The Five Friends: An we’re a noddin, nid nid noddin

Robert Tannahill wrote this song to describe how five friends spent their time in the “taverns” of Scotland at the end of the 18th / early 19th century, we are not at the level of debauchery of the “rakes” but rather it is a convivial meeting with drinks, good food and songs! On the melody “They’re a ‘Nodding,” which Robert Burns had reworked for the SMM .
Robert Tannahill
scrisse questo canto per descrivere come passavano il tempo cinque amici nei “bar” della Scozia alla fine del 700/primi dell’800, non siamo ai livelli della dissolutezza dei “modaioli” rakes quanto piuttosto si tratta un incontro conviviale con bevande, buon cibo e canzoni! 
Sulla melodia They’re a’ Nodding,” che già a suo tempo Robert Burns aveva rielaborato per lo SMM. 

In a letter addressed to pen friend James Clark (who is one of the five) dated November 22, 1809, Tannahill encloses the poem.

His friend R.A. Smith about the same convivial meeting wrote The little bacchanalian rant you are so anxious to know the history of was written in commemoration of a very happy evening spent by the Poet with four of his musical friends. At that meeting he was in high spirits, and his conversation became more than usually animated ; many songs were sung, and we had some glee singing, but neither fiddle nor flute made its appearance in company, nor were any of us ‘laid, nid, noddin.’ 

In una lettera indirizzata all’amico di penna James Clark (che è uno dei cinque) datata il 22 novembre 1809 Tannahill acclude la poesia
Scrive l’amico R.A. Smith a proposito dello stesso incontro conviviale “Il piccolo baccanale di cui siete così ansioso di conoscere la storia è stato scritto in commemorazione di una serata molto felice trascorsa dal Poeta con quattro dei suoi amici musicisti. In quell’incontro era di buon umore e la sua conversazione divenne più animata del solito; molte canzoni furono cantate, e abbiamo cantato allegramente, ma né il violino né il flauto hanno fatto la loro comparsa in compagnia, né nessuno di noi è stato “laid, nid, noddin“. 

Sam Monaghan

Jim Reid in The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Volume I (2006) 


I
Weel, wha’s in the bouroch,[1]
an what is your cheer (2) ?
The best that ye’ll fin
in a thousan a year.
Chorus
An we’re a noddin, nid nid noddin, 
We’re a noddin fu at e’en.
An we’re a noddin, nid nid noddin, 
We’re a noddin fu at e’en.
II
There’s our ain Jamie Clark,[3]
frae the Ha o Argyle,
Wi his leal Scottish heart,
an his kind (4) open smile.
III
There is Will the guid fallow,[5]
wha kills a our care
Wi his sang an his joke,
an a mutchkin mair.
IV
There is blythe Jamie Barr [6]
frae “Sanct Barchan’s” toun,
Whan wit gets a kingdom,
he’s sure o the croun.
V
There is Rab, frae the south, [7]
wi his fiddle an his flute ;
I coud list tae his strains (8)
till the starns fa out.
VI
Apollo, for our comfort,
has furnish’d the bowl,
An here is my bardship,
as blin as an owl (9)
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto*
I
Beh chi c’è al raduno
e qual’è la vostra occasione?
I migliori che si possano trovare
in un centinaio d’anni!
Coro
E stiamo annuendo, an-an annuendo
stiamo annuendo e anche tanto
E stiamo annuendo, an-an annuendo
stiamo annuendo e anche tanto
II
C’è il nostro Jamie Clark,
dal Castello di Argyle
con il suo leale cuore scozzese
e il suo sorriso aperto
III
C’è Will il buon compagno
che uccide il malumore
con il suo canto e i suoi scherzi
e molto di più
IV
C’è l’allegro Jamie Barr
da “Sanct Barchan’s”
che se prenderemo un regno
lui avrà di certo la corona
V
C’è Rab dal Sud
con violino e flauto
potrei elencare tutte le sue melodie
finchè le stelle cadranno
VI
Apollo per il nostro agio
ha messo la boccia
ed ecco il mio essere poeta
cieco come un gufo

NOTE
* con qualche perplessità
1) secondo la definizione data dallo stesso autore: “bouroch is either Gaelic or old Scotch, and means, a core, meeting”
2) credo voglia sapere l’occasione dei festeggiamenti, il motivo dell’allegro raduno
3) James Clark was born in Paisley in 1781 ; and he and William Stuart, ‘the guid fallow,’ were schoolfellows. In 1798, when he was eighteen years of age, he volunteered into the Argyleshire Militia [James Clark è nato a Paisley nel 1781; e lui e William Stuart, ‘the guid fallow,’, erano compagni di scuola. Nel 1798, all’età di diciotto anni, si arruolò volontario nella Milizia dell’Argleshire]
4) kind è usato come avverbio
5) William Stuart
6) Close friend of Tannahill and long-time correspondent, James Barr (1770-1836), a professional musician in Kilbarchan, central Renfrewshire, Scotland. A weaver’s apprentice, Barr was an autodidact on violin and flute, and taught instrumental music bands. In the second decade of the 19th century he moved to Glasgow where he found work in a music publishing firm, and established himself as a music teacher in the city. However, in 1832 he and his family emigrated to New Brunswick, Canada, where he farmed for twenty years. Barr returned to Scotland towards the end of his life and is buried at Kilbarchan. (from here)
Amico intimo di Tannahill e per lungo tempo amico di penna,” James Barr (1770-1836), musicista professionista di Kilbarchan, nel centro del Renfrewshire, in Scozia. Un apprendista tessitore, Barr era un autodidatta di violino e flauto e insegnava musica ai complessi bandistici Nel secondo decennio del XIX secolo si trasferì a Glasgow dove trovò lavoro in una casa editrice musicale e si affermò come insegnante di musica in città. Tuttavia, nel 1832, lui e la sua famiglia emigrarono a New Brunswick, in Canada, dove fece l’agricoltore per venti anni. Barr tornò in Scozia verso la fine della sua vita e fu sepolto a Kilbarchan.”
7) Richard Archibald Smith l’amico musicista che ha adattato le maggior parte delle melodie ai testi di Robert
8) tra i tanti significati di strain
9) non conosco il modo di dire, in italiano non esiste, forse equivale a “Blind as a Bat”: refers to someone who is unwilling to recognize bad things, or someone who is completely blind. You can use the idiom ‘As Blind as a Bat’ to describe someone who refuses to notice an obvious thing.

LINK
https://roberttannahill.weebly.com/letter-to-james-clark-22-november-1809.html
http://www.grianpress.com/Tannahill/TANNAHILL’S%20SONGS%2040B.htm
http://www.grianpress.com/Tannahill/TANNAHILL’S%20POEMS%2024.htm

Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie?

Leggi in italiano

From the tradition of “night visiting songs” the text is attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Tannahill and in fact various findings place the story in the woods of Paisley. ( in ‘The Poems and Songs of Robert Tannahill’ – 1874  assigned as a “Sleeping Maggie” melody.)
The heroine of this song was Margaret Pollock, a cousin of the Author by the mother’s side. She was the eldest daughter of Matthew Pollock (3rd) of Boghall, by his second marriage (mentioned in the Memoir of the Tannahills); and it is very probable the Poet beheld such an evening as he had described, in walking from Paisley over the high road to his uncle’s farm steading in Beith Parish. Margaret Pollock afterwards lived in family with William Lochhead, Ryveraes, and she and Mrs. Lochhead frequently sang that song together. Miss Pollock died unmarried (from here)

NIGHT VISITING IN DARK STYLE

The scene described is not really autobiographical (pheraps more in keeping with Robert Burns‘s temperament): the protagonist arrives at Maggy’s house in a dark and stormy night (the picture is rather gothic: an icy winter wind raging in the woods , a night of new moon without stars, the disturbing moaning of the owl, the iron gate that slams against the hinges) and he hopes that in the meantime the lover has not fallen asleep, letting come him in secret! And then no more worries or fears in the arms of Maggy every gloomy thought is dissolved!

http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/
http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/

I must mention the version collected by Hamish Henderson from the voice of Jeannie Robertson (see fragment of 1960) which shows a different melody from that later made famous by Tannahill Weavers.

The song was made known to the general public by the Tannahill Weavers, the good “weavers” of Robert Tannahill, also by Paisley,
At the moment you can find several live versions on you tube, but the best performances of the group are two: one in Mermaid’s Song 1992 (listen from Spotify) a faster version integrated with the reel “The Noose In The Ghillies” (with Roy Gullane , Phil Smillie, Iain MacInnes, Kenny Forsyth) and the first in Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976 with Roy Gullane, Phil Smillie, Hudson Swan, and Dougie MacLean (fiddle). In this first version the melody is slower and full of atmosphere (with hunder, wind and the rain effect)

Tannahill Weavers from Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976


Dougie Maclean (who collaborated with Tannahill Weavers from 1974 and until 1977 and then toured with them in 1980) in Real Estate -1988 and also in Tribute 1995

Jim Reid in The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Volume I(2006) 

Sam Monaghan 


I
Mirk and rainy is the nicht,
there’s no’ a starn in a’ the carry(1)
Lichtnin’s gleam athwart the lift,
and (cauld) winds dive wi’ winter’s fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
let me in, for loud the linn
is roarin'(2) o’er the Warlock Craigie(3).
II
Fearfu’ soughs the boortree(4) bank
The rifted wood roars wild an’ dreary.
Loud the iron yett(5) does clank,
An’ cry o’ howlets mak’s me eerie.
III
Aboon my breath I daurna’ speak
For fear I rouse your waukrif’ daddie;
Cauld’s the blast upon my cheek,
O rise, rise my bonnie ladie.
IV
She op’d the door, she let him in
I cuist aside my dreepin’ plaidie(6).
‘Blaw your warst, ye rain and win’
Since, Maggie, now I’m in aside ye.
V
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
What care I for howlet’s cry,
For boortree bank or warlock craigie?
English translation
I
Dark and rainy is the night
there’s no star in all the carry
lightning flashes gleam across the sky
and cold winds drive with winters fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are you sleeping Maggie
Oh, are you sleeping Maggie
let me in, for the loud the waterfall
is roaring over the warlock crag.
II
Fearful sighs on the elder tree bank
The rifted wood roars wild and dreary
Loud the iron gate does clank,
And cry of owls makes me fearful.
III
Above my breath I dare not speak
For fear I rouse your wakeful father
Cold is the blast upon my cheek
O rise, rise my pretty lady.
IV
She opened the door, she let him in
I cast aside my dripping cloak
“Blow your worst, you rain and wind
Since, Maggie, now I’m beside you.”
V
Now, since you’re woken, Maggie
Now, since you’re woken, Maggie
What care I for owl’s cry,
For elder tree bank or warlock crag?

NOTES
1) carry is for sky, “the direction in which clouds are carried by the wind”
2) howling
3) warlock crag is the name of a waterfall at Lochwinnoch that forms a large pool or a small pond
4) elder tree in which the fairies prefer to dwell
5) yett is gett according to the ancient custom of writing the two vowels interchangeably
6) plaidie  see more

Great horned owl and chicks. Image size 5.6 by 7.9 inches @ 300 dpi. Photo credit: © Scott Copeland

SLEEPY & DROWSY MAGGY REELS

“Sleepy Maggie” is a reel in two-part and is often paired with the “Drowsy Maggie” reel, sometimes the two melodies are, mistakenly, confused. In the version of Francis O’Neill and James O’Neill (in O’Neill’s Music of Ireland) it is in 3 parts.

Sleepy Maggie as reported by Fidder’s Companion is a traditional Scottish melody whose oldest transcribed source is in Duke of Perth Manuscript or Drummond Castle Manuscript (1734)

Sleepy Maggie is also known in Ireland under different names “Lough Isle Castle,” “Seán sa Cheo” or “Tullaghan Lassies” and is the model for “Jenny’s Chickens”.

Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)
Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)

“Drowsy Maggie” is instead a traditional Irish tune in 2, 3 or 4 parts, but much more popular at least at the recording level (it will be for its appearance in the movie “Titanic”!)

Gaelic Storm  (Titanic Set) – of course there is also the Scottish version: usually slow part and then it gets faster and faster so the title between in deception because there is nothing “sleepy” in the melody that comes to a final paroxysm .

SLEEPY MAGGIE

Sleepy Maggie Alasdair Fraser on fiddle
Sleepy Maggie
Gabriele Possenti  on a Mcilroy AS 65c (C)
Tullaghan Lassies Fidil Irish Fiddle trio
Jenny’s Chickens Shanon Corr on fiddle

DROWSY MAGGIE
John Simie Doherty Donegal fiddle master
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann live

The Chieftains 
 

Driftwood (Joe Nunn on fiddle)

Jake Wise live

Rock versions
Dancing Willow an Irish folk band from Münster (Germany)
DNA Strings from Cape Town ( South Africa)
Lack of limits faster more and more

 

LINKS
http://archive.org/details/poemssongsofrobe00tannrich
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/64522/1;
jsessionid=B312B09442ED31BB18C4FDA5E2E2BB59

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59687
http://members.aol.com/tannahillweavers/
http://www.lochwinnoch.info/tales/warlock-craigie.php
http://thesession.org/tunes/787
http://thesession.org/tunes/27
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/SLA_SLE.htm#SLEEPY_MAGGY/MAGGIE

THE SHEARINGS NAE FOR YOU

lovers-observed-dettaglioCanto tradizionale dell’Ayrshire, probabilmente risalente al 1700, che sebbene sia stato pubblicato in poche collezioni, è piuttosto popolare in Scozia e Irlanda, diffuso in diverse versioni testuali. Per i testi qui
La storia si dipana su due filoni, quello più cupo racconta di una ragazza incinta che non può partecipare alla tosatura delle pecore (o alla mietitura del raccolto); è stata presa con la forza da un soldato che non ha nessuna intenzione di sposarla,  anzi se ne torna al suo reggimento in partenza e l’abbandona.
In altre versioni invece l’uomo le dice che la sposerà subito e il canto assume un tono protettivo: lo sposo che si preoccupa delle condizioni di salute della moglie.

Una slow air quasi una ninna-nanna nonostante la crudezza del testo; la ritengo una sorta di canto di consolazione che potrebbe essere cantato dalla donna al proprio bambino ancora nella pancia per spiegarli com’è che verrà al mondo (e in che mondo verrà a vivere!). Dolce e triste nello stesso tempo.

Nei brani selezionati per l’ascolto la storia si svolge in forma di dialogo.

ASCOLTA The Tannahill Weavers in Leaving St. Kilda (strofe II, IV e I) su Spotify
ASCOLTA Allan Macleod (strofe I, II, III, V)

CHORUS
O the shearing(1)’s not for you, my bonny lassie o,
O the shearing’s not for you, my bonny lassie o,
The shearing’s not for you
For your back it winna bow,
And your belly’s rolling fu'(2), my bonny lassie o.
I
It was in the month of May, my bonny lassie o,
It was in the month of May, my bonny lassie o,
It was in the month of May
When the flowers they were gay,
And the lambs did sport and play, my bonny lassie o.
II
Don’t you mind on yonder hill, my bonny laddie o,
Don’t you mind on yonder hill, my bonny laddie o,
Don’t you mind on yonder hill
When you swore you would me kill
If you did not get your will, my bonny laddie o.
III
Don’t you mind the banks of Ayr, my bonny laddie o,
Don’t you mind the banks of Ayr, my bonny laddie o,
Don’t you mind the banks of Ayr
When you drew me in your snare,
And you left me in despair, my bonny laddie o.
IV(3)
Tis you may kill me dead, my bonny laddie o,
Tis you may kill me dead, my bonny laddie o,
Tis I’ll not kill you dead
Nor make your body bleed(4),
Nor marry you with speed, my bonny lassie o.
V
The fifes(5) do sweetly play, my bonny lassie o,
The fifes do sweetly play, my bonny lassie o,
The fifes do sweetly play
And the troops do march away,
And it’s here I will not stay, my bonny lassie o.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
CORO
“La falciatura non è per te bella mia,
la falciatura non è per te, bella mia,
la falciature non è per te
perchè la tua schiena non si piega
e la tua pancia sta per sfornare
o bella mia”
I
“Era il mese del maggio mia bella
era il mese del maggio mia bella
era nel mese di Maggio
quando i fiori erano vivaci e gli agnelli giocavano
o mia bella”
III
“Non ricordi quella collina laggiù bello mio,
non ricordi quella collina laggiù bello mio
non ricordi quella collina laggiù
quando giurasti che mi avresti ucciso se non si faceva come volevi?
IV
Non ricordi le rive di Ayr bello mio,
non ricordi le rive di Ayr bello mio,
non ricordi le rive di Ayr
quando mi hai preso in trappola
e mi hai lasciato nella disperazione?”
IV
“Mi farai morire bello mio,
mi farai morire bello mio”
“Non ti ucciderò  bella mia
non ti ucciderò  bella mia
e non ti picchierò
né ti sposerò subito, bella mia
V
I pifferi suonano allegramente mia bella
i pifferi suonano allegramente mia bella
i pifferi suonano allegramente
e le truppe marciano via
e qui non resterò bella mia”

NOTE
1) shearing si traduce come la falciatura del raccolto ma spesso in Scozia si intende la tosatura delle pecore
2) l’espressione letteralmente dice “l’ombellico si dondola” ma nella parola roll è implicito il concetto di avvolgimento ovvero di “ripieno” così si intende che nella pancia sta crescendo un bambino
3) nella versione di Tannahill weavers dice
Well I’ll no kill you deid my bonnie lassie o No I’ll no kill you deid my bonnie lassie o No I’ll no kill you deid, nor will I harm your pretty heid I will marry you with speed my bonnie lassie o
4) letteralmente “farò sanguinare il tuo corpo”: il ragazzo crede che lei non sia più vergine, un calssico della visione macho del mondo in cui se una donna non è più illibata allora vuol dire che ci sta con tutti
5) anche pipes

La versione romantica accenna invece soltanto ad un incontro magico sulle rive dell’Ayr in cui l’uomo si è innamorato della bella fanciulla e prosegue dicendole di lasciare i capelli sciolti e di levare le fibbie dalle scarpe perchè non andrà più alle feste da ballo essendo ora una donna sposata e incinta.

ASCOLTA Jim Reid in I Saw the Wild Geese Flee 1984

CHORUS
Oh the shearin’s no for you, my bonnie lassie oh
Oh the shearin’s no for you, my bonnie lassie oh,
Oh the shearin’s no for you, for yer back it winna boo,
And yer belly’s rowan fit’ my bonnie lassie oh.
I
Dae ye mind the banks o’ Ar, my bonnie lassie oh,
Dae ye mind the banks o’ Ar, my bonnie lassie oh,
Dae ye mind the banks o’ Ar, where my heart ye did ensnare(6),
And yer love ye did declare, my bonnie lassie oh.
II
Tak the ribbons frae yer hair, my bonnie lassie oh,
Tak the ribbons frae yer hair, my bonnie lassie oh,
Tak the ribbons frae yer hair, and let doon yer ringlets fair,
Ye’ve nocht noo but doul an’ care(7), my bonnie lassie oh.
III
Tak the buckles frae yer shoon(8), my bonnie lassie oh,
Tak the buckles frae yer shoon, my bonnie lassie oh,
Tak the buckles frae yer shoon, for ye’ve wed an unco loon(9),
And yer dancin days are done, my bonnie lassie oh

NOTE
6) in questa versione il cuore è stato intrappolato
7) nocht noo but doul an care: nothing now but hardship
8) shoon: shoes.
9) an unco loon: ‘a wild dude’.

KELVIN GROVE

Si tratta di una versione “edulcorata” di “The shearing’s not for you”, una riscrittura in epoca vittoriana per una melodia dolce e bella, da poter essere cantata senza arrossire anche nei salotti bene. Attribuita a volte a Mr. John Sim, è più probabilmente di Thomas Lyle (Paisley 1792-Glasgow 1859) che la riporta nel suo “Collected Poems and Songs” (1837). La storia tra fate di mezzanotte valli ombrose e acque limpide è quella di un emigrante che lascia la sua innamorata e la sua terra per fare fortuna non essendo ancora degno di aspirare alla di lei mano.

ASCOLTA Charlie Zahm in una versione tradizionale e con le strofe ridotte a 4

I
Let us haste to Kelvin Grove(1), bonnie lassie, O Thro’ its mazes let us rove, bonnie lassie, O Where the roses in their pride Deck the bonnie dingle side Where the midnight fairies glide, bonnie lassie, O.
II
Let us wander by the mill, bonnie lassie, O To the cove beside the rill, bonnie lassie, O Where the glens rebound the call Of the roaring waters’ fall Thro’ the mountains rocky hall, bonnie lassie, O.
III
Tho’ I dare not call thee mine, bonnie lassie, O As the smile of fortune’s thine, bonnie lassie, O Yet with fortune on my side I could stay thy father’s pride And win thee for my bride, bonnie lassie, O.
IV
Then farewell to Kelvin Grove, bonnie lassie, O And adieu to all I love, bonnie lassie, O To the river winding clear To the fragrant scented brier Even to thee of all most dear, bonnie lassie, O.
traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Andiamo a Kevin Growe mia bella sebbene intricato andiamo mia bella dove le rose nel loro orgoglio ornano la valletta ombrosa dove le fate di mezzanotte aleggiano
II
Andiamo al mulino, mia bella alla grotta accanto al ruscello dove la stretta valle rimbalza la voce della cascata assordante per le montagne rocciose mia bella
III
Non oso dirti mia bella fanciulla mentre la fortuna ti sorride mia bella eppure con la buona sorte dalla mia potrei affrontare l’orgoglio di tuo padre e averti come mia sposa bella fanciulla
IV
Allora addio a Kelvin Grove e addio a tutto ciò che amo al limpido fiume tortuoso al roseto profumato e a te di tutti la più cara bella fanciulla

NOTE
1) Kelvin Grove è un boschetto nel West End Glasgow meta preferita dalle giovani coppiette, diventato parco per uso delle classi medie nel 1852 e progettato da Sir Joseph Paxton
2) brier: rose bush

TAK THE BUCKLES FRAE YOUR SHEEN

Con questo titolo sono raccolte diverse versioni testuali sempre però con la stessa melodia di “The shearing’s not for you” e che raccontano la stessa storia ma senza fare cenno alla violenza.

ASCOLTA Jeannie Robertson in Scottish Ballads and Folk Song. Qui il ragazzo dice alla ragazza di mettere via le belle fibbie dalle scarpe perchè I giorni per ballare sono finiti; di prendere le balze del vestito e di cucire un vestito per il bambino

Tak the buckles frae your sheen, bonnie lassie O
Tak the buckles frae your sheen, for your dancin’ days are deen,
For your dancing days are deen bonnie lassie O
Tak the flounces frae your goun, bonnie lassie O,
Tak the flounces frae your goun, mak a frockie(1) tae your loon(2),
Mak a frockie tae your loon, bonnie lassie O
Dae ye min’ on Glesca(3) Green, bonnie lassie O?
Dae ye min’ on Glesca Green, when I played on your machine(4)?
Dae ye min’ on Glesca Green, bonnie lassie O?

NOTE
1) vestito da donna ma anche per infante, alcuni lo traducono come pannolino per neonato
2) bambino
3) Glasgow
4) l’unico accenno alla notte d’amore un ben strano eufemismo paragonare il sesso di una donna con una macchina!

Per completezza si riporta anche questa versione, in cui la nostra storia è introdotta da una filastrocca per bambini

ASCOLTA Ray & Archie Fisher

What’s poor Mary weeping for?
Weeping for, weeping for,
What’s poor Mary weeping for?
On a cold and a frosty morning.

Because she wants to see her lad,
See her lad, see her lad.
Because she wants to see her lad
On a cold and a frosty morning.

She buckled up her shoes and away she run
Away she run, away she run.
She buckled up her shoes and away she run
On a cold and a frosty morning.

Tak’ the buckles fae your shoon, bonnie lassie-o
Tak’ the buckles fae your shoon, bonnie lassie-o
Tak’ the buckles fae your shoon, for you’ve married sicca loon
That your dancing days are done, bonnie lassie-o.

Tak’ the ribbons fae your hair, bonnie lassie-o
Tak’ the ribbons fae your hair, bonnie lassie-o
Tak’ the ribbons fae your hair, and cut off your ringlets fair
For you’ve naught but want and care, bonnie lassie-o.

Tak’ the floonces fae your knee, bonnie lassie-o
Tak’ the floonces fae your knee, bonnie lassie-o
Tak’ the floonces fae your knee, for it’s better far for ye
To look ower your bairnies three, bonnie lassie-o.

FONTI http://www.ramshornstudio.com/o__the_shearing_s_not_for_you.htm http://www.alansim.com/scohtml/sco344.html http://sangstories.webs.com/shearinsnoforyou.htm

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=58285 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7343 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44400 http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/KelvinGrove.html http://www.ecalpemos.org/2011/02/kelvingrove-iona-and-dark-side-of.html

http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/s/shearins.html http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/ 28094/3;jsessionid=D4148994E2CCDA30933EDFF2063C7A19 http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/ 35083/3;jsessionid=3006AFF03316C4D11C49FED66DCA2F3B http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/ 18482/1;jsessionid=1A35DB3D7C8638AA6051084255FF2E8F

Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie?

Read the post in English

Dalla tradizione delle “night visiting songs” il testo è attribuito al poeta scozzese Robert Tannahill e in effetti vari riscontri collocano la storia nei boschi di Paisley. (‘The Poems and Songs of Robert Tannahill’ – 1874 con la melodia “Sleeping Maggie”.)
“L’eroina di questa canzone era Margaret Pollock, cugina dell’Autore dalla parte della madre. Era la figlia maggiore di Matthew Pollock (3 °) di Boghall, con il suo secondo matrimonio (menzionato nel Memoir of the Tannahills); ed è molto probabile che il Poeta abbia assistito a una serata simile a quella che aveva descritto, camminando da Paisley sulla strada maestra fino alla fattoria di suo zio che si trova a Beith Parish. Margaret Pollock in seguito visse in famiglia con William Lochhead, Ryveraes, e lei e la signora Lochhead cantarono spesso quella canzone insieme. La signorina Pollock morì non sposata” (tradotto da qui)

NIGHT VISITING IN STILE DARK

La scena descritta non è decisamente autobiografica (semmai più consona al temperamento di Robert Burns) ma più di genere: il protagonista giunge alla casa di Maggy in una notte buia e tempestosa (il quadretto è piuttosto gotico: un gelido vento invernale che infuria nel bosco, una notte di novilunio priva di stelle, l’inquietante lamento del gufo, il cancello di ferro chiuso in malo modo che sbatte contro i cardini) e spera che nel frattempo la sua bella sia ancora sveglia e lo faccia entrare di nascosto come promesso! E allora non più preoccupazioni o paure: nelle braccia di Maggy ogni cupo pensiero è dissolto!

http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/
http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/

E’ doveroso citare la versione collezionata da Hamish Henderson dalla voce di Jeannie Robertson (vedi frammento del 1960) che riporta una melodia diversa da quella poi resa famosa dai Tannahill Weavers.

Il brano è stato fatto conoscere al grande pubblico dai Tannahill Weavers (la loro scheda qui), i bravi “tessitori” di Robert Tannahill anche loro di Paisley,
Al momento su you tube si trovano varie versioni live, ma le esecuzioni migliori del gruppo sono due: una in Mermaid’s Song 1992 (da ascoltare su Spotify)  una versione più veloce integrata con il reel “The Noose In The Ghillies” (formazione Roy Gullane, Phil Smillie, Iain MacInnes, Kenny Forsyth) e la prima in Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976 con la formazione: Roy Gullane, Phil Smillie, Hudson Swan, e Dougie MacLean come violinista. In questa prima versione la melodia è più lenta e ricca di atmosfera (con tanto di tuoni, vento e l’effetto pioggia)

Tannahill Weavers  in Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976

Dougie Maclean (che ha collaborato con i Tannahill Weavers dal 1974 e fino al 1977 e poi ancora in tour con loro nel 1980) in Real Estate -1988 e anche in Tribute 1995

Jim Reid in The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Volume I(2006) 

Sam Monaghan


I
Mirk and rainy is the nicht,
there’s no’ a starn in a’ the carry(1)
Lichtnin’s gleam athwart the lift,
and (cauld) winds
drive wi’ winter’s fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
let me in, for loud the linn is roarin'(2)
o’er the Warlock Craigie(3).
II
Fearfu’ soughs the boortree(4) bank
The rifted wood roars wild an’ dreary.
Loud the iron yett(5) does clank,
An’ cry o’ howlets (6) mak’s me eerie.
III
Aboon my breath I daurna’ speak
For fear I rouse your waukrif’ daddie;
Cauld’s the blast upon my cheek,
O rise, rise my bonnie ladie.
IV
She op’d the door, she let him in
I cuist aside my dreepin’ plaidie(7).
‘Blaw your warst, ye rain and win’
Since, Maggie, now I’m in aside ye.
V
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
What care I for howlet’s cry,
For boortree bank or warlock craigie?
Traduzione italiano
I
Buia e piovosa è la notte
non c’è una stella che mandi
raggi di luce in tutto il cielo (1)
e i venti freddi si uniscono
alla furia dell’inverno.
RITORNELLO
Stai dormendo Maggy?
Stai dormendo Maggy?
Fammi entrare che la cascata rimbomba (2)
e ruggisce sul Warlock Crag (3).
II
Timorosi fruscii sul pendio dei sambuchi (4), il bosco ruggisce selvaggio e triste, 
forte il cancello (5) di ferro sbatte con clamore, /e piange il gufo facendomi paura.
III
Non oso parlare più forte di un sospiro, per timore di svegliare tuo padre che è sempre vigile,/fredda è la raffica del vento sulla mia guancia,/ svegliati mia bella.
IV
Lei aprì la porta e lo fece entrare.
Posai il mantello (7) gocciolante di pioggia: “Spazza via il peggio, la pioggia e il vento 
dal momento che Maggy ora sono con te!”
V
Ora che ti sei svegliata Maggy
Ora che ti sei svegliata Maggy
che m’importa del grido del gufo,
della collina dei sambuchi o del Warlock Crag?

NOTE
1) carry sta per cielo, “the direction in which clouds are carried by the wind”
2) howling
3) letteralmente dirupo del mago, è il nome di una cascata a Lochwinnoch che forma una grande pozza o un piccolo laghetto
4) elder tree, il sambuco, l’albero in cui dimorano le fate
5) yett diventa gett secondo l’antica consuetudine di scrivere le due vocali in modo intercambiabile. La lettera y più comunemente sostituiva anche la combinazione “th” per cui “the” era anche scritto “ye” (si tratta della lettera þ detta “thorn” che ha lo stesso suono di “th”)
6) letteralmente il lamento dei gufi: howlet è un termine dialettale  scozzese per owl, owlet
7) plaidie, una coperta o un mantello vedi

Great horned owl and chicks. Image size 5.6 by 7.9 inches @ 300 dpi. Photo credit: © Scott Copeland

SLEEPY & DROWSY MAGGY REELS

“Sleepy Maggie” è un reel in due parti e spesso è abbinato al reel “Drowsy Maggie”, a volte le due melodie sono, erroneamente, confuse. Nella versione di Francis O’Neill and James O’Neill (in O’Neill’s Music of Ireland) è in 3 parti.

Sleepy Maggie secondo quanto riportato da Fidder’s Companion è una melodia tradizionale scozzese la cui più antica fonte trascritta si trova in Duke of Perth Manuscript ovvero Drummond Castle Manuscript (1734)

Sleepy Maggie è conosciuta in Irlanda anche con differenti nomi “LoughIsleCastle,” “Seán sa Cheo” o “Tullaghan Lassies” ed è il modello per “Jenny’s Chickens”.

Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)
Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)

“Drowsy Maggie” è invece una melodia tradizionale irlandese in 2, 3 o 4 parti, però molto più popolare almeno a livello di registrazioni (sarà per la sua comparsa nel film “Titanic”!)

Gaelic Storm  (Titanic Set)- ovviamente c’è anche la versione scozzese: in genere parte lenta e poi diventa sempre più veloce così il titolo tra in inganno perché non c’è niente di “sonnolento” nella melodia che arriva ad una parossismo finale.

SLEEPY MAGGIE

ASCOLTA Sleepy Maggie Alasdair Fraser al violino

ASCOLTA Sleepy Maggie Gabriele Possenti alla chitarra
ASCOLTATullaghan Lassies Fidil
ASCOLTAJenny’s Chickens Shanon Corr

DROWSY MAGGIE della serie “fast & furious”
Le variazioni sono infinite su solo 2 parti di base

ASCOLTA John Simie Doherty
ASCOLTA Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann

The Chieftains  Versione studio

Driftwood (Joe Nunn al violino)

Jake Wise live

Versioni più rock
ASCOLTA Dancing Willow
ASCOLTA DNA Strings
ASCOLTA Lack of limits

FONTI
http://archive.org/details/poemssongsofrobe00tannrich
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/64522/1;
jsessionid=B312B09442ED31BB18C4FDA5E2E2BB59

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59687
http://members.aol.com/tannahillweavers/
http://www.lochwinnoch.info/tales/warlock-craigie.php
http://thesession.org/tunes/787
http://thesession.org/tunes/27
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/SLA_SLE.htm#SLEEPY_MAGGY/MAGGIE