenneth MacLeod “Traditionally, watercress is regarded as both food and drink; it is said to have been the food of the pilgrims on their way to Iona” Secondo una fantasiosa credenza inglese, il crescione può rivelare il futuro a una ragazza in cerca di marito: si deve seminare una fila di crescione e una di lattuga il 24 di marzo, e stare ad aspettare, se spunta prima la lattuga, il marito sarà dolce e comprensivo, se nasce prima il crescione, l’amato sarà severo, puntiglioso, forse violento.

LA VERISIONE DI MARJORY KENNEDY-FRASER: THE BENS OF JURA

Ed ecco la versione versificata in inglese adattata musicalmente al gusto “romantico” dei tempi da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser. La traduzione dal gaelico è dell’amico e collaboratore rev. Kenneth Macleod

ASCOLTA Kenneth McKellar

Versione Kenneth Macleod
I
Like watercress(3) gathered fresh from cool streams
Thy kiss, dear love, by the Bens of Jura(1)
Cold the Bens, cold thy love as they.
Like watercress gathered fresh from cool streams.
II
Gold the morn at dawn up wingeth,
Dreams the night deep drowned in dew-mist,
And my heart reft of its own sun,
Deep lies sunk in death torpor cold and gray.
III
Like watercress gathered fresh from cool streams,
Thy kiss dear love, by the Bens of Jura
Cold the Bens, cold the mist and gray
Like watercress gathered fresh from cool streams.

tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Come il crescione raccolto fresco dai freddi rivi
è il tuo bacio, amore mio, sui Monti di Jura, freddi i monti, così freddo il tuo amore.
Come il crescione raccolto fresco dai freddi rivi
II
Dorato il mattino sulle ali dell’alba
i sogni notturni svaniti nell’umida foschia
e il mio cuore privato del suo sole
sprofonda nel torpore della morte, freddo e grigio
III
Come il crescione raccolto fresco dai freddi rivi
è il tuo bacio, amore mio, sui Monti del Jura
freddi i monti, fredda e grigia la bruma, come il crescione raccolto fresco dai freddi rivi

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/matrimonio-celtico-storia.html
http://www.southernhebrides.com/isle-of-jura/
https://europatoursaveriopepe.wordpress.com/2015/02/24/lisola-di-jura-pura-scozia/
http://isleofjura.scot/isle-of-jura-history/
http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/daniell-on-the-isle-of-jura-t02789
https://thesession.org/tunes/6096
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/86670/3
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/91874/3
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/91355/3;jsessionid=D7F351E518D9416F6836E4C548855550

M’IONAM AIR

The Spinning Wheel, c.1855 (oil on panel)Una madre delle Highland scozzesi canta al suo bambino per tenerlo buono, mentre lei è affaccendata nei lavori domestici, (continua) : si raccomanda che cresca forte affinchè da grande possa provvedere al benessere della madre.
La canzone proviene dall’immenso patrimonio dei canti in gaelico delle Isole Ebridi

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in Beautiful Wasteland 1997 la voce di Karen sembra quasi un sospiro, morbida come la coperta di lana, soffice come le piume del cuscino, e a tratti si leva come onda del mare..

GAELICO SCOZZESE
Sèist:
M’ionam air a ghille bheag
Cuin a bheir e gùn dhomh?
Cuin a bheir e còt’
Agus cleoc as a’ bhùth dhomh?
M’ionam air a ghille bheag
Cuin a bheir e gùn dhomh?
I
Nuair dh’fhàsas e làidir
‘S a dh’fhàgas e’n dùthaich
II
Bidh siùil ri croinn àrda
‘S mo ghràdhsa ga stiùireadh
III
Nuair ruigeas i na h-Innsean
Thig sìoda ‘gam ionnsaigh
IV
B’fhearr leam fhin gum beireadh an teile
‘N teile dhe na heireagan
B’fhearr leam fhin gum beireadh an teile
Dh’eireagan Shleit am maireach
V
Gheibheadh tu fhein, a ghaoil an t-ugh (x3)
Nam beireadh na heireagan bana


TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus:
My thoughts are on the little boy
Wondering when he’ll bring me a gown?
When will he bring me a coat
Or a cloak from the store?
I
When he grows strong
And leaves the country
II
The sails will be on the tall masts
And my love will be at the helm
III
When the ship reaches the Indies
Then silk will come back in my direction
IV
I would prefer if the other(1) would bear the pullet hens
I would prefer if the other would bear
The hens of Sleat(2) tomorrow
V
You, love, would get the egg(3)
If the fair hen would lay

tradotto da Cattia Salto
CORO
I pensieri vanno al mio bambino
chiedendomi quando mi porterà un vestito
quando mi porterà una giacchetta
o una mantella dal negozio?
I
Quando diventerà forte
e lascerà il paese
II
Le vele saranno sull’albero maestro e il mio amore al timone
III
Quando la nave raggiungerà le Indie
allora mi porterà la seta
IV
Vorrei che l’altro portasse delle pollastrelle
vorrei che l’altro portasse
le galline di Sleat domani
V
Tu amore avrai l’uovo
se la bella gallina lo deporrà

NOTE
1) evidentemente si riferisce all’altro suo amore, il marito oppure all’altro figlio più grande che già lavora
2) Sleat è rinomata come “the garden of Skye”.
3) oh l’ovetto sbattuto con lo zucchero che un tempo le madri premurose preparavano per i loro bambini!

Loch Coruisk, isola di Skye dipinto di Sidney Richard Percy 1874

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/mionam.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/25281/1;jsessionid=7A5B417BDD8B85383D3A23837B2D3716