Archivi tag: pirate ballad

The Coasts of High Barbary

Leggi in italiano

The George Aloe and the Sweepstake o (The Coasts of) High Barbary is considered both a sea shanty and a ballad (Child ballad # 285) and certainly its original version is very old and probably from the 16th century. So ‘in the seventeenth-century comedy “The Two Noble Kinsmen” we read: “The George Alow came from the south, From the coast of Barbary-a; And there he met with brave gallants of war, By one, by two, by three-a. Well hail’d, well hail’d, you jolly gallants! And whither now are you bound-a? O let me have your company”

French_ship_under_atack_by_barbary_pirates

BARBARY PIRATES

The Muslim pirates of the African coasts came from what the Europeans called Barbary or Algeria Tunisia, Libya, Morocco (and more precisely the city-states of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli, but also the ports of Salé and Tetuan).
The most correct definition is barbarian pirates because they attacked only the ships of Christian Europe (also doing raids in the Christian countries of the Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean to get slaves or to get the best redemptions). The term included Arabs, Berbers, Turks as well as European renegades.
In the affair there were also for good measure the Christian corsairs, which carried out the same raids along the coasts of Barbary (mainly the orders of chivalry of the Knights of Malta and the Knights of St. Stephen, but obviously in these cases it was a matter of “crusade” and not piracy !!

Although pirate activities were endemic in the Mediterranean Sea, the period of maximum activity of the barbarian pirates was the first half of the 1600s.

FIRST VERSION: a forebitter

Stan Hugill in his bible “Shanties From The Seven Seas” shows two melodies: one more ancient when the song was a forebitter and a faster one as a capstan chantey.
The oldest version of the ballad tells of two merchant ships The George Aloe, and The Sweepstake with George Aloe who avenges the sinking of the second ship using the same “courtesy” to the crew of the French pirate ship who had thrown into the sea the Sweepstake crew.
Pete Seeger

Joseph Arthur from  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006 (biography and records here) rock version

There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin’ down the coast
Of High Barbary
“Aloft there, aloft there”
Our jolly bosun cried
“Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an’ a-lee”
“There’s naught upon the stern, sir
There’s naught upon our lee
But there’s a lofty ship to wind’ard
An’ she’s sailin’ fast and free”
“Oh hail her, oh hail her”
Our gallant captain cried
“Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?” cried he
“Oh, I’m not a man-o-war
Nor privateer,” said he
“But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee”
For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
‘Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate’s mast away
“Oh quarter, oh quarter”
Those pirates they did cry
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank ‘em in the sea

SECOND VERSION: a sea shanty

The ballad resumed popularity in the years between 1795 and 1815 in conjunction with the attacks of Barbary pirates to American ships.

Tom Kines from “Songs from Shakespeare´s Plays and Songs of His Time”,1960
a version of how it was sung in the Elizabethan era

Quadriga Consort from Ships Ahoy 2013

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag  sea shanty version

The Shanty Crew

“Look ahead, look-astern
Look the weather in the lee!”
Blow high! Blow low!
And so sailed we.

“I see a wreck to windward,
And a lofty ship to lee!
A-sailing down along
The coast of High Barbary”
“O, are you a pirate
Or a man o’ war?” cried we.
“O no! I’m not a pirate
But a man-o-war,” cried he.
“We’ll back up our topsails
And heave vessel to.
For we have got some letters
To be carried home by you”.
For broadside, for broadside
They fought all on the main;
Until at last the frigate
Shot the pirate’s mast away.
“For quarter, for quarter”,
the saucy pirates cried
But the quarter that we showed them
was to sink them in the tide
With cutlass and gun,
O we fought for hours three;
The ship it was their coffin
And their grave it was the sea
But O! ‘Twas a cruel sight,
and grieved us, full sore,
To see them all a drownin’
as they tried to swim to shore

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/england/barbary.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=137331 https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/barbaree.html http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/barbareschi.htm http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/pirati.htm
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_285

Little Billee sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

A sea song with caustic humorism also entitled “Three Sailors from Bristol City” or “Little Boy Billee”, which deals with a disturbing subject for our civilization, but always around the corner: cannibalism!
The sea is a place of pitfalls and jokes of fate, a storm can take you off course, on a boat or raft, without food and water, it’s a subject also treated in great painting (Theodore Gericault, The raft of the Medusa see): human life poised between hope and despair.

The three sailors

The maritime songs can express the biggest fears with a good laugh! This song was born in 1863 with the title “The three sailors” written by William Makepeace Thackeray as a parody of “La Courte Paille” (= short straw) – that later became “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) as a nursery rhyme.(see first part): cases of cannibalism at sea as an extreme resource for survival were much debated by public opinion and the courts themselves were inclined to commute death sentences in detention.
The murder by necessity (or the sacrifice of one for the good of others) finds a justification in the terrible experience of death by starvation that pushes the human mind to despair and madness, but in 1884 the case of the sinking of Mignonette broke public opinion and the same home secretary Sir William Harcourt had to say “if these men are not condemned for the murder, we are giving carte blanche to the captain of any ship to eat the cabin boy every time the food is scarce “. (translated from here).
The ruling stands as a leading case and puts life as a supreme good by not admitting murder for necessity as self-defense

Little Billee
Bernard Partridge Cartoons

From notes of “Penguin Book” (1959):
The Portugese Ballad  A Nau Caterineta  and the French ballad  La Courte Paille  tell much the same story.  The ship has been long at sea, and food has given out.  Lots are drawn to see who shall be eaten, and the captain is left with the shortest straw.  The cabin boy offers to be sacrificed in his stead, but begs first to be allowed to keep lookout till the next day.  In the nick of time he sees land (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) and the men are saved.  Thackeray burlesqued this song in his  Little Billee.  It is likely that the French ballad gave rise to The Ship in Distress, which appeared on 19th. century broadsides.  George Butterworth obtained four versions in Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [issue 17] pp.320-2) and Sharp printed one from James Bishop of Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) with “in many respects the grandest air” which he had found in that county.  The text comes partly from Mr. Bishop’s version, and partly from a broadside.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Ralph Steadman from “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.(1)”

“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(2)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(3) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (4)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.

NOTES
Thackeray lyrics here
1) from french chemise
2) or top fore-gallant
2) his companions did not have to be very attached to the Bible (and probably Billy would have invented new ones to save time!)
4)  “Knight Commander of the Bath”, the chivalrous military order founded by George I in 1725

SEA SHANTY VERSION

According to Stan Hugill “Little Billee” was a sea shanty for pump work, a boring and monotonous job that could certainly be “cheered up” by this little song! Hugill only reports the text saying that the melody is like the French “The était a Petit Navire”, so the adaptation of Hulton Clint  has the performance of a lullaby.

I
There were three sailors of Bristol City;
They stole a boat and went to sea.
But first with beef and hardtack biscuits
And pickled pork they loaded she.
And pickled pork they loaded she
II
There was gorging Jack and guzzling Jimmy,
And likewise there was little Billee.
but when they got to the Equator
They’d only left but one split pea.
III
Then gorging Jack to guzzling Jimmy,
“I am confounded hungaree.”
Says guzzling Jimmy to gorging Jacky
“We’ve no wittles (1), so we must eat we.”
IV
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“Oh Guzzling Jim what a fool you be..
There’s little Billy, who’s young and tender,
We’re old and tough, so let’s eat he.”
V
“Make haste, make haste” then say Guzzling Jimmy
as he drew his snickher snee (2)
“O Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
undo the collar of your chemie.”
VI
When William heard this information
he drope down on bended knee
“O let me say my catechism
which my dear mom taught to me”
VII
So up he went to the maintop-gallant
and he drope down on his bended knee
and than he said  all his catechism
which his dear mamy once taught to he
VIII
He scarce had said his catechism
when up he jumps “There’s land I see
Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
IX
“Jerusalem and Madagascar,
And North and South Amerikee;
There’s the British fleet a-riding at anchor,
With Admiral Napier, K.C.B.”
X
When they bordered to Admiral’s vessel,
He hanged fat Jack (3) and flogged Jimmee;
as for little Bill they make him
The Captain of a Seventy-three (4).

NOTES
1)  It’s a mispronunciation of “vittles,” which is a corrupted form of “victuals,” which means “food.”
2) a particularly lethal big knife used as a weapon
3)in some versions the degree of guilt between the two sailors is distinguished, so only one is hanged
4) 73 cannon war vessel

And for corollary here is the French version “Un Petit Navire”

LINK
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872

The Ship in Distress sea ballad

Leggi in italiano

“You Seamen Bold” or “The Ship in Distress” is a sea song that tries to describe the horrors suffered on a ship adrift in the ocean and without more food on board. Probably the origin begins with a Portuguese ballad of the sixteenth century (in the golden age of the Portuguese vessels), taken from the French tradition with the title La Corte Paille.

This further version was very popular in the south of England
A. L. Lloyd writes ‘The story of the ship adrift, with its crew reduced to cannibalism but rescued in the nick of time, has a fascination for makers of sea legends. Cecil Sharp, who collected more than a thousand songs from Somerset, considered The Ship in Distress to be the grandest tune he had found in that country.’ (from here)
Louis Killen

Martin Carhty & Dave Swarbrick from But Two Came By 1968Marc Almond from Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013

I
You seamen bold who plough the ocean
See dangers landsmen never know.
It’s not for honour and promotion;
No tongue can tell what they undergo.
In the blusterous wind and the great dark water
Our ship went drifting on the sea,
Her rigging (1) gone, and her rudder broken,
Which brought us to extremity (2).
II
For fourteen days, heartsore and hungry,
Seeing but wild water and bitter sky,
Poor fellows, they stood in a totter,
A-casting lots as to which should die.
The lot (3) it fell on Robert Jackson,
Whose family was so very great.
‘I’m free to die, but oh, my comrades,
Let me keep look-out till the break of day.’
III
A full-dressed ship like the sun a-glittering(4)
Came bearing down to their relief.
As soon as this glad news was shouted,
It banished all their care and grief.
The ship brought to, no longer drifting,
Safe in Saint Vincent, Cape Verde, she gained.
You seamen all, who hear my story,
Pray you’ll never suffer the like again (5).

NOTES
1) Marc say  headgear
2) extremity: bring to the extremes to be intended also in a moral sense
3 )the one who pulled the shorter straw was the “winner”, and sacrificed himself for the benefit of the survivors, this practice was called  ”the custom of the sea”: to leave the choice of the sacrificial victim to fate, it excluded the murder by necessity from being a premeditated murder
4) the juxtaposition between the two verses with the man ready for the sacrifice and sighting at dawn of the ship that will rescue them, it wants to mitigate the harsh reality of cannibalism, a horrible practice to say but that is always lurking in the moments of desperation and as an extreme resource for survival. In reality we do not know if the ship was only dreamed of by the sacrificial victim.
5) surviving sailors rarely resume the sea after the cases of cannibalism (see for example the Essex whaling story). In 1884 an English court condemned two of the three sailors of the “Mignonette” yacht who had killed Richard Parker, the 17-year-old cabin boy (the third had immunity because he agreed to testify); the death sentence was commuted at a later time in six months in prison. A curious case is that Edgar Allan Poe in 1838 in “The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket ” tells of four survivors forced into a lifeboat who decide to rely on the “law of the sea”, the cabin boy that pulled the shorter straw was called Richard Parker!

Little Boy Billy
The Banks of Newfoundland

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theshipindistress.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/sea_bold.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/05/04/the-ship-in-distress/
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/anche-i-cannibali-hanno-un-cuoree-se-lo-mangiano-luca-luca-nave
http://www.canestrinilex.com/risorse/dudley-and-stephens-case-1884-mignonette/

Barnacle Bill the Sailor

Una drinking song popolare in America variamente intitolata “Barnacle Bill ( o Bollocky Bill- Abraham Brown), the Sailor ”
Il contesto è quella di una night visiting song con botta e risposta tra la fanciulla e il marinaio, inevitabili le versioni pecorecce e anche nelle versioni “pulite” non mancano i doppi sensi.
La situazione è ripresa anche nei cartoons, vediamola nel triangolo Olivia, Bracio di Ferro e Bluto (nei panni di Barnacle Bill)!

ASCOLTA Kembra Phaler w/ Antony/Joseph Arthur/Foetus Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 (su Spotify) nella versione  la leggiadra fanciulla è un uomo che canta in farsetto e la voce del vecchio sporco marinaio infoiato è di Kembra Phaler -con effetto esilarante

Testo nella versione di Kembra Phaler
I
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Cried the fair young maiden!
II
I’ll come down and let you in
I’ll come down and let you in
I’ll come down and let you in
Cried the fair young maiden
III
Well, it’s only me from over the sea
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
I’m hard to windward and hard a-lee,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
I’ve newly come upon the shore,
And this is what I’m looking for,
A jade (1), a maid, or even a whore
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
IV
Are you young and handsome, sir
Are you young and handsome, sir
Are you young and handsome, sir
Cried the fair young maiden
V
I’m old and rough and dirty and tough
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
I never can get drunk enough,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor,
I drinks my whiskey when I can
Drinks it from an old tin can,
For whiskey is the life of man,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
VI
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Cried the fair young maiden
VII
You foolish girl, it’s nothing but sport,
Says Barnacle Bill the Sailor
The handsome gals is what I court
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
With my false heart and flatterin’ tongue
I courts ‘em all both old and young
I courts ‘em all, but marries none
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
VIII
When will I see you again
When will I see you again
When will I see you again
Cried the fair young maiden
IX
Never no more you fucking whore,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
Tonite I’m sailin’ from the shore
Said Barnacle Bill the sailor.
I’m sailing away in another track
To give other maid a crack,
But keep it oiled till I come back,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LEI
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
II LEI
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
III LUI
Beh, sono solo io da oltre il mare
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
Ce l’ho duro controvento e sottovento
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
sono appena sbarcato a terra
e questo è quanto cerco: una cavallona, una fanciulla o anche una puttana -disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
IV LEI
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
V LUI
Sono un vecchio sporco brutto ceffo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
e non mi ubriaco mai abbastanza
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
bevo whiskey quando posso
lo bevo da una vecchia lattina
perchè il whiskey è la vita di un uomo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
VI LEI
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo ?
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo ?
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
VII LUI
Sei pazza, non è altro che divertimento
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
alle belle ragazze faccio la corte
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
con cuore falso e lingua
ingannevole
le corteggio tutte, vecchie e giovani
le corteggio tutte, ma nessuna sposo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
VIII LEI
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
IX LUI
Mai più fottuta puttana
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
stanotte sto salpando da terra
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
in partenza per un’altra scia
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
ma tienila oliata finchè non torno
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio

NOTE
1) jade arriva dai tempi di Shakespeare per indicare una ragazza che vale poco perchè consumata proprio come ol termine spregiativo per indicare una “giumenta” (jade)

FONTI
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/whosthat.htm
http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/b/barnaclebillthesailor.html
https://perfect-beaker.livejournal.com/175213.html

Jenny dei Pirati

Seeräuberjenny  è una canzone tratta dall'”Opera da tre soldi” di Bertold Brecht (1928) su musica di Kurt Weill, uno dei brani più famosi di tutta la pièce. Rielaborazione della “Beggar’s Opera” (L’opera del mendicante) di John Gay la commedia si svolge nella Londra vittoriana del malaffare, per smascherare nello stesso tempo il mondo aristocratico e borghese. il suo cinismo e i suoi affari molto simili a quelli della malavita (in realtà metafora della Berlino del tempo).

Nella produzione originale è  Polly a cantare “Jenny dei Pirati” nell’osteria dove lei e il bandito Mackie Messer fanno festa con gli amici durante il loro banchetto nunziale, Polly la imparò da Jenny, sguattera-prostituta, che narra il suo sogno -il sottotitolo della canzone è “Sogni di una sguattera”-: un giorno i pirati arriveranno in città, la raderanno al suolo e la incoroneranno regina, facendola fuggire  dalla sua miserabile vita.  Ma Polly è una figlia della borghesia che si è appena sposata con “il capo dei pirati” e quindi il suo sogno si è già avverato!
“Cantando la storia di Jenny dei pirati, Polly crea un momento di teatro nel teatro: all’interno dell’azione principale viene infatti inserita una seconda azione, in cui alcuni personaggi recitano di fronte ad altri, che assistono proprio come fossero spettatori. Prima di cantare la canzone, Polly ricrea l’ambiente della taverna dove lavorava Jenny e chiede ai presenti di partecipare alla messinscena con le battute adeguate. E’ un chiaro esempio del teatro didattico brechtiano, con il suo scopo di messaggio politico-sociale e con le sue tecniche di straniamento” (tratto da qui)
Nelle versioni successive è Jenny a cantare la sua canzone “È una canzone che esprime il sentimento rivoluzionario – scrive Greta Giavedoni- In essa compaiono, infatti, i simboli della nave (antitesi della casa borghese) e dei pirati (uomini che non permettono ad alcuna regola o legge di assoggettarli, ovvero emblema del potere sovversivo). Queste sono le figure che evoca Jenny, la sguattera d’un albergo d’infimo ordine (che rappresenta tutti coloro che stanno in basso), esprimendo la propria sete di vendetta, secondo alcuni, e di giustizia secondo altri, nei confronti di coloro che l’additano e la deridono senza sapere chi lei sia”.

E’ stata Nina Simone negli anni sessanta a farla diventare un canto di ribellione sociale.

La versione inglese “Pirate Jenny” dalla “Threepenny Opera” è però una riscrittura del testo per mano di  Brecht e Kurt Weill
ASCOLTA Shilpa Ray w/ Nick Cave & Warren Ellis in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013

ASCOLTA Ute Lemper in una versione cabarettistica con un testo on cui apporta delle marginali modifiche alla versione inglese (e alterna all’inglese le strofe in tedesco).. quando il cabaret era teatro non di svago ma di satira politica.

ASCOLTA Steeleye Span – con il titolo The Black Freighter


You people can watch (1) while I’m scrubbing these floors
And I’m scrubbin’ the floors while you’re gawking
Maybe once ya tip me and it makes ya feel swell
In this crummy Southern town (2)
In this crummy old hotel(3)
But you’ll never guess (4) to who you’re talkin’.
No. You couldn’t ever guess to who you’re talkin’.

Then one night there’s a scream in the night
And you’ll wonder who could that have been (5)
And you see me kinda grinnin’ while I’m scrubbin’
And you say, “What’s she got to grin?”
I’ll tell you.


There’s a ship
The Black Freighter
with a skull on its masthead
will be coming in (6)


You gentlemen can say, “Hey gal, finish them floors! Get upstairs! What’s wrong with you! (7)
Earn your keep here!”
You toss me your tips
and look out to the ships (8)
But I’m counting your heads
as I’m making the beds
Cuz there’s nobody gonna sleep here, honey (9)
Nobody
Nobody!


Then one night there’s a scream (10) in the night
And you say, “Who’s that kicking up a row  (11)?”
And ya see me kinda starin’ out the winda
And you say, “What’s she got to stare at now?”
I’ll tell ya.


There’s a ship
The Black Freighter
turns around in the harbor (12)
shootin’ guns from her bow (13)


Now
You gentlemen can wipe off that smile off your face
Cause every building in town is a flat one
This whole frickin’ place will be down to the ground
Only this cheap hotel standing up safe and sound
And you yell, “Why do they spare that one?”
Yes.
That’s what you say.
“Why do they spare that one?”


All the night through, through the noise and to-do
You wonder “who is that person that lives up there?”
And you see me stepping out in the morning
Looking nice with a ribbon in my hair


And the ship
The Black Freighter
runs a flag up its masthead
and a cheer rings the air


By noontime the dock
is a-swarmin’ with men (14)
comin’ out from the ghostly freighter
They move in the shadows
where no one can see
And they’re chainin’ up people
and they’re bringin’ em to me
askin’ me,
“Kill them NOW, or LATER?”
Askin’ ME!
“Kill them now, or later?”


Noon by the clock
and so still by the dock
You can hear a foghorn miles away
And in that quiet of death
I’ll say, “Right now (15).
Right now!”


Then they’ll pile up the bodies
And I’ll say,
“That’ll learn ya!(16)”


And the ship
The Black Freighter
disappears (17) out to sea
And
on
it
is
me.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Lor signori vedono mentre
passo il cencio sui pavimenti
e passo il cencio sui pavimenti,
mi guardate infastiditi,
e forse mi date  la mancia
solo per sentirvi meglio,
in questa sudicia città del Sud
in questo miserabile vecchio albergo
Ma non indovinerete mai a chi state parlando
Ma non indovinerete mai a chi state parlando

Poi una sera ci sarà un grido nella
notte
e vi domanderete che cosa potrebbe essere stato
e mi vedrete un po’ sogghignare mentre passo il cencio
e direte “Che cosa avrà da ridere?”
Ve lo dirò


C’è una nave
il Vascello Nero
con un teschio sull’albero maestro
e arriverà qui


Lor signori dicono “Ehi ragazza, finisci questi pavimenti!
Vai di sopra! Cos’hai che non va!
Guadagnati da vivere!”
Mi lanciate le vostre mance
e fate attenzione alle navi.
Ma io conto le teste
mentre rifaccio i letti
perchè non ci sarà nessuno che verrà a dormire qui, tesoro,
nessuno,
nessuno


Quella sera ci sarà un grido nella
notte
e direte:”Che cos’è tutto questo subbuglio?”
e mi vedrete affacciata alla
finestra
e direte “Che cosa avrà da  guardare proprio adesso?”
Te lo dirò


C’è una nave
il Vascello Nero
che gira nel porto
sparando con i cannoni di prua


Ora
signori, potete cancellare
quel sorriso dalla faccia
perchè ogni edificio in città
cadrà
tutto questo posto marcio sarà raso al suolo
tranne questo albergo scadente che resterà in piedi, sano e salvo
e voi direte “Perchè hanno rispiarmiato proprio quello?”
Si,
questo è quello che direte
“Perchè hanno rispiarmiato quello?”


Tutta la notte tra il rumore e la confusione
vi chiederete “Chi è quella persona che vive lassù?”
E mi vedrete uscire in mattinata
tutta carina con un nastro
tra i capelli


E la nave
il Vascello Nero
isserà la bandiera in cima all’albero
e l’aria risuonerà per il tripudio.


A mezzogiorno il molo
brulicherà di uomini
che usciranno dal vascello fantasma
per muoversi nell’ombra
dove nessuno possa vederli
e incateneranno le persone
e me le porteranno
e mi chiederanno
“Li uccidiamo adesso o più tardi?”
e mi chiederanno
“Li uccidiamo adesso o più tardi?”


Nel pomeriggio al rintocco
ci sarà silenzio al molo, si potrebbe sentire un corno da nebbia in lontananza e in quella quiete mortale
dirò “Adesso
proprio adesso!”


Allora ammucchieranno i corpi
e io dirò
“Che vi serva da lezione!”


e la nave
il Vascello Nero
scompare in mare
e
a
bordo
ci sono
io

NOTE
1) oppure “gawk”
2) Steeleye Span dicono: ratty waterfront
3) oppure ratty hotel comunque un albergo dei poveri
4) oppure ” you never know to whom”
Steeleye Span dicono: And a yell: what the hell is that din”
6)  Steeleye Span dicono:Sails into the bay
7) Steeleye Span dicono “hey girl, scrub the floors Make the beds, get up the stairs”
8)  Steeleye Span dicono “And you pass out the tips as you look out at the ships”
9) Tonight none of you will sleep here
10 oppure banging
11) oppure And you yell: what the hell is that row
12) oppure With fifty long cannons
13) oppure Opens fire on the town
14) oppure Then just before noon there’ll be hundreds of men
15 Steeleye Span dicono  kill ‘em now
16)  Steeleye Span dicono hoopla!come nella versione tedesca; la rivalsa di Jenny è un grido di vendetta per gli abusi subiti, la sua è sete di sangue (così come accade nelle sommosse e rivoluzioni popolari, quando il popolo sobillato e al giusto punto di cottura esplode la sua rabbia e furia cieca); Jenny non rivendica la giustizia sociale, vuole “diventare” uguale ai suoi aguzzini, è pronta a prenderne il posto per poter avere la sua fetta di torta.
17) oppure Sails away

Lotte Lenya “Seeräuber Jenny” nel film Die Dreigroschenoper del 1931 (testo qui)- (strofe I, III, IV)

I
Meine Herren, heute sehen Sie mich Gläser abwaschen
Und ich machte das Bett für jeden.
Und Sie geben mir einen Penny und ich bedanke mich schnell
Und Sie sehen meine Lumpen und dies lumpige Hotel
Und Sie wissen nicht, mit wem Sie reden.
Und Sie wissen nicht, mit wem Sie reden.
Aber eines Abends wird ein Geschrei sein am Hafen
Und man fragt: Was ist das für ein Geschrei?
Und man wird mich lächeln sehn bei meinen Gläsern
Und man sagt: Was lächelt die dabei?
Und ein Schiff mit acht Segeln
Und mit fünfzig Kanonen
Wird liegen am Kai.
II
Man sagt: Geh, wisch deine Gläser, mein Kind
Und man reicht mir den Penny hin.
Und der Penny wird genommen, und das Bett wird gemacht!
(Es wird keiner mehr drin schlafen in dieser Nacht.)
Und Sie wissen immer noch nicht, wer ich bin.
Und Sie wissen immer noch nicht, wer ich bin.
Aber eines Abends wird ein Getös sein am Hafen
Und man fragt: Was ist das für ein Getös?
Und man wird mich stehen sehen hinterm Fenster.
Und man sagt: Was lächelt die so bös?
Und das Schiff mit acht Segeln
Und mit fünfzig Kanonen
Wird beschießen die Stadt.
III
Meine Herren, da wird wohl Ihr Lachen aufhörn
Denn die Mauern werden fallen hin
Und die Stadt wird gemacht dem Erdboden gleich
Nur ein lumpiges Hotel wird verschont von jedem Streich
Und man fragt: Wer wohnt Besonderer darin?
Und man fragt: Wer wohnt Besonderer darin?
Und in dieser Nacht wird ein Geschrei um das Hotel sein
Und man fragt: Warum wird das Hotel verschont?
Und man wird mich sehen treten aus der Tür gen Morgen
Und man sagt: Die hat darin gewohnt?
Und das Schiff mit acht Segeln
Und mit fünfzig Kanonen
Wird beflaggen den Mast.
IV
Und es werden kommen hundert gen Mittag an Land
Und werden in den Schatten treten
Und fangen einen jeglichen aus jeglicher Tür
Und legen ihn in Ketten und bringen vor mir
Und frage: Welchen sollen wir töten?
Und frage: Welchen sollen wir töten?
Und an diesem Mittag wird es still seinam Hafen
Wenn man fragt, wer wohl sterben muß.
Und dann werden Sie mich sagen hören: Alle!
Und wenn dann der Kopf fällt, sage ich: Hoppla!
Und das Schiff mit acht Segeln
Und mit fünfzig Kanonen
Wird entschwinden mit mir.

La versificazione in italiano è molto più aderente al testo tedesco che non la versione inglese
Milva in Jenny dei Pirati
La traduzione è simile a quella allestita da Giorgio Strehler per l’Opera da tra Soldi presentata  al Teatro Piccolo di Milano nelle stagioni del 1958-59 e del 1972-73 (che dirigerà proprio Milva nel ruolo di Jenny delle Spelonche).

Oh signori voi mi vedete asciugare le posate disfare i letti,
e mi date tre spiccioli di mancia e guardate i miei stracci
e questo albergo tanto povero e me,
ma ignorate chi son io davvero,
ma ignorate chi son io davvero.
Ma una sera al porto grideranno e ci si domanderà:
“cosa diavolo mai c’è?!”
Si vedrà che io servo il vino sorridendo,
si dirà “da ridere che c’è?!”
Tutto vele e cannoni
una nave pirata
al molo starà.


M’han detto “asciuga i bicchieri ragazza” e m’han dato di mancia un cent,
mi son presa il soldino e sono andata a rifare un letto
che nessuno domani disferà,
chi son io non c’è nessuno che lo sa,
chi son io non c’è nessuno che lo sa.
Ma ecco gran rumore laggiù al porto e ci si domanderà
“che succede mai laggiù?!”
mi vedranno apparire alla finestra,
si dirà “qualcosa certo c’è!”
Tutto vele e cannoni
il vascello pirata
raderà la città.
Oh, signori quando vedrete crollare la città vi farete smorti,
questo albergo starà in piedi in mezzo a un mucchio di sporche rovine
e di macerie e ci si chiederà il perchè,
il perchè di questo strano caso,
il perchè di questo strano caso.
Poi s’udranno grida vicino a noi e ci si domanderà
“come mai non sparan qui?!”
verso l’alba mi vedranno uscire in strada,
si dirà “chi è dunque quella lì?!”
Tutto vele e cannoni
il vascello pirata
la bandiera isserà.


E più tardi cento uomini armati verranno avanti e tenderanno agguati,
faranno prigionieri tutti quanti,
li porteranno
legati davanti a me,
mi diranno “chi dobbiamo far fuori?!”
mi diranno “chi dobbiamo far fuori?!”
E il cannone allora tacerà e ci si domanderà
“chi dovrà morire?!”
ed allora mi udranno dire
“Tutti”
e ad ogni testa mozza io farò
“Oplà!”
Tutta vele e cannoni
la galera di Jenny
lascerà la città.

FONTI
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=1651

Cannibalismo in mare: You Seamen Bold

Read the post in English

“You Seamen Bold” oppure “The Ship in Distress” è una canzone del mare che cerca di descrivere gli orrori patiti su di una nave alla deriva nell’oceano e senza più viveri a bordo. Probabilmente l’origine prende l’avvio da una ballata portoghese del XVI secolo (nell’era d’oro dei vascelli portoghesi) ripresa alla tradizione francese con il titolo La Corte Paille.

Quest’ulteriore versione era molto popolare nel sud dell’Inghilterra
A. L. Lloyd scrive ‘La storia della nave alla deriva, con il suo equipaggio ridotto al cannibalismo ma salvato all’ultimo minuto, ha un fascino per i creatori di leggende marinare. Cecil Sharp, che raccolse oltre un migliaio di canzoni dal Somerset, considerò The Ship in Distress come la più grande melodia che avesse trovato in quel paese.’ (tratto da qui)
Louis Killen
Martin Carhty & Dave Swarbrick  in But Two Came By 1968Marc Almond in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
You seamen bold who plough the ocean
See dangers landsmen never know.
It’s not for honour and promotion;
No tongue can tell what they undergo.
In the blusterous wind and the great dark water
Our ship went drifting on the sea,
Her rigging (1) gone, and her rudder broken,
Which brought us to extremity (2).
II
For fourteen days, heartsore and hungry,
Seeing but wild water and bitter sky,
Poor fellows, they stood in a totter,
A-casting lots as to which should die.
The lot (3) it fell on Robert Jackson,
Whose family was so very great.
‘I’m free to die, but oh, my comrades,
Let me keep look-out till the break of day.’
III
A full-dressed ship like the sun a-glittering(4)
Came bearing down to their relief.
As soon as this glad news was shouted,
It banished all their care and grief.
The ship brought to, no longer drifting,
Safe in Saint Vincent, Cape Verde, she gained.
You seamen all, who hear my story,
Pray you’ll never suffer the like again (5).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Voi lupi di mare che solcate l’oceano
vedete pericoli che i terricoli mai conosceranno.
Non è per l’onore o la carriera
nessuna lingua può raccontare cosa ebbero a patire: nel vento di burrasca e nelle vaste acque oscure,
la nostra nave andò alla deriva
con il sartiame andato e il timone
rotto
il che ci portò fuori rotta
II
Per quattordici giorni, disperati e affamati,
non vedendo che acqua e cielo scuro, poveri compagni, in piedi a stento.
Si tirò a sorte chi doveva morire.
La sorte cadde su Robert Jackson,
la cui famiglia era di valore.
“Sono pronto a morire, ma oh, miei compagni, lasciatemi guardare fino allo spuntar del giorno”
III
Una nave a vele spiegate scintillante come il sole
venne a portare loro soccorso.
non appena la lieta notizia fu gridata
bandirono tutte le loro preoccupazioni e il dolore. La nave li portò, non più alla deriva, al sicuro a Saint Vincente, Capo Verde.
Voi marinai tutti che ascoltare la mia storia, pregate di non soffrire mai  lo stesso.

NOTE
1) Marc dice  headgear (motore)
2) extremity: portare agli estremi da intendesi anche in senso morale
3) quello che tirava la paglia più corta era il “vincitore”, e si sacrificava per il bene dei sopravvissuti, questa pratica era definita “legge del mare“: lasciare alla sorte la scelta della vittima sacrificale  escludeva l’omicidio per necessità dall’omicidio premeditato, assolvendo di fatto i sopravvissuti
4) la giustapposizione tra le due strofe con l’uomo pronto per il sacrificio e l’avvistamento all’alba della nave che li soccorrerà, vuole mitigare la cruda realtà del cannibalismo, una pratica orribile a dirsi ma che è sempre in agguato nei momenti di disperazione e come risorsa estrema per la sopravvivenza. In realtà non sappiamo se la nave sia solo stata sognata dalla vittima sacrificale e la vera nave giunta chissà quanti giorni dopo a trarre in salvo i sopravvissuti.
5) raramente i marinai sopravvissuti riprendono il mare dopo i casi di cannibalismo (vedasi ad esempio la vicenda della baleniera Essex). Nel 1884 un tribunale inglese condannò due dei tre marinai dello yacht “Mignonette” che avevano ucciso Richard Parker, il mozzo diciassettenne per sfamarsi, (il terzo ebbe l’immunità perché accettò di testimoniare); la condanna a morte venne commutata in un secondo tempo in sei mesi di carcere. Caso curioso è che Edgar Allan Poe nel 1838 nelle “Le avventure di Arthur Gordon Pym” racconta di quattro naufraghi  costretti in una scialuppa di salvataggio che decidono di affidarsi alla “legge del mare”, il mozzo che tirò la pagliuzza più corta si chiamava  Richard Parker!

continua: Little Boy Billy
continua: The Banks of Newfoundland

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theshipindistress.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/sea_bold.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/05/04/the-ship-in-distress/
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/anche-i-cannibali-hanno-un-cuoree-se-lo-mangiano-luca-luca-nave
http://www.canestrinilex.com/risorse/dudley-and-stephens-case-1884-mignonette/

Good Ship Venus

“Good Ship Venus” ( o “Friggin in the Riggin”) è una canzone del mare decisamente volgare, una canzonaccia da pirati ubriachi (una “bawdy drinking song”) con un crescendo descrittivo di atti osceni presumibilmente avvenuti sulla nave Venus. Secondo alcuni la canzone è stata ispirata dall’ammutinamento sul brigantino Venere  sobillato da Charlotte Badger, la prima donna pirata australiana (1806). Originaria dello Worcestershire, era una poverella che per campare e nutrire la famiglia si dedicava a piccoli furti, finchè fu sorpresa a rubare un fazzoletto di seta e qualche moneta, e finì ai lavori forzati nel Nuovo Galles del Sud (Australia). Il sistema carceraio ai tempi era severissimo e chi rubava (ai ricchi) passava come minimo sette anni in galera (o nelle colonie penali d’oltreoceano). Dopo aver scontato la sua pena Charlotte si imbarcò sul “Venus” ma il capitano del brigantino Samuel Chase era un sadico, che godeva a frustare le donne, e si accanì contro Charlotte e una sua compagna Catherine Hagerty.
Le due donne convinsero i passeggeri a ribellarsi e riuscirono a prendere possesso della nave dirigendosi verso la Nuova Zelanda (o la Tasmania): della nave non si seppe più nulla e anche sulle  due piratesse ci sono scarse notizie, secondo un racconto la nave fu catturata dai nativi maori che la bruciarono e si cibarono dell’equipaggio. Un’altra storia racconta che Charlotte riuscì a nascondersi sull’isola e ad imbarcarsi su una baleniera americana travestita da uomo.

ASCOLTA Loudon Wainwright III in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006 (senza ritornello)

Registrata anche dai Sex Pistols e dagli Anthrax con il titolo “Friggin in the Riggin” con l’aggiunta del ritornello e alcunie varianti nelle strofe (vedi)

Friggin’ in the riggin’
Friggin’ in the riggin’
Friggin’ in the riggin’
There was fuck all else to do
I
On the good ship Venus
By Christ you should have seen us
The figurehead was a whore in bed
Sucking a dead man’s penis
The captain’s name was Lugger
By Christ he was a bugger
He wasn’t fit to shovel shit
From one ship to another
II
And the second mate was Andy
By Christ he had a dandy
Till they crushed his cock on a jagged rock
For cumming in the brandy.
The third mate’s name was Morgan
By God he was a gorgon
From half past eight he played till late
Upon the captain’s organ
III
The captain’s wife was Mabel
And by God was she able
To give the crew their daily screw(1)
Upon the galley table
The captain’s daughter Charlotte (2)
Was born and bred a harlot
Her thighs at night were lily white
By morning they were scarlet
IV
The cabin boy was Kipper
By Christ he was a nipper
He stuffed his ass with broken glass
And circumcised the skipper
The captain’s lovely daughter
Liked swimming in the water
Delighted squeals came when some eels
Found her sexual quarters
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Fottere nel sartiame
Fottere nel sartiame
non c’era un cazzo d’altro a fare
I
Sulla buona nave Venere
per Cristo dovresti vederci!
La polena era una puttana nel letto
che succhia il pene di un uomo morto.
Il nome del capitano era Lugger,
per Cristo era un sodomita
buono solo a spalare merda
da una nave all’altra.
II
E il secondo era Andy
per Cristo sembrava un damerino
finchè gli hanno pigiato il cazzo su una roccia aguzza
e fatto venire nel brandy.
Il nome del terzo ufficiale era Morgan
per Dio era una gorgone,
dalle otto e mezza fino a tardi suonava sull’organo del capitano
III
La moglie del capitano era Mabel
e per Dio se era capace
di dare alla ciurma la “sturata” giornaliera sul tavolo della cambusa.
La figlia del capitano Charlotte
nacque e fu allevata da una prostituta
le sue cosce di notte biancogiglio
al mattino erano scarlatte.
IV
Il mozzo era Kipper
per Cristo se era birichino,
si è ficcato in culo i vetri rotti
per circoncidere il capitano.
La bella figlia del capitano
amava nuotare nell’acqua
deliziosi squittii fece quando delle anguille
trovarono le sue parti intime.

NOTE
1) screw significa in questo contesto “cavatappi”, da qui il senso di “sturare” sinonimo di sveltina
2) probabile riferimento alla piratessa Charlotte Badger

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/emigration-songs/

LA FANCIULLA MARINAIO

ROGUES GALLERY & SON OF ROGUES GALLERY

Sulla scia del film  “Pirati dei caraibi”  il produttore Hal Willner (con Gore Verbinski e Johnny Depp) diede alle stampe una prima compilation (Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys) dedicata a canzoni tradizionali ispirate alla vita della pirateria e della marineria in genere (2006 ). Il bis è arrivato nel 2013 con un altro doppio Cd (Son of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys)

In the wake of the film “Pirates of the Caribbean” the producer Hal Willner (with Gore Verbinski and Johnny Depp) gave the prints a first compilation, Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys, dedicated to traditional songs inspired by the life of piracy and marine in general (2006). The encore arrived in 2013 with another double CD (Son of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys)

Anche le grandi star del rock si sono lasciate trascinare dall’idea di comparire in una  galleria di brutti ceffi (“Rogue’s Gallery” nel mondo anglosassone indica gli schedari fotografici dei criminali), in compagnia di grandi interpreti folk, blues, jazz, e chi ne ha più ne metta, per interpretare i canti dei pirati con la propria sensibilità e il relativo background musicale; il progetto coordinato da Hal Willner è iniziata con una lunga ricerca dei testi e delle melodie negli archivi storici e nel web e si è concretizzato in una serie di intense “session” a  Seattle, Los Angeles, Londra, Dublino e New York. Il materiale registrato è bastato per quattro cd pubblicati (in formato doppio) a sei anni di distanza .

Even the great rock stars have been carried away by the idea of appearing in a gallery of ugly guys (“Rogue’s Gallery” in the Anglo-Saxon world indicates the criminal photo files), in the company of great folk, blues, jazz musicians, to interpret pirate songs with their own sensitivity and musical background; the project coordinated by Hal Willner began with a long research of texts and melodies in the historical archives and on the web and it has been realized in a series of high “sessions” in Seattle, Los Angeles, London, Dublin and New York. The recorded material was sufficient for four published CDs (in double format) six years later.

Il regista Verbinski usa metafore marine per descrivere l’esperienza.
«L´oceano. È tutto intorno al grande blu che riempie due terzi del pianeta. Il rapporto dell´essere umano con questo abisso crea un´interessante prospettiva. Credo che i navigatori del tempo stessero danzando con la morte, e queste sono le loro canzoni. Risuonano con la gente in qualche livello interiore che non è immediatamente chiaro perché non è nella nostra memoria, è nel nostro sangue. È quello che ci fa sentire così soli».

Director Verbinski uses marine metaphors to describe the experience. “The ocean. It’s all about the vast blue that engulfs two thirds of the planet. The human being cast against that abyss creates an interesting bit of perspective. I think the sailors of the time were dancing with death, and these were their tunes. They resonate with people on some internal level that is not immediately obvious because it’s not in our memory, it’s in our blood. It operates on a cellular level. It’s what makes us feel so alone.

ROGUES GALLERY: PIRATE BALLADS, SEA SONGS AND CHANTEYS

2006 – Anti-Records

Disc 1:

Cape Cod Girls” – Baby Gramps – 7:14
Mingulay Boat Song” – Richard Thompson – 4:13
My Son John” – John C. Reilly – 1:38
Fire Down Below” – Nick Cave – 2:50
Turkish Revelry” – Loudon Wainwright III – 4:21
Bully in the Alley” – Three Pruned Men (The Virgin Prunes) – 2:30
The Cruel Ship’s Captain” – Bryan Ferry – 3:35
Dead Horse” – Robin Holcomb – 2:54
Spanish Ladies” – Bill Frisell – 2:22
Coast of High Barbary” – Joseph Arthur – 4:02
Haul Away Joe” – Mark Anthony Thompson – 4:10
Dan Dan” – David Thomas – 0:50
Blood Red Roses” – Sting – 2:44
Sally Brown” – Teddy Thompson – 2:54
Lowlands Away” – Rufus Wainwright & Kate McGarrigle – 3:25
Baltimore Whores” – Gavin Friday – 4:40
Rolling Sea” – Eliza Carthy – 4:49
The Mermaid” – Martin Carthy & The UK Group – 2:23
Haul on the Bowline” – Bob Neuwirth – 1:29
A Dying Sailor to His Shipmates” – Bono – 4:44
Bonnie Portmore” – Lucinda Williams – 3:36
Shenandoah” – Richard Greene & Jack Shit – 2:58
The Cry of Man” – Mary Margaret O’Hara – 3:06

Disc 2:

Boney” – Jack Shit – 1:55
Good Ship Venus” – Loudon Wainwright III – 3:15
Long Time Ago” – White Magic – 2:35
Pinery Boy” – Nick Cave – 3:15
Lowlands Low” – Bryan Ferry & Antony Hegarty  – 2:35
One Spring Morning” – Akron/Family – 5:25
Hog Eye Man” – Martin Carthy & Family – 2:44
The Fiddler” – Ricky Jay & Richard Greene – 1:34
Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold” – Andrea Corr – 3:58
Fathom the Bowl” – John C. Reilly – 3:44
Drunken Sailor” – David Thomas – 3:44
Farewell Nancy” – Ed Harcourt – 6:06
Hanging Johnny” – Stan Ridgway – 3:28
Old Man of the Sea” – Baby Gramps – 5:18
Greenland Whale Fisheries” – Van Dyke Parks – 4:41
Shallow Brown” – Sting – 2:30
The Grey Funnel Line” – Jolie Holland – 4:53
A Drop of Nelson’s Blood” – Jarvis Cocker – 7:10
Leave Her Johnny” – Lou Reed – 5:30
Little Boy Billy” – Ralph Steadman – 5:33

SON OF ROGUES GALLERY: PIRATE BALLADS, SEA SONGS AND CHANTEYS

2013 – Anti-Records

Disc 1:


Non sono riuscita a recuperare alcuni testi e per il momento i titoli sono privi di link, se qualcuno avesse la buona volontà di sbobinarli…
(I have not been able to recover some texts and for the moment the titles are without links, if someone had the good will to transcribe them..)

  1. Leaving of Liverpool – Shane MacGowan w/ Johnny Depp & Gore Verbinski
  2. Sam’s Gone Away – Robyn Hitchcock
  3. River Come Down – Beth Orton
  4. Row Bullies Row – Sean Lennon w/ Jack Shit
  5. Shenandoah – Tom Waits w/ Keith Richards
  6. Mr. Stormalong – Ivan Neville
  7. Asshole Rules the Navy – Iggy Pop w/ A Hawk and a Hacksaw
  8. Off to Sea Once More – Macy Gray
  9. The Ol’ OG – Ed Harcourt
  10. Pirate Jenny – Shilpa Ray w/ Nick Cave & Warren Ellis
  11. The Mermaid – Patti Smith & Johnny Depp
  12. Anthem for Old Souls – Chuck E. Weiss
  13. Orange Claw Hammer – Ed Pastorini
  14. Sweet and Low – The Americans
  15. Ye Mariners All – Robin Holcomb & Jessica Kenny
  16. Tom’s Gone to Hilo – Gavin Friday and Shannon McNally
  17. Bear Away – Kenny Wollesen & The Himalayas Marching Band

Disc 2:

Non sono riuscita a recuperare alcuni testi e per il momento i titoli sono privi di link, se qualcuno avesse la buona volontà di sbobinarli…
(I have not been able to recover some texts and for the moment the titles are without links, if someone had the good will to transcribe them..)

    1. Handsome Cabin Boy – Frank Zappa & the Mothers of Invention
    2. Rio Grande – Michael Stipe & Courtney Love
    3. Ship in Distress – Marc Almond
    4. In Lure of the Tropics – Dr. John
    5. Rolling Down to Old Maui – Todd Rundgren
    6. Jack Tar on Shore – Dan Zanes w/ Broken Social Scene
    7. Sally Racket Sissy Bounce – Katey Red & Big Freedia with Akron/Family
    8. Wild Goose – Broken Social Scene
    9. Flandyke Shore – Marianne Faithfull w/ Kate & Anna McGarrigle
    10. The Chantey of Noah and his Ark (Old School Song) – Ricky Jay
    11. Whiskey Johnny – Michael Gira
    12. Sunshine Life for Me – Petra Haden w/ Lenny Pickett
    13. Row the Boat Child – Jenni Muldaur
    14. General Taylor – Richard Thompson w/ Jack Shit
    15. Marianne – Tim Robbins w/ Matthew Sweet & Susanna Hoffs
    16. Barnacle Bill the Sailor – Kembra Phaler w/ Antony/Joseph Arthur/Foetus
    17. Missus McGraw – Angelica Huston w/ The Weisberg Strings
    18. The Dreadnought – Iggy Pop & Elegant Too
    19. Then Said the Captain to Me (Two Poems of the Sea) – Mary Margaret O’Hara

FONTI/LINK
http://www.anti.com/releases/pirate-ballads-sea-songs-and-chanteys/
http://www.anti.com/artists/rogues-gallery/
http://www.anti.com/press/hal-willner-productions-presents/

CAPTAIN WARD AND THE RAINBOW

Tra le canzoni del mare nella serie Sea Shanty Edition per il quarto episodio del video-gioco Assassin’s Creed si annoverano alcune ballate sui capitani coraggiosi, per celebrarne le vittorie o le gesta eroiche che li hanno portati alla morte. Non solo ufficiali della Royal Navy ma anche corsari o pirati.
Il Capitano John Ward (1553-1622), soprannominato Jack Birdy nacque a Feversham nel Kent da un semplice pescatore, ma preferì la vita del corsaro sotto il regno di Elisabetta I; caduto in disgrazia sotto Giacomo I (che non volle proseguire la guerra di corsa contro la Spagna) si dedicò alla pirateria nel Canale della Manica, passando ben presto ai ricchi bottini dei traffici mercantili nel Mediterraneo; John o Jack Ward si fece musulmano e divenne un famigerato pirata barbaresco con il nome di Yusuf Reis, dedito al lucroso traffico degli schiavi (l’oro bianco): nel secolo successivo l’asse della storia si sposta definitivamente nel Mar delle Antille e il connubio Pirata&Caraibi per noi oggi scatta in automatico, sminuendo ai l’importanza del Mar Mediterraneo e delle sue rotte commerciali (continua)
Jack nel suo palazzo di marmo e alabastro a Tunisi allevava piccoli uccellini perciò venne soprannominato Jack “Asfour” (Jack il passero) cioè Jack Birdy (che assonanza con l’hollywoodiano Jack Sparrow!)
Metà uomo, metà leggenda, John Ward era l’arcipirata, il re corsaro del folklore popolare. Autori di ballate londinesi raccontavano per le strade che il “più famoso pirata del mondo” terrorizzava i mercanti di Francia e di Spagna, Portogallo e Venezia, e metteva in rotta i potenti Cavalieri di San Giovanni con la sua intrepidezza e astuzia. Genitori spaventavano i loro figli con i racconti del demone “che non temeva né Dio né il diavolo e le sue azioni sono perfide, maligni i suoi pensieri”, e si spaventavano a vicenda raccontando che coloro che finivano nelle sue grinfie venivano legati dorso a dorso e gettati in mare, oppure fatti a pezzi, o spietatamente uccisi a colpi di arma da fuoco. Dai pulpiti, ecclesiastici proclamavano che Ward e i suoi rinnegati avrebbero finito i loro giorni in ebbrezza, lascivia e sodomia nei sibaritici ambienti del loro palazzo tunisino…”. (Adrian Tinniswood in Pirati. Avventure, Scontri E Razzie, 2011 tratto da qui)

LA BALLATA: WARD THE PIRATE

Sul Pirata vennero scritte diverse ballate a testimoniare la sua popolarità e anche il professor Child riporta una versione testuale nella sua imponente raccolta “The English and Scottish Popular Ballads”, classificandola al numero 287.  Kenneth S. Goldstein commenta: “This ballad concerns the famous English pirate, John Ward, who, together with a Dutch accomplice, Dansekar, was the scourge of the seas from 1604 to 1609. Though Ward was the subject of numerous ballad and prose pieces, the traditional ballad appears to derive from a black letter broadside of the 17th century.The ballad has had a longer life in the New World than in Britain. It has not been reported from tradition in England since Child, and the two versions recorded by Greig in Aberdeen appear to be the last reported in Scotland. It has, however, not infrequently been reported in America. Some of the American texts tell of Ward’s capture and hanging, which, though consistent with history, do not come from the broadside tradition mentioned above. It is possible that this element may have been borrowed from some other sea song in much the same way in which some versions of Sir Andrew Barton (Child 167) borrow Ward’s taunting lines from the last stanza of this ballad.” (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Top Floor Taivers

ASCOLTA Linda Morrison

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers


I
Come all ye jolly mariners
That love to tak’ a dram (1)
I’ll tell ye o’ a robber
That o’er the seas did come.
II
He wrote a letter to his king
The eleventh o’ July,
To see if he would accept o’ him
For his jovial company. (2)
III
“Ho no, ho no,” says the king,
“Such things they cannot be,
They tell me ye are a robber,
A robber on the sea.”
IV
He has built a bonnie ship,
An’ sent her to the sea,
With four and twenty mariners
To guard his bonnie ship wi’.
V
They sailed up an’ they sailed down,
Sea stately, blythe, an’ free, (3)
Till they spied the king’s high Reindeer (4)
A leviathan on the sea.
VI
They fought from one in the morning
Till it was six at night,
Until the king’s high Reindeer
Was forced to take her flight.
VII
“Gang him, gang him, ye tinkers (5).
Tell ye your king fear me
Though he’s the king on dry land,
And I will be king upon the sea.”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti voi allegri marinai
che amate ascoltare le storie (1)
Vi narrerò di un filibustiere
che dal mare è venuto
II
Scrisse una lettera al suo Re
l’11 di luglio
per vedere se lo avrebbe ricevuto
per una piacevole visita (2).
III
“O no, no, no – dice il Re-
non s’ha da fare
mi risulta che tu sia un filibustiere,
un filibustiere del mare”
IV
Costruì una bella nave
e la mandò in mare
con 24 marinai
a governare la sua bella nave
V
Navigarono in lungo e in largo sul mare maestosamente, felici e liberi (3)
fino a quando videro la Reindeer (4)
l’ammiraglia del Re,
un leviatano del mare
VI
Dettero battaglia dall’una di mattina
fino alle sei di sera
finchè la Reindeer
fu costretta ad andarsene
VII
“Tornate da lui, voi vagabondi (5)
dite al vostro Re che non lo temo
anche se è il re della terra ferma
io sono il re dei Mari”

NOTE
1) in origine il verso era: strike up, you lusty gallants, with musick and sound of drum,
2) Giacomo I gli rifiutò il perdono regale condannandolo all’esilio perpetuo
3) come dice Jack Sparrow “una nave non è solo una chiglia e uno scafo con ponte e vele. Una nave è libertà
4) nella versione riportata dal Professor Child la nave è inviata dal Re e si chiama The Rainbow
5) termine dispregiativo derivato dai traveller

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch287.htm
http://www.homolaicus.com/storia/trasversale/pirati-corsari.htm
http://guide.supereva.it/rinascimento/interventi/2010/07/dal-kent-a-tunisi
https://corsaridelmediterraneo.it/ward-john/
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1146ly13.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=56447
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/ward.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/wardthepirate.html

Little Boy Billy

Read the post in English

Una canzone del mare umoristica (del tipo caustico)  intitolata anche “Three Sailors from Bristol City” o “Little Boy Billee”, che tratta un argomento inquietante per la nostra civiltà, ma sempre dietro l’angolo: il cannibalismo!
Il mare è un luogo d’insidie e di scherzi del fato, una tempesta ti può portare fuori rotta, su una barcaccia di fortuna o una zattera, senza cibo e acqua, un tema trattato anche nella grande pittura ( Theodore Gericault, La zattera della Medusa vedi): la vita umana in bilico tra speranza e disperazione.

The three sailors

Nelle canzoni marinaresche si finisce per esprimere le paure più grandi con una bella risata! Il brano nasce nel 1863 con il titolo “The three sailors” scritto da William Makepeace Thackeray come parodia di una canzone marinaresca francese dal titolo “La Courte Paille” (=la paglia corta)– diventata in seguito “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) e finita nelle canzoncine per bambini. (vedi prima parte): i casi di cannibalismo in mare come estrema risorsa per la sopravvivenza erano molto dibattiti dall’opinione pubblica e gli stessi tribunali erano inclini a commutare le sentenze di morte in detenzione.
L’omicidio per necessità (o il sacrificio di uno per il bene degli altri) trova una giustificazione nella terribile esperienza della morte per fame che spinge la mente umana alla disperazione e alla pazzia, ma nel 1884 il caso del naufragio del Mignonette  spaccò l’opinione pubblica e lo stesso ministro dell’interno dell’epoca Sir William Harcourt, ebbe a dire “se questi uomini non vengono condannati per l’omicidio, stiamo dando carta bianca al capitano di qualsiasi nave di mangiare il mozzo ogni volta che scarseggiano i viveri”. (tratto da qui).
La sentenza si pone come caso leader e mette la vita come bene supremo non ammettendo l’omicidio per necessità come autodifesa

Little Billee
Bernard Partridge Cartoons

Dalle note del “Penguin Book” (1959):
La ballata portoghese A Nau Caterineta e la ballata francese La Courte Paille raccontano la stessa storia. La nave è stata a lungo in mare e il cibo e vinito. Le pagliuzze sono pescate per vedere chi deve essere mangiato, e il capitano rimane con la cannuccia più corta. Il mozzo si offre per essere sacrificato al suo posto, ma chiede di poter restare di vedetta fino al giorno successivo. In breve tempo vede la terra (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) e gli uomini vengono salvati. Thackeray ha parodiato questa canzone nel suo Little Billee. È probabile che la ballata francese abbia dato origine a The Ship in Distress, apparsa nei fogli volanti dell’Ottocento. George Butterworth si è procurato quattro versioni nel Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [numero 17] pp.320-2) e Sharp ne ha stampato una da James Bishop di Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) con “per molti versi una melodia più grandiosa “che aveva trovato in quella contea. Il testo proviene in parte dalla versione di Bishop, e in parte da un foglio volante.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Ralph Steadman in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.(1)”
“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(2)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(3) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (4)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano tre uomini di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare.
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e anche il giovane Billy.
Rubarono una lattina di biscotti al capitano
e una grande bottiglia di whisky.
Ma quando raggiunsero il mare aperto
non era avanzato che un pisello
secco.
Disse Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Non abbiamo niente da mangiare così ti mangerò”
disse Jimmy il Trinca “Sono vecchio e rinsecchito,
è meglio mangiare il giovane Billy”
“Oh Giovane Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti
così sbottona il primo bottone della tua camiciola”
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti come la mia cara mamma mi ha raccomandato?”
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro
e poi si inginocchiò (sulla crocetta).
Ma quando arrivò all’11° comandamento
gridò “Yo Ho! Terra”.
“Vedo Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
Vedo la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B.”
Impiccarono Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
ma fecero ammiraglio il Giovane Billy.

NOTE
La versione di Thackeray qui
1) dal francese chemise
2) scritto anche come top fore-gallant
2) i suoi compagni non dovevano essere molto ferrati con la Bibbia (e probabilmente Billy ne avrebbe inventati di nuovi per guadagnare tempo!)
4) sigla di “Knight Commander of the Bath” = Cavaliere Commendatore del Bagno, l’ordine militare cavalleresco fondato da Giorgio I nel 1725

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

Secondo Stan Hugill “Little Billee” era una sea shanty per il lavoro alle pompe, un lavoro noioso e monotono che poteva senz’altro essere “rallegrato” da questa canzoncina! Hugill riporta solo il testo dicendo che la melodia è come la francese “Il était un Petit Navire”, così l’adattamento di Hulton Clint ha l’andamento di una ninna-nanna.


I
There were three sailors of Bristol City;
They stole a boat and went to sea.
But first with beef and hardtack biscuits
And pickled pork they loaded she.
And pickled pork they loaded she
II
There was gorging Jack and guzzling Jimmy,
And likewise there was little Billee.
but when they got to the Equator
They’d only left but one split pea.
III
Then gorging Jack to guzzling Jimmy,
“I am confounded hungaree.”
Says guzzling Jimmy to gorging Jacky
“We’ve no wittles (1), so we must eat we.”
IV
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“Oh Guzzling Jim what a fool you be..
There’s little Billy, who’s young and tender,
We’re old and tough, so let’s eat he.”
V
“Make haste, make haste” then say Guzzling Jimmy
as he drew his snickher snee (2)
“O Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
undo the collar of your chemie.”
VI
When William heard this information
he drope down on bended knee
“O let me say my catechism
which my dear mom taught to me”
VII
So up he went to the maintop-gallant
and he drope down on his bended knee
and than he said  all his catechism
which his dear mamy once taught to he
VIII
He scarce had said his catechism
when up he jumps “There’s land I see
Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
IX
“Jerusalem and Madagascar,
And North and South Amerikee;
There’s the British fleet a-riding at anchor,
With Admiral Napier, K.C.B.”
X
When they bordered to Admiral’s vessel,
He hanged fat Jack (3) and flogged Jimmee;
as for little Bill they make him
The Captain of a Seventy-three (4).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre marinai della città di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare, ma prima la caricarono di manzo e gallette
e di maiale sotto sale
di maiale sotto sale
II
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e c’era anche il giovane Billy.
Ma quando raggiunsero l’Equatore
era avanzato solo un pisello.
III
Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Sono terribilmente affamato”
dice Jimmy il Trinca a  Jack il Gordo “Non abbiamo cibo, così ci mangeremo”
IV
Disse Jack il Gordo  a Jimmy il Trinca “Oh Jim il trinca, che sciocco sei,
c’è il piccolo Billy, che è giovane e tenero, noi siamo vecchi e duri, meglio mangiare lui”
V
“Sbrigati, sbrigati ” allora dice Jimmy il Trinca mentre estrae il suo snickher snee
“Oh  Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti,  disfa il nodo della camicia”
VI
Quando William udì questa notizia
si gettò in ginocchio
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti che la mia cara mamma mi ha insegnato?”
VII
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro e poi si inginocchiò per recitare i comandamenti che sua madre gli aveva un tempo insegnato
VII
Non aveva finito di dirli
quando si rizzò con un balzo ” Vedo terra, Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
IX
Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America
c’è la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B.”
X
Quando salirono a bordo del vascello dell’ammiraglio
Impiccarono il grasso Jack e
frustarono Jimmy
ma fecero il giovane Billy
capitano di un 73

NOTE
1)  storpiatura di “vittles,”che sta per “victuals,”= “food.”
2) un grande coltello particolarmente letale usato come arma, non c’è un equivalente italiano
3) in alcune versioni si distingue il grado di colpa tra i due marinai, così uno solo è impiccato
4) vascello da guerra di 73 cannoni

E per corollario ecco la versione francese “Un Petit Navire”
FONTI
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872