To Hear the Nightingale Sing One Morning in May

Leggi in Italiano

”The Bold Grenader”, “A bold brave bonair” or “The Soldier and the Lady” but also “To Hear the Nightingale Sing”, “The Nightingale Sings” and “One Morning in May” are different titles of a same traditional song collected in England, Ireland, America and Canada.

THE PLOT

The story belongs to some stereotypical love adventures in which a soldier (or a nobleman, sometimes a sailor) for his attractiveness and gallantry, manages to obtain the virtue of a young girl. The girls are always naive peasant women or shepherdesses who believe in the sweet words of love sighed by man, and they expect to marry him after sex, but they are inevitably abandoned.

NURSERY RHYME: WHERE ARE YOU GOING MY PRETTY MAID

soldierIn the nursery rhyme above “Where are you going my pretty maid” this seductive situation is sweetly reproduced and the illustrator portrays the man in the role of the soldier. Walter Craine (in “A Baby’s Opera”, 1877) represents him as a dapper gentleman, but in reality he is the archetype of the predator , the wolf with the fur inside and the woman of the nursery rhyme with his blow-answer seems to be a good girl who has treasured the maternal teachings

In other versions is the girl (bad girl !!) to take the initiative and to bring the young soldier in her house (see more), only the season is always the same because it is in the spring that blood boils in the veins; as early as 1600 there was a ballad called “The Nightingale’s Song: The Soldier’s Rare Musick, and Maid’s Recreation”, so for a song that has been around for so long, we can expect a great deal of textual versions and different melodies. An accurate overview of texts and melodic variations starting from 1689 here

FOLK REVIVAL: “They kissed so sweet & comforting”

This is the version almost at the same time diffused by the Dubliners and the Clancy Brothers, the most popular version in the 60’s Folk clubs.

The Dubliners

Clancy Brothers & Tommy Maker, from Live in Ireland, 1965
The Nightingale


I
As I went a walking one morning in May
I met a young couple so far did we stray
And one was a young maid so sweet and so fair
And the other was a soldier and a brave Grenadier(1)
CHORUS
And they kissed so sweet and comforting
As they clung to each other
They went arm in arm along the road
Like sister and brother
They went arm in arm along the road
Til they came to a stream
And they both sat down together, love
To hear the nightingale sing(2)
II
Out of his knapsack he took a fine fiddle(3)
He played her such merry tunes that you ever did hear
He played her such merry tunes that the valley did ring
And softly cried the fair maid as the nightingale sings
III
Oh, I’m off to India for seven long years
Drinking wines and strong whiskies instead of strong beer
And if ever I return again ‘twill be in the spring
And we’ll both sit down together love to hear the nightingale sing
IV
“Well then”, says the fair maid, “will you marry me?”
“Oh no”, says the soldier, “however can that be?”
For I’ve my own wife at home in my own country
And she is the finest little maid that you ever did see

NOTES
1) soldier becomes sometimes a volunteer, but the grenadier is a soldier particularly gifted for his prestige and courage, the strongest and tallest man of the average, distinguished by a showy uniform, with the characteristic miter headgear, which in America was replaced by a bear fur hat.
2) it is the code phrase that distinguishes this style of courting songs. The nightingale is the bird that sings only at night and in the popular tradition it is the symbol of lovers and their love conventions (vedi)
3) perhaps the instrument was initially a flute but more often it was a small violin or portable violin called the kit violiner (pocket fiddle): it was the popular instrument par excellence in the Renaissance. It is curious to note how in this type of gallant encounters the soldier has been replaced by the itinerant violinist, mostly a dance teacher, so it is explained how any reference to the violin, to its bow or strings could have some sexual connotations in the folk tradition

SECOND MELODY: APPALCHIAN TUNE

John Jacob Niles – One Morning In May

Jo Stafford The Nightingale

THIRD MELODY: THE MOST ANCIENT VERSION, THE GRENADIER AND THE LADY

The melody spread in Dorsetshire, so vibrant and passionate but with a hint of melancholy, a version more suited to the Romeo and Juliet’s love night and to the nightingale chant in its version of medieval aubade, also closer to the nursery rhyme “Where are you going my pretty maid” of which takes up the call and response structure.

To savor its ancient charm, here is a series of instrumental arrangements

Harp

Guitar

Le Trésor d’Orphée
Redwood Falls (Madeleine Cooke, Phil Jones & Edd Mann)

Isla Cameron The Bold Grenadier from “Far from The Madding Crowd”


I
As I was a walking one morning in May
I spied a young couple a makin’ of hay.
O one was a fair maid and her beauty showed clear
and the other was a soldier, a bold grenadier.
II
Good morning, good morning, good morning said he
O where are you going my pretty lady?
I’m a going a walking by the clear crystal stream
to see cool water glide and hear nightingales sing.
III
O soldier, o soldier, will you marry me?
O no, my sweet lady that never can be.
For I’ve got a wife at home in my own country,
Two wives and the army’s too many for me.

LINK
http://jopiepopie.blogspot.it/2018/02/nightingales-song-1690s-bold-grenadier.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folksongs-appalachian-2/folk-songs-appalacian-2%20-%200138.htm
http://folktunefinder.com/tunes/105092
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LP14.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/onemorninginmay.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3646
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29541
http://www.military-history.org/soldier-profiles/british-grenadiers-soldier-profile.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/sing.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/america/nighting.html
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=hes&p=1506

Jimmy Randal

A folk ballad that inaugurates a narrative genre collected in multiple variations called “The will of the poisoned man“: the story of a dying son, because he has been poisoned, who returns to his mother to die in his bed and make a will; in all likelihood the ballad starts from Italy, passes through Germany to get to Sweden and then spread to the British Isles (Lord Randal) until it lands in America.
[Una ballata popolare che inaugura un genere narrativo ripreso in molteplici varianti detto “il testamento dell’avvelenato”: la  storia di un figlio morenteperchè è stato avvelenato, che ritorna dalla madre per morire nel suo letto e lasciare il testamento; con tutta  probabilità la ballata parte dall’Italia, passa per la Germania per arrivare  in Svezia e poi diffondersi nelle isole britanniche (Lord Randal) fino a sbarcare in  America.]

Archive
Italy: “il testamento dell’avvelenato”
Scotland: LORD RANDAL (Child # 12)
Lord Ronald, my Son (Robert Burns)
Henry my Son (irish version)
Irish gaelic: Amhrán na hEascainne
The Wild, wild Berry (english version from Shropshire)
“The devil and the huntsman”
America: Jimmy Randal (John Jacob Niles)

Jimmy Randal

In America the noble title of our poisoned is omitted in favor of the proper name so the protagonist becomes “Jimmy Randal”, “Jimmy Randolph”, “Jimmy Ransome”, or “Tiranti, my love”.
[In America il titolo nobiliare del nostro avvelenato viene omesso in favore del nome proprio così il protagonista diventa “Jimmy Randal”, “Jimmy Randolph”, “Jimmy Ransome”, oppure “Tiranti, my love”.
La vittima ha comunque molti nomi differenti: ‘Laird (= Lord) Rowland’ (Scozia), ‘Reynolds’, ‘Tyranty’ (New England), ‘Diranty’, ‘Duranty’, per arrivare ad un ‘Durango’ dell’Oklahoma, che ci ricorda certo più il Messico che le montagne scozzesi. In Virginia diventa ‘Johnny Randolph’ (con un cognome abbastanza simile all’originale; ma la sequenza ‘r-n’ o ‘-ran-‘ è presente in tutte le varianti del nome), mentre nella Carolina del Sud, persosi il nome, è rimasta comunque una sorta di coscienza dell’origine ed il protagonista diventa ‘McDonald’. Come è ovvio, in America il titolo nobiliare è di solito omesso.”
‘Lord Randal’, essendo tra le ballate più note, seguì nel Nuovo Mondo i primi colonizzatori scozzesi che vi si stabilirono (verrebbe voglia di dire: dagli Appennini agli Appalachi…): qui, alla perfida avvelenatrice spettano di solito il ‘fuoco infernale’ e lo ‘zolfo… per bruciar le sue ossa fino a carbonizzarle’ (Cox, p. 26), ma si ha anche il caso di un Lord Randal della Carolina del Sud (Smith, p. 102) che sbotta appassionatamente (in modo tipicamente yankee, diremmo): Le lascio un barile di polvere Per farla saltare in aria!” (Roberto Venturi)]

JOHN JACOB NILES

In 1932 John Jacob Niles picked up the version from the testimony of Solomon and Beth Holcolm of Whitesburg 
[John Jacob Nilesraccolse la versione dalla testimonianza di Solomon e Beth Holcolm di Whitesburg nel 1932]


I
“Where have you been,
Jimmy Randall, my son,
Where have you roved,
my oldest dear one?”
“O mither o mither,
go make my bed soon,
cause my courting has sicked me
and
I fain would lay doon.”
II
“What had you for supper
What had you for supper
“Some fried eels and parsnips, (1)
go make my bed soon..
III
“What will you give me,
What will you your mother,
“My houses and my lands,
make my bed soon,
IV
“What will you your father,
What will you your father,
My wagon and team, mither
make my bed soon,
V
What will you your brother,
What will you your brother,
My horn and my hound
make my bed soon,
VI
And what will you your sweetheart
what will you your sweetheart
“Bullrushes, bullrushes (2)
and them all parched brown
for she give me the pizen
that I did drink down “
VII
“And when you are dead
And when you are dead
Go dig me a grave
‘side my grandfather’s son (3)
cause my courting has sicked me
and I fain would lay doon
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Dove sei stato
Jimmy Randall figlio mio
“Dove sei andato in giro
il mio più adorato?”
“O madre, madre
vai a prepararmi il letto
perchè il mio amore mi ha avvelenato
e temo di dovermi coricare”
II
“Cosa hai preso per cena
Cosa hai preso per cena?
Delle anguille fritte e pastinaca (1)
vai a prepararmi il letto…”
III
“Cosa disponi per me
cosa lascerai a tua madre?
“Le mie case e terre
prepararmi il letto..”
IV
Cosa lascerai a tuo padre
cosa lascerai a tuo padre?
“Il mio carro e i cavalli, madre
prepararmi il letto..”
V
Cosa lascerai a tuo fratello
cosa lascerai a tuo fratello?
“Il mio corno e il levriero
prepararmi il letto…”
VI
“Cosa lascerai alla tua fidanzata
Cosa lascerai alla tua fidanzata?
“Un fico secco, un fico secco (2)
tutto avvizzito
perchè lei mi ha dato il veleno
che ho bevuto
VII
” E quando sarai morto
quando sarai morto?
“Va a scavare una tomba
accanto al figlio di mio nonno
perchè il mio amore mi ha avvelenato
e temo di dovermi coricare”

NOTE
John Jacob Niles (1892-1980) was an American composer, singer and collector of traditional ballads. [era un compositore, cantante e collezionista americano di ballate tradizionali.]
1) the parsnip is a tuber that looks like a large carrot (it is in fact considered a wild carrot) but it is nutty in color, has a very fresh sweet taste, between carrot, celeriac and parsley root. [la pastinaca è un tubero che assomiglia a una grossa carota (è infatti considerata una carota selvatica) ma è di colore nocciola, ha un sapore dolce molto fresco, una via di mezzo tra carota, sedano rapa e radice di prezzemolo. ]
2) bulrushes sono i giunchi e in particolare la varietà detta stiancia, ho preferito tradurre con un’espressione più italiana
3) il padre oppure lo zio 

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/lord-randal/
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/english-and-other-versions–12-lord-randal.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/us–canadian-versions-child-12-lord-randal.aspx
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-JimmyRandall.html
https://dearballadeer.com/portfolio/niles-no-9-tiranti-my-love/
http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/lord-randall/

In the Month When Sings the Cuckoo [Il Mese del Cuculo]

In the British Isles it is the cuckoo among all birds to be the herald of Spring, and more generally it is a sacred bird with oracular qualities. The cuckoo arrives from Africa between the end of March and the beginning of April and immediately the courtship begins, raising its characteristic song. In Northern Europe it comes a little later, roughly in mid-April. Once the season of love is over (end of May), the cuckoo (male) does not sing anymore. 
Nelle Isole Britanniche è il cuculo tra tutti gli uccelli ad essere l’araldo della Primavera, e più in generale è un uccello sacro (oggi si dice magico) dalle doti oracolari.
Il cuculo arriva dall’Africa tra la fine di marzo e i primi d’Aprile e inizia subito il corteggiamento innalzando il suo caratteristico canto . Nell’Europa Settentrionale arriva un po’ più tardi, all’incirca a metà aprile. Una volta terminata la stagione dell’amore (fine maggio), il cuculo (maschio) non canta più.

The female emits a very long and warbling note similar to a “puhuhhuhuhu“.
La femmina emette una nota molto lunga e gorgheggiante simile a un «puhuhhuhuhu». 

In the Greek myth the cuckoo is an animal consecrated to Zeus who, to seduce Hera (the sister-bride) unleashed a storm and turned into a cuckoo; all wet and cold he rested on the knees of the goddess, who moved with compassion and welcomed him under her breast to warm it. In the Roman cult the cuckoo is instead consecrated to Juno , the goddess of fertility: it was the song of the cuckoo to bring rain and renew the fertility of the fields. Hence the positive symbol associated with love, fruitfulness and abundance.
Nel mito greco il cuculo è un animale consacrato a Zeus, il quale per sedurre Hera (la sorella-sposa) scatenò una tempesta e mutato in cuculo, si posò tutto bagnato e infreddolito sulle ginocchia della dea, la quale si mosse a compassione e lo accolse sotto il suo seno per riscaldarlo. 
Nel culto romano il cuculo è invece consacrato a Giunone in quanto dea della fecondità: era il canto del cuculo a portare la pioggia e a rinnovare la fertilità dei campi.
Da qui il simbolo positivo associato a amore, fecondità e abbondanza.


Jupiter and Juno on Mount Ida by James Barry, 1773
L’arrivo del cuculo dalla migrazione invernale era una data importante, sulla quale, nelle campagne, ci si basava per programmare molte operazioni agricole. A Bologna si diceva che “Quando canta il cuculo, c’è da fare per tutti”, cioè iniziano i lavori agricoli. L’arrivo di questo uccello era previsto per i primi giorni d’aprile, e quando tardava ci si preoccupava: “Il due o il tre d’aprile, il cuculo ha da venire. L’otto, se non è venuto, o che è morto, o che è cotto”. Nel Bolognese, a chi è ardito con le parole, ma non lo è poi nei fatti, si dice “Come il cuculo, tutta voce e penne”. Questo volatile è infatti un gran chiacchierone: il maschio, una volta stabilitosi in un certo territorio, trascorre, ad esempio, ore e ore a ripetere incessantemente il suo cu-cù (da cui anche il nome). (tratto da qui)

THE PROPHETIC CUCKOO
[ IL CUCULO INDOVINO ]

The symbol of the cuckoo is however ambivalent.
Cattabiani writes “As Aristotle already reported, this animal lays its egg in the nest of other birds (mostly passerine) eliminating from the brood one of those of the host; at the hatching, the small cuckoo is raised by the unaware parent. This fact has had two significant attributions in the world of symbolism: on the one hand, it has increased its typical spring meanings, on the other it has made it appear in some areas as an “emblem of the abandonment of maternal duties and of parasitism, but also of the teasing, so much so that once the verb “cuculiare” was used to “tease” “
Il simbolo del cuculo è tuttavia ambivalente.
Scrive il Cattabiani “Come riportava già Aristotele, questo animale depone il suo uovo nel nido di altri uccelli (per lo più passeracei) eliminando dalla covata uno di quelli dell’ospite; allo schiudersi, il piccolo cuculo viene allevato e cresciuto dall’ignaro genitore adottivo. Questo fatto ha avuto due significative attribuzioni nel mondo del simbolismo: da una parte, ha accresciuto i significati primaverili che già erano propri di tale animale, dall’altra lo ha fatto apparire in alcuni ambiti quale “emblema dell’abbandono dei doveri materni e del parassitismo, ma anche del canzonatore, tanto che una volta si usava il verbo “cuculiare” per “prendere in giro“”

Its symbolism is often negative: starting from the observation that the female lays the eggs in others’ nests, the cuckoo has become synonymous with cuckold.
Il suo simbolismo è spesso negativo: partendo dall’osservazione che la femmina depone il suo uovo nei nidi altrui, il cuculo è diventato sinonimo di cornuto (in francese cornuto si  dice cocu mentre in inglese cuckold).

The alleged longevity (or immortality) of the cuckoo (in the italian proverbs it is said “Old as the cuckoo “) has turned it into a sibyl. It is a bird that foretells the future in particular, the young maidens ask it when they will marry and count the response, a year for each chant.
After marriage the bride could ask it how many children she’ll get. But you may ask the cuckoo how many years you will live or how many years to spend in purgatory to redeem your sins.
When you first hear in the new season the cuckoo song, you should have money in your pocket: the coming year will be free of economic problems. Not having money is the announcement of the coming misery. But seeing a cuckoo closely is generally synonymous with luck.
La presunta longevità (o immortalità) del cuculo (nei proverbi si dice “”Vecchio come il cucco”) lo ha trasformato in veggente. E’ un uccello che predice il futuro in particolare lo interrogano le ragazze da marito per chiedere entro quanti anni si sposeranno: c’è pure una filastrocca che recita
O cucco, cucco dal becco fiorito
dimmi quanti anni sto a prender marito
dopo di chè si conteranno i versi in risposta, un anno per ogni cucù.
Una volta sposata la donna potrà ancora interrogare il cuculo per sapere quanti figli avrà. Ma al cuculo si possono chiedere anche quanti anni restano ancora da vivere.. o quanti anni si dovranno passare in purgatorio per redimere i propri peccati prima di poter andare in paradiso.
La tradizione vuole che quando si sente per la prima volta nella nuova stagione il canto del cuculo, bisogna subito controllare se in tasca avanza qualche monetina: l’anno in arrivo sarà privo di problemi economici. Non averne è l’annuncio della miseria in arrivo. Vedere un cuculo da vicino è in genere sinonimo di fortuna.

The Cuckoo is a pretty bird

The cuckoo is the protagonist of many songs dedicated to the arrival of summer. This one called “The Cuckoo” is relatively rare in Scotland, but popular in England, Ireland and America (Appalachian Mountains).
Il cuculo è  il protagonista di molti canti dedicati all’arrivo della bella stagione. Questo dal titolo “The Cuckoo” è relativamente poco diffuso in Scozia, ma popolare in Inghilterra, Irlanda e America (Monti Appalachi).

English version

We can classify this song among the warning songs in which the singer warns the maidens against love pain: the cuckoo is invoked as an example of a sincere heart, which loves without deceit, unlike the joyful young men who prefer fly from flower to flower.
Possiamo classificare questo canto tra le warning songs in cui chi canta mette in guardia le fanciulle a non incappare nelle pene d’amore: il cuculo viene invocato come esempio di un cuore sincero, che ama senza inganni, al contrario dei giovanotti gaudenti i quali preferiscono volare di fiore in fiore.

Pentangle in Basket of Light, 1969


I
The Cuckoo she (1) is a pretty bird,
she sings as she flies (2).
She bringeth good tidings (3),
she telleth no lies (4)
She sucketh white flowers (5)
for to keep her voice clear
And she never sings “cuckoo”
till summer draweth near (6)
II
As I once was a-walking
and talking one day
I met my own true love
as he came that way
Though the meeting him was pleasure, though the courting was woe
For I’ve found him false hearted,
he’d kiss me, and then he’d go.
III
I wish I was a scholar
and could handle the pen.
I’d write to my lover
and to all roving men (7)
I would tell them of the grief and woe
that attend on their lies
I would wish them have pity
on the flower, when it dies
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Il cuculo è un bel uccellino
canta in volo
e porta buone novelle,
non dice bugie.
Sugge i fiori bianchi
per mantenere chiara la voce
e non canta mai “cu-cù”
fino a quando l’estate è vicina .
II
Un giorno che andavo a passeggio
e conversavo
incontrai il mio innamorato
che veniva per quella strada:
sebbene incontrarlo fosse un piacere
la sua galanteria era un tormento,
perchè mi è sembrato un cuore mendace, 
mi baciava e poi se ne sarebbe andato!
III
Se fossi uno studioso
abile nel maneggiare la penna
scriverei al mio amore
e a tutti i donnaioli 
direi quale pena e dolore
causano le loro bugie;
vorrei che avessero pietà
di un fiore morente.

NOTE
* dalla traduzione in Musica e Memoria
1) I’s the male to sing its courting song! [il cuculo della canzone è una femmina (she) ma in realtà  il tipico canto di corteggiamento è emesso solo dal maschio]
2) the cuckoo is a big talker [il cuculo è un gran chiacchierone]
3) the arrival of the warm season but also according to the proverbs a bit of luck  [l’arrivo della bella stagione ma anche secondo i proverbi un po’ di fortuna]
4) the popular tradition has a lot of proverbs that often contradict itself: here the cuckoo is seen in its oracular role  [la tradizione popolare ha un sacco di proverbi che spesso si contraddicono: qui il cuculo è visto nella sua veste oracolare]
5) in the nursery song it is written “little bird’s eggs” in reality the cuckoo eats insects and worms, the reference to the destruction of the eggs it is due to the opportunist attitude of the cuckoo that deposits the egg in the nests of others by subtracting the “legitimate” ones [nella nursery song è scritto “little bird’s eggs” in realtà il cuculo mangia insetti e vermi, il riferimento alle distruzione delle uova è dovuto all’atteggiamento opportunista del cuculo che deposita l’uovo nei nidi altrui sottraendo quelli “legittimi”]
6) the song of the cuckoo is a harbinger of Spring, also because once the season of love is over (end of May), the cuckoo (male) does not sing anymore. [Il canto del cuculo è foriero di Primavera, anche perchè una volta terminata la stagione dell’amore (fine maggio), il cuculo (maschio) non canta più]
7) roving men in this context are not simply vagabonds, but pleasure-seekers who prefer to have fun with women [roving men in questo contesto sono non semplicemente dei vagabondi, ma dei gaudenti che preferiscono spassarserla con le donne senza legarsi ad un amore.]

John Jacob Niles-The Cuckoo

I
The Cuckoo she is a pretty bird,
she sings as she flies.
She brings us glad tidings,
and she tells no lies
She sucks all the pretty flowers
that make her voice clear
And she never says “cuckoo”
till the Spring of the year
II
A walkin’ and talkin’
and a wanderin’ goes I
Waitin’ for Sweet Willie,
he will come bye and bye
I’ll meet him in the morning,
cause he’s all my delight
I could walk and talk with him
from mornin’ till night.
III
Our meeting is pleasure,
and our parting is grief
A false-hearted lover is worse
as a thief
A thief will but rob you
and take all you got
While a false-hearted lover
will lead you to the grave.
IV
The grave will consume you
and turn you to dust
They ain’t one in a hundred
that a poor gal can trust
They’ll hug thee and they’ll kiss thee
and call thee their own
Perhaps their other darlin’
is awaitin’ at home.
V
Now come all ye fair damsels,
take warning of me
Ne’er place your affections
on a [green golden] tree
The leaves they will wither,
the roots they will die
If I am forsaken,
I know right well why
VI
If I am forsaken,
I will not be forsworn
And he’s fully mistaken
if he thinks I will mourn
For I’ll get myself up
in some right high degree
And I’ll walk as like by him
as he will by me.

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il cuculo è un bel uccellino
canta in volo
e porta buone novelle 
non dice bugie.
Sugge i fiorellini
per mantenere chiara la voce
e non canta mai “cu-cù”
fino a Primavera
II
Passeggiavo e conversavo
andando in giro
in attesa che il caro Willy
venisse a salutarmi,
lo vedrò al mattino
perchè è tutta la mia gioia
potrei passeggiare e conversare con lui
da mane a sera
III
Il nostro incontro è piacere
la nostra separazione è dolore,
un cuore mendace è peggio
di un ladro,
un ladro ti deruberà
e ti prenderà tutto,
ma un amore bugiardo
ti porterà alla tomba
IV
La tomba ti consumerà
e trasformerà in polvere,
non c’è nè uno su cento
di cui una povera fanciulla possa fidarsi
ti abbracceranno e ti baceranno
e ti diranno “mia cara”
mentre l’altra 
sta aspettando a casa
V
Allora venite belle damigelle
accettate questo consiglio
non affezionatevi mai
a un albero [in autunno]
le foglie appassiranno
le radici moriranno
se sono stata abbandonata
so bene il perchè
VI
Se sono stata abbandonata
dico sul serio
e lui si sbaglia completamente
se crede che piangerò
perchè mi alzerò da sola
e mi metterò in tiro
e camminerò proprio come lui
farà con me

THE CUCKOO BIRD (Coo Coo Bird)

On the side of the Appalachian Mountains we find instead the version reworked by Clarence Ashley which has become a standard, albeit with the addition of several stanzas.
Sul versante dei Monti Appalachi troviamo invece la versione rielaborata da Clarence Ashley diventata uno standard, seppure con l’aggiunta di numerose strofe

Clarence “Tom” Ashley (I, II, III)

Doc Watson (I, II, IV, V)


I
Gonna build me a log cabin
On a mountain so high
So I can see Willie
As he goes walking by
(Chorus)
Oh, the cuckoo, is a pretty bird
And she warbles when she flies
She never say cuckoo
Till the fourth (last) day of July
II
I’ve played cards in Old England
I’ve gambled over in Spain
I’ll bet you ten dollars
that I’ll beat you next game
III
Jack of Diamonds
Jack of Diamonds
I know you of old
You robbed my poor pockets
Of my silver and gold
IV
My horses they ain’t hungry
And they won’t eat your hay.
I’ll drive home just a little further
Wondering why you treat me this way.
variation chorus
Oh, the cuckoo she’s a pretty bird.
Lord, she warbles as she flies.
She’ll cause you never more trouble
And she’ll tell you no lies.
V
There’s one thing that’s been a puzzle
Since the day that time began:
A man’s love for, for his woman
And her sweet love for her man.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Andò a costruire un capanno
su un’alta montagna
così potrò vedere Willy
mentre ci passa vicino
CORO
Il cuculo è un grazioso uccellino
cinguetta in volo
e non canta mai cu-cù
fino al 4 luglio
II
Ho giocato a carte in Inghilterra
ho giocato d’azzardo in Spagna
scommetterò 10 dollari
e ti batterò alla prossima partita
III
Fante di Quadri
Fante di Quadri
ti conosco da molto tempo
mi hai svuotato le tasche
dell’argento e dell’oro
IV
I miei cavalli non hanno fame
e non mangeranno il tuo fieno.
Andrò a casa un po’ più tardi
domandandomi perchè mi tratti così
coro
Il cuculo è un grazioso uccellino
cinguetta in volo
non ti causerà più problemi
e non ti dirà più bugie.
V
C’è una cosa che è stato un dilemma
sin dagli inizi del tempo:
l’amore di un uomo per, per la sua donna
e il suo dolce amore per il suo uomo.

 

SOURCES (FONTI)
“Volario”, Alfredo Cattabiani, 2000
mia madre, montagna vicentina, classe 41
http://www.ilfriuli.it/mobile/articolo/Archivio/Il_cuculo,_animale_premonitore/29/81225
http://www.altosannio.it/usi-costumi-cuculo/

LINKS
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thecuckoo.html
http://antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=13513&lang=it
http://www.musicaememoria.com/pentangle_basket_of_light.htm

http://www.bluegrasslyrics.com/song/the-cuckoo-bird/

The Carol of the Birds

Following the traces of a Christmas carol on birds dating back to the Middle Ages there are various adaptations in the popular tradition of the British Isles.
[Seguendo le tracce di un canto natalizio sugli uccelli risalente al Medioevo si trovano diversi adattamenti nella tradizione popolare delle Isole Britanniche.]

CAROL OF THE BIRDS

The version that recalls the Catalan Christmas song “El cant dels ocells“, titled “The Carols of the Birds“, begins with the verse “When rose the eastern star
[La versione che riprende il canto natalizio catalano “El cant dels ocells” intitolandosi “The Carols of the Birds”, inizia con il verso “When rose the eastern star”]

Joan Baez in Noel, 1966

Emily Mitchell 1989


I
When rose the Eastern Star
The birds came from afar
In that full night of glory
With one melodious voice
They sweetly did rejoice
And sang the wondrous story
Sang, praising God on high
Enthroned above the sky
And his fair mother, Mary.
II
The eagle left his lair
Came winging through the air
His message loud arising
And to his joyous cry
The sparrow made reply
His answer sweetly voicing
“O’ercome are death and strife,
This night is born New Life”
The Robin (1) sang, rejoicing
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Quando la Stella d’Oriente si levò
gli uccelli vennero da lontano
in quella notte piena di gloria
con una voce melodiosa,
essi soavemente  si rallegrarono
e cantarono la storia meravigliosa,
cantarono e lodarono Dio celeste
in trono nell’alto dei Cieli
e la sua nella madre, Maria
II
L’aquila lasciò la sua tana
venne volando dall’alto
il suo messaggio forte risuonò
e al suo grido di gioia
il passero rispose
intonando il suo canto soavemente
“Vinti sono Morte e Dolore
questa notte è nata una Nuova Vita”
il pettirosso cantò rallegrandosi

NOTE
1) the robin is a bird full of symbolism, opposed to the wren (or small sparrow). In his book The White Goddess, Robert Graves explains that in the Celtic tradition, the struggle between the two parts of the year is represented by the struggle between the king-holly (or mistletoe), which represents the nascent year and the king-oak , which represents the dying year. At the winter solstice the king-holly wins over the oak-king, and vice-versa at the summer solstice. In oral tradition, a variant of this fight is represented by the robin and the wren, which are hidden between the leaves of the two respective trees. The wren represents the waning year, the robin the new year, and the death of the wren is a passage of death-rebirth – see more]
[il pettirosso è un uccello ricco di simbolismi, contrapposto allo scricciolo (o piccolo passero). Nel suo libro La dea bianca, Robert Graves spiega che nella tradizione celtica, la lotta tra le due parti dell’anno, è rappresentata dalla lotta tra il re-agrifoglio (o vischio), che rappresenta l’anno nascente e il re-quercia, che rappresenta l’anno morente. Al solstizio d’inverno il re-agrifoglio vince sul re-quercia, e viceversa per il solstizio d’estate. Nella tradizione orale, una variante di questa lotta è rappresentata dal pettirosso e lo scricciolo, nascosti tra le foglie dei due rispettivi alberi. Lo scricciolo rappresenta l’anno calante, il pettirosso l’anno nuovo e la morte dello scricciolo è un passaggio di morte-rinascita. continua]

 

WHENCE COMES THIS RUSH OF WINGS?

From the French noel, in the Provençal version “Nadal dels aucèls”, (Bas-Quercey), also translated into French under the title “Noël des oiseaux” or “Voici l’étoile de noël”, this Christmas song “Whence comes this rush of wings?” or simply “Carol Of The Birds ” is instead popular in America and is reported in print by Charles Lewis Hutchins in” Carols Old and Carols New “(Boston, Massachusetts: Parish Choir, 1916)
[Ancora  dal noel francese, nella versione provenzale “Nadal dels aucèls” (Bas-Quercey), tradotta anche in francese con il titolo “Noël des oiseaux” o “Voici l’étoile de noël”, questo canto natalizio intitolato  “Whence comes this rush of wings?”  ma anche “Carol Of The Birds” è invece popolare in America ed è riportato in stampa da Charles Lewis Hutch­ins in “Car­ols Old and Car­ols New” (Bos­ton, Mass­a­chu­setts: Par­ish Choir, 1916)]

Alan William (piano)

Megan Metheney (harp)


Celtic Ladies


I
Whence comes this rush of wings afar,
Following straight the Noel star?
Birds from the woods in wondrous flight,
Bethlehem seek this Holy Night.
II
“Tell us, ye birds, why come ye here,
Into this stable, poor and drear?”
“Hast’ning we seek the newborn King,
And all our sweetest music bring.”
III
Hark how the Greenfinch bears his part,
Philomel, too, with tender heart,
Chants from her leafy dark retreat,
Re, mi, fa, sol, in accents sweet.
IV
Angels and shepherds, birds o’ the sky,
Come where the Son of God doth lie;
Christ on earth with man doth dwell,
Join in the shout “Noel, Noel.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Da dove viene questo battito d’ali lontane che vanno verso la stella di Natale?
Uccelli dal bosco in magnifica flotta
cercano Betlemme questa Santa Notte.
II
“Diteci, voi uccelli, perchè venite qui,
in questa grotta, povera e fredda?”
“Ci affrettiamo per cercare il Re appena nato,
e portare la nostra musica più soave”
III
Ascolta come il verdone tiene la sua parte,
anche l’usignolo appassionato,
canta dal suo nascondiglio frondoso
re, mi, fa sol con dolci accordi
IV
Angeli e pastori, uccelli del cielo
venite dove il figlio di Dio riposa;
Cristo sulla terra con l’uomo dimora
unitevi al grido “Natale, Natale”

THE AMERICAN-IRISH VERSION
[LA VERSIONE AMERICANA-IRLANDESE]

John Jacob Niles (1892-1980) wrote his version of “The Carol of the Birds” in 1942 making it a nursery rhyme for his son who was then four years old. Niles was a famous folk music collector, lute player and dulcimer and also a composer.
[John Jacob Niles (1892-1980) scrisse la sua versione di “The Carol of the Birds” nel 1942 facendone una filastrocca per il figlio che all’epoca aveva quattro anni. Niles era un famoso collezionista di musica folk, suonatore di liuto e dulcimer e anche compositore.]

Clancy Brothers in “Christmas” 1969

Brocelïande

Jeff Black 2009


I
Full many a bird did wake and fly
Curoo curoo curoo
Full many a bird did wake and fly
To the manger bed with a wandering cry
On Christmas day in the morning (1)
Curoo curoo curoo
Curoo curoo curoo
II
The lark the dove and the red bird came
And they did sing in sweet Jesus’ name
III
The owl was there with eyes so wide
And he did sit at sweet Mary’s side
IV
The shepherds knelt upon the hay
And angels sang the night away
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Più di un uccello si levò e volò
Curu curu curu
Più di un uccello si levò e volò
alla mangiatoria con un grido d’attesa
Il giorno di Natale nel mattin
Curu curu curu
Curu curu curu
II
L’allodola, la colomba e il pettirosso andarono
e cantarono nel nome dell’amato Gesù
III
C’era il gufo con gli occhi spalancati
e si sistemò al fianco della cara Maria
IV
I pastori s’inginocchiarono nella paglia
e gli angeli cantarono tutta la notte

NOTE
1) the verse recalls the Christmas nursery rhyme “I Saw Three Ships”
[il verso richiama la filastrocca natalizia “I Saw Three Ships”]

AUSTRALIAN VERSION
[LA VERSIONE AUSTRALIANA]

Still a “Carol of the Birds”, but this time coming from Australia composed by William G. James on the text of John Wheeler and collected in “Five Australian Christmas Carols”, 1948.
Obviously the Australian climate needs other subjects than snow sleds!
This one has the refrain that repeats “Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day”
[Ancora una “Carol of the Birds”, ma questa volta proveniente dall’Australia composta da William G. James sul testo di John Wheeler e raccolta in “Five Australian Christmas Carols“, 1948. Ovviamente il clima australiano ha bisogno di ben altri soggetti che le slitte sulla neve! Questa ha il ritornello che ripete “Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day“]


I
Out on the plains the brolgas (1) are dancing
Lifting their feet  like warhorses prancing
Up to the sun the woodlarks go winging
Faint in the dawn light
echoes their singing
Orana! Orana! Orana to Christmas Day.
II
Down where the tree ferns grow by the river
There where the waters sparkle and quiver
Deep in the gullies bell-birds (2) are chiming
Softly and sweetly their lyric notes rhyming
III
Friar birds (3) sip the nectar of flowers
Currawongs (4) chant in wattle tree bowers
In the blue ranges lorikeets(5) calling
Carols of bush birds
rising and falling
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sul terreno le gru danzano
sollevando i piedi come  cavalli saltellanti
verso il sole le allodole si slanciano in volo
lontani nella luce dell’alba
riecheggiano i loro canti
Benvenuto! Benvenuto! Benvenuto giorno di Natale
II
Giù dove le felci crescono sulle rive
dove le acque luccicano e mormorano
nelle forre i campanari cantano
dolci e lievi i loro canti riecheggiano
III
Gli uccelli frate succhiano il nettare dei fiori
i currawong cantano sotto le fronde d’acacia
nelle livree blu i lorichetti chiamano
i canti degli uccelli nei cespugli
aumentano e diminuiscono

NOTE
1) Australian crane, known for its mating dance [gru brolga è la gru australiana, nota per la sua danza di accoppiamento]
2) Bell Bird or New Zealand bell ringer with a characteristic greenish color [Bell Bird o campanaro della Nuova Zelanda dalla caratteristica colorazione verdastra]
3) bird friar has no feathers on the head [filemone o uccello frate non ha piume sulla testa]
4) the scientific name of the genus, Strepera, derives from the late Latin and means “noisy”, referring to the loquacity of these birds. The collective common name of currawong, with which the species ascribed to the genus are known, is a local name and derives from the aboriginal languages [l nome scientifico del genere, Strepera, deriva dal tardo latino e significa “rumorosa”, in riferimento alla loquacità di questi uccelli. Il nome comune collettivo di currawong, col quale sono note le specie ascritte al genere, è un’onomatopea e deriva dalle lingue aborigene]
5) lori is a brightly colored parrot [il lori o lorichetto è un pappagallino dai colori vivaci]

FRENCH VERSIONS
[VERSIONI IN FRANCIA]

Also in France we find an adaptation of the Catalan version”El cant dels ocells” with the title “Le Chant des Oiseaux”
Anche in Francia ritroviamo un adattamento della versione catalana con il titolo “Le Chant des Oiseaux”

The Provençal version “Nadal dels aucèls” was released by Maria Roanet in 1976 in her album Cantem Nadal
the song starts at minute 9:55
[La versione provenzale “Nadal dels aucèls” è stata divulgata da Maria Roanet nel 1976 nel suo album Cantem Nadal
il brano inizia al minuto 9:55]


I
“Aicí l’estèla de Nadal,
Qu’es aquel bruch dessús l’ostal?
-Es una tropa d’aucelons
A Betelèm van dos a dos.”
II
Dins l’estable, lo Rei del Cèl
Dòrm entre l’ase e lo maurèl
“Digatz aucèls qué venètz far?
-Venèm nòstre Dieu adorar..”
III
Lo pol s’avança lo primièr
Monta sul boès del rastelièr
E per començar l’orason
Entòna son “Cocorocon”
IV
Lo cardin sortís de son niu
Saluda e fa “rirli chiu chiu”
“Chiu chiu” respond lo passerat
E la calha fa “palpabat”
V
Lo mèrle arriba en estiflant
Lo linòt en canturlejant
Lo pijon fa “rocon rocon”
La lauseta “tira liron”
VI
Vaicí venir lo baticoet
Se pausa a costat del verdet
E sus l’albar lo rossinhòl
Canta a l’Enfant “re mi fa sòl
VII
Per onorar lo Filh de Dieu
Venètz en granda devocion
Angèls, pastors, aucèls del cèl
Totes cantem Noèl Noèl,
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Ecco la stella di Natale
cos’è questo trambusto sopra la stalla?”
“E’ uno stormo di uccellini
che a Betlemme vanno in coppia”
II
Nella stalla il Re dei Cieli
dorme tra l’asino e il bue
“Ditemi uccelli, cosa siete venuti a fare?”
“Veniamo ad adorare il nostro Dio”
III
Il gallo avanza per primo
salta sul legno della rastrelliera
e per iniziare la sua orazione
canta “cocorocon”
IV
Il cardellino esce dal suo nido
saluta e fa “rirli chiu chiu”
“Chiu chiu” risponde il passero
e la quaglia fa “palpabat”
V
Il merlo arriva fischiettando
il fanello dal suono ronzante
il piccione fa “rocon rocon”
l’allodola “tira lion”
VI
Ecco che viene il batticoda
si posa vicino al verdone
e sul salice l’usignolo
canta al Bambino “re, mi, fa, sol”
VII
Per onorare il Figlio di Dio
venite con grande devozione
Angeli, pastori, uccelli del cielo
e tutti cantiamo Natale, Natale

NOTE
english translation qui

Another title “Le Noël des petits oiseaux” was written by Camille Soubise in 1890 (with music by Charles Pourny) always a Christmas noel but completely different from the examples already analyzed (see)
[Un altro titolo “Le Noël des petits oiseaux” è invece stato scritto da Camille Soubise nel 1890 (con musica di Charles Pourny) sempre un noel natalizio ma completamente diverso dagli esempi già analizzati]

first part El cant dels ocells

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10493
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/carol_of_the_birds.htm
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/whence_comes_this_rush_of_wings.htm

http://ingeb.org/songs/outonthe.html

GALLOWS POLE

La ballata popolare “Gallows pole”, “The Maid Freed From The Gallows”, “The Prickly Bush” oppure “The Hangman”, “Highwayman” viene dalle Isole Britanniche classificata tra le Child ballads al numero 95.
In origine era un’antica storia  del Vecchio Continente risalente al Medioevo in cui è una fanciulla ad essere in attesa di giudizio per aver perso  un bene prezioso che le era stato affidato: una pallina d’oro zecchino che rappresenta un bene supremo, il valore della castità.  (vedi prima parte)

LE VERSIONI AMERICANE

Nelle versioni americane è più spesso l’uomo il condannato all’impiccagione, il quale supplica il boia di attendere ancora un momento l’arrivo di amici e parenti venuti per salvarlo in cambio di un riscatto. Ma gli amici e anche i suoi stessi genitori giungono lì per assistere all’impiccagione, solo all’ultimo arriverà il fidanzato/a a pagare il riscatto al boia e la sua libertà. Ricollegandosi alla matrice originaria della ballata la lezione morale è sempre la stessa: la castità è un bene prezioso la cui perdita significa la rovina di una fanciulla.
ASCOLTA John Jacob Niles The Maid Freed From The Gallows


I
“Hangman, hangman,
Slack your line,
Slack it just a while,
For I think I see my papa comin’,
Travelin’ many a mile,
Travelin’ many a mile.
II
“Papa, papa,
Has you brought gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
Or did you come to see me swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree?”
III
“Daughter, daughter, daughter,
I brought no gold
For to pay that hangman’s fee,
But I come to see you swingin’, swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree.”
IV
“Hangman, hangman,
Slack your line,
Slack it just a while,
For I think I see my mama comin’,
Travelin’ many a mile,
Travelin’ many a mile.
V
“Mama, mama, mama
Have you brought gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
Or did you come to see me swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree?”
VI
“Daughter, daughter, daughter,
I brought no gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
But I come to see you swingin’, swingin’
High from that hangman’s tree,
High from that hangman’s tree.”
VII
“Hangman, hangman,
Slack your line,
Slack it just a while,
For I think I see my lover comin’,
Travelin’ many a mile,
Travelin’ many a mile.
VIII
“Sweetheart, sweetheart, sweetheart,
Did you bring gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
Or did you come to see me swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree?”
IX
“Darlin’, darlin’, darlin’,
I brought that gold
For to pay that hangman’s fee,
‘Cause I don’t want to see you swingin’, swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree.”
Tradotto* da Cattia Salto
I
” Boia, boia
Allenta la tua corda,
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mio papà
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata”
II
“Papà, papà
hai portato l’oro
per pagare  il mio riscatto al boia
o sei venuto per vedermi dondolare
in alto sulla forca?
In alto sulla forca?”
III
“Figlia, figlia, figlia
non  ho portato l’oro
per pagare  il
 riscatto al boia
ma sono venuto per vederti dondolare
in alto sulla forca,
in alto sulla forca”
IV
” Boia, boia
Allenta la tua corda,
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mia mamma
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata”
V
“Mamma, mamma, mamma
hai portato l’oro
per pagare  il mio riscatto al boia
o sei venuta per vedermi dondolare
in alto sulla forca?
In alto sulla forca?”
VI
“Figlia, figlia, figlia
non  ho portato l’oro
per pagare  il riscatto al boia
ma sono venuta per vederti dondolare
in alto sulla forca,
in alto sulla forca”
VII
” Boia, boia
Allenta la tua corda,
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere il mio amore
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata”
VIII
“Amore, amore, amore
hai portato l’oro
per pagare  il mio riscatto al boia
o sei venuta per vedermi dondolare
in alto sulla forca?
In alto sulla forca?”
IX
“Amore, amore, amore
ho portato l’oro (1)
per pagare  il  riscatto al boia
perchè non voglio vederti dondolare,
dondolare
in alto sulla forca,
In alto sulla forca”

NOTE
* in “Led Zeppelin, tutti i testi con traduzione a fronte”, Arcana editrice, 1994
1) solo il fidanzato con un matrimonio riparatore può ridare l’onore alla fanciulla che ha perso la verginità

ASCOLTA Peter, Paul & Mary – Hangman che aggiungono un ritornello: qui è l’uomo ad essere condannato ed è la sua fidanzata che paga il riscatto per salvarlo dalla forca.


I
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my father comin’ ridin’ many a mile
Father have you brought me hope
or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
Chorus 1
I have not brought you hope,
I have not paid your fee
Yes I have come to see you hangin’ from the gallows tree.
II
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my mother comin’ ridin’ many a mile
Mother have you brought me hope
or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
III
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my brother comin’ ridin’ many a mile
Brother have you brought me hope or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
IV
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my true love comin’ riding’ many a mile
True love have you brought me hope
or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
Chorus 2
“Yes I have brought you hope,
yes I have paid your fee
For I’ve not come to see you hangin’ from the gallows tree.”
Tradotto* da Cattia Salto
I
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mio padre arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Padre mi hai portato della speranza
o hai pagato per il mio riscatto
o sei venuto per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
Coro
“Non ti ho portato della speranza
e non ho pagato per il tuo riscatto
si sono venuto per vederti impiccare sulla forca”
II
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mia madre arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Madre mi hai portato della speranza
o hai pagato per il mio riscatto
o sei venuta per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
III
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mio fratello
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Fratello mi hai portato della speranza o hai pagato per il mio riscatto
o sei venuto per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
IV
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere il mio vero amore
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Amore mi hai portato della speranza o hai pagato per il mio riscatto (1)
o sei venuta per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
Coro
“Si ti ho portato della speranza,
si ho pagato per il tuo riscatto,
perciò non sono venuta per vederti impiccare sulla forca”

NOTE
1) lo scambio sessuale qui non è esplicitato, la fanciulla potrebbe aver pagato il riscatto con l’oro e con con la sua virtù; il finale non è completo perchè sappiamo dalla novellistica medievale che l’uomo viene impiccato ugualmente (vedi). Castità, purezza, (e fedeltà) sono doti che una donna deve considerare sacre e inviolabili e se usate come merce di scambio portano solo alla sua rovina.

La ballata è stata rivisitata anche nell’ambito del rock, in quella che è la versione più conosciuta al giorno d’oggi (su un riff blues ripreso da Leadbelly ):  la versione con il condannato che viene impiccato ugualmente si ricollega alle molteplici varianti della tradizione orale della ballata considerata oggi come una canzone di protesta, un tempo invece la dimostrazione delle infauste conseguenze dell’infedeltà (o della perdita della verginità).
ASCOLTA Led Zeppelin su Spotify  in “Led Zeppelin III”, 1970
oppure la versione live con Jimmy Page e Robert Plant riarrangiata unplugged

Traduzione di Angela Branca e Davide Sapienza da qui*

I
Hangman, hangman,
hold it a little while,
Think I see my friends coming,
riding many a mile.
Friends, did you get some silver?
Did you get a little gold?
What did you bring me, my dear friends, to keep me from the Gallows Pole?
What did you bring me to keep me from the Gallows Pole?
I couldn’t get no silver,
I couldn’t get no gold,
You know that we’re too damn poor
to keep you from the Gallows Pole.
II
Hangman, hangman,
hold it a little while,
I think I see my brother coming, riding many a mile.
Brother, did you get some silver?
Did you get a little gold?
What did you bring me, my brother, to keep me from the Gallows Pole?
Brother, I brought you some silver,
I brought a little gold, I brought a little of everything
To keep you from the Gallows Pole.
Yes, I brought you to keep you from the Gallows Pole.
III
Hangman, hangman,
turn your head awhile,
I think I see my sister coming, riding a many mile, mile, mile.
Sister, I implore you,
take him by the hand,
Take him to some shady bower, save me from the wrath of this man,
Please take him, save me from the wrath of this man, man.
IV
Hangman, hangman,
upon your face a smile,
Pray tell me that I’m free to ride,
Ride for many a mile, mile, mile.
Oh, yes, you got a fine sister,
she warmed my blood from cold,
Brought my blood to boiling hot
to keep you from the Gallows Pole,
Your brother brought me silver,
your sister warmed my soul,
But now I laugh and pull so hard and see you swinging on the Gallows Pole
Yeah, swingin’ on the gallows pole!
I
“Boia, boia,
aspetta un attimo,
mi sembra di vedere i miei amici arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata.
Amici, avete dell’argento?
Avete un po’ d’oro?
Cosa mi avete portato, amici cari,
per sottrarmi
alla forca?
Cosa mi avete portato,
per sottrarmi alla forca?”
“Non ho potuto portare argento,
non ho potuto portare oro,
sai che siamo troppo poveri, dannazione, per sottrarti alla forca.”
II
“Boia, boia,
aspetta un attimo,
mi sembra di vedere mio fratello arrivare, viene così da lontano.
Fratello, hai dell’argento?
Hai un po’ d’oro?
Cosa mi hai portato, fratello, per sottrarmi alla forca?”
“Fratello, ti ho portato dell’argento,
ti ho portato un po’ d’oro,
ti ho portato un po’ di tutto per sottrarti alla forca,
sì, ti  ho portato di che sottrarti alla forca.”
III
“Boia, boia,
volta la testa un attimo,
mi sembra di vedere mia sorella arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata.
Sorella, ti prego,
prendilo per mano (1),
portalo in qualche luogo nascosto ,
salvami dall’ira di questo uomo,
ti prego portalo via,
salvami dall’ira di quest’uomo.”
IV
“Boia, boia,
sul tuo viso un sorriso,
ti prego dimmi che sono libero di cavalcare, cavalcare per molte miglia.”
“Oh, sì, hai una sorella deliziosa,
ha riscaldato il mio sangue che era freddo, lo ha fatto diventare bollente
per sottrarti alla forca, sì.
Tuo fratello mi ha portato l’argento,
tua sorella mi ha riscaldato l’animo,
ma ora rido e tiro forte
e ti vedo penzolare dalla forca,
sì, penzolare dalla forca”

NOTE
* in “Led Zeppelin, tutti i testi con traduzione a fronte”, Arcana editrice, 1994.
1) il condannato chiede alla sorella di concedersi sessualmente al boia, mentre nella versione italiana della ballata conosciuta come “Cecilia” è la moglie a passare la notte con il capitano che ha fatto imprigionare il marito (vedi) in entrambe le versioni l’uomo viene ugualmente giustiziato.  Per  Murder Ballad Monday Shawnee Gee ipotizza l’influenza della ballata ungherese “Feher Anna”  e per l’approfondimento rimando alla prossima puntata

continua

FONTI
https://www.mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thepricklybush.html
https://singout.org/2012/08/13/maid-freed-from-the-gallows-gallows-pole-child-ballad-95/
https://singout.org/2012/08/17/the-price-my-dear-is-you/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=5603
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-Highwayman.html

Il canto dell’Usignolo: attente al Lupo!

Read the post in English

”The Bold Grenader”, “A bold brave bonair” o “The Soldier and the Lady” ma anche “To Hear the Nightingale Sing”, “The Nightingale Sings” e “One Morning in May” sono i vari titoli di una stessa canzone tradizionale diffusa in Inghilterra, Irlanda, America e Canada.

LA TRAMA

La storia appartiene al filone delle avventure amorose abbastanza stereotipate in cui un soldato (o un nobiluomo, talvolta un marinaio) per la sua avvenenza e galanteria, riesce a ottenere la virtù di una giovane ragazza. Le ragazze sono sempre delle ingenue contadinotte o pastorelle che credono alle dolci parole d’amore sospirate dall’uomo, e si aspettano che lui le sposi dopo aver consumato, ma sono immancabilmente abbandonate.

LA NURSERY RHYME: WHERE ARE YOU GOING MY PRETTY MAID

soldierNella nursery rhyme “Where are you going my pretty maid” si riproduce in modo edulcorato proprio questa situazione seduttiva e l’illustratore ritrae l’uomo nei panni del soldato, Walter Craine (in “A Baby’s Opera”, 1877) lo rappresenta come un azzimato gentiluomo, ma in realtà è l’archetipo del predatore, il lupo con il pelo all’interno e la donna della filastrocca con il suo botta-risposta sembra essere una brava ragazza che ha fatto tesoro degli insegnamenti materni..

In altre versioni è la ragazza (bad girl!!) a prendere l’iniziativa e a portare nottetempo il giovane soldato nientedimeno che in casa propria (vedi), solo la stagione è sempre la stessa perchè è in primavera che il sangue ribolle nelle vene; già nel 1600 circolava una ballata dal titolo  “The nightingale’s song: or The soldier’s rare musick, and maid’s recreation“, così per una canzone in giro da così tanto tempo non possiamo aspettarci che una grande quantità di versioni testuali, nonchè l’abbinamento con diverse melodie. Un’accurata panoramica di testi e varianti melodiche a partire dal 1689 qui

LA MELODIA DEL FOLK REVIVAL: “They kissed so sweet & comforting”

E’ la versione diffusa quasi in contemporanea dai  Dubliners e dai Clancy Brothers ed è quella più popolare che andava per la maggiore nei Folk club degli anni 60

The Dubliners

Clancy Brothers & Tommy Maker, Live in Ireland, 1965 titolo The Nightingale


I
As I went a walking one morning in May
I met a young couple so far did we stray
And one was a young maid so sweet and so fair
And the other was a soldier and a brave Grenadier(1)
CHORUS
And they kissed so sweet and comforting
As they clung to each other
They went arm in arm along the road
Like sister and brother
They went arm in arm along the road
Til they came to a stream
And they both sat down together, love
To hear the nightingale sing(2)
II
Out of his knapsack he took a fine fiddle(3)
He played her such merry tunes that you ever did hear
He played her such merry tunes that the valley did ring
And softly cried the fair maid as the nightingale sings
III
Oh, I’m off to India for seven long years
Drinking wines and strong whiskies instead of strong beer
And if ever I return again ‘twill be in the spring
And we’ll both sit down together love to hear the nightingale sing
IV
“Well then”, says the fair maid, “will you marry me?”
“Oh no”, says the soldier, “however can that be?”
For I’ve my own wife at home in my own country
And she is the finest little maid that you ever did see
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre ero a passeggio in un mattino di Maggio
incontrai una giovane coppia, così tanto ci allontanammo,
una era una giovane fanciulla tanto amabile e bella
e l’altro era un soldato e un prode granatiere(1)
RITORNELLO
E si baciavano con amorevole trasporto
attaccati uno all’altra
andavano a braccetto per la strada
come sorella e fratello
andavano a braccetto per la strada
finchè arrivarono ad un ruscello
ed entrambi si sedettero insieme, amore
ad ascoltare l’usignolo cantare (2)
II
Fuori dalla sua sacca egli prese un bel violino(3)
le suonò delle melodie allegre che non se se sono mai sentite
le suonò delle melodie allegre che per la vallata risuonavano
e piano gridò la bella fanciulla mentre l’usignolo cantava
III
“Starò fuori in India per sette lunghi anni, a bere vino e forte whisky invece che birra scura
e se mai ritornerò di nuovo sarà in primavera
ed entrambi ci siederemo insieme, amore, ad ascoltare l’usignolo cantare.”
IV
“Bene allora – dice la bella fanciulla – mi vuoi sposare?”
“Oh no – dice il soldato –
come potrei?
Perchè tengo moglie a casa nel mio paese
e lei è la più bella fanciulla che si sia mai vista”

NOTE
1) il più generico soldier diventa un volunteer, ma il granatiere è un soldato particolarmente dotato per la sua prestanza e il coraggio, l’uomo più forte e più alto della media, contraddistinto da una vistosa uniforme, con il caratteristico copricapo a mitria, che in America venne sostituito da un colbacco in pelo di orso.
2) è la frase in codice che contraddistingue questo filone di courting songs. L’usignolo è l’uccello che canta solo di notte e nella tradizione popolare è il simbolo degli amanti e dei loro convegni amorosi, (vedi)
3) forse lo strumento inizialmente era un flauto ma più spesso si trattava di un piccolo violino o violino portatile detto il kit violiner (pocket fiddle):  era lo strumento popolare per eccellenza nel Rinascimento. E’ curioso notare come in questa tipologia degli incontri galanti il soldato sia stato sostituito dal violinista itinerante, per lo più un maestro di danza, perciò si spiega come ogni riferimento al violino, al suo archetto o all’impeciamento delle corde abbia assunto nelle ballate popolari delle sottointese connotazioni sessuali

SECONDA MELODIA: APPALCHIAN TUNE

John Jacob Niles – One Morning In May

Jo Stafford The Nightingale

TERZA MELODIA: LA VERSIONE PIU’ ANTICA, THE GRENADIER AND THE LADY

E’ la melodia diffusa nel Dorsetshire, così vibrante e appassionata ma con una punta di malinconia, una versione più adatta alla notte d’amore di Romeo e Giulietta e al canto dell’usignolo nella sua versione di aubade medievale, e che più si avvicina alla struttura della nursery rhyme “Where are you going my pretty maid” di cui riprende la struttura a botta e risposta.

Per assaporarne il fascino antico ecco una serie di arrangiamenti strumentali
PER ARPA

PER CHITARRA
Le Trésor d’Orphée

Tra gli interpreti più recenti
Redwood Falls (Madeleine Cooke, Phil Jones & Edd Mann)
recensione qui

Isla Cameron The Bold Grenadier dal film “Far from The Madding Crowd”


I
As I was a walking one morning in May
I spied a young couple a makin’ of hay.
O one was a fair maid and her beauty showed clear
and the other was a soldier, a bold grenadier.
II
Good morning, good morning, good morning said he
O where are you going my pretty lady?
I’m a going a walking by the clear crystal stream
to see cool water glide and hear nightingales sing.
III
O soldier, o soldier, will you marry me?
O no, my sweet lady that never can be.
For I’ve got a wife at home in my own country,
Two wives and the army’s too many for me.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre ero a passeggio in un mattino di Maggio, vidi una giovane coppia che faceva il fieno: l’una era una giovane fanciulla e la sua bellezza si mostrava con evidenza e l’altro era un soldato, un prode granatiere
II
“Buon giorno Buon giorno Buon giorno -disse lui- dove state andando mia bella signorina?”
“Sto andando a passeggiare accanto al ruscello di puro cristallo
per vedere scorrere l’acqua fresca
ad ascoltare l’usignolo cantare.”
III
“O soldato, mi vuoi sposare?”
“O no mia bella signorina come potrei?
Perchè tengo moglie a casa nel mio paese
due mogli e l’esercito sarebbero troppo per me”

FONTI
http://jopiepopie.blogspot.it/2018/02/nightingales-song-1690s-bold-grenadier.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folksongs-appalachian-2/folk-songs-appalacian-2%20-%200138.htm
http://folktunefinder.com/tunes/105092
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LP14.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/onemorninginmay.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3646
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29541
http://www.military-history.org/soldier-profiles/british-grenadiers-soldier-profile.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/sing.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/america/nighting.html
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=hes&p=1506

BLACK IS THE COLOUR

Una canzone d’amore dalla tradizione popolare dei Monti Appalachi esportata degli immigrati provenienti dalle Isole Britanniche (si ipotizza l’origine scozzese). Esistono varie versioni con il protagonista maschile e più raramente femminile e moltissime interpretazioni dei maggiori gruppi e solisti di area celtica (soprattutto irlandesi) e non.

La melodia diventata standard non è quella più antica bensì è stata composta tra il 1916 e il 1920 dal grande John Jacob Niles  (1892-1980). Così scrive lo stesso Niles “Black is The Color of My True Love’s Hair’…was composed between 1916 and 1921. I had come home from eastern Kentucky, singing this song to an entirely different tune–a tune not unlike the public-domain material employed even today. My father liked the lyrics, but thought the tune was downright terrible. So I wrote myself a new tune, ending it in a nice modal manner. My composition has since been ‘discovered’ by many an aspiring folk-singer.

Si tratta secondo gli studiosi di una versione modificata di The Sailor Boy (Laws K12).
Il brano ha un andamento ipnotico, dolce e sensuale nello stesso tempo e la maggior parte degli artisti che lo hanno interpretato hanno sottolineato questa caratteristica.
Pochi versi nella strofa iniziale riprendono ossessivamente la descrizione dell’amata(o) sembrano indicare che il protagonista, separato dal suo amore, ne stia ricordando il colore dei capelli, la delicatezza delle labbra, il sorriso radioso e le mani delicate, ma soprattutto la sua andatura: la terra stessa calpestata dall’amata(o) diventa fonte di gioia e amore.

The Princess Out of School di Edward Robert Hughes
The Princess Out of School di Edward Robert Hughes

Paul Weller con la sua voce lievemente roca, gli arpeggi della chitarra e un violino un po’ zingaro

Christy Moore, pura seta che ti avvolge l’anima, un sussurro vellutato sostenuto dalla sola chitarra  (tra le tante versioni live)

Gaelic Storm in Tree 2001, una versione decisamente gypsy

Cara Dillon 

A documentare una popolarità che ha varcato i confini del folk questa versione dei Twilling Singers


CHORUS
Now black is the colour of my true love’s hair
Her lips are like a rose so fair (some roses fair)
the sweetest smile and the gentlest hands
I love the ground whereon she stands
I
I love my love and well she knows
I love the ground whereon she goes
I wish (hope) the day – would soon (will one day) come
When she and I can be as one
II
I go to the Clyde (1) for to mourn and weep
For satisfied I never can be (2)
I write her letters just a few short lines
And suffer death ten thousand times
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
CORO
Nero è il colore dei capelli del mio vero amore
le sue labbra sono simili a una bellissima rosa.
Ha il sorriso più dolce e le mani più gentili,
amo il terreno su cui si posa.
I
Amo il mio amore e lui (lei) lo sa bene, amo il terreno sul quale cammina, vorrei che  venga presto  il giorno
in cui lui(lei) ed io saremo una cosa sola.
II
Andrò al fiume Clyde a piangere e singhiozzare,
perchè non potrò mai più essere contenta(o), gli(le) scriverò delle lettere, solo delle brevi righe e patirò la morte 10mila volte

NOTE
1) Il fiume Clyde è il più importante fiume della Scozia e attraversa Glasgow
2) nella versione tradizionale la lettera è scritta da una ragazza presa dalla disperazione di aver appreso la morte in guerra del suo innamorato. La lettera è un testamento in cui chiede di essere sepolta con una colomba sul petto, perchè è certa di stare per morire di crepacuore.
“Go dig my grave both wide and deep,
Place a marble stone at my head and feet,
And on my breast a turtle dove,
To show to the world that I died for love.
And on my breast a turtle dove,
To show to the world that I died for love.” (tratto da qui)

cascate-clyde
Le cascate del fiume Clyde – New Lanark, South Lanarkshire (Scozia)

FONTI
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BlackIsColor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32248
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18179
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=666
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=665
http://saturdaychorale.com/2013/06/22/john-jacob-niles-18921980-black-is-the-color-of-my-true-loves-hair/