Archivi tag: Paul Brady

Shamrock shore

Leggi in italiano

Two texts in search of an author, with the same title “Shamrock shore” we distinguish two different songs, both as text and as melody, the first reported by PW Joyce at the end of the nineteenth century is an irish emigration song, the second ever traditional is also an emigration song, but above all a protest song, the social and political denunciation of the Irish question.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Already at the end of the 1800s P. W. Joyce reported it in his  “Ancient Irish Music” to then republish it in 1909, so he writes “This air, and one verse of the song, was published for the first time by me in my Ancient Irish Music, from which it is reprinted here. It was a favourite in my young days, and I have several copies of the words printed on ballad-sheets“. Again P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) reports further text
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

The Irish emigrant arrives in London, the tune is that generally known with the title of”Erin Shore” (see)

Horslips from Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

More than a song, a political rant about the need for the independence of Ireland and the evils of landlordism.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore

NOTES
1) The song is obviously post-Union (1800), because it refers to the dissolved Irish Parliament
2) the plague of landlordism
3)  in 1846 the entire crop of potatoes (basic diet of the Irish) was all destroyed due to a fungus, the peronospera; the “great famine” occurred (1845-1849 which some historians prolonged until 1852) which lasted for several years and almost halved the population; those who did not die of hunger were lucky if the
y could leave for England or Scotland, but more massive was the migration to America
4) ‘tithes and taxes’ paid in support of the Irish Church, so the song pre-dates the Act of Disestablishment in 1869
5) the years of large-scale industrial expansion (with relative upgrading of infrastructure) began in Britain starting from 1840-50
6) John Bull is the national personification of the Kingdom of Great Britain

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

Leggi in italiano

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore ” is a traditional Irish song originally from Donegal, of which several textual versions have been written for a single melody.

TUNE: Erin Shore

A typically Irish tune spread among travellers already at the end of 1700, today it is known with different titles: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (LISTEN instrumental version of the Irish group The Corrs from Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (LISTEN to the version always instrumental of the Corrs from Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair or The Green Glens Of Gweedor (with text written by Francie Mooney)

Standard version: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

The common Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore was first sung on an EFDSS LP(1969) by Packie Manus Byrne, now over 80 and living in Ardara Co Donegal*. He was born at Corkermore between there and Killybegs. It was taken up by Paul Brady and subsequently. However, there are longer and more local (to north Derry, Donegal) versions in Sam Henry’s Songs of the People and in Jimmy McBride’s The Flower of Dunaff Hill.” (in Mudcats ) and Sam Henry writes “Another version has been received from the Articlave district, where the song was first sung in 1827 by an Inishowen ploughman.”
The recording made by Sean Davies at Cecil Sharp House dates back to 1969 and again in the sound archives of the ITMA we find the recording sung by Corney McDaid at McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal in 1987 (see) and also Paul Brady recorded it many times.
Kevin Conneff recorded it with the Chieftains in 1992, “Another Country” (I, II, IV, V, II)

Amelia Hogan from “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.”

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny ( I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (I, II, IV, V)

intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

NOTES
*additional first verse by Garrison White
1) It refers to the reception of immigrants who were inspected and held for bureaucratic formalities, but the sentence is not very clear. Ellis Island was used as an entry point for immigrants only in 1892. Prior to that, for approximately 35 years, New York State had 8 million immigrants transit through the Castle Garden Immigration Depot in Lower Manhattan.

OTHER VERSIONS

This text was written by Patrick Brian Warfield, singer and multi-instrumentalist of the Irish group The Wolfe Tones. In his version the point of landing is not New York but Baltimore.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones from Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 

Lyrics: Patrick Brian Warfield 
I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore

This version takes up the 3rd stanza of the previous version as a chorus
The High Kings

I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
III
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór (2)
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore

NOTES
1) Banna Strand , Banna Beach, is situated in Tralee Bay County Kerry
2) my love

Shamrock shore

LINK
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

STREETS OF DERRY

Gli studiosi datano l’origine della ballata tra il 1817 e il 1830, collegandola con “The Maid Freed from the Gallows” ma anche con la ballata di Geordie; più in generale “Streets of Deyy” si inserisce nel filone delle “ballate del patibolo“: il protagonista viene salvato dalla forca da un perdono giunto all’ultimo momento portato dalla fidanzata che arriva al galoppo su uno stremato cavallo.


Alcune versioni chiamano l’eroina Ann O’Neill e la maggior parte indicano  la città di Derry come il luogo in cui sta per avvenire l’impiccagione; in alcune compare anche un sacerdote pronto ad accogliere la confessione del condannato (e a ritardare l’esecuzione).
Eleanor R. Long (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada) nel suo saggio “Derry Gaol From Formula to Narrative Theme in International Popular Tradition” analizza 27 versioni della ballata e le classifica in 5 filoni. Così osserva la Long “Certain aspects of the ballad’s narrative, however, are timeless in their reflection of Irish history and culture. The public execution of Irish patriots was a familiar phenomenon throughout the period of British occupation, and history as well as ballad-literature reports the ubiquity of sorrowing relatives at the execution site, requests for appropriate religious rites for the dying, and desperate, not infrequently successful appeals for last-minute pardons f or political offenders. But during the time-period under consideration (1817-1830), two specific historical events occurred which corroborate the circumstances described in Laws L 11 without localizing those circumstances in northern Ireland: the Catholic clergy developed an exceptionally militant attitude toward the denial of freedom of conscience to prisoners in British penitentiaries, and in the summer of 1821 King George IV became the first English monarch to set foot on Irish soil since the Reformation, winning by that gesture a degree of popularity among the Irish people that was as unprecedented as it was temporary.” (vedi)

ASCOLTA su Spotify  Bothy Band (voce Triona Ni Dhomhnaill)  in “Out of the Wind, Into the Sun”, 1977 (testo qui)
ASCOLTA su Spotify  Peter Bellamy in “Both Sides Then”, 1979
ASCOLTA Oisin in Winds of Change”, 1989

ASCOLTA Cara Dillon & Paul Brady


I
After morning there comes an evening
And after the evening another day.
And after false love there comes a true love;
I’ll have you listen now to what I say.
II
My love he is as fine a young man
As fair as any the sun shone on.
But how to save him I do not know it,
For now he’s got a sentence to be hung.
III
As he was a-marching through the streets of Derry,
I’m sure he marched up right manfully,
Being much more like a commanding officer
Than a man to die upon a gallows tree.
IV
But the very first step he did put on that ladder,
His bloomin’ colour began to fail
And with heavy sighin’ and bitter cryin’,
“Is there no releasement from Derry Gaol?
V
And the very next step he did put on that ladder,
His lovin’ clergyman was standing by,
Cryin’, “Stand you back, you false prosecutors,
For I’ll make you see that he may not die.”
VI
“Yes, I’ll make you see that you may not hang him
Until his confession to me is done,
And then you’ll see that you may not hang him
‘Til within ten minutes of the setting sun.
VII
“What keeps my love, she’s so long a-coming?
Oh, what detains her so long from me?
Or does the think it’s a shame or scandal
To see me die on the gallows tree?”
VIII
He looked around and he saw her coming,
And she was dressed all in woollen fine
The weary steed that my love was riding
It flew more swifftly than the wind
IX
Come down, come down from that cruel gallows
I’ve got your pardon from the king
And I’ll let them see that they dare not hang you
And I’ll crown my love with a bunch of green 
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Dopo il mattino viene la sera
e dopo la sera un altro giorno
così dopo un falso innamorato arriva il vero amore,
ascoltate bene cosa vi dico
II
Il mio amore è un bel giovanotto
bello come pochi sotto il sole, ma come fare per salvarlo non so, perchè è stato condannato all’impiccagione
III
Mentre camminava per le strade di Derry (1)
di certo marciava spavaldo
molto più simile a un comandante
che a un condannato sul punto di morire sulla forca
IV
Ma al primo passo che mise su quella scaletta
il suo colorito iniziò a spegnersi
e con profondi sospiri gridò amaramente “Non c’è il perdono dal carcere di Derry?”
V
E il secondo passo che mise su quella scaletta il suo caro sacerdote (2) gli stava accanto
gridando “State indietro, falso pubblico ministero,
che vi mostrerò perchù lui non può morire!
VI
Si, vi mostrerò che non potete
impiccarlo

finchè non mi ha rilasciato la sua confessione, e così vedete che non potete impiccarlo
fino a quando mancheranno 10 minuti al tramonto”
VII
Cosa trattiene il mio amore che ci mette tanto a venire?
Che cosa la tiene così lontana da me?
Crede forse che sia una vergogna o uno scandalo
vedermi morire sulla forca?

VIII
Si guardò intorno e la vide
arrivare
ed era vestita di un bel panno
il destriero affaticato che il [suo] amore cavalcava
volava più veloce del vento.
IX
Scendi, scendi da quella forca crudele
ho ottenuto il perdono dal Re (3)
farò loro vedere che non oseranno impiccarti
e incoronerò il mio amore con una ghirlanda verde (4)”

NOTE
1) il riferimento alle strade di Derry o alla prigione di Derry appare nelle varianti della ballata solo a partire dal 1830
2) il tema del sacerdote che cerca di ottenere tempo sul patibolo è sostituito in altre versioni dalla richiesta di conforto rivolta ai congiunti ad esempio i Bothy Band
His beloved father was standing by
“Come here, come near, my beloved father
And speak one word to me before I die”
3) nella versione di Bellamy è “the Queen” in altre versioni la grazia arriva “dal Re e dalla Regina”
4) nella versione dei Bothy Band diventa un “a laurel leaf”, Al O’Donnell canta invece “…with a bunch of bloom”.

FONTI
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/95a-derry-gaol-or-the-streets-of-derry-bronson.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/derry-gaol-from-formula-to-narrative-theme.aspx
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53736&lang=it
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/thestreetsofderry.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/bothyband/streets.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3780

ROSE CONNOLEY IN A WILLOW GARDEN

“Down in the Willow Garden” è una “mountain murder ballad” di fine ottocento di cui non si conoscono le origini perchè trasmessa per lo più in forma orale; compare nelle raccolte stampate solo agli inizi del 900 in America, in quello specifico territorio dei Monti Appalachi pieno zeppo di emigranti irlandesi e scozzesi. Il dubbio che la fonte primaria arrivi dalle isole britanniche è più che fondato. La storia è un fatto di cronaca nera che appartiene ad un clichè noir molto popolare fin dal Settecento, l’amante che uccide la donna, che ha messo incinta.

Prima di pugnalarla come da copione però, la intossica con del veleno, disciolto in un frizzante e dolce sidro alle pere: un classico omicidio premeditato che ha come movente l’interesse economico (l’amante andava bene come sollazzo fisico, ma probabilmente il tipo aveva una fidanzata ricca da qualche altra parte). Niente nella canzone ci dice dello stato interessante della ragazza tranne il nome Rose (e quando si dice rosa nelle ballate popolari… è sempre una storia infausta)

VINO O SIDRO?

Tra gli antichi saperi dei contadini che non buttavano via mai niente e che soprattutto s’ingegniavano a conservare il cibo per i giorni di magra, ci sono tante ricette dimenticate, una di queste è il “vino di pera”, cioè una bevanda ottenuta dalla fermentazione naturale del succo di pera. Si tratta naturalmente di un sidro dal color paglierino e spumoso, zuccherino ma non stucchevole. a bassa gradazione alcolica perfetto come aperitivo o per accompagnare un dolce al cucchiaio (o per scioglierci qualche pozione malefica)

Tim O’Brien &Paul Brady

The Chieftains & Bon Iver in Voices of Ages 2012

THE WILLOW GARDEN
I
Down in a willow garden
Where me and my love did meet,
‎’Twas there we sat a courting
My love dropped off to sleep.‎
‎ II
I had a bottle of the Burglar’s wine
Which my true love did not know,
And so I poisoned that dear little girl
Down under the bank below.
‎ III
I stobbed her with a dagger,
Which was a bloody knife,
I threw her in the river,
Which was a dreadful sight.‎
‎ IV
My father often told me
That money would set me free,
If I would murder that dear little girl
Whose name was Rose Connelly.‎
‎V
And now he sits in his own cottage door,
A-wiping his weeping eye,
And now he waits for his own dear son,
Upon the scaffold high.‎
‎VI
My race is run beneath the sun,
Lo, hell’s now waiting for me,
For I have murdered that dear little girl
Whose name was Rose Connelly.‎
LÀ NEL GIARDINO DEI SALICI
(rivista da qui)
I
Là nel giardino dei salici
dove io e la mia amante c’incontravamo,‎
Fu là che iniziammo la relazione
e il mio amore cadde addormentato ‎
II
Avevo una bottiglia di sidro di pera (1) ‎
che il mio amore non conosceva
E così intossicai (2) quella cara ragazza
Laggiù vicino all’argine
III
La trafissi con la lama
di un pugnale assetato di sangue‎,
La buttai nel fiume‎
Fu orribile a vedersi
IV
Mio padre mi diceva spesso ‎
Che il denaro mi avrebbe reso libero ‎
E così ho ucciso quella cara ragazza ‎
Il cui nome era Rose Connelly
V
Ed ora [il mio vecchio] siede sulla porta di casa
Asciugandosi il pianto dagli occhi
Ed attende che il suo unico amato figlio
Salga ‎sulla forca
VI
La mia vita correva sotto il sole ‎
Ma ecco, ora l’inferno mi aspetta ‎
Perchè ho ucciso quella cara ragazza ‎
Il cui nome era Rose Connelly

NOTE
1) bulgar: c’è chi lo prende come un refuso per bordeau (“burgundy wine”), alcuni propendono per drogato, ma Lyre Lofgren nel suo articolo su Inside Bluegrass, May 2003, dopo molte accurate ricerche suggerisce la parola burgaloo cioè una varietà di pera, e il sidro alle pere era una bevanda contadina nella Virginia fin dal 700- come sempre accade quando un termine non è più compreso (perchè caduto in disuso o perche specifico di un certo territorio e una certa epoca) è stato storpiato e riconvertito nei modi più disparati
2) è risaputo che il veleno è l’arma preferita dalle donne, e infatti l’uomo non lo usa per uccidere la ragazza, semplicemente scioglie del sonnifero nel suo bicchiere di sidro, coadiuvato dal fatto che la ragazza con conoscesse il sapore del sidro alle pere non avendolo mai assaggiato prima

continua

FONTI
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-RoseConn.html
http://appalachianlifestyles.blogspot.it/2009/03/in-search-of-rose-conelly.html

YOUNG EDMUND IN THE LOWLANDS

La ballata, diffusa sotto molti titoli  nel nuovo e vecchio continente, è una murder ballad ed è stata pubblicata in Inghilterra in molti broadsides del 1800; l’argomento è stato trattato in modo esaustivo nel blog di Patrick Blackman “Sing Out! Murder Ballad Monday” e quindi mi limiterò alle traduzioni in italiano e a qualche osservazione personale.
Nella prima parte ho commentato le versioni del folk americano (qui) nella seconda parte la versione nel folk inglese (qui) e in questa terza parte concludo con la versione in Irlanda.

LE VERSIONI IRLANDESI Young Edmund in the Lowlands Low

La variante irlandese della ballata viene dall’Ulster (contea di Tyrone) ed è forse la melodia più straziante, cantata con molto pathos dagli interpreti, resa magistralmente da Jarlath Henderson, differisce dalla versione inglese nella conclusione in cui il padre è consumato dal rimorso e confessa di aver ucciso il giovane Edmund, per finire così impiccato sulla pubblica piazza.

tyburn

ASCOLTA Paul Brady in “Welcome Here Kind Stranger”, 1978 (per il testo qui)

ASCOLTA Jarlath Henderson in “Hearts Broken, Heads Turned”, 2016 (notevole e talentuoso musicista polistrumentista nonchè cantante che ci regala un cd denso di emozioni)
Nelle note scrive: “Geordie Hanna was described to me as a big gentle farmer from the southern shores of Lough Neagh, with hands like shovels, I am told, and a welcome for everyone. Geordie and his sister, Sarah-Anne O’Neill, collected many songs and kept the singing tradition alive in County Tyrone, even through the dark days of the troubles. Sadly, Geordie passed away soon after I was born, in 1987. As a young teenager, I met Sarah-Anne during music sessions held on Friday nights in Derrytresk. I take my inspiration here from Geordie’s version of this dark and well-travelled murder ballad.”

VERSIONE JARLATH HENDERSON
I
Young Emily being a servant girl(1),
Her lover a sailor bold(2),
He ploughed the main
much gold to gain(3)
For Emily, we are told.
After seven long years had been and gone,
Young Edmund returned home;
He landed to his true love
And all his gold he did it show,
That he had gained dwell on the main,
as he ploughed the Lowlands Low(4).
II
Her Father kept a public house,
It was down by the sea,
said Emily “You may enter there
And all night you can stay;
And I’ll meet you here tomorrow,
But don’t let my Father know(5)
That your name it is young Edmund Deares
who ploughed the Lowlands Low.”
III
And Edmund Deares has enter there,
And all his gold he did show –
Said Emily’s cruel Father,
“This gold will be your woe (foe),
For I’ll send your body sinkin’,
Down in the Lowlands Low.”
IV
As Edmund did go to bed
And scarce had fell asleep,
young Emily’s cruel Father
Into his room did creep –
He has dragged and put him out of bed
To the beach, sure he did go,
And he sent his body sinkin’
Down in the Lowlands Low.
V
As Emily on her pillow lay,
She dreamt a frightful dream –
She dreamt to saw her true love
Lying in a crystal stream(6);
and early the next morning
To her Father’s house she did go,
because she loved him dearly
who ploughed the Lowlands Low.
VI
Sayin’, “Father, where’s that stranger
Who came last night to lie?”
“Oh, he is dead, no tales he’ll tell,”
Her Father did reply.
“Then, Father, cruel Father,
You will die a public show
For the murder of young Edmund Deares
who ploughed the Lowlands Low.”
VII
And Emily’s cruel Father
Could not day or night get rest;
For the cruel deed that he had done,
He later did confess(7);
He was tried and he was sentenced,
And he died a public show,
For the murder of young Edmund Deares
who ploughed the Lowlands Low.(8)
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
La giovane Emily era una ragazza a servizio(1)
e il suo amore un prode marinaio(2)
che navigava sull’oceano
per guadagnare molto denaro(3)
per Emily, così mi è stato detto.
Dopo che trascorsero sette lunghi anni
il giovane Edmund ritornò a casa
sbarcò a terra dal suo vero amore
e le mostrò tutti i soldi
che aveva guadagnato sul mare
mentre navigava per le Terre basse(4).
II
Il padre gestiva una locanda
che stava in riva al mare
disse Emily “Devi andarci
e restaci per tutta la notte.
ci vedremo al mattino,
ma non far sapere a mio padre(5)
che che tu sei il giovane Edmund Deares
che navigava per le Terre basse”
IV
E Edmund Deares ci entrò
e mostrò tutto il suo danaro
disse il crudele padre di Emily
“Quest’oro sarà la tua rovina
perchè farò affondare il tuo corpo
giù negli abissi”
IV
Edmund andò a letto
e si era appena messo a dormire
che il crudele padre di Emily,
piano nella sua stanza scivolò
lo pugnalò e lo tirò fuori dal letto,
dritto alla spiaggia andò
e fece affondare il suo corpo
giù negli abissi
V
Mentre Emily dormiva nel suo letto
fece un sogno spaventoso,
sognò di vedere il suo vero amore
fermo in una corrente di cristallo(6)
così subito al mattino dopo
andò alla casa di suo padre
perchè amava teneramente
colui che navigava per le Terre basse
VI
dicendo “Padre, dov’è quello straniero
che è venuto l’altra notte a dormire? ”
“E’ morto e non racconterà niente”
rispose il padre
“Allora padre, crudele padre
morirai sulla pubblica piazza
per l’omicidio del giovane Edmund Deares
colui che navigava per le Terre basse ”
VI
E il crudele padre di Emily
giorno e notte non poteva riposare
per l’atto crudele che aveva commesso
e alla fine confessò(7)
fu processato e condannato
e morì sulla pubblica piazza
per l’omicidio del giovane Edmund Deares
che navigava per le Terre basse(8)

NOTE
1) nelle versioni del vecchio mondo Emma non è una semplice fanciulla in età di marito (maiden) ma una fanciulla a servizio presso una famiglia benestante, viveva perciò presso la loro casa e non nella locanda dei genitori
2) in questa versione Edwin si è arruolato nella British Army e si è imbarcato su una nave da guerra
3) per potersi sposare e mettere su casa con la sua fidanzata. In questa versione non si sta proprio parlando di un sacco di soldi, giusto quello che poteva raccimolare un marinaio della marina britannica
4) nel Settecento-Ottocento con questo termine generico si indicavano le colonie olandesi, e più in generale molte terre e isole nelle Indie Occidentali.  D’altra parte a voler retrodatare la ballata non dobbiamo dimenticare che il Seicento fu un secolo di guerre tra Inghilterra e Olanda per il predominio dei mari e per la spartizione delle colonie. Mi viene da pensare piuttosto al riferimento ad un luogo dell’immaginario evocato già in tante altre ballate del tempo. Il nome richiama inoltre i fondali del mare che diventeranno la tomba dell’incauto giovane.
5) perchè Emily non vuole far sapere ai famigliari del ritorno del fidanzato? Adesso sarebbe probabilmente un buon partito, supposto che prima invece fosse stato allontanato dalla famiglia a causa della sua inferiore condizione sociale. C’è da presumere un qualche dissapore personale o un amore paterno distorto e morboso, e quindi non l’avidità, ma la gelosia sarebbe all’origine del delitto: una lettura in profondità non insolita nelle ballate popolari in cui il disagio psico-fisico era appena dietro l’angolo.
6) l’immagine poetica è quella di una bara con le pareti di vetro
7) la versione irlandese di questa ballata diventa sempre più simile a un racconto di fiabe: il colpevole è assalito dal rimorso e confessa il suo crimine. Mentre nella versione inglese abbiamo solo la speranza della ragazza che il padre finisca nelle mani della giustizia, qui ci viene la conferma della sua impiccagione nella pubblica piazza.
8) verrebbe da completare la ballata con l’ultimo verso preso in prestito dalla versione di Maggy Murphy dalla contea di Fermanagh
Now Emily she can wander
Down by yon beech-green isle
For to see the great big steamers
And small boats pass to and fro.
For to see the great big steamers
And small boats pass to and fro;
It reminds her of her Edmund Deares
who ploughed the lowlands low

continua ultima parte

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/youngedwininthelowlandslow.html
http://singout.org/2012/10/18/he-therefore-did-confess/
https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/Bella-Hardy/Young-Edmund
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/11551776/Blog%20Stuff/Young%20Edmund%20in%20the%20Lowlands%20Low%20-%20Paul%20Brady.txt
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=142487

LOUGH ERNE SHORE

Con lo stesso titolo si identificano due diverse melodie, la prima è quella più comunemente nota come “Shamrock shore” (vedi) per il titolo del testo a cui è abbinata

ERIN SHORE O LOUGH ERIN SHORE

ASCOLTA The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995)

ASCOLTA The Corrs in “Unplugged” 1999

oppure la versione live The Corrs & The Chieftains 2008

LOUGH ERNE SHORE

angelabetta3La seconda è una Irish pastoral love song probabilmente una “Ulster Hedge School ballad” del 1700 o 1800. Per il soggetto ricorda un’altra ballata dal titolo “The Pretty Girl Milking the Cow” (vedi). La melodia è una slow air tipica delle aisling song (rêverie song) ossia un genere letterario della poesia irlandese (per lo più in gaelico) proprio del 1600-1700 in cui il protagonista (spesso un poeta) ha la visione in sogno di una bella fanciulla che rappresenta l’Irlanda. Questa in particolare sebbene non sia pervenuta nella sua versione in gaelico si ritiene provenga dal un maestro di scuola (hedge-school) del Fermanagh

ASCOLTA Paddy Tunney (vedi scheda)
ASCOLTA Paul Brady & Andy Irvine  in “Andy Irvine and Paul Brady” (1976).
ASCOLTA La Lugh

Old Blind Dogs in Wherever Yet May Be 2010 (Jonny Hardie violino, Aaron Stone voce e chitarra, Ali Hutton  border pipes, Fraser Stone percussioni)

VERSIONE PADDY TUNNEY da “The Stone Fiddle”
I
One morning as I went a-fowlin’,
bright Phoebus(1) adorned the plain.
It was down by the shades of Lough Erne(2),
I met with this wonderful dame.
II
Her voice was so sweet and so pleasing;
these beautiful notes she did sing.
And the innocent fowl of the forest,
their love unto her they did bring.
III
Well, it being the first time I met her,
my heart, it did lep with surprise.
And I thought that she could be no mortal,
but an angel that fell from the skies.
IV
Her hair it resembled gold tresses;
her skin was as white as the snow.
And her lips were as red as the roses
that bloom around Lough Erne shore.
V
When I heard that my love was eloping,
these words unto her I did say:
“Oh, take me to your habitation,
for Cupid(1) has led me astray.”
VI
“For ever I’ll keep the commandments;
they say that it is the best plan.
Fair maids who do yield to men’s pleasures,
the scriptures do say they are wrong.”
VII
“Oh, Mary, don’t accuse me of weakness,
for treachery I do disown.
I will make you a lady of the splendour
if with me, this night, you’ll come home.”
VIII
Oh, had I the lamp of great Al-addin(3),
his rings and his genie that’s more,
I would part with them all for to gain you,
and live around Lough Erne shore.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Una mattina mentre ero a passeggio, il luminoso Febo(1) soleggiava la pianura così mi addentrai nei boschetti del Lago Erne (2) e incontrai una bella dama.
II
La sua voce era così dolce e armoniosa,
le belle note che cantava gli innocenti uccelli del bosco (ri)portavano con l’amore a lei.
III
Essendo la prima volta che la incontravo il mio cuore fece un balzo per la sorpresa e pensai che lei non potesse essere una mortale, ma un angelo caduto dal cielo.
IV
I capelli sembravano trecce d’oro, la pelle bianca come la neve, e le labbra rosse come le rose
in fiore lungo le rive del Lago Erne.
V
Quando mi accorsi che mi ero innamorato,
le dissi queste parole
“Oh portatemi alla vostra dimora, che Cupido(1) mi ha colpito”.
VI
“Osserverò i comandamenti per sempre, dicono che sia il miglior proposito. Le scritture dicono che sono in errore le belle fanciulle che soggiacciono ai voleri degli uomini”
VII
“Oh Maria non accusarmi di debolezza
perchè io rinnego il tradimento,
ti farò una signora ricca se con me, questa notte, verrai!
VIII
Avessi la lampada del grande Aladino(3)
e in più i suoi anelli e il genio,
li condividerei tutti con te per vivere sulla riva del Lago Erne”

NOTE
1) l’autore da sfoggio delle sue conoscenze classiche citando a Febo (ovvero Apollo) il dio del sole  e Cupido il dio dell’amore
2) Il Lough Erne è un complesso di due laghi situati nelle Midlands d’Irlanda: Lower e Upper. “Senza alcuna fretta di raggiungere il mare, il fiume Erne serpeggia da una parte all’altra dell’acquosa e boscosa contea Fermanagh. Scorre fino a formare un lago composto di due bacini, Lower e Upper Lough Erne, nel cui centro si trova l’isoletta su cui sorge il capoluogo di contea, Enniskillen. Paradiso per uccelli, fiori e piante selvatiche e pescatori, Lough Erne è un corso d’acqua meraviglioso, ideale per crocere e gite in barca. ” (tratto da qui)
3) il verso si ritrova anche in una canzone dallo stesso tema “The Pretty Maid Milking her Cow

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19864
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=11428
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=28342
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lough_Erne’s_Shore

La terra del verde trifoglio di Paddy

Read the post in English

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore” è una  canzone irlandese tradizionale originaria del Donegal, di cui per una sola melodia sono state scritte diverse versioni testuali,

LA MELODIA

Una melodia tipicamente irish diffusa tra i traveller già alla fine del 1700, oggi si conosce con diversi titoli: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (ASCOLTA versione strumentale del gruppo irlandese The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (ASCOLTA la versione strumentale sempre dei Corrs in Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair ovvero The Green Glens Of Gweedor (con testo scritto da Francie Mooney)

LA VERSIONE STANDARD: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

” Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore è stata cantata per la prima volta su un EFDSS LP (1969) di Packie Manus Byrne, ora ultraottantenne [Packie è morto il 12 maggio 2015] e residente ad Ardara -Contea del Donegal. Era nato a Corkermore tra lì e Killybegs ed è stata ripresa da Paul Brady. Tuttavia, ci sono versioni più lunghe e locali (a North Derry, Donegal) in “Songs of the People” di Sam Henry e in “The Flower of Dunaff Hill” di Jimmy McBride” (tratto da qui) Sam Henry scrive in merito “Un’altra versione proviene dal distretto di Articlave, dove la canzone è stata cantata per la prima volta nel 1827 da un aratore di Inishowen.
La registrazione effettuata da Sean Davies al Cecil Sharp House risale al 1969 e ancora negli archivi sonori  dell’ITMA troviamo la registrazione cantata da Corney McDaid al McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal nel 1987 (vedi) e anche Paul Brady l’ha registrata più volte.
Kevin Conneff la registra con i Chieftains nel 1992 per l’album “Another Country” 

Amelia Hogan in “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.” con un bellissimo video -racconto

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny (strofe I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (strofe I, II, IV, V)

VERSIONE STANDARD
intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
introduzione
Venite irlandesi che ascoltate la mia canzone, il vostro destino è una storia triste, quando siete indietro con gli affitti e siete tartassati e i raccolti sono andati a male
abbandonerete le vostre terre
e vi laverete le mani di tutto quello che è avvenuto e prenderete il mare per una nuova occasione, lontano dalla terra del verde trifoglio.
I
Dal molo di Derry partimmo
il 23 di Maggio
eravamo imbarcati in una simpatica ciurma che salpava per l’America,
abbiamo preso cinque mila e più litri di acqua fresca
per il breve viaggio
fino a New York,
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
II
Così addio cara e dolce Liza,
e addio alla città di Derry
e due volte addio ai miei bravi compagni
che restano su quella terra santa,
se fama e fortuna mi arrideranno
e farò dei soldi a palate,
ritornerò indietro e sposerò la fidanzatina che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
III
Alle dodici in punto abbiamo avvistato
il famoso Mullin Head
e Innistrochlin a destra spiccava sul letto dell’oceano,
una vistra migliore mai prima videro i miei occhi
del sole che tramonta tra il mare e il cielo
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
IV
Navigammo per tre giorni (settimane) e abbiamo sofferto tutti il mal di mare, non c’era un uomo a piede libero a bordo, eravamo tutti confinati nelle nostre cuccette, senza nessuno a confortarmi, né la cara madre, né il buon padre a sorreggermi la testa che era dolorante, il che mi ha fatto pensare ancora di più alla ragazza che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
V
Raggiungemmo infine l’altra sponda in salvo in 23 gioni, siamo stati presi come passeggeri da un uomo che ci ha portato in giro in sei strade diverse
così bevemmo tutti il bicchiere dell’addio nel caso non ci fossimo più incontrati e bevemmo alla salute della vecchia Irlanda e alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

NOTE
* strofa introduttiva scritta da Garrison White
1) si riferisce dell’accoglienza degli immigrati che erano ispezionati e trattenuti per le formalità burocratiche, ma la frase non è molto chiara. Ellis Island fu usata come punto d’ingresso agli immigrati solo nel 1892. Prima di allora, per circa 35 anni, lo Stato di New York ha fatto transitare 8 milioni di immigrati per il Castle Garden Immigration Depot situato in Lower Manhattan

Rispetto alla versione “standard” si trovano un paio di testi, i quali riprendono sempre il tema dell’emigrazione

ALTRE VERSIONI

Questo testo è stato scritto da Patrick Brian Warfield, cantante e polistrumentista del gruppo irlandese The Wolfe Tones (autore di molte canzoni per il gruppo). Nella sua versione il punto di sbarco non è New York ma Baltimora.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones in Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 


I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio all’Irlanda
la mia cara terra natia,
mi si spezza il cuore a separarmi dagli amici
perchè è allora che le lacrime scorrono, devo andare in America.
Rivedrò ancora una volta la mia casa, per ora lascio la mia innamorata e la terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
II
La nostra nave si trova in rada
e lei è in piedi sul molo;
che la buona sorte ci accompagni ogni notte
mentre solchiamo mare,
molte navi sono andate perdute (nel naufragio) costato molte vite,
in questo viaggio che abbiamo davanti, con le lacrime agli occhi, dirò addio alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
III
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai ,
anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
IV
Ora la nostra nave è in viaggio
che il cielo ci protegga tutti
con i venti e  le vele di certo non falliremo
in questo viaggio verso Baltimora,
ma che genitori e amici restino a salutare
fino a quando non riuscirò più a vederli e allora darò l’ultimo sguardo
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

Questa versione riprende  la III strofa della versione precedente con un coro
The High Kings


I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio il mio solo vero amore
ti penserò notte e giorno
addio alla vecchia Irlanda
e addio a te Bannastrant
non c’è tempo per guardarsi indietro, ma fronteggiare il vento e combattere le onde, che il cielo ci protegga
dal freddo, dalla fame e dalle raffiche rabbiose, ti prego non voglio perdermi,
vento nelle vele portami al sicuro
Coro
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai , anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

II
Fuori ora sull’oceano profondo
il rumore della nave rende difficile il sonno, gli occhi si riempiono di lacrime
la tua immagine non se ne vuole andare via. (coro)
New York alla fine è in vista
il mio cuore batte forte
cerco di essere coraggioso
ma desidero averti vicino
accanto a me, cuore mio
(coro)
Finchè potrò fare ritorno un giorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi

NOTE
1) Banna Strand , ovvero Banna Beach, si trova nella Tralee Bay contea di Kerry

Shamrock shore

FONTI
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

La terra del verde trifoglio

Read the post in English

Due testi in cerca di autore, con lo stesso titolo “Shamrock shore” distinguiamo due diverse canzoni, sia come testo che come melodia, la prima riportata da P. W. Joyce alla fine dell’Ottocento è una irish emigration song, la seconda sempre tradizionale è anche una emigration song ma soprattutto una party song di protesta, la denuncia sociale e politica della questione irlandese.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Già alla fine del 1800 P. W. Joyce la riporta nella sua raccolta “Ancient Irish Music” per poi ripubblicarla nel 1909, così scrive “Una delle mie ballate preferite della mia gioventù di cui ho diverse copie delle parole stampate sui fogli volanti “.
Ancora P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) riporta ul ulteriore testo
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

L’emigrante irlandese sbarca a Londra, la melodia è quella generalmente conosciuta con il titolo di “Erin Shore” (vedi)

Horslips in Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore…
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
All’inizio della primavera quando gli uccellini cantano e gli agnellini si divertono e giocano, presi la mia decisione di abbandonare gli amici per andare al molo di Dublino.
Mi imbarcai come passeggero e partii per l’Inghilterra, dissi addio a tutti i miei amici e lasciai la terra del trifoglio.
II
Nella bella Londra mi rifugiai,
per cercare un po’ di divertimento laggiù, trovavo che fosse un bel posticino e gradevole alla vista,
le donne del posto piacevoli da guardare con indosso delle costose pellicce, ma niente vidi che si sarebbe potuto paragonare alla fanciulle della terra del trifoglio

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

Più che una canzone una concione politica sulla necessità dell’indipendenza dell’Irlanda e sui mali del latifondismo.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters (7) stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto*
I
Voi fieri giovani figli dell’isola di Erin
spero che prestiate attenzione per un momento : sono i torti della cara vecchia Irlanda che vi andò a riferire
nero e maledetto fu il giorno in cui il nostro parlamento fu abolito e tutti i nostri guai e le sofferenze iniziarono da allora.
Perchè i nostri figli robusti e le nostre belle figlie devono recarsi in altri paesi e lasciare la loro terra natia alle spalle, con dolore condannati
a cercare un lavoro, devono viaggiare
lontano, molto lontano dalla loro casa
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio
II
L’Irlanda è benedetta con l’abbondanza, ma la gente è oppressa, a tutti quei tiranni maledetti dobbiamo obbedire, per compiacere i boriosi padroni che delle nostre case e delle nostre terre s’impadroniranno  per mettere 50 fattorie in una e portarci tutti via, senza riguardo ai pianti della vedova, alle lacrime della madre e ai lamenti dell’orfano.
In migliaia siamo stati cacciati da casa, che mi rattrista il cuore, siamo stati costretti dalla carestia e dalla malattia a emigrare attraverso i mari
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
III
Il nostro sostentamento portato via per pagare le decime e le tasse
per sostenere la chiesa protetta dalla legge a cui loro aderiscono
e la nostra gentry inglese, è risaputo,
vanno in altri paesi e i soldi della vecchia Irlanda vanno sperperando in lungo e in largo. Perchè se i nostri possidenti restassero a casa e non viaggiassero per altri paesi, costruirebbero opifici e fabbriche qui per dare lavoro alla povera gente; perchè se avessimo il commercio e l’economia, per me nessun’altra nazione si potrebbe paragonare a quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
IV
L’inglese si vanta, ride con disprezzo
e dice che l’irlandese è nato
per essere sempre scontento perchè in sull’isola non andremo mai daccordo,
eppure bandiremo i tiranni dalla nostra terra
e da buone sorelle ci alzeremo a chiedere i diritti dell’Irlanda.
Quindi uniamoci tutti
e  il nostro parlamento al College Green si riunirà per le assemblee
e giorni felici nell’isola di Erin avremo presto ancora una volta
e la cara vecchia Irldanda presto sarà
una grande e gloriosa nazione
e pace e benedizioni presto sorrideranno alla terra del trifoglio

NOTE
1) la canzone è stata scritta dopo il 1800 e l’atto di unione con il regno di Gran Bretagna ( Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda)
2) la piaga del latifondismo
3)  nel 1846 l’intero raccolto delle patate (dieta base degli irlandesi) andò tutto distrutto a causa di un fungo, la peronospera; sopravvenne “la grande carestia” (1845-1849 che alcuni storici prolungano fino al 1852) che durò per vari anni e dimezzò quasi la popolazione; chi non moriva di fame era fortunato se riusciva a partire per l’Inghilterra o la Scozia, ma più massiccia fu la migrazione in America continua
4) decime obbligatorie per il sostenamento della Chiesa Anglicana. Solo sotto il primo ministero Gladstone fu tolto (1869) alla Chiesa episcopale irlandese il riconoscimento di confessione ufficiale e fu promulgata la prima legge (Land Act) protettiva dei fittavoli.
5) gli anni dell’espansione industriale su grande scala (con relativo potenziamento delle infrastrutture)  iniziano in Gran Bretagna a partire dal 1840-50
6) John Bull è la personificazione nazionale del Regno di Gran Bretagna, il nomigliolo nasce nel 1700 a rappresentare il tipo del gentiluomo di campagna, uomo d’affari capace e onesto ma collerico e di umore variabile, amante dello scherzo e della buona tavola.(Treccani)
7) letteralmente “in armonia come sorelle”, non colgo però l’allusione

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm

PADDY’S LAMENTATION OR BY THE HUSH, MY BOYS

(vedi prima parte)
L’emigrazione massiccia delle popolazioni del continente europeo nei territori americani durante il 1800 e per buona metà del 1900, come quella delle popolazioni del continente africano o del Medio Oriente verso l’Europa dei nostri tempi, sono la lotta per la sopravvivenza di gruppi sociali svantaggiati, i quali trovavano ad aspettarli gruppi sociali detentori del potere e della ricchezza (legali e illegali) pronti per lo più a sfruttarli: i poveri, i disperati sono così disumanizzati, trasformati in merce e forza- lavoro sottopagata, o ridotta allo stato di schiavitù.

Nell’America della Speranza Irlandesi (e Italiani e soprattutto Cinesi) lavorarono rischiando la vita ogni giorno (si calcola che 1/3 della forza lavoro irlandese morì a causa della dinamite fatta brillare con la miccia troppo corta, forse per imperizia ma soprattutto per economizzare) per la costruzione della rete ferroviaria del paese America vedi.
Nell’America della Speranza gli Irlandesi furono mandati a combattere nella Guerra di Secessione.

THE DRAFT RIOT IN GANGS OF NEW YORK

La rivolta che scoppiò a New York (the Draft Riot) nel luglio del 1863 fu una reazione popolare alla leva resa obbligatoria dal Congresso nel mese di marzo. Prima di quella data l’arruolamento era a base volontaria, anche se gli incentivi di tre pasti al giorno e un premio d’ingaggio, potevano attirare i più poveri e i disoccupati. Se però uno stato mancava la sua quota di soldati assegnata, subentrava la legge del 1863 e così si sorteggiava la rimanenza tra i maschi bianchi di età compresa tra i 20 e i 35 anni (i più ricchi potevano però farsi esonerare pagando 300 dollari o mandando un sostituto al proprio posto). La nuova legge acuì il malcontento degli Irlandesi in particolare di New York e sembrò loro che la lotta del Sud per l’Indipendenza fosse equivalente a quella irlandese contro l’Inghilterra (indubbiamente c’erano anche i timori che la manodopera afro-americana liberata finisse per “portare via” il lavoro o a far scendere ancora di più i salari). La folla devastò i locali della Commissione federale per la circoscrizione, distrusse i negozi e le abitazioni se la prese con le persone benvestite o ritenute responsabili della situazione e per buona misura i neri vennero bastonati e  impiccati ai lampioni. L’ordine venne ristabilito solo con l’esercito (alcuni reparti che avevano appena combattuto a Ghettysburg) con il rastrellamento strada per strada, con perquisizioni casa per casa, dei quartieri “caldi” e con le sparatorie sulla folla (stime realistiche parlano di un migliaio di morti).

(nella scena del film il termine per indicare i rivoltosi è mob che sottintende il concetto di organizzazione criminale, l’irish mob ossia la mafia irlandese si è originata proprio dalle gangs di irlandesi in America, così a New York operavano i Forty Thieves, i Dead Rabbits e i Whyos, poi arrivarono gli italiani e gli ebrei)

Così nella canzone “Paddy’s lamentation” un soldato irlandese che ha combattuto per Lincoln si ritrova senza una gamba e senza la pensione d’invalidità e maledice l’America perchè lo ha mandato a combattere, senza avergli lasciato la possibilità di scelta. Alcuni ritengono che la canzone sia stata scritta proprio negli anni successivi alla guerra quando i soldati mutilati si trovarono in difficoltà a riscuotere la promessa pensione.
Non mi voglio addentrare negli aspetti della guerra civile americana e nemmeno sul fatto che gli irlandesi si ritrovarono inevitabilmente a combattere tra di loro sui due fronti (come accadde anche per gli italiani: la maggior parte degli italiani che combatterono per l’unione provenivano dal distretto di New York, mentre dalla parte confederata c’erano per lo più i resti dell’esercito borbonico), quanto chiarire un paio di punti utili alla comprensione dei versi.

Questa volta, nonostante mi piaccia molto l’interpretazione di Sinead O’Connor, non ho dubbi sulla versione da selezionare per l’ascolto

Mary Black & The Chieftains in “Long Journey Home” 1998. Mary Black ha inciso una versione precedente con i De Dannan (come preferiscono farsi chiamare) nel 1984  qui nella quale è cantata anche la V strofa.

Nella versione per il film “Long Journey Home” di Thomas Lennon, Paddy Moloney ha preferito non inserire la V strofa, quella in cui si maledice l’America, in effetti l’America è diventata la patria di migliaia d’irlandesi che oggi sono irlandesi americani fieri dello loro origini (stimato come secondo gruppo di ascendenza europea per consistenza dopo i tedeschi americani), ma anche grati alla terra che li ha accolti. A conti fatti le condizioni che trovarono nella nuova terra erano migliori della fame e disperazione che si lasciavano alle spalle; in America emigrarono anche famiglie di ricchi proprietari terrieri (che avevano perso la fiducia di trovare in Irlanda una prospettiva di ripresa per il futuro), così nell’Ulisse di Joyce leggiamo questo di lamento “Dove sono oggi quei venti milioni mancanti di Irlandesi che ci dovrebbero essere qui oggi invece di quattro, le nostre tribù perdute? E le nostre ceramiche e i tessuti, i migliori del mondo? E la nostra lana che si vendeva a Roma ai tempi di Giovenale e il nostro lino e il nostro damasco dei telai di Antrim e i nostri merletti di Limerick..

tra le versioni maschili

ASCOLTA Paul Brady in “The Gathering” 1977
ASCOLTA Frank Harte in “Daybreak and a Candle – End” 1987 in versione integrale su Spotify con il titolo di “By the Hush Me Boys”


I
“And it’s by the hush”(1), me boys, and sure that’s to hold your noise
And listen to poor Paddy’s sad narration
I was by hunger pressed(2), and in poverty distressed
So I took a thought I’d leave the Irish nation
CHORUS
Here’s you boys, now take my advice
To America I’ll have ye’s not be comin’
There is nothing here but war, where the murderin’ cannons roar
And I wish I was at home in dear old Dublin
II
Well I sold me horse and cow, my little pigs and sow
My little plot of land I soon did part with
And me sweetheart Bid McGee, I’m afraid I’ll never see
For I left her there that morning broken-hearted
III
Well meself and a hundred more, to America sailed o’er
Our fortunes to be made we were thinkin’
When we got to Yankee land, they shoved a gun into our hands
Sayin’ “Paddy, you must go and fight for Lincoln”
IV
General Meagher(3) to us he said, if you get shot or lose a leg
Every mother’s son of yous(4) will get a pension
Well myself I lost me leg, they gave me a wooden peg
And by God this is the truth to you I mention
V
Well I think meself in luck, if I get fed on Indian buck(5)
And old Ireland is the country I delight in
To the devil, I would say, God curse Americay
For the truth I’ve had enough of your hard fightin'(6)
Traduzione  di Lorenzo Masetti *
I
Beh c’è silenzio, ragazzi miei, e sono sicuro che eviterete di fare rumore
per ascoltate la triste storia del povero Paddy:
ero stremato dalla fame e tormentato per la povertà,
così mi venne in mente di lasciare
l’Irlanda
CORO
Ecco ragazzi, seguite il mio consiglio,
in America, vi dico, non andate, non c’è nient’altro qui che guerra, dove i cannoni assassini tuonano
e vorrei essere a casa nella vecchia cara Dublino
II
Bene ho venduto il mio cavallo e la mucca, i maialini e la scrofa,
dal mio piccolo pezzo di terra presto mi separai
ed il mio amore Bid McGee, mi dispiace, non la rivedrò
perché la lasciai lì quel mattino col cuore spezzato.
III
Bene, io e altri cento, partimmo per l’America,
pensavamo che saremmo andati a fare fortuna,
quando arrivammo nella terra degli Yankee,
ci misero in mano dei fucili “Paddy, devi andare a combattere per Lincoln”.
IV
Il generale Meagher ci disse, “se venite feriti o perdete una gamba,
ogni figlio di mamma tra di voi prenderà una pensione”.
Beh io stesso ho perso la gamba, me ne hanno data una di legno
e per Dio vi sto raccontando la verità.
V
Bene mi ritengo fortunato, se ho da mangiare grano indiano
e la vecchia Irlanda è il paese che mi dà gioia;
al diavolo, voglio dire, Dio maledica l’America
per la verità ne ho avuto abbastanza del vostro duro combattere

NOTE
*  tratta da qui e parzialmente riveduta
1) da gaelico ‘Bí i do thost’ ossia ‘be quiet’
2) durante la grande carestia irlandese (vedi) ci fu un flusso di emigranti sempre più massiccio a iniziare del 1845 principalmente verso le colonie del Canada e in ogni porto dell’est degli Stati Uniti (in particolare Boston e New York)
3) il generale Thomas Francis Meagher fu a capo del “Irish American 69th Infantry Regiment” (“Fighting 69th”), durante la guerra di secessione. Da allora, il reggimento ha combattuto in tutte le guerre americane (e quindi in Afghanistan e Iraq). Il reggimento é parte della Guardia Nazionale dello stato di New York.
Thomas Francis Meagher. This colorful character, whose equestrian statue now stands before the state capitol, was a brash adventurer who came here with an international reputation and an appetite for even greater glories. Descended from a wealthy Irish family, young Meagher became a leading figure in the Irish independence movement, a noted orator, and an ally of the famous Daniel O’Connell. He narrowly escaped execution by the British because of his revolutionary activities and was banished instead to the penal colony of Tasmania. After escaping from Tasmania, Meagher came eventually to New York, and he soon rose to prominence there as a leader among the thousands of Irish immigrants in that city. During the Civil War, he became famous as the organizing commmander and general of the Irish Brigade. This hard charging outfit saw fierce action at such battles as Malvern Hill and Antietam…practically annihilated in the suicide charge at Fredericksburg. (tratto da qui). Alla fine della guerra fu nominato governatore del Montana
4) yous invece di you è una espressione tipica della cittadina di Walkerville
5) “Indian buck“: indian è l’aggettivo che insieme a “corn” qualificava il mais, in Europa detto granoturco, anche se non ha niente a che vedere con la Turchia, a ben vedere il mais avrebbe dovuto chiamarsi “grano indiano” perchè proveniente da quelle che al tempo erano dette Indie Occidentali, ovvero “grano americano”
Alberto Guidorzi scrive (qui):
“Il mais arrivò in Spagna già nel 1493, cioè con i primissimi viaggi di Colombo, ma solo con gli insediamenti spagnoli nelle regioni temperate delle Americhe, avvenute 30 o 40 anni dopo la scoperta del nuovo continente, in Europa arrivano le varietà precoci che meglio si adatteranno (al clima). E’ solo così che il mais si diffuse nel bacino del Mediterraneo [una fascia geografica che comprende Spagna, Francia, Italia, Penisola Balcanica, Ucraina, Caucaso.]. Tuttavia i botanici rinascimentali non poterono non notare che la pianta aveva affinità con piante recentemente riscoperte quali il sorgo, la saggina, il miglio ed il panico, ma che erano di origine euroasiatica e pertanto, visto anche che ciò coincideva con l’avanzata turca, simbolo di un popolo diverso proveniente da sud, si preferì assegnare al nuovo cereale una provenienza diversa da quella vera, chiamando appunto il mais “granoturco”. Altra particolarità da segnalare è che il mais fungeva da cereale alimentare degli equipaggi delle navi durante il viaggio transcontinentale di ritorno.
Il mais tuttavia per almeno un secolo non ebbe mercato, vale a dire che era seminato negli orti per un uso famigliare, ma i ricchi nobili, proprietari dei terreni, rifiutavano di ricevere mais in conto d’affitto appunto perché merce non mercantile, a differenza del frumento, tanto era la poca considerazione come cibo umano. E’ in questo modo che il mais si è affermato solo come cibo dei poveri e anche come pianta per uso zootecnico. Non sembri inoltre strano come il mais sia un esempio storico della reazione di rifiuto che viene riservato a tutto ciò che è nuovo in fatto di cibo. All’inizio non si disconobbe l’utilità del mais, ma lo si fece detenere dal diavolo, infatti, secondo racconti popolari spagnoli, San Martino l’avrebbe portato via al diavolo in occasione di una scommessa e nelle Lande francesi la cosmologia popolare descrive il mais non come un dono di Dio, ma come una pianta data agli uomini dal maligno e che dagli utilizzatori, avrebbe preteso alla loro morte il possesso dell’anima. Forse è per questo che il primo uso fu zootecnico, nel senso che la pianta verde era somministrata al bestiame o agli animali di bassa corte e per molto tempo fu seminata in terreni non destinati alla coltivazione delle piante alimentari, quali quelle a riposo. L’uso quasi esclusivo presso i diseredati durante le carestie del XVIII sec. fece il resto per demonizzare ulteriormente il mais, anche perchè ben presto cominciarono a verificarsi i primi casi di pellagra(*). A tutto ciò si aggiunse la nomea di pianta depauperatrice dei terreni e quindi incoltivabile nei terreni dati in affitto per proibizione dei proprietari. Tuttavia di questa pianta i contadini non potevano fare senza, perché produceva di più in quantità e soprattutto il seme costava poco, a differenza di quello del frumento. In questo contesto di sfiducia la pianta del mais mantenne la valenza di alimento subumano per almeno un secolo e mezzo, restando comunque una coltura di nicchia al punto tale che ciò determino la creazione di numerosissime popolazioni locali gelosamente custodite e fenotipicamente ben caratterizzate.”
L’alimentazione basata quasi esclusivamente sulla polenta di mais provocò il diffondersi della pellagra fra i mezzadri del Nord Italia dalla fine del ‘700. La malattia non si sviluppò nelle popolazioni native americane perchè procedevano ad un trattamento speciale
E’ molto ingegnoso il processo che veniva (e che viene tuttora usato) in tutte le Americhe detto nixtamalizzazione. I chicchi di mais essiccati vengono inzuppati e cotti in una soluzione alcalina, solitamente a base di idrossido di calcio. Questo ammorbidisce il pericarpo, la parte esterna del chicco, rendendo più semplice la macinatura. Il processo trasforma il mais da semplice fonte di amido (zucchero) in un impasto nutrizionalmente più completo: aumenta la biodisponibilità di calcio, ferro, rame e zinco (anche con l’aiuto del vasellame) oltre che di niacina (evitando così il rischio di ammalarsi di pellagra), riboflavina ed altre vitamine. Lo sviluppo di alcune miceti (funghi) è un altro dei lati positivi del procedimento: lasciando fermentare l’impasto si produce un’ulteriore aumento del valore nutritivo con l’aggiunta di amminoacidi quali lisina e triptofano. Fagioli, verdure, frutta, chili e mais così preparato (nixtamal) erano in grado di fornire una dieta nutrizionalmente soddisfacente senza il bisogno di ricorrere alle proteine animali. (tratto da qui)
5) come intendere questa strofa? Il soldato irlandese dopo essersi lamentato di aver ricevuto solo una gamba di legno e non la promessa pensione d’invalidità ha preferito ritornare in Irlanda a fare la fame piuttosto che continuare a vivere sul suolo americano? Oppure si ritiene comunque fortunato perchè in America ha da mangiare (anche se il cibo dei poveri) e si consola pensando alla sua Irlanda..
Nel primo caso l’Indian buck è il “granoturco” che arrivava dall’America con gli aiuti (per la grande carestia) e che per quanto si tratti di un cereale molto digeribile (adatto in particolare nei casi di deperimenti organici) tuttavia avrebbe potuto creare qualche problema agli stomaci non fenotipizzati degli Irlandesi. Nel secondo caso si tratta del cibo dei poveri l’unico che l’ex soldato disoccupato poteva permettersi di mangiare.
Le due interpretazioni hanno entrambe senso e come sempre per le canzoni popolari lasciano il campo alla valutazione di ogni interprete e ascoltatore.

FONTI
“Song of the North Woods” di Dr. László Vikár, 2004 (qui)
“La genesi della potenza americana. Da Jefferson a Wilso”n di Loretta Valtz Mannucci
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=2770&lang=it http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-ByTheHush.html http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/ByTheHush.pdf http://thomaslennonfilms.com/documentary/the-irish-in-america-long-journey-home/ http://www.thechieftains.com/main/long-journey-home/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4988 http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/p/paddysla.html

HEATHER ON THE MOOR BY ROBERT BURNS

National Galleries of Scotland; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation“The Heather down the Moor” appartiene al filone degli incontri romantici “among the Heather” tra procaci pastorelle e baldi giovanotti, una canzoncina nota in Scozia anche con il titolo “Doon the Moor” (“Down the Moor”) la canzone è stata attribuita da Robert Burns alla cantante di strada Jean Glover (1758-1800) “who was not only a whore but a thief; and in one or other character has visited most of the Correction Houses in the West. … I took the song down from her singing as she was strolling through the country with a sleight-of-hand blackguard.”

Robert Burns la riporta per la pubblicazione nello ‘The Scots Musical Museum’, IV, (1792), con il titolo “O’er the moor amang the heather“, e tuttavia la canzone è molto più antica e alcuni studiosi la accomunano alla ballata “The Laird o’ Drum” (Child 236); la canzone è diffusa parimenti nell’Irlanda del Nord ed è stata divulgata da Paul Brady. Nelle note riportate in The Songs of Robert Burns (qui) leggiamo in merito alla melodia “Some previous verses with the title must have existed, because the tune O’er the muir amang the heather is in Bremner’s Keels, 1760,77, published, according to C. K. Sharpe, when Glover was only two years old. The tune was well known, for it is repeated in Stewart’s Reels, 1761; Campbell’s Reels, 1778,  and elsewhere.”

ASCOLTA Paul Brady inThe Gathering “1981


I
As I roved out of a bright May morning
Calm and clear was the weather
Well I chanced to roam some miles from home
Among the beautiful blooming Heather
And it’s heather on the moor,
over the heather

Over the moor and among the heather
And I chanced to roam some miles from home
Among the beautiful blooming heather
And it’s heather on the moor
II
As I roved along with my hunting song
And my heart as light as any feather
I met a pretty maid along the way
She was tripping the dew down from the heather
And it’s heather on the moor…
III
Where are you going to my pretty fair maid?
By hill or dale come tell me whether?
Right modestly she answered me
To the feeding of my lamb’s together
And it’s heather on the moor..
IV
Well we both shook hands and down we sat
For it being the finest day in summer
And we sat till the red setting beams of the sun
Came a-sparkling down among the Heather
And it’s heather ..
V
Now she says I must away
For my sheep and lambs have strayed from other
But I am loath to part from you
As those fond lambs are to part their mother
And it’s heather ..
VI
Up she rose and away she goes
And her place and name I know not either
But if I was king I’d make her queen
The lass I met among the Heather
And it’s heather ..
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo in un chiaro mattin di maggio, il tempo era sereno e piacevole, percorsi qualche miglio (lontano) da casa
tra la bella erica
fiorita

ed è l’erica della brughiera,
sull’erica

nella brughiera, tra l’erica
percorsi qualche miglio (lontano) da casa
tra la bella erica fiorita,
che è l’erica della brughiera

II
Mentre passeggiavo con la mia canzone di caccia, a cuor leggero come una piuma, incontrai lungo la strada una bella fanciulla che trotterellava nella rugiada tra l’erica
che è l’erica della brughiera..
III
Dove stai andando mia bella fanciulla?
Verso la collina o la valle,
suvvia dimmi dove vai?”
Lei mi rispose con modestia
” A governare il gregge degli agnelli”
che è l’erica della brughiera..
IV
Beh ci siamo stretti la mano e ci siamo seduti a terra,
perchè era il più bel giorno d’estate,
e restammo seduti finchè il rosso tramonto del sole
venne a risplendere
tra l’erica
che è l’erica della brughiera..
V
Poi lei disse “Devo andare via
perchè le pecore e gli agnelli si sono allontanati dal gregge,
ma mi rincresce separarmi da voi
come questi cari agnelli che si separano dalla loro madre
che è l’erica della brughiera..
VI
Su si alzò e andò via
e non sapevo neppure il suo nome nè da dove venisse
ma se fossi il re lei sarebbe la mia regina, la ragazza che incontri tre l’erica che è l’erica della brughiera..

ASCOLTA June Tabor (1980)


I
One morn in May when fields were gay
Serene and pleasant was the weather
I spied a lass and a very bonnie lass
She was sweeping the dew from among the heather
Down the moor
It’s upon the heather (1) round o’er the moor
and through the heather

I spied a lass and a very bonnie lass
She was sweepin’ the dew
from among the heather
Down the moor
II
Barefoot was she, she was comely dressed
And on her head no cap nor feather
She’d a plaid wrapped neatly round her waist(2)
As we tripped through the blooming heather
Down the moor ..
III
I stepped up to this fair maid
“Tell your name, come tell me hither.”
And she answered me “down by the bonnie burn side
I herding all my ewes together”
Down the moor ..
IV
I courted her that lee long day
My heart was as light as any feather
Until the rays of the red setting sun
Came shining down in among the heather
Down the moor
V
She said “Young man, I must away,
My ewes are straying from each other.
But I’m as loath for to part with you
As the bonnie wee lambs to part their mother
Down the moor
VI
Then up she got and away she went
Her name and place I can not gather
But if I was a king, I’d make her my queen
That bonnie wee lass I met among the heather
Down the moor
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Una mattina di maggio tra i campi ridenti e con il tempo sereno e piacevole, vidi una ragazza, proprio una bella ragazza che stava camminando nella rugiada
tra l’erica giù nella brughiera
tra l’erica per la brughiera
e tra l’edera
vidi una ragazza, proprio una bella ragazza
che stava camminando nella rugiada
tra l’erica, giù nella brughiera
II
Era a piedi nudi, vestita in modo attraente
e sul capo non aveva cappello nè piume, portava il mantello drappeggiato intorno alla vita,
mentre andavamo in giro tra l’erica in fiore
giù nella brughiera.
III
Mi sono fermato davanti a questa bella fanciulla “Dimmi il tuo nome, vieni a dirmelo da vicino”
E lei mi ha risposto “Giù per le belle sponde del ruscello governo il mio gregge di pecore ”giù nella brughiera..

IV
La corteggiai per tutto il giorno,
il mio cuore era leggero come una piuma, finchè i raggi del sole al tramonto
vennero a splendere tra l’erica
giù nella brughiera
V
Lei disse “Giovanotto, devo andare,
le mie pecore si allontanano le une dalle altre, ma io sono riluttante a separarmi da voi come i bei agnellini nel separarsi dalla loro madre
giù nella brughiera.
VI
Allora si alzò e via andò,
non sapevo il suo nome e il luogo di provenienza
ma se fossi stato un re, l’avrei fatta diventare la mia regina, la bella ragazzina che incontrai tra l’erica,
giù nella brughiera

NOTA
1) Dalle Highlands di Robert Burns alle Moorlands di Emily Bronte, e fino alla Baraggia del Vercellese il brugo (ma anche l’erica) popola quelle che in suo nome vengono definite brughiere. continua
2) scritto anche “But the plait hung neatly around her waist”

FONTI
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-iv,-song-328,-page-338-oer-the-moor-amang-the-heather.aspx
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/us–canada-versions-236-the-laird-o-drum.aspx http://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/heatherdownthemoor.html http://www.paulbrady.com/disco-1/lyrics/heather-on-the-moor/ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=421
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=24926 http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/doon-the-moor.html http://www.acousticguitar.com/How-To/Play-the-Irish-Love-Song-Heather-on-the-Moor http://thesession.org/tunes/2489
http://www.ramshornstudio.com/heather.htm