Lancashire, Yorkshire & Oxfordshire may day carols

Leggi in italiano

GREATER MANCHESTER – Lancashire

Manchester May Day.
“One tradition was for girls to don mainly white dresses, made from curtains or whatever, and carry around a broomstick representing a maypole. Another tradition was for boys to dress up in women’s clothing and to colour their faces – they were called molly dancers, ‘molly’ being an old expression for an effeminate man. Dr Cass[Dr Eddie Cass, the Folklore Society] says they went round quoting a verse. One such, from the Salford area, was: I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew. Itch Koo Pushing little wagons up a brew I earn thirty bob a week I’ve a wife and kids to keep I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew Dr Cass himself remembers both traditions. The girls would dance round the maypole and sing other songs, such as: Buttercups and daisies Oh what pretty flowers Coming in spring time To tell of sunny hours We come to greet you on the first of May We hope you will not send us away For we dance and sing our merry song On a maypole day (from here)

SWINTON MAY SONG

The version reproduced by Watersons in 1975 is taken from W & R Chamber “Book of Days” – 1869 – with words and music collected by Mr. Job Knight (1861) –  A.L. Lloyd comments
The critical seasons of the year—midwinter, coming of spring, onset of autumn—were times for groups of carollers to go through the villages singing charms for good luck, in hope of a reward of food, drink, money. This one was sung on May Eve or thereabouts in Yorkshire and Lancashire, but it’s much like similar songs from any other county.”

This song is  titled “Drawing Near the Merry Month of May” and the text is also reported in Edwin Waugh’s book “Lancashire Sketches” (1869)
The area of reference is Yorkshire and Lancashire and “Swinton” was a small borough, then Salford city now become a part of Manchester (England)

The Watersons from For Pence and Spicy Ale -1975

Brass Monkey from Flame of Fire – 2005

The two melodies are different, the version of the Brass Monkey recalls the Padstow May Song, another song of springtime still popular ritual in the town of Padstow, Cornwall.
As reported in Chambers’ Book of Day (1869), Swinton’s two songs were the Old May song and the New May song. The Old May Song was a so-called Night song that was sung during the night by groups of mayers accompanied with various musical instruments.

OLD MAY SONG

I
All in this pleasant evening together
come has we
for the summer springs so fresh and green and gay.
We’ll tell you of a blossom and a bud on every tree
Drawing near to the merry month of May
II
Rise up, the master of this house all in your chain of gold
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope you’re not offended with your house we make so bold
Drawing near to the merry month of May
III
Rise up, the mistress of this house with gold all on your breast
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
And if your body is asleep we hope your soul’s at rest
Drawing near to the merry month of May
IV
Rise up, the children of this house, all in your rich attire
For the summer springs so gresh and green and gay.
And every hair all on your head shines like a silver wire
Drawing near to the merry month of May
V
God bless this house and arbor, your riches and your store
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope that the Lord will prosper you both now and evermore
Drawing near to the merry month of May
VI
So now we’re going to leave you in peace and plenty here
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We will not sing you May again until another year
For to drive you these cold winter nights away

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

We heve a direct testimony in the book”Memoirs of Seventy Years of an Eventful Life  from Charles Hulbert (Providence Grove, Near Shrewsbury:1852), pg 107
With feelings of indescribable pleasure, I still call to my remembrance various customs and scenes familiar to my early years. Still present is the delight with which I hailed the approach of May-day morning, when a select company of the musical Rustics of Worsley, Swinton and Eccles, would assemble at midnight to commence the grateful task of saluting their neighbours with the sound of the Clarionet, Hautboy, German Flute, Violin, and the melody of twenty voices. On this occasion the leader of the band would commence his song under the window or before the outer door of the family “he delighted to honour” with
O rise up Master of this House, all in your chain of gold,
For the summer springs so fresh, green and gay;
I hope you’ll not be angry at us for being so bold,
Drawing near to the merry month of May.
In this strain, including some encomiums or happy allusion to the various qualifications of all the other branches of the family the whole were saluted: after which a purse of silver or a few mugs of good ale were distributed among the company; thus they proceeded from house to house, tilling the air with their music and happy voices, till six o’clock in the morning.
Among the drinks with which the singers were refreshing their throat in addition to the inevitable beer there was also the Syllabub prepared with milk cream. see more

OXFORDSHIRE

THE SWALCLIFFE MAY DAY CAROL

CMB-009Here is the transcription of a 19th-century May song sung by Swalcliffe’s children, clearly a Day Song
Swalcliffe (pronounced sway-cliff) is a village near Banbury in North Oxfordshire. The words of this carol were noted by Miss Annie Norris around 1840 from the singing of a group of children in the village. The words were passed onto the collector – and Adderbury resident – Janet Blunt in 1908, and she finally collected a tune for the song from Mrs Woolgrove of Swalcliffe, and Mrs Lynes of Sibford, at Sibford fete, July 1921.” (from here)

Magpie Lane from The Oxford Ramble 1993

I
Awake! awake! lift up your eyes
And pray to God for grace
Repent! repent! of your former sins
While ye have time and space
II
I have been wandering all this night
And part of the last day
So now I’ve come for to sing you a song
And to show you a branch of May
III
A branch of may I have brought you
And at your door it stands
It does spread out, and it spreads all about
By the work of our Lord’s hands
IV
Man is but a man, his life’s but a span
He is much like a flower
He’s here today and he’s gone tomorrow
So he’s all gone down in an hour
V
So now I have sung you my little short song
I can no longer stay
God bless you all both great and small
And I wish you a happy May

LINK

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=129987 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30126 http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/april/24.htm http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/ making_history/makhist10_prog5d.shtml https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/ swintonmaysong.html http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/ oxford_ramble/may_day_carol.htm https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2013/04/29/ week-88-swalcliffe-may-day-carol/

Carole di Primavera nel Lancashire, Yorkshire & Oxfordshire

Read the post in English

GREATER MANCHESTER – Lancashire

Si stralcia da qui in merito alle tradizioni del Primo Maggio a Manchester e dintorni.
Per tradizione le ragazze indossavanoa biti bianchi, fatti con le tende od altro, e portavano in giro il Ramo del Maggio. I ragazzi si vestivano con abiti femminili e si annerivano il viso-  erano chiamati Molly dancers, (“molly” è una vecchia espressione per un uomo effemminato). Il dott. Cass [la dottoressa Eddie Cass, della Folklore Society, la società del folklore] dice che andavano in giro recitando un versetto. Uno di questi, dalla zona di Salford, era:
I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew.
Itch Koo Pushing little wagons up a brew
I earn thirty bob a week I’ve a wife and kids to keep
I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew
(lavoro nel birrificio di Pendlebury. Spingo i vagoni della birra e guadagno trenta sterline a settimana. Ho una moglie e dei figli da mantenere, lavoro nel birrificio di Pendlebury)
Le ragazze ballavano intorno al May pole e cantavano altre canzoni, come:
Buttercups and daisies
Oh what pretty flowers
Coming in spring time
To tell of sunny hours
We come to greet you on the first of May
We hope you will not send us away
For we dance and sing our merry song
On a maypole day
(Ranuncoli e margherite Oh che bei fiori spuntano in primavera, per raccontare delle ore di sole. Veniamo a salutarvi il primo maggio, speriamo che non ci mandiate via, perchè balliamo e cantiamo la nostra allegra canzone intorno al Palo del Maggio)

SWINTON MAY SONG

La versione riprodotta dai Watersons nel 1975 è tratta da W&R Chamber “Book of Days” – 1869 – con parole e musica collezionate dal signor Job Knight (1861) – e nelle note di copertina A.L. Lloyd commenta “I momenti cruciali del cambio stagioni dell’anno-mezzo inverno, arrivo della primavera, inizio dell’autunno – erano l’occasione in cui gruppi di cantori attraversavano i villaggi cantando incantesimi benaugurali, nella speranza di una ricompensa di cibo, bevande, denaro. Questo è stato cantato alla vigilia di maggio nello Yorkshire e nel Lancashire, ma è molto simile alle stesse canzoni di qualsiasi altra contea.”

La carola viene anche intitolata “Drawing Near to the Merry Month of May” e il testo è anche riportato nel libro di Edwin Waugh “Lancashire Sketches” (1869)
L’area di riferimento è il Yorkshire e il Lancashire e “Swinton” era un piccolo borgo, poi città di Salford ora diventata una parte di Manchester (Inghilterra)

The Watersons in For Pence and Spicy Ale -1975

Brass Monkey in Flame of Fire – 2005

Le due melodie sono diverse, la versione dei Brass Monkey richiama la Padstow May Song, altro canto rituale di questua primaverile ancora popolare nella cittadina di Padstow, Cornovaglia.
Come è riportato nel Book of Day di Chambers (1869) le canzoni di Swinton erano due la Old May song e la New May song. La Old May Song era una cosiddetta Night song che era cantata appunto durante la notte da gruppi di mayers accompagnati con vari strumenti musicali.

OLD MAY SONG

I
All in this pleasant evening together
come has we
for the summer springs so fresh and green and gay.
We’ll tell you of a blossom and a bud on every tree
Drawing near to the merry month of May
II
Rise up, the master of this house all in your chain of gold
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope you’re not offended with your house we make so bold
Drawing near to the merry month of May
III
Rise up, the mistress of this house with gold all on your breast
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
And if your body is asleep we hope your soul’s at rest
Drawing near to the merry month of May
IV
Rise up, the children of this house, all in your rich attire
For the summer springs so gresh and green and gay.
And every hair all on your head shines like a silver wire
Drawing near to the merry month of May
V
God bless this house and arbor, your riches and your store
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope that the Lord will prosper you both now and evermore
Drawing near to the merry month of May
VI
So now we’re going to leave you in peace and plenty here
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We will not sing you May again until another year
For to drive you these cold winter nights away
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
In questa piacevole serata tutti insieme, veniamo
perché l’estate sboccia così fresca, verde e allegra.
Vi diremo di boccioli e gemme su ogni albero,
portiamo dentro l’allegro mese di Maggio
II
Alzatevi, padrone di questa casa con la vostra catena tutta d’oro,
perché l’estate sboccia così fresca, verde e allegra
speriamo che non vi offendiate che ci siamo avvicinati alla vostra casa in modo così audace,
portiamo dentro l’allegro mese di Maggio
III
Alzatevi, padrona di questa casa con la spilla d’oro sul petto
perché l’estate sboccia così fresca, verde e allegra
e se il vostro corpo è addormentato speriamo che la vostra anima sia in pace,
portiamo dentro l’allegro mese di Maggio
IV
Alzatevi ragazzi di questa casa, nei vostri ricchi vestiti
perché l’estate sboccia così fresca, verde e allegra
e i capelli sulla vostra testa brillano come fili d’argento,
portiamo dentro l’allegro mese di Maggio
V
Dio benedica questa casa e il pergolato,
i vostri beni e il negozio
perché l’estate sboccia così fresca, verde e allegra
che il Signore vi dia prosperità adesso e per sempre,
portiamo dentro l’allegro mese di Maggio
VI
Adesso vi lasciamo in pace e abbondanza
perché l’estate sboccia così fresca, verde e allegra,
non canteremo il Maggio fino al prossimo anno,
per portare via queste fredde notti d’Inverno
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

Possiamo leggere una testimonianza di prima mano anche nel libro “Memoirs of Seventy Years of an Eventful Life di Charles Hulbert (Providence Grove, Near Shrewsbury:1852), pg 107
E’ con sommo piacere che ancora ricordo le varie usanze e le consuetudini dei miei primi anni. Ancora viva la gioia con cui salutavo l’avvicinarsi del mattino del Primo Maggio con l’arrivo di una  compagnia scelta di musicisti (Rustics of Worsley, Swinton and Eccles), che annunciavano si sarebbero riuniti a mezzanotte per iniziare il grato compito di salutare i loro vicini con il suono di flauti, clarinetti e violini e trenta voci.
O rise up Master of this House, all in your chain of gold,
For the summer springs so fresh, green and gay;
I hope you’ll not be angry at us for being so bold,
Drawing near to the merry month of May.
Dopo aver aggiunti altri versi di encomio e qualche battuta per tutto il ramo della famiglia venivano i saluti: una borsa d’argento e un paio di boccali di birra erano distribuiti per la compagnia  proseguivano di casa in casa riempiendo l’aria della loro musica e delle loro allegre voci fino alle sei del mattino .
Tra le bevande con cui i cantori si rinfrescavano le ugole oltre all’immancabile birra c’era anche il Syllabub (traducibile in italiano come vino frizzante) preparato con la crema del latte. continua

OXFORDSHIRE

THE SWALCLIFFE MAY DAY CAROL

CMB-009Ecco la trascrizione di un canto del maggio risalente al XIX secolo cantato dai bambini di Swalcliffe, chiaramente una Day Song
Le parole di questo canto sono state trascritte da Miss Annie Norris intorno al 1840 dal canto di un gruppo di bambini nel villaggio. Le parole furono passate alla collezionista – e residente ad Adderbury – Janet Blunt nel 1908, che infine raccolse una melodia della signora Woolgrove di Swalcliffe, e della signora Lynes di Sibford, alla festa di Sibford, nel luglio del 1921.” (tratto da qui)

Magpie Lane in The Oxford Ramble 1993


I
Awake! awake! lift up your eyes
And pray to God for grace
Repent! repent! of your former sins
While ye have time and space
II
I have been wandering all this night
And part of the last day
So now I’ve come for to sing you a song
And to show you a branch of May
III
A branch of may I have brought you
And at your door it stands
It does spread out, and it spreads all about
By the work of our Lord’s hands
IV
Man is but a man, his life’s but a span
He is much like a flower
He’s here today and he’s gone tomorrow
So he’s all gone down in an hour
V
So now I have sung you my little short song
I can no longer stay
God bless you all both great and small
And I wish you a happy May
Traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Svegliatevi, aprite gli occhi
e chiedete la Grazia a Dio.
Pentitevi per i vostri peccati
adesso che siete ancora in tempo.
II
Ho camminato per tutta la notte
e parte del giorno e adesso sono qui per cantarvi una canzone e per portarvi il ramo del maggio.
III
Vi ho portato il ramo del maggio
fin davanti alla porta,
sta fiorendo e porterà a fioritura tutto ciò che lo circonda
ad opera delle mani di Nostro Signore.
IV
L’uomo tuttavia è solo un uomo, la sua vita è breve, è molto simile a un fiore
è qui oggi e domani
non c’è più,
così tutto finisce nel giro di un ora.
V
Adesso che ho cantato la mia canzoncina
non posso restare più a lungo,
Dio vi benedica grandi e piccoli
e vi auguro un felice Maggio

FONTI

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=129987 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30126 http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/april/24.htm http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/ making_history/makhist10_prog5d.shtml https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/ swintonmaysong.html http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/ oxford_ramble/may_day_carol.htm https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2013/04/29/ week-88-swalcliffe-may-day-carol/

LA GHIRLANDA DEL MAGGIO “the bringing home the May”

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

Nel Medioevo prima dello spuntare del giorno di Calendimaggio i giovani del villaggio raccoglievano fiori di campo, rami di biancospino e facevano entrare il Maggio nel paese: cantavano, danzavano, appendevano alle finestre i rami raccolti e donavano i fiori alle fanciulle più graziose. Festeggiare il Maggio era una consuetudine anche dei nobili per tutto il tardo Rinascimento come ci mostrano i molti dipinti dell’epoca.

MayDay_Leslie(Charles Robert Leslie – May Day in the reign of Queen Elizabeth)

Nel dipinto di Charles Robert Leslie è raffigurata proprio una scena celebrativa del Maggio con la Regina Elisabetta raffigurata sulla destra in primo piano nel mentre è intrattenuta da un giullare. Sulla distesa in secondo piano si staglia il palo del maggio impavesato e decorato con ghirlande verdi; attorno al palo si stanno svolgendo le danze e sono ben distinguibili i personaggi vestiti da Robin Hood, Lady Marian, Fra Tack, ma anche un cavalluccio, un drago e un buffone.

LA REGINA DEL MAGGIO

Sempre sullo sfondo è raffigurato anche una specie di pergolato ricoperto di fiori e fronde, a forma di grotta dentro il quale si intravede una figura di donna: è la regina del Maggio, la rappresentazione vivente della dea Flora, protetta e appartata rispetto alla zona in cui si svolge la festa, quasi una reliquia, oggetto di ammirazione dei nobili e dei popolani.
Le coppie danzano intorno al Palo del Maggio per contendersi l’ambito premio, la ghirlanda del Maggio, e diventare l’anno seguente il Re e la Regina del Maggio.

Si possono rintracciare tradizioni ancora più remote in questa Fanciulla della Primavera, echi di culti ancestrali ancora impregnati della spiritualità antica in un canto irlandese in gaelico Amhran Na Bealtaine

garlan-may-dayEd ecco che nell’Ottocento in Inghilterra ritroviamo la regina del Maggio effigiata in una bambolina posta tra una corona di fiori e nastri appesa ad un’asta portata in giro dai Mayers (i maggiolanti).

Si tratta della “piccola Bride” la dea triplice celtica la fanciulla del grano confezionata dalle donne a Imbolc (il primo febbraio) con il grano avanzato dall’ultimo covone della mietitura dell’anno passato, ossia la giovane Fanciulla della Primavera, un forte simbolo di rinascita nel ciclo di morte-vita in cui si perpetua la Natura: nella bambolina si era trasferito lo spirito del grano che non moriva con la mietitura.
Le bamboline di Brigid venivano anche vestite con un abito bianco o decorate con nastri e fiori e portate in processione per tutto il paese passando di porta in porta affinchè ciascuno lasciasse un dono. continua

(c) Rushcliffe Borough Council; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

A-MAYING

Come per il Wassaling e il caroling natalizio anche in primavera i bambini andavano di casa in casa per la questua, cantando una serie di versi (imparati dalla mamma) e mostrando la Ghirlanda del Maggio.victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day
Nell’Ottocento la connotazione della questua era decisamente più ossequiosa della Chiesa, con versi da penitenti e la bambolina intesa come rappresentazione della Vergine Maria.
Tradizioni che si sono conservate in varie parti d’Europa fino alle soglie del Novecento.

In Italia ad esempio le cronache del tempo riferibili alla Romagna (vedi) “…nella notte d’ingresso di tale mese, elettrizzandosi la gioventù, accorrono i giovani a cantare il maggio sotto le finestre delle loro favorite. Contemporaneamente si sentono torme di giovinette cantare canzoni ponendo sulle finestre ed alle loro porte rami di albero con fiori, come dire di avere piantato Maggio” (Placucci – 1818).

il primo giorno di maggio gli amanti prendono un ramo di acacia in fiore e vanno la mattina per tempo a piantarlo o presso l’uscio, o vicino ad una finestra dell’amata: alcune volte attaccano a questo ramo doni come spille, fazzoletti o altro. Poi cantano” (Bagli – 1885).

seconda parte: Il cantar maggio nel Basso Piemonte continua
terza parte: Il cantar Maggio nelle Isole Britanniche continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/beltane-la-festa-celtica-del-maggio.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/beltaine-albero-maggio.htm

Il Maggio in Irlanda: il canto di Beltane

Read the post in English

Il canto ha molti titoli: Amhran Na Bealtaine, Samhradh, Summertime, Thugamur Fein An Samhradh Linn (We Brought The Summer With Us, We Have Brought The Summer In). Oggi viene comunemente chiamata Beltane Song

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

AMHRAN NA BEALTAINE

Il brano potrebbe risalire al tardo Medioevo e la sua prima traccia si trova nei festeggiamenti  popolari per lo sbarco di James Butler Duca di Ormonde nel 1662, nominato Lord Luogotenente d’Irlanda. E’ un canto tradizionale nella parte sud-est dell’Ulster (Irlanda del Nord) ed era cantato da gruppi di giovani che andavano di casa in casa a portare il ramo di Maggio (mummers, mayers- vedi).
Molto probabilmente questo era un canto di questua per ottenere   del cibo o bevande in cambio del ramo di biancospino o del prugnolo  da lasciare davanti alla porta . Con questo gesto benaugurale si proteggono gli abitanti dalle fate. Era convinzione che le fate non potessero superare tali barriere fiorite. continua

Il brano è ancora molto popolare in Irlanda  in particolare nella regione di Oriel (che include parti delle contee di Louth, Monaghan e Armagh) ed è eseguito sia in versione strumentale che cantato.
Edward Bunting afferma che il brano era suonata nell’area di Dublino fin dal 1633.
MELODIA TRASCRITTA DA EDWARD BUNTING


The Chieftains , questa versione strumentale è un inno alla gioia, un canto di uccelli che si risvegliano al richiamo della primavera: inizia il flauto irlandese appoggiandosi all’arpa, che trilla nel crescendo (a imitazione del canto dell’allodola) ripreso in canone dai vari strumenti a fiato (il flauto irlandese, il whistle e la uillean pipes) e dal violino, grandioso!

ASCOLTA  Gloaming  2012 con il titolo di Samhradh Samhradh (al violino Martin Hayes)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin in A Stór Is A Stóirín 1994 

Gelico irlandese
I
Bábóg na Bealtaine, maighdean an tSamhraidh,
Suas gach cnoc is síos gach gleann,
Cailíní maiseacha bán-gheala gléasta,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
Sèist
Samhradh, samhradh, bainne na ngamhna,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí na nóinín glégeal,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.

II
Thugamar linn é ón gcoill chraobhaigh,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí ó luí na gréine,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
III
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm ‘sag luascadh sna spéartha,
Áthas do lá is bláth ar chrann.
Tá an chuach is an fhuiseog ag seinm le pléisiúr,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Traduzione inglese*
I
Mayday doll(1),
maiden of Summer (2)
Up every hill
and down every glen,
Beautiful girls,
radiant and shining,
We have brought the Summer in.
CHORUS
Summer, Summer,
milk of the calves(3),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(4) summer
of clear bright daisies,
We have brought the Summer in.
II
We brought it in
from the leafy woods(5),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(6) Summer
from the time of the sunset(7),
We have brought the Summer in.
III
The lark(8) is singing
and swinging around in the skies,
Joy for the day
and the flower on the trees.
The cuckoo and the lark
are singing with pleasure,
We have brought the Summer in.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
La Fanciulla del Maggio
fanciulla dell’Estate
su per ogni collina
e giù per ogni valle
(noi) Belle Ragazze,
solari e splendenti
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
CORO
Estate, estate,
il latte dei vitelli
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate.
Gialla estate
di chiare e luminose margherite
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
II
L’abbiamo portata
dai boschi frondosi,
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate.
Gialla estate
a partire dal tramonto
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
III
L’allodola canta
e sfreccia nel cielo
Gioia per il giorno
e gli alberi in fiore
Il cuculo e l’allodola
cantano con gioia
Abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

NOTE
* da qui
garlan-may-day1) la Bábóg è la bambola (fanciulla) di Primavera. Brídeóg era la “piccola Bride“, (Brigit, o Brigantia in Britannia, una dea trina -Vergine, Madre, Crona) tra le più importanti del pantheon celtico, la fanciulla del grano confezionata dalle donne a Imbolc (il primo febbraio) con il grano avanzato dall’ultimo covone della mietitura dell’anno passato, ossia la giovane Dea della Primavera, un forte simbolo di rinascita nel ciclo di morte-vita in cui si perpetua la Natura: nella bambolina si era trasferito lo spirito del grano che non moriva con la mietitura. Le bamboline di Brigid venivano anche vestite con un abito bianco o decorate con pietre, nastri e fiori e portate in processione per tutto il paese affinchè ciascuno lasciasse un dono alla piccola Bride.
La bambolina ricomparirà nelle celebrazioni vittoriane del Maggio, questa volta come vera a propria bambola biancovestita posta tra una corona di fiori e nastri appesa ad un asta e portata in giro per il paese dai Mayers (i maggiolanti). continua
2) samhradh nel contesto è il nome dato alla ghirlanda fiorita portata di casa in casa con l’effige della Bábóg
3)  il latte delle mucche per i vitellini. Il giorno del Maggio è chiamato  na Beal tina ossia il giorno del fuoco di Beal, consacrato quindi al dio Bel o Belenos. Alla vigilia si accendevano grandi fuochi e si faceva passare il bestiame tra di essi – come era l’antica usanza dei Celti – usanza conservata ancora nelle campagne irlandesi con la convinzione che ciò impedisse al Piccolo Popolo- in particolare ai folletti molto ghiotti di latte – di fare brutti scherzi come intrecciare le code delle mucche o rubare il latte
4) i fiori che venivano raccolti erano per lo più gialli per richiamare il colore e il calore del sole. Fiori e rami fioriti erano posti sulla soglia di casa e ai davanzali delle finestre per proteggere gli abitanti dalle fate e come auspicio di buona sorte. Era convinzione che le fate non potessero superare tali barriere fiorite. Tale tradizione era tipica dell’Irlanda del Nord. I bambini soprattutto andavano a raccogliere i fiori selvatici per preparare delle ghirlande, specialmente con fiori dal colore giallo.
5) il greenwood, il bosco più inviolato e sacro sede degli antichi rituali celtici dal quale le ragazze hanno tagliato i rami del Maggio (in altre versioni testuali indicati come branches of the forest) ossia i rami di biancospino o di prugnolo

Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson
Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson

6) i giovani si recano nel bosco nella notte della vigilia del 1 Maggio al tramonto del sole e quindi sul far del giorno iniziano la loro questua processionale per far entrare il Maggio nel paese (continua)
7) l’allodola è un uccello sacro dal simbolismo solare (vedi simbolismo)
8) il canto del cuculo è foriero di Primavera, anche perchè una volta terminata la stagione dell’amore (fine maggio), il cuculo (maschio) non canta più (continua)

In un’altra versione testuale (vedi)

Cuileann is coll is trom is cárthain,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
Is fuinseog ghléigeal Bhéal an Átha,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Traduziopne inglese
Holly and hazel
and elder and rowan,(1)
We have brought the Summer in.
And brightly shining ash
from Bhéal an Átha,(2)
We have brought the Summer in
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
L’agrifoglio, il nocciolo,
il sambuco e il sorbo

abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
e il bianco frassino
dalla Bocca del Guado,

abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

1) Il biancospino è una pianta delle fate come l’agrifoglio, il nocciolo, il sambuco e il sorbo, protettiva e benaugurale (probabilmente a causa delle spine molto acuminate). La tradizione del Maggio vuole in particolare che il ramo  di biancospino sia posto fuori dalla casa (appeso alle finestre e accanto all’ingresso) perché se portato in casa, soprattutto quando è fiorito, porta sfortuna. Questa accezione negativa risale al Medioevo quando i rami di biancospino erano usati come amuleti contro il malocchio, le streghe e i demoni e forse si può far risalire al vago odore putrescente dei rami, ma sicuramente è legata al tentativo della Chiesa di assimilare i riti precristiani a pratiche sataniche.  vedi
2) Bhéal an Átha letteralmente la bocca del guado è anche una località oggi nota come Ballina una città sul fiume Moy nella conta di Mayo. L’insediamento è però relativamente recente (fine XV secolo)
Na Bealtaine è più probabile che si riferisca a un toponimo Beulteine così come era chiamato il luogo della festa di Beltane al confine tra la contea di Armagh e quella di Louth, a Kilcurry, oggi ci sono solo un piccolo tumulo con le rovine di una vecchia chiesa. Tutte le versioni raccolte nell’area descrivono un raggio intorno a questa località di circa venti miglia

Bábóg na Bealtaine, altre melodie

La Lugh (Eithne Ní Uallacháin & Gerry O’Connor) in Brighid’s Kiss 1995. Questa versione con il titolo Bábóg na Bealtaine mantiene il testo originale, ma la melodia è composta da Eithne Ní Uallacháin
(strofe I, III,IV, V, VI)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin ha reinterpraetato la canzone, già precedentemte pubblicata sulla melodia trascritta da Edward Bunting,  sulla melodia e testo come trascritti da Séamus Ennis dalla testimonianza di Mick McKeown, Lough Ross registrato su cilindo a cera (I, II, III, IV, V, VII)


I
Samhradh buí na nóiníní gléigeal,
thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn,
Ó bhaile go baile is chun ár mbaile ’na dhiaidh sin,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
(Mick McKeown version
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins na léanaí,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Samhradh buí, earrach is geimhreadh
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.)
II
Cailíní óga, mómhar sciamhach,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Buachaillí glice, teann is lúfar,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.
III
Bábóg na Bealtaine, maighdean an tsamhraidh
suas gach cnoc is síos gach gleann
cailíní maiseacha, bángheala gléasta,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
IV
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm is ag luasadh sna spéartha,
beacha is cuileoga is bláth ar na crainn,
tá’n chuach’s na héanlaith ag seinm le pléisiúr,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
V
Tá nead ag an ghiorria ar imeall na haille,
is nead ag an chorr éisc i ngéaga an chrainn,
tá mil ar na cuiseoga is na coilm ag béiceadh,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn.
VI
Tá an ghrian ag loinnriú`s ag lasadh na dtabhartas,
tá an fharraige mar scathán ag gháirí don ghlinn,
tá na madaí ag peithreadh is an t-eallach ag géimni
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn.
VII
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins a’ léana,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Ó bhaile go baile is go Lios Dúnáin a’ phléisiúir,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.
Traduzione inglese*
CHORUS
Golden Summer of the white daisies,
we bring the Summer with us,
from village to village
and home again,
and we bring the Summer with us.
I Mick McKeown version
Golden summer, lying in the meadows,
we brought the summer with us;
Golden summer, spring and winter,
and we brought the summer with us.
II
Young maidens, gentle and lovely,
we brought the summer with us;
Lads who are clever, sturdy and agile,
and we brought the summer with us.
III
Beltaine dolls,
Summer maidens
Up hill and down glens
Girls adorned in pure white,
and we bring the Summer with us.
IV
The lark making music
and sky dancing
the blossomed trees laden with bees
the cuckoo and the birds
singing with joy
and we bring the Summer with us.
V
The hare nests on the edge of the cliff
the heron nests in the branches
the doves are cooing, honey on stems
and we bring the Summer with us.
VI
The shining sun is lighting the darkness
the silvery sea shines like a mirror
the dogs are barking, the cattle lowing
and we bring the Summer with us.
VII
Golden summer, lying in the meadow,
we brought the summer with us;
From home to home and to Lisdoonan of pleasure,
and we brought the summer with us.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Estate dorata delle bianche margherite
 portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
di villaggio in villaggio
e in ogni casa
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
I Versione Mick McKeown
Estate dorata tra i prati
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
estate dorata, primavera e inverno
e abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
II
Giovani fanciulle, gentili e amabili
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
con giovani svegli, robusti  agili,
per portare l’arrivo dell’estate
III
Le Fanciulle di Beltane,
fanciulle dell’Estate
su per ogni collina e giù per ogni valle
ragazze vestite di candido bianco,
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
IV
L’allodola canta
e sfreccia nel cielo
gli alberi in fiore carichi di api
Il cuculo e gli uccelli
cantano con gioia
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
V
La lepre fa il nido sul limitare della scogliera, l’airone nei cespugli
le colombe tubano, miele sui rami
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
VI
Il sole splendente illumina l’oscurità
il mare argentato brilla come specchio, i cani abbaiano, il bestiame muggisce portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
VII
Estate dorata nel prato
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
do casa in casa alla Lisdoonan  del piacere
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

NOTE
* tratta da qui e qui

APPROFONDIMENTO
Amhrán na Craoibhe (The Garland Song)
LA TRADIZIONE DEL MAGGIO IN IRLANDA

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/beltane-la-festa-celtica-del-maggio.html
http://songsinirish.com/samhradh-samhradh-lyrics/
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/ThugamarFeinAnSamhradhLinn.html

https://thesession.org/tunes/10447

https://www.orielarts.com/songs/thugamar-fein-an-samhradh-linn/

Amhrán Na Craoibhe la ghirlanda di Beltane

Read the post in English

Amhrán Na Craoibhe (in inglese The Garland Song)  è il canto processionale  in gaelico irlandese delle donne che portano il ramo del Maggio (May garland) nelle celebrazioni rituali per la  festa di Beltane, diffuso ancora agli inizi del Novecento nell’Irlanda del Nord (regione di Oriel).

La canzone proviene dalla signora Sarah Humphreys  che viveva nella contea di Armagh ed è stata raccolta agli inizi del Novecento, erroneamente chiamata  ‘Lá Fhéile Blinne‘ (The Feast of St Blinne) perchè era cantanta nella festa della santa locale di Killeavy  Moninne, detta affettuosamente  “Blinne“, un evidente innesto delle tradizioni pre-cristiane nel solco dei rituali cattolici.
Santa Moninna di Killeavy morì nel 517-518, seguace di Santa Brigida di Kildare  i suoi nomi  “Blinne” o “Moblinne” sono più che altro vezzeggiativi per “piccola” o “sorella” (“Mo-ninne”  potrebbe essere una versione di Niniane, la “Signora del lago” del ciclo arturiano) secondo gli studiosi il suo nome era Darerca e la sua (presunta) tomba si trova nel cimitero di Killeavy sulle pendici del Slieve Gullion dove era originariamente situato il suo monastero, diventato luogo di pellegrinaggio per tutto il  Medioevo insieme al suo pozzo sacro, St Bline’s Well.

SANTA DARERCA (MONENNA) DI KILLEAVY

Sembra che il nome di Battesimo di questa vergine, commemorata nei martirologi irlandesi al 6 luglio, sia stato Darerca, e che Moninna sia invece un vezzeggiativo di origine oscura. A noi sono pervenuti i suoi Acta, ma essi presentano notevoli difficoltà dal momento che la santa è stata confusa con l’inglese santa Modwenna, venerata a Burton-on-Trent. Darerca fu la fondatrice e la prima badessa di uno dei più antichi e importanti monasteri femminili di Irlanda, sorto a Killeavy (contea di Armagh), ove sono ancora visibili le rovine di una chiesa a lei dedicata. Morì nel 517. Killeavy rimase un importante centro di vita religiosa, finché fu distrutto dai predoni scandinavi nel 923; Darerca continuò ad essere largamente venerata specialmente nella regione settentrionale dell’Irlanda. (tratto da qui)

UN’ANTICA DEA

The Slieve Gullion Cairns

Slieve Gullion ( Sliabh gCuillinn ) è in realtà un luogo di culto in epoca preistorica sulla sulla cui cima è stata costruita una tomba a camera con l’ingresso orientato  con il sorgere del sole al solstizio d’inverno. (vedi fenomeno).
Secondo la leggenda sulla sua cima vive la Vecchia Strega, la Cailleach Biorar (‘Old woman of the waters’) e il ‘South Cairn’ è la sua casa detto anche ‘Cailleach Beara‘s House’.
Per eslporare il sito con la reatà virtuale!
Sulla cima un piccolo lago e il secondo tumulo sepolcrare più piccolo costruito nell’età del bronzo. Nel lago vive, stando alle testimonianze locali, un kelpie o un mostro marino e si cela il passaggio per le Stalle del Re (the King’s Stables) Navan, Co. Armagh
Tutt’intorno alla montagna un anello di basse colline (il Ring of Gullion)

Cailleach Beara dipinto di Cheryl Rose-Hall

The Hunt of Slieve Cuilinn

La dea, una dea madre dell’Irlanda, Cailleach Biorar (Bhearra) -la Velata è chiamata  Milucradh / Miluchradh, descritta come sorella della dea Aine nel racconto di “Fionn mac Cumhaill e la  Vecchia Strega”, scopriamo così che il soprannone di Fionn (Finn MacColl) “il biondo”, “il bianco” viene da un racconto del ciclo dei Fianna: tutto ha inizio con una scommessa tra due sorelle Aine (la dea dell’amore) e Moninne (la vecchia dea), Aine si vantava che non avrebbe mai giaciuto con un uomo dai capelli grigi, così la sorella prima portò  Fionn sullo Slieve Gullion (sotto forma di grigio cerbiatto fece in modo che Fionn la inseguisse nella foga della caccia separandosi dal resto dei suoi guerrieri) poi si trasformò in una bellissima fanciulla in lacrime seduta accanto al lago per convinvere Fionn a tuffarsi e ripescare il suo anello. Ma le acque del lago erano state incantate dalla dea per portare la vecchiaia a coloro che vi si immergevano (operando all’inverso dei pozzi sacri), così Fionn uscì dal lago vecchio e decrepito e ovviamente con i capelli bianchi. I suoi compagni dopo averlo raggiunto e riconosciuto riescono a farsi dare dalla Cailleach una pozione magica che ridà il vigore a Fionn ma lo lascia con i capelli bianchi! (vedi)

La Cailleach e Bride sono probabilmente la stessa dea ossia le diverse manifestazioni della stessa dea , la vecchia dell’Inverno e la Fanciulla della Primavera nel ciclo di morte-rinascita-vita dell’antica religione.

il sentiero che porta al pozzo sacro

In occasione della festa patronale della Santa Moninna  (il 6 luglio) si svolgeva a Killeavy una processione che partiva dalla sua tomba, si dirigeva fino al pozzo sacro percorrendo un antico sentiero, e poi ritornava al cimitero. Si svolgeva una gara tra squadre di giovani dei vari villaggi nel confezionare l’effigie più bella della Dea, uno sbiadito ricordo dei festeggiamenti di Beltane per eleggere la propria Regina del Maggio. Durante la processione i giovani cantavano Amhrán Na Craoibhe accompagnandosi ad una  danza, la cui coreografia è andata perduta, ogni frase è intonata dal solista a cui risponde il coro benaugurale. La melodia è una variante di Cuacha Lán de Bhuí sulla struttura di un’antica carola (vedi)

Uno dei panorami più spettacolrari d’Irlanda
In una giornata limpida, è possibile vedere dalla vetta (573 metri) fino a Lough Neagh, a ovest di Belfast, e le montagne di Wicklow, a sud di Dublino

Páidraigín Ní Uallacháin in “An Dealg  Óir” 2010

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin & Sylvia Crawford live 2016 in questa seconda versione è aggiunto un coro

Gaelico irlandese
AMHRÁN NA CRAOIBHE ‘S í mo chraobhsa craobh na mban uasal
(Haigh dó a bheir i’ bhaile í ‘s a haigh di)
Craobh na gcailín is craobh na mbuachaill;
(Haigh dó a bheir i’ bhaile í ‘s a haigh di).
Craobh na ngirseach a rinneadh le huabhar,
Maise hóigh, a chaillíní, cá bhfaigh’ muinn di nuachar?
Gheobh’ muinn buachaill sa mbaile don bhanóig;
Buachaill urrúnta , lúdasach, láidir
A bhéarfas a ‘ghéag seo di na trí náisiún,
Ó bhaile go baile è ar ais go dtí an áit seo
Dhá chéad eachaí è sriantaí óir ‘na n-éadan,
Is dhá chéad eallaigh ar thaobh gach sléibhe,
È un oiread sin eile de mholtaí de thréadtaí,
Óró, a chailíní, airgead is spré di,
Tógfa ‘muinn linn í suas’ un a ‘bhóthair,
An áit a gcasfaidh dúinn dhá chéad ógfhear,
Casfa ‘siad orainn’ sa gcuid hataí ‘na ndorn leo,
An áit a mbeidh aiteas, ól is spóirse,
È cosúil mbur gcraobh-na le muc ina mála,
Nó le seanlong bhriste thiocfadh ‘steach i mBaile Chairlinn,
Féada ‘muinn tilleadh anois è un’ chraobh linn,
Féada ‘muinn tilleadh, tá an lá bainte go haoibhinn,
Bhain muinn anuraidh é è bhain muinn i mbliana é,
è mar chluinimse bhain muinn ariamh é.
traduzione inglese di P.Ní Uallacháin*
My branch is the branch
of the fairy women,
Hey to him who takes her home,
hey to her;

The branch of the lasses
and the branch of the lads;
Hey to him who takes her home,
hey to her;

The branch of the maidens
made with pride;
Hey, young girls,
where will we get her a spouse?
We will get a lad
in the town for the bride (1),
A dauntless, swift, strong lad,
Who will bring this branch (2)
through the three nations,
From town to town
and back home to this place?
Two hundred horses
with gold bridles on their foreheads,
And two hundred cattle
on the side of each mountain,
And an equal amount
of sheep and of herds (3),
O, young girls, silver
and dowry for her,
We will carry her with us,
up to the roadway,
Where we will meet
two hundred young men,
They will meet us with their
caps in their fists,
Where we will have pleasure,
drink and sport (4),
Your branch is like
a pig in her sack (5),
Or like an old broken ship
would come into Carlingford (6),
We can return now
and the branch with us,
We can return since
we have joyfully won the day,
We won it last year
and we won it this year,
And as far as I hear
we have always won it.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Il mio ramo è il ramo
delle nobildonne.
Salute a colui che la sposa,
salute a lei;

il ramo delle ragazze
e  il ramo dei ragazzi;
Salute a colui che la sposa,
salute a lei;

il ramo delle fanciulle
fatto con orgoglio.
Salute, giovanette,
dove le prenderemo uno sposo? Prenderemo un ragazzo
di città per la sposa,
un ragazzo intrepido,  svelto e forte.
Chi porterà la ghirlanda
per le tre nazioni
di paese in pese
e ritornerà in questo luogo?
200 cavalli
con briglie dorate sulla fronte
e 200 bovini
sul lato di ogni montagna
e una pari quantità
di pecore e agnelli.
O giovani fanciulle, argento
e dote per lei.
La porteremo con noi
fino alla carreggiata
dove incontreremo
200 giovanotti
Li incontreremo con i loro
berretti in testa
dove ci divertiremo
con bevute e danze.
La vostra ghirlanda è come
un maiale nel sacco
o come una vecchia nave sfasciata
che arriva a Carlingford
Possiamo tornare ora
con la nostra ghirlanda
possiamo tornare
perchè abbiamo vinto
abbiamo vinto lo scorso anno
e abbiamo vinto quest’anno,
da quanto ho sentito
abbiamo sempre vinto noi

Note
1) è la May doll, ma anche la Regina del Maggio personificazione del principio femminile della fertilità
2) è la ghirlanda del maggio confezionata dalle donne
3) sono i capi di bestiame in dote ossia gli animali del villaggio che saranno pufificati dai fuochi di Beltane
4) dopo la processione la festa si concludeva con un ballo
5) sono le frasi denigratorie nei confronti delle altre ghirlande portate dalle squadre rivali: “a pig in a poke” è un incauto acquisto, invece di un maialino nel sacco potrebbe esserci un gatto!
6) Lough Carlingford  deriva dal vecchio norvegese e si traduce in irlandese come “Lough Cailleach”

7005638-albero-di-biancospino-sulla-strada-rurale-contro-il-cielo-bluIl biancospino è l’albero della festa di Beltane caro a Belisama, la splendente, cresce come arbusto o come albero di dimensioni ridotte (arriva solo ai 7 mt di altezza) allargando la chioma in tutte le direzioni possibili, per i molti rametti che si formano intrecciandosi sulle strutture più vecchie, alla ricerca della luce verso l’alto.
Il ramo di biancospino e i suoi fiori si utilizzavano nei rituali nunziali celtici e dell’antica Grecia e anche per gli antichi Romani era il fiore del matrimonio, augurio di felicità e prosperità.
Le virtù curative del biancospino erano conosciute fin dal Medioevo: è chiamato la “valeriana del cuore” perché agisce sul flusso sanguineo migliorandone la circolazione ed è inoltre utilizzato per contrastare l’insonnia e gli stati di angoscia. continua

BIANCOSPINO O PRUGNOLO?

fiori sono piccoli, bianchi e con delle delicate sfumature rosacee, dolcemente profumati. In zone dalle fioriture tardive per la festa di Beltane o per le questue rituali dei maggianti (i “mayers”),  si utilizza però il ramo di prugnolo (stessa famiglia delle Rosaceae  ma con fioritura già a marzo-aprile)

 

Il Maggio in Irlanda: il canto di Beltane

FONTI
https://www.catholicireland.net/saintoftheday/st-moninne-of-killeavy-d-c-518-virgin-and-foundress/
http://www.killeavy.com/stmon.htm
http://www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Moninna’s%20Holy%20Well.html
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=28400
http://irishantiquities.bravehost.com/armagh/killevy/killevy.html
http://www.nicsramblers.co.uk/p240213.html
http://irelandsholywells.blogspot.it/2012/06/saint-monninas-well-killeavy-county.html
http://www.megalithicireland.com/Killeavy%20Churches.html
http://omniumsanctorumhiberniae.blogspot.it/2015/07/saint-moninne-july-6.html
https://atlanticreligion.com/tag/moninne/
http://www.newgrange.com/slieve-gullion.htm
https://voicesfromthedawn.com/slieve-gullion/

https://www.independent.ie/life/travel/ireland/walk-of-the-week-slieve-gullion-co-armagh-26543944.html
http://geographical.co.uk/uk/aonb/item/559-the-ring-of-gullion

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59221
https://www.orielarts.com/songs/amhran-na-craoibhe/
http://journalofmusic.com/focus/breathing-embers