Lady Greensleeves

Leggi in italiano

Greensleeves is a song coming from the English Renaissance (with undeniable Italian musical influences) that tells us about the courtship of a very rich gentleman and a Lady who rejects him, despite the generous gifts.

It was the year 1580 when Richard Jones and Edward White competed for prints of a fashion song, Jones with “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” and White with “A ballad, being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his frende “, then after a few days, White again with another version:” Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves “and a few months later Jones with the publication of” A merry newe “Northern Songe of Greene Sleeves” ; this time the reply came from William Elderton, who wrote the “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” in February 1581.
Finally, the revised and expanded version by Richard Jones with the title “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” included in the collection ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites‘ of 1584, was the one that became the final version, still performed today (at least as regards the melody and for most of the text with 17 stanzas).

The Melody

The melody is born for lute, the instrument par excellence of Renaissance (and baroque) music that has seen in England a fine flowering with the likes of John Jonson and John Dowland. As evidenced in the in-depth study of Ian Pittaway the ancestor of Greensleeves is the old Passamezzo.
By the late 15th century, plucked instruments such as the lute were just beginning to develop a new technique to add to their repertoire of playing styles, chordal playing, leading the way for grounds to be chordal rather than the single notes of the mediaeval period. One of the chordal grounds that developed was the passamezzo antico, meaning old passamezzo (there was also the passamezzo moderno), which began in Italy in the early 16th century before it spread through Europe. It’s a little like the blues today in that you have a basic, unchanging chord sequence and, on top of that, a melody is added. (from here)
The chorus of Greensleeves however follows the melodic trend of a  Romanesca which in turn is a variant of the passamezzo.

lute melody in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” written by Adriaen Smout for the Netherlands in 1595

Baltimore Consort  instrumental version in Renaissance style for dancing

We find a choreography of the dance  only in later times, in the “English Dancing Master” by John Playford (both in the edition of 1686 and then published several times in the eighteenth century) as an English country dance

The Legend

anne-boleyn-roseIn 1526 Henry VIII wrote “Greensleeves” for Anna Bolena, right at the beginning of their relationship.
A suggestive hypothesis because both the melody that the text well suited to the character, that of his own he wrote several piece still today in the repertoire of many artists of ancient music; however the poem was not transcribed in any manuscript of the time and therefore we can not be certain of this attribution.
The misunderstanding was generated by William Chappell who in his “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (London: Chappell & Co, 1859) attributes the melody to the king, misinterpreting a quote by Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th ‘Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.” (In Skialethia, or Shadow of Truth, 1598: the ballad “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” dates back to time of Henry VIII (King Harries) and, according to Chappell has always been sung on the melody Greensleeves.

The Tudor serie + The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Gregorian“,  ( I, III, VIII, IX)

Irish origins!?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1905) was the first to assume (without giving evidence) the irish origins. “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.
Since then the idea of Irish paternity has become more and more vigorous so much so that this song is present in the compilations of Celtic music labeled as irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

A courting song or a dirty trick?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-S
Roberto Venturi observes in his essay
Already at the time of Geoffrey Chaucer and the Tales of Canterbury (remember that Chaucer lived from 1343 to 1400) the green dress was considered typical of a “light woman”, that is a prostitute. She would therefore be a young woman of promiscuous customs; Nevill Coghill, the famous and heroic modern English translator of the Canterbury Tales, explains – referring to an interpretation of a Chaucerian step – that, at the time, the green color had precise sexual connotations, particularly in the phrase A green gown. It was the dress of a woman with some grass spots, who practiced (or suffered) a sexual intercourse in a meadow. If a woman was said to have “the green skirt”, in practice it was a whore.
The song would then be the lamentation of a betrayed and abandoned lover, or of a rejected customer; in short, you know, something far from regal (although in every age the kings were generally the first whoremongers of the Kingdom). Another possible interpretation is that the lover betrayed, or rejected, has wanted to revenge on the poor woman by devoting to her a delicious little song in which he calls her a whore through the metaphor of the “green sleeves” (translated from here)

Many interpreters, with versions both in ancient than modern style (also Yngwie Malmsteen plays it with his guitar and Leonard Cohen proposes a rewrite in 1974)
Today the text is rarely performed and only for two or four stanzas, but it is a song loved by choral groups that sing it more extensively.

In ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, from the collection of Israel G. Young (about twenty strophe see) all the gifts that the nobleman makes to his Lady to court her:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” with “sleeves of satin”, but also “men clothed all in green” and “dainties”!

So many versions (see) and a difficult choice, but here is:

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The Visit 1991 (I, III) interpreted “as if she were singing Tom Waits

Jethro Tull  in Christmas Album 2003 (instrumental version)

David Nevue amazing piano version!


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
NOTE
1) the first two sentences are sometimes reversed and start in the opposite direction
2) In the Middle Ages the green color was the symbol of regeneration and therefore of youth and physical vigor, meant “fertility” but also “hope” and with gold indicating pleasure. It was the color of medicine for its revitalizing powers. Color of love in the nascent stage, in the Renaissance it was the color used by the young especially in May; in women it was also the color of chastity.
But the other more promiscuous meaning is of “light woman always ready to roll in the grass”. And the charm of the ballad lies in its ambiguity!
Green is also the color that in fairy tales / ballads connotes a fairy creature.
The Gaelic words “Grian Sliabh” (literally translated as “sun mountain” or a “mountain exposed to the south, sunny”) are pronounced Green Sleeve (the song is also very popular in Ireland especially as slow air). Grian is also the name of a river that flows from Sliabh Aughty (County Clare and Galway)
3) the expressions are proper to the courtly lyric
4) sendal= light silk material

in the extended version the gifts of the suitor are many and expensive and it is all a complaint about “oh how much you costs me my dear!”

“Extended version
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

SOURCE
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm

John Barleycorn must die!

Leggi in italiano

John Barleycorn (in Italian Giovanni Chicco d’Orzo) is a traditional song spread in England and Scotland, focused on this popular character, embodiment of the spirit of beer and whiskey. (see)
There are several text versions collected at different times; the oldest known is from 1460.
As often happens with the most popular ballads we talk about family in reference to a set of texts and melodies connected to each other or related.

The plot traced by Pete Wood is well documented and we refer you to his John Barleycorn revisited for the deepening: the first ballad that identifies a man as the spirit of barley is Allan-a-Maut (Allan del Malto) and it comes from Scotland .
The first ballad that bears the name John Barleycorn is instead of 1624, printed in London “A Pleasant new Ballad.To be sung evening and morn, of the bloody murder of Sir John Barleycorn” shortened in The Pleasant Ballad: as Pete Wood points out, all the elements that characterize the current version of the ballad are already present, the oath of the knights to kill John, the rain that quenches him, and the sun that warms him to give him energy, the miller who grinds him between two stones.

Originale screenprint by Paul Bommer (da qui)

THE DEATH-REBIRTH OF KING BARLEY

spirito-granoIt is narrated the death of the King of Barley according to myths and beliefs that date back to the beginning of the peasant culture, customs that were followed in England in these forms until the early decades of the ‘900.
According to James George Frazier in “The Golden Bough“, anciently “John” was chosen among the youth of the tribe and treated like a king for a year; at the appointed time, however, he was killed, following a macabre ritual: his body was dragged across the fields so that the blood soaked the earth and fed the barley.

More recently in the Celtic peasant tradition the spirit of the wheat entered the reaper who cut the last sheaf (who symbolically killed the god) and he had to be sacrificed just as described in the song (or at least figuratively and symbolically). see more

However, the spirit of the Wheat-Barley never dies because it is reborn the following year with the new crop, its strength and its ardor are contained in the whiskey that is obtained from the distillation of barley malt!

JOHN BARLEYCORN

“The Pleasant ballad” was set to the tune “Shall I Lie Beyond Thee?” on the broadside.63  This tune is quoted by a number of sources by a variety of very similar titles, including “Lie Lulling Beyond Thee” .  It is this writer’s belief from a variety of considerations, including Simpson 64 that these are one and the same tune.  There has been some confusion regarding the use of the tune “Stingo” for various members of the family.  Several publications say that John Barleycorn should be sung to this tune, (including Dixon), and some people have assumed this was the tune for “The Pleasant Ballad.”  These impressions seem to have originated from Chappell 65, who meant that “Stingo” was the tune for another member of the family “The Little Barleycorne”, a view which accords with his own comments on the version in the Roxburghe Ballads 66, with Simpson, and Baring-Gould who says ‘[Stingo] is not the air used in the broadsides nor in the west of England’ 67.  Two further tunes, “The Friar & the Nun” and “Twas when the seas were roaring”, are mentioned by Simpson.  Mas Mault has been suggested to be set to the tune “Triumph and Joy”, the original title of “Greensleeves”. 68 (Pete Wood)

In fact, as many as 45 different melodies have been used for centuries for this ballad, and Pete Wood analyzes the four most common melodies.

 MELODY 1

The 1906 version of John Stafford published by Sharp in English Folk Songs is probably the melody that comes closest to the time of James I
The Young Tradition

MELODY DIVES AND LAZARUS

The Shepherd Haden version became “standard” for being included in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs.T

Traffic (Learned by Mike Waterson)

Traffic lyrics
I
There was three men come out of the West
Their fortunes for to try
And these three men made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn(1) must die.
II
They ploughed, they sowed, they harrowed him in
Throwing clods all on his head
And these three men made a solemn vow
John barleycorn was Dead.
III
They’ve left him in the ground for a very long time
Till the rains from heaven did fall
Then little Sir John’s sprung up his head
And so amazed them all
IV
They’ve left him in the ground till the Midsummer
Till he’s grown both pale and wan
Then little Sir John’s grown a long, long beard
And so become a man.
V
They hire’d men with their scythes so sharp
To cut him off at the knee.
They’ve bound him and tied him around the waist
Serving him most barb’rously
VI
They hire’d men with their sharp pitch-forks
To prick him to the heart
But the drover he served him worse than that
For he’s bound him to the cart.
VII
They’ve rolled him around and around the field
Till they came unto a barn
And there they made a solemn mow
Of Little Sir John Barleycorn
VIII
They’ve hire’d men with their crab-tree sticks
To strip him skin from bone
But the miller, he served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
IX
Here’s Little sir John in the nut-brown bowl(2)
And brandy in the glass
But Little Sir John in the nut-brown bowl’s
Proved the stronger man at last
X
For the hunts man he can’t hunt the fox
Nor so loudly blow his horn
And the tinker, he can’t mend Kettles or pots
Without a little of Sir John Barleycorn.
NOTES
1)  the spirit of beer and whiskey
2) The cask of walnut or oak used today to age the whiskey

Jetro Tull live


Damh The Bard from The Hills They Are Hollow

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODY 3

The version of Robert Pope taken by Vaughan Williams in his Folk Song Suite
version for choir and orchestra

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODY 4

from Shropshire
Fred Jordan live

Jean-François Millet - Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868
Jean-François Millet – Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868

JOHN BARLEYCORN BY ROBERT BURNS

The version published by Robert Burns in 1782, reworks the ancient folk song and becomes the basis of subsequent versions

The first 3 stanzas are similar to the standard version, apart from the three kings coming from the east to make the solemn oath to kill John Barleycorn, in fact in the English version the three men arrive from the West: to me personally the hypothesis that Burnes he wanted to point out the 3 Magi Kings … it does not seem pertinent to the deep pagan substratum of history: Christianity (or the cult of the God of Light) doesnt want to kill the King of the Wheat, unless you identify the king of the Grain with the Christ (a “blasphemous” comparison that was immediately removed from subsequent versions).

History is the detailed transformation of the grain spirit, grown strong and healthy during the summer, reaped and threshed as soon as autumn arrives, and turned into alcohol; and the much more detailed description (always compared to the standard version) of the pleasures that it provides to men, so that they can draw from the drink, intoxication and inspiration. Burns was notoriously a great connoisseur of whiskey and the last verse is right in his style!

The indicated melody is Lull [e] Me Beyond Thee; other melodies that fit the lyrics are “Stingo” (John Playford, 1650) and “Up in the Morning Early”
The version of the Tickawinda takes up part of the text by singing the stanzas I, II, III, V, VII, XV

Robert Burns
I
There was three kings into the east,
Three kings both great and high,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn should die.
II
They took a  plough and plough’d him down,
Put clods upon his head,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn was dead
III
But the cheerful Spring came kindly on,
And show’rs began to fall;
John Barleycorn got up again,
And sore surpris’d them all
IV
The sultry suns  of Summer came,
And he grew  thick and strong,
His head weel   arm’d wi’ pointed spears,
That no one  should him wrong.
V
The sober Autumn enter’d mild,
When he grew wan and pale;
His bending joints and drooping head
Show’d he began to fail.
VI
His coulour sicken’d more and more,
He faded into age;
And then his enemies began
To show their deadly rage.
VII
They’ve taen a weapon, long and sharp,
And cut him by the knee;
Then ty’d him fast upon a cart,
Like a rogue for forgerie(1).
VIII
They laid him down upon his back,
And cudgell’d him full sore;
They hung him up before the storm,
And turn’d him o’er and o’er.
IX
They filled up a darksome pit
With water to the brim,
They heaved in John Barleycorn,
There let him sink or swim
X
They laid him out upon the floor,
To work him farther woe,
And still, as signs of life appear’d,
They toss’d him to and fro.
XI
They wasted, o’er a scorching flame,
The marrow of his bones;
But a Miller us’d him worst of all,
For he crush’d him between two stones.
XII
And they hae taen his very heart’s blood,
And drank it round and round;
And still the more and more they drank,
Their joy did more abound.
XIII
John Barleycorn was a hero bold,
Of noble enterprise,
For if you do but taste his blood,
‘Twill make your courage rise.
XIV
‘Twill make a man forget his woe;
‘Twill heighten all his joy:
‘Twill make the widow’s heart to sing,
Tho’ the tear were in her eye.
XV
Then let us toast John Barleycorn,
Each man a glass in hand;
And may his great posterity
Ne’er fail in old Scotland!
NOTES
1) the condemned to death were transported to the place of the gallows on a cart for the public mockery

Steeleye Span from Below the Salt 1972


I (Spoken)
There were three men
Came from the west
Their fortunes for to tell,
And the life of John Barleycorn as well.
II
They laid him in three furrows deep,
Laid clods upon his head,
Then these three man made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn was dead.
III
The let him die for a very long time
Till the rain from heaven did fall,
Then little Sir John sprang up his head
And he did amaze them all.
IV
They let him stand till the midsummer day,
Till he looked both pale and wan.
The little Sir John he grew a long beard
And so became a man.
CHORUS:
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Fa la la la lay o
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Sing fa la la la lay
V
They have hired men with the scythes so sharp,
To cut him off at the knee,
The rolled him and they tied him around the waist,
They served him barbarously.
VI
They have hired men with the crab-tree sticks,
To cut him skin from bone,
And the miller has served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
VII
They’ve wheeled him here,
they’ve wheeled him there,
They’ve wheeled him to a barn,
And thy have served him worse than that,
They’ve bunged him in a vat.
VIII
They have worked their will on John Barleycorn
But he lived to tell the tale,
For they pour him out of an old brown jug
And they call him home brewed ale(1).
NOTES
1) The oldest drink in the world obtained from the fermentation of various cereals. The beer originally was classified out as “beer” (with hops) and “ale” (without hops) . Its processing processes start with a spontaneous fermentation of the starch (ie the sugar) that is the main component in cereals, when they come into contact with water, due to wild yeasts contained in the air. And just as in bread, female food, EARTH, WATER, AIR and FIRE combine magically to give life to a divine food that strengthens and inebriates.
The English term of homebrewing or the art of home-made beer translates into Italian with an abstruse word: domozimurgia and domozimurgo is the producer of homemade beer in which domo, is the Latin root for “home”; zimurgo is the one who practices “zimurgy”, or the science of fermentation processes. The domozimurgo is therefore the one who, within his own home, studies, applies and experiments the alchemy of fermentation. Making beer for your own consumption (including that of the inevitable friends and relatives) is absolutely legal as well as fun and relatively simple although you never stop learning through the exchange of experiences and experimentati
on
see more

And finally the COLLAGE of the versions of Tickawinda, Avalon Rising, John Renbourn, Lanterna Lucis Viriditatis, Xenis Emputae, Travelling Band, Louis Killen, Traffic

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/barleycorn.htm
http://www.musicaememoria.com/JohnBarleycorn2.htm
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/j_barley.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14888
http://www.omniscrit.com/2013/01/who-was-john-barleycorn-folk-song-and.html

Jack in the Green festival

Leggi in italiano
man-natureThe Green Man is an archetypal figure connected with the cycle of nature, it is the immanent green force of Nature. The myth tells of a Goddess, the Mother, who generates her child, but this child is not immortal, and because the cycle of life is renewed, he must die.
His death and rebirth are the regeneration of the Spring and with it the regeneration of the community that celebrates the rite for propitiate fertility.

The Green Man  is the guardian spirit of the woods, perhaps an ancient god of vegetation and fertility transversal to many cultures that takes the name of Pan, Cernunnos, Dionysus ..

Heart of Faerie Oracle tarot, Brian & Wendy Froud

It is depicted as a human face among the green foliage or rather its skin is of foliage: in the illustration (Heart of Faerie Oracle tarot, Brian & Wendy Froud) they are artistically reproduced oak leaves, holly, ivy and the palmate leaf of the Maple. Two branches look like horns, the eyes are reddish like those of the fairies of Avalon, among the branches a sprig of mistletoe grows with its berry, the sacred plant of the Druids.
From the mouth of the Green Man sprouts the rowan twigs with the characteristic red berries. The rowan of the birds, as it is commonly called, represents in the Druidic tradition the rebirth of light after the winter and was therefore considered the tree par excellence of the awakening of Nature.

And yet all this veneration of the past was lost in the Middle Ages when the old gods died and the Green Man became a sort of decorative mask to be understood sometimes as benign but more often as a depiction of the evil one.

green-man
British Library, Add MS 18850, the ‘Bedford Hours’ , Paris XV century

 

TRIPLE NATURE OF GREEN MAN

Notre Dame la Grande, Politiers : X century

The deep bond between man and nature is all in the archetype of the green man, the man metamorphosed into a tree, the indissoluble bond between man and nature and its laws. A bond that instills fear but also peace and tranquility hence the ambivalence of the benign or malicious symbol depending on the context: the images smile benevolently or are mocking and fierce. But there is a third type of Green Man: one in which the faces seem scared and suffering.

If some Green Man, instead of joyous, look scary, we find others that, on the contrary, seem scared. These are certainly not demons, but we can not even associate them with images that celebrate the relationship between man and nature. We are faced with another value that this image can take on, that of suffering. In the late Middle Ages, especially after the terrifying experience of the pestilence known as the Black Death, there are rarely joyful and peaceful Green Men. Often branches and leaves stick out of the eyes, in an image that can be terrifying; sometimes the teeth are protruding or very pronounced, as if trying to bite the plant that protrudes from the mouth, to cut it and thus free itself from its suffocating grip. Finally, sometimes we find deformed faces and this too is a very strong signal for the medieval mentality: at that time, in fact, the deformities were a phenomenon much more frequent and known than in the present day, due to insecurity on the places of work, malnutrition and poor care for poor people, and not too advanced medicine. Such incidents in a man’s life were always associated with some divine punishment for his sins. A suffering face that turns into a plant, therefore, puts the accent on the boundary between natural and supernatural, and can sound like a warning against sin and temptations. Another typical representation that can be found is that of Green Man that show the language, probably inspired by the classic Gorgon masks, where it was supposed that this gesture had the sense to drive away evil. It is certain, however, that the people of the Middle Ages did not look at this image in the same way: beyond, in fact, the passages of the Bible that speak of the language as an “unseemly organ”, something that if shown could give rise to scandal, a face with the tongue outside also remembered the image of the hanged man, so certainly not pleasant. (translate from here)

JACK IN THE GREEN

Trisha Fountain Design

In the English folk tradition The Green Man is reborn in a popular May mask of medieval origins (and presumably even more ancient). “Green Jack” was a popular mask of the English May, from the Middle Ages and until the Victorian era, fallen into disuse at the end of the nineteenth century, it returned to show itself and spread to starting from the 1970s in May Day parades.

William Hone in his “The every day book” of 1878 describes the mask of Jack-o’-the-Green “Formerly a pleasant character dressed out with ribands and flowers, figured in village May-games under the name of The Jack-o’-the-Green would sometimes come into the suburbs of London and amuse the residents by rustic dancing.. A Jack-o’-the-Green always carried a long walking stick with floral wreaths; he whisked it about the dance, and afterwards walked with it in high estate like a lord mayor’s footman”

Jack’s mask is further spectacularized by the guild of chimney sweeps, with a boy inside a pyramid-shaped wicker structure, covered with ivy and foliage, surmounted by a kind of wreath of flowers. He went out into the streets with his other friends to dance and collect offers in money. see more

HASTINGS JACK IN THE GREEN FESTIVAL

As well as the other parts of England, the custom was lost in the early twentieth century, but in Hastings  (East Sussex, England) the local group of Morris dance, “Mad Jacks” has had the brilliant idea to resume the tradition, mainly organizing a noisy and green festival that lasts a long weekend from Friday to Monday! Songs and dances, drum races, folk music sessions, concerts, follow each other to culminate the last day in the costume parade with the Morris dancers, musicians, chimney sweeps, queens of May, wild men, and green men, to greet the return of Jack, so a long procession is formed behind him, from 10 in the morning until noon where they converges in the stage on the West Hill where among foods, drinks, performances of participants, crafts fair we spend the afternoon for arrive at 4 when Jack is symbolically killed and stripped of his leaves which are thrown to the crowd as a good luck charm.
Ewan Golder & Daniel Penfold movie (The Child Wren’s music),  they write in the video notes “Since 1983 folk-lore revivalists have organised the annual Jack In The Green Festival held over the May Day weekend in Hastings. The ‘Jack’, covered head to foot in garlands of flowers and leaves, is paraded through the streets before being ‘ sacrificed’. His death marks the end of winter and the birth of summer. Beltane is the Gaelic name of this festival. The film follows Jack’s journey through the streets of Hastings, to his inevitable demise upon the hilltop.

Jethro Tull,  from “Songs from the wood“, 1977

JACK IN THE GREEN
I
Have you seen Jack(1)-In-The-Green?
With his long tail hanging down.
He sits quietly under every tree –
in the folds of his velvet gown.
He drinks from the empty acorn cup
the dew that dawn sweetly bestows.
And taps his cane upon the ground –
signals the snowdrops it’s time to grow.
II
It’s no fun being Jack-In-The-Green –
no place to dance, no time for song.(2)
He wears the colours of the summer soldier –
carries the green flag all the winter long.
<
III
Jack, do you never sleep –
does the green still run deep in your heart?
Or will these changing times,
motorways, powerlines,
keep us apart?
Well, I don’t think so –
I saw some grass growing through the pavements today.
IV
The rowan(3), the oak and the holly tree(4)
are the charges left for you to groom.
Each blade of grass whispers Jack-In-The-Green.
Oh Jack, please help me through my winter’s night.
And we are the berries on the holly tree.
Oh, the mistlethrush is coming(5).
Jack, put out the light.

NOTES
1) Jack is the diminutive of two different names James and John, but more than a name right here is to indicate the Green Man
2) the first of May was the feast of Green Jack, with the masks that went around singing and dancing for begging
3)  The druids considered the rowan the tree of the Down of the year and it was the symbol of the return of light for its spring rebirth. But they consider most sacred the fruits that they thought were the food of the gods, able to rejuvenate, to prolong life, to satiate and to treat serious wounds. The tree was often planted near houses and stalls to protect them, because it was believed to turn away lightning; if it grew spontaneously close to the houses, it was a bearer of good luck. (translated from here)
4) Holly is a tree with masculine symbology, linked to fraternal love and paternity, the winter counterpart of the Quercia. Sir James George Frazer, in his book “The Golden Bough” and Robert Graves, in “The White Goddess” and “The Greek Myths”, they describe a ritual ceremony that was, according to them, practiced in Ancient Rome and in other more ancient European cultures: the ritual fight between King Holly and King Quercia, a struggle that guaranteed the alternation of winter and summer seasons.  (see more)
5) The thrushes and the blackbirds are insensitive to the toxicity of the holly berries and consume large quantities of them becoming the disseminators. The male holly starts to flower when it is about 20 years old and produces small, fragrant white-rosy flowers from May to June. The berries (on the female holly) are green and in autumn they become a shiny red similar to coral: they remain on the tree for the whole winter constituting an important source of food for the birds (be careful because the berries are instead toxic for the man)

second part

LINK
http://www.hastingsjitg.co.uk/
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/jack-in-the-green-chimney-sweeps-day/
http://www.angolohermes.com/Simboli/Green_Man/Green_Man.html
http://insidetheobsidianmirror.blogspot.it/2013/09/la-vera-natura-delluomo-verde.html

“Up, ride with the kelpie” by Ian Anderson

Ian Anderson in 1979 wrote “The Kelpie” for the concept album Stormwatch of Jethro Tull : with this song returns to its roots and the common legends in some Scottish loch about the “water horse”, a sort of aquatic demon that takes the form of a horse but also the human form, they are called “kelpie”, “each uisge” (in English water-horse), “eich-mhara” (in English sea horse); wanting to be picky “kelpie” lives preferably near the rapids of the rivers, fords and waterfalls, while “each uisge” prefers lakes and the sea, but kelpie is the most used word for both (see)
[Ian Anderson nel 1979 scrisse “The Kelpie” per il concept album Stormwatch: con questo brano ritorna alle sue radici e alle leggende comuni nei loch scozzesi sul “cavallo del mare”, una sorta di demone acquatico che prende la forma di cavallo ma anche la forma umana, “kelpie“, “each uisge” (in inglese water-horse),  “eich-mhara” (in inglese sea horse), cavalli d’acqua e del mare; a voler essere pignoli il kelpie vive preferibilmente nei pressi delle rapide dei fiumi, dei guadi e delle cascate, mentre l’each uisge preferisce i laghi e il mare, ma kelpie è la parola più usata per entrambi.(continua)]

Scotland paid to the myth a steel sculpture consisting of two gigantic horse heads of the artist Andy Scott, inserted in a monumental context in Falkirk.
[La Scozia ha tributato al mito una scultura di acciaio consistente in due gigantesche teste di cavallo dell’artista Andy Scott, inserite in un contesto monumentale a Falkirk.]

The Kelpies in Falkirk (https://parliamenthouse-hotel.co.uk/edinburgh-guide/attractions/kelpies-helix/)

Jethro Tull in “Stormwatch” 1979

Kelpie (Kersting Blodig & Ian Melrose) in “Kelpie” 2002 (here is all the CD, the song of Kelpie is track 3 and starts at 8:00 min) [qui è riportato tutto il cd , la canzone del Kelpie è la track 3 e inizia a 8:00 min]


I
There was a warm wind
with the high tide
On the south side of the hill
When a young girl
went a-walking (1)
And I followed with a will
II
“Good day to you,
my fine young lady
With your lips, so sweetly full”
“May I help you comb (2)
your long hair?
Sweep it from that brow, so cool (3)”
CHORUS
Up, ride with the kelpie (4)
I’ll steal your soul to the deep
If you don’t ride with me
while the devil’s free
I’ll ride with somebody else
III
“Well, I’m a man when I’m feeling
The urge to step ashore
So, I may charm you, not alarm you
Tell you all fine things and more (5)
CHORUS
IV
Say goodbye to all your dear kin
For they hate to see you go
In your young prime (6)
to this place of mine
In the still loch far below”
CHORUS
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era un vento caldo
con l’alta marea
Sul lato sud della collina
quando una giovane fanciulla
andò a passeggiare
e la seguii con un proposito
II
“Buon giorno a voi,
giovane e bella Madama
dalle labbra così turgide.”
“Posso aiutarvi a pettinare
i vostri capelli lunghi?
Vi nascondono una fronte tanto fredda”
CORO
Su cavalca con il kelpie
ti ruberò l’anima nell’abisso.
Se non cavalcherai con me,
mentre il diavolo è in libertà,
cavalcherò con qualcun altro
III
“Beh, sono un uomo quando sento
il bisogno di fare un passo a terra
così vi affascino, per non allarmarvi,
vi racconto tutte le cose più belle
CORO
IV
Dite addio ai vostri cari parenti
perchè odiano vedervi andare
nella vostra gioventù in fiore
in questo mio luogo lontano
sotto all’immoto lago”
CORO

NOTE
1) Kerstin Blodig modifies the context instead and says that the girl is intent on collecting berries
“There was a young girl,
off-picking brambles. “
[Kerstin Blodig modifica invece il contesto e dice che la ragazza è intenta a raccogliere delle bacche putrebbe trattarsi di prugnoli o di mirtilli]
2) The girl is not as naive as it seems, in fact being alone along the shores of a mountain lake (clearly the story is set on the high pastures of the Highlands) she suspected that it may be the kelpie: therefore she asks permission to comb his wet hair because the only way to recognize the demon is to look for sand and seaweed caught in the comb!
La fanciulla non è così ingenua come sembra, infatti trovandosi sola lungo le rive di un lago di montagna (chiaramente la storia è ambientata sugli alti pascoli delle Highlands) le viene il sospetto che possa trattarsi del kelpie: gli chiede quindi il permesso di pettirargli i capelli bagnati perchè l’unico modo per riconoscere il demone è quello di  cercare della sabbia e alghe impigliate nel pettine!
3) Kerstin Blodig sings
“Good day to you my young lady, let me show you where to go
To where the berries, they grow much sweeter, at the quiet loch side shore”
(traduzione italiano dei versi cantati da Kerstin: Buon giorno mia giovane madama, permettetemi di farvi vedere dove andare, dove le bacche più dolci crescono, sulla riva del lago)
4) the Kelpie is considered an evil creature a kind of demon that hunts victims to seduce and drown (and devour) them in the abyss (a memory of ancient sacrifices to the spirits of the waters?) So popular wisdom first recommended not to climb incautiously on the back of a lonely horse (because once we climbed on a kelpie there is no possibility of going down) and secondly if we have climbed and we are going to end up dragged in the deep water, we have to look for bridles to tame it (easier said than done naturally).
[il Kelpie è considerata una creatura malvagia una sorta di demone che va a caccia di vittime da sedurre e far annegare (e divorare) negli abissi (un ricordo di antichi sacrifici agli spiriti delle acque?) Così la saggezza popolare raccomandava per prima cosa di non salire mai incautamente in groppa ad un cavallo solitario (perchè  una volta saliti su un kelpie non c’è più possibilità di scendere) e per seconda cosa se proprio ci siamo saliti e stiamo per finire trascinati nelle acque profonde, di cercare le briglie per domarlo (più facile a dirsi che a farsi naturalmente).]
5)  Kelpie is often looking for a companion and it is described as a “leannan-sith” or a “fairy-lover”; Mary Mackellar in her essay ‘The Shieling: Its Traditions and Songs‘ (Gaelic Society of Inverness 1889) writes of the many enchanted seductions to the summer pastures, when the shepherds carried the sheep on the highlands.
[il Kelpie  è spesso in cerca di un compagno/compagna e viene descritto come un “leannan-sith” ovvero una “fata-amante” Mary Mackellar nel suo saggio ‘The Shieling: Its Traditions and Songs’ (Gaelic Society of Inverness 1889 qui) scrive delle molte seduzioni fatate ai pascoli estivi, quando i pastori portavano le pecore sugli altopiani.]
6) the last stanza puts this song in the context of the warning song: the kelpie is the sexual predator but also the sexual call that awakens in the body of a girl when she blooms starting to feel curiosity and desires mostly repressed by the society of adults
[l’ultima strofa colloca la canzone nel contesto delle warning song: il kelpie è il predatore sessuale ma anche il richiamo sessuale che si sveglia nel corpo delle fanciulle quando sbocciano e iniziano a provare curiosità e desideri per lo più repressi dalla società degli adulti]

Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVE (ARCHIVIO CANTI)
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

MAIN PAGE
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/sea-song/creature-del-mare-nella-mitologia-celtica/

L’uomo verde

Read the post in English
man-natureL’Uomo Verde è una figura archetipa connessa con il ciclo della natura, è la forza verde immanente della Natura. Il mito narra di una Dea, la Madre, che genera (autogenera) il figlio, ma questo figlio non è immortale, e perchè il ciclo della vita si rinnovi, egli deve morire.
La sua morte e rinascita sono la rigenerazione della Primavera e con essa la rigenerazione della comunità che celebra il rito per propiziare la fertilità.
Il Green Man è lo spirito-guardiano dei boschi, forse un antichissimo dio della vegetazione e della fertilità trasversale a molte culture che prende il nome di Pan, Cernunno, Dioniso..

Heart of Faerie Oracle tarot, Brian & Wendy Froud

Viene raffigurato come un volto umano tra il fogliame verde o meglio la sua pelle è di fogliame: nell’illustrazione (Heart of Faerie Oracle tarot, Brian & Wendy Froud) sono artisticamente riprodotte le foglie di quercia, agrifoglio, edera e la foglia palmata dell’acero. Due rami si biforcano simmetricamente come corna, gli occhi sono rossastri come quelli delle fate di Avalon, tra i rami spunta un rametto di vischio con la sua bacca, pianta sacra dei Druidi.
Dalla bocca del Green Man germogliano rametti di sorbo con le caratteristiche bacche rosse. Il sorbo degli uccellatori, come viene comunemente chiamato, rappresenta nella tradizione druidica la rinascita della luce dopo l’inverno ed era quindi considerato l’albero per eccellenza del risveglio della Natura.

E tuttavia tutta questa venerazione del passato si è perduta nel Medioevo quando i vecchi dei sono morti e il Green Man è diventato una sorta di maschera decorativa da intendersi a volte come benigna ma più spesso come raffigurazione del maligno.

green-man
British Library, Add MS 18850, the ‘Bedford Hours’ , libro delle ore Parigi, XV sec

LA TRIPLICE NATURA DEL GREEN MAN

Notre Dame la Grande, Politiers : X sec

Il legame profondo tra uomo-natura è tutto nell’archetipo del green man, l’uomo metamorfizzato in albero, il legame indissolubile dell’uomo con la natura e le sue leggi. Un legame che infonde timore ma anche pace e tranquillità da qui l’ambivalenza del simbolo benigno o maligno a seconda del contesto: le immagini sorridono benevole o sono beffarde e feroci. Ma c’è una terza tipologia del Green Man: quella in cui i volti sembrano spaventati e sofferenti.

Se alcuni Green Man, invece che gioiosi, appaiono spaventosi, se ne trovano altri che, al contrario, sembrano spaventati. Non si tratta certamente di demoni, ma nemmeno li possiamo associare alle immagini che celebrano il rapporto dell’uomo con la Natura. Ci troviamo di fronte ad un’altra valenza che questa immagine può assumere, quella della sofferenza. Nel tardo Medioevo, soprattutto dopo la terrificante esperienza della pestilenza nota come la Morte Nera, raramente si trovano Green Men gioiosi e pacifici. Spesso rami e foglie spuntano fuori dagli occhi, in un’immagine che può risultare terrificante; a volte i denti sono sporgenti o molto pronunciati, quasi a voler cercare di mordere la pianta che spunta dalla bocca, per tagliarla e liberarsi così dalla sua stretta soffocante. Talvolta, infine, troviamo dei volti deformi ed anche questo è un segnale molto forte per la mentalità medievale: a quell’epoca, infatti, le deformità erano un fenomeno molto più frequente e conosciuto che non ai giorni nostri, dovute all’insicurezza sui luoghi di lavoro, alla malnutrizione ed alla scarsa cura verso la gente povera, ed alla medicina non troppo avanzata. Tali incidenti nella vita di un uomo venivano sempre associati a qualche punizione divina per i suoi peccati. Un volto sofferente che si trasforma in pianta, quindi, pone l’accento sul confine tra naturale e soprannaturale, e può suonare come un monito contro il peccato e le tentazioni. Un’altra tipica rappresentazione che si può trovare è quella di Green Man che mostrano la lingua, probabilmente ispirata alle classiche maschere della Gorgone, dove si supponeva che questo gesto avesse il senso di scacciare il male. È certo, invece, che la gente del Medioevo non guardasse la questa immagine nello stesso modo: oltre, infatti, ai passi della Bibbia che parlano della lingua come di un “organo sconveniente”, qualcosa che se mostrato poteva dare adito a scandalo, un volto con la lingua di fuori ricordava anche l’immagine dell’impiccato, quindi non certo piacevole. (tratto da qui)

JACK IN THE GREEN

Trisha Fountain Design

Nella tradizione popolare inglese The Green Man rinasce in una popolare maschera del Maggio di origini medievali (e presumibilmente ancora più remote). “Il verde Jack ” (the Green Man, in italiano l’Uomo Verde) è stata una popolare maschera del Maggio inglese, dal medioevo e fino in epoca vittoriana, caduta in disuso alla fine dell’Ottocento, è ritornata a mostrarsi  e a diffondersi a partire dagli anni 1970 nelle sfilate per le feste del Maggio.

William Hone nel suo “The every day book” del 1878 descrive così la maschera di Jack-o’-the-Green “Un tempo un simpatico personaggio vestito con nastri e fiori, rappresentato nei giochi di maggio del villaggio con il nome di The Jack-o’-the-Green, veniva a volte nei sobborghi di Londra e divertiva i residenti con danze rustiche.  Jack-o’-the-Green portava sempre un lungo bastone da passeggio guarnito di fiori e foglie; lo dimenava durantre la danza e poi camminava con il bastone tenuto in alto come il maggiordomo del Sindaco”

La maschera di Jack viene ulteriormente spettacolarizzata dalla corporazione degli spazzacamini, con un ragazzo dentro a una struttura di vimini a forma piramidale, ricoperta di edera e fogliame, sormontata da una specie di corona di fiori. Se ne andava per le strade con altri suoi compari per ballare e a raccogliere offerte in danaro. continua

JACK IN THE GREEN FESTIVAL A HASTINGS

Come anche dalle altre parti d’Inghilterra l’usanza si era persa agli inizi del Novecento, ma a Hastings  (East Sussex, Inghilterra) il gruppo locale di Morris dance, i “Mad Jacks” hanno avuto la brillante idea di riprendere la tradizione, organizzando principalmente una festa chiassosa e verdissima che dura un lungo finesettimana dal venerdì al lunedì! Canti e danze, gare di tamburi, session di musica folk, concerti, si susseguono per culminare l’ultimo giorno nella parata in costume con i Morris dancers, musicisti, spazzacamini, regine del Maggio, uomini selvatici, e uomini verdi,  per dare il salutare il ritorno di Jack , così una lunga processione si forma dietro di lui , dalle 10 del mattino fino a mezzogiorno dove si confluisce nell’area palco sulla West Hill dove tra rinfreschi, esibizioni dei partecipanti, fiera dell’artigianato si passa il pomeriggio per arrivare alle 4 quando Jack viene simbolicamente ucciso e spogliato delle sue foglie gettate alla folla come portafortuna.

Filmato di Ewan Golder & Daniel Penfold (musica dei The Child Wren) così scrivono nelle note del video “Dal 1983 sulla scia del revival folkloristico si organizza a Hastings l’annuale Jack In The Green Festival durante il weekend del primo maggio. Il “Jack”, coperto da capo a piedi da ghirlande di fiori e foglie, sfila per le strade prima di essere “sacrificato”. La sua morte segna la fine dell’inverno e la nascita dell’estate. Beltane è il nome gaelico di questo festival. Il filmato segue il viaggio di Jack per le strade di Hastings, alla sua inevitabile dipartita sulla collina.

Jethro Tull, Jack in the Green in “Songs from the wood“, 1977


I
Have you seen Jack(1)-In-The-Green?
With his long tail hanging down.
He sits quietly under every tree –
in the folds of his velvet gown.
He drinks from the empty acorn cup
the dew that dawn sweetly bestows.
And taps his cane upon the ground –
signals the snowdrops it’s time to grow.
II
It’s no fun being Jack-In-The-Green –
no place to dance, no time for song.(2)
He wears the colours of the summer soldier –
carries the green flag all the winter long.
III
Jack, do you never sleep –
does the green still run deep in your heart?
Or will these changing times,
motorways, powerlines,
keep us apart?
Well, I don’t think so –
I saw some grass growing through the pavements today.
IV
The rowan(3), the oak and the holly tree(4)
are the charges left for you to groom.
Each blade of grass whispers Jack-In-The-Green.
Oh Jack, please help me through my winter’s night.
And we are the berries on the holly tree.
Oh, the mistlethrush is coming(5).
Jack, put out the light.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Hai visto l’Uomo Verde(1)?
Con la sua lunga coda penzoloni
si siede tranquillamente sotto ogni albero-avvolto nel suo abito di velluto.
Beve dalla ghianda cava come una tazza, la rugiada che l’alba dolcemente dona e batte il bastone a terra-
per avvisare i bucaneve che è il momento di spuntare.
II
Non è divertente essere l’Uomo Verde -nessun posto per ballare, né tempo per cantare.(2)
soldato che indossa i colori dell’estate-
e porta la bandiera del verde oltre l’inverno.
III
Uomo, non dormi mai-
il verde ancora scorre nel profondo del tuo cuore?
O questi tempi mutati,
autostrade, linee elettriche,
ci separeranno?
Beh, io non la penso così-
ho visto dell’erba crescere attraverso il marciapiede oggi.
IV
Il sorbo(3), la quercia e l’albero di agrifoglio(4)
sono i doveri di cui farti carico.
Ogni filo d’erba sussurra” Uomo Verde”.
Oh, Uomo, aiutami attraverso la notte del mio inverno
che noi siamo bacche sull’albero di agrifoglio.
Oh, il tordo sta arrivando(5).
Uomo, spegni la luce.

NOTE
1) Jack è il diminutivo di due diversi nomi James (Giacomo) e John (Giovanni, Gianni), ma più che un  nome proprio qui sta a indicare l’Uomo Verde
2) il primo maggio era la festa del Verde Jack, con le maschere che andavano in giro a cantare e a ballare in una sorta di questua continua
3)  I druidi consideravano il sorbo l’albero dell’Aurora dell’anno ed era il simbolo del ritorno della luce per la sua rinascita primaverile. Ma quel che più era sacro erano i frutti che ritenevano fossero il cibo degli dei, in grado di ringiovanire,di allungare la vita, di saziare e di curare ferite gravi . L’albero, veniva spesso piantato nelle vicinanze di case e stalle a loro protezione, perché si riteneva che allontanasse i fulmini; se cresceva spontaneamente vicino alle abitazioni, era portatore di buona sorte, fortuna. (tratto da qui)
4) L’agrifoglio è un albero dalla simbologia maschile, legato all’amore fraterno e alla paternità, la controparte invernale della Quercia. Sir James George Frazer, nel suo libro “Il Ramo d’Oro” e Robert Graves, in “La Dea Bianca” e “I Miti Greci”, hanno descritto una cerimonia rituale che veniva, secondo loro, praticata nell’Antica Roma e in altre culture europee più antiche: la lotta rituale tra il Re Agrifoglio e il Re Quercia, lotta che garantiva l’alternarsi delle stagioni invernale e estiva. (continua)
5) I tordi ed i merli sono insensibili alla tossicità delle bacche dell’agrifoglio e ne consumano grandi quantità diventandone i disseminatori. L’agrifoglio maschio inizia a fiorire “da grande”, quando ha circa 20 anni e produce dei fiori piccoli e bianco-rosato profumati da maggio a giungo. Le bacche (sull’agrifoglio femmina) sono verdi e d’autunno diventano di un rosso lucido simile a corallo: restano sull’albero per tutto l’inverno costituendo una importante fonte di cibo per gli uccelli (attenzione perché le bacche sono invece tossiche per l’uomo)

seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.hastingsjitg.co.uk/
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/jack-in-the-green-chimney-sweeps-day/
http://www.angolohermes.com/Simboli/Green_Man/Green_Man.html
http://insidetheobsidianmirror.blogspot.it/2013/09/la-vera-natura-delluomo-verde.html

RING OUT, SOLSTICE BELLS

Jethro+TullGodiamoci i Jethro Tull in questa rara animazione promozionale per l’uscita nel 1976 del Singolo “Ring Out The Solstice bells“, il brano in questione è poi riproposto nell’album “Songs from the Wood” dell’anno seguente: melodie folk e rock scozzese in una combinazione che non ha perso il suo smalto.
Ian Anderson si è fatto ritrarre come un druido (proprio come era immaginato nelle illustrazioni ottocentesche!) con una campana nella mano destra e un grosso falcetto nella mano sinistra (che diventa nel video un’inquietante falce missoria), ai suoi piedi un rametto di vischio e di agrifoglio, alle spalle una quercia centenaria dai possenti rami.


I
Now is the solstice of the year,
winter is the glad song that you hear.
Seven maids move in seven time.
Have the lads up ready in a line.(1)
CHORUS
Ring out these bells.
Ring out, ring solstice bells.
Ring solstice bells.
II
Join together beneath the mistletoe(2).
by the holy oak whereon it grows.
Seven druids dance in seven time.
Sing the song the bells call,
loudly chiming.
III
Praise be to the distant sister sun(3),
joyful as the silver planets run(4).
Seven maids move in seven time.
Sing the song the bells call,
loudly chiming.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ora è il solstizio dell’anno, inverno è la canzone allegra che senti.
Sette fanciulle si muovono in sette tempi, i ragazzi sono pronti in fila (1)
RITORNELLO
Suona forte queste campane
Suona forte le campane
del solstizio
II
Abbracciamoci sotto il vischio (2)
Accanto alla sacra quercia su cui cresce.
Sette Druidi danzano in sette tempi.
“Canta la canzone”, le campane
chiamano a gran voce
III
Sia lode alla lontana sorella sole (3),
gioiosa mentre i pianeti d’argento girano (4).
Sette fanciulle si muovono in sette tempi
Canta la canzone, le campane
chiamano a gran voce.

NOTE
1) si riferisce a una country dance con le due linee di uomini e donne che si fronteggiano: qui il numero sette è un numero magico e ovviamente sono i druidi a ballare la danza del solstizio!!
2) il riferimento alla festa druidica di Mezz’inverno non poteva ignorare la sua pianta sacra, il vischio
3) che il sole per gli Inglesi sia femmina è una questione antica e densa di fascinazione: “Here lies a she sun, and a he moon there” John Donne (1572-1631), The Complete English Poems.
4) l’immagine è potente attorno alla dea Sole, origine della vita, ruotano i pianeti un tempo conosciuti ovvero sette (quelli visibili a occhio nudo) e poichè il sole è dorato, i suoi pianeti sono delle sfere d’argento. Così la potenza del Suono si traduce in Danza..
Il numero sette rappresenta un po’ in tutte le culture del passato un ciclo  compiuto e perfetto, formato dalla triade sacra e i quattro elementi costitutivi del mondo sensibile che quindi racchiude il divino e l’umano, spirito di ogni cosa.

KING HENRY’S MADRIGAL: PAST TIME IN GOOD COMPANY WITH TUDORS

Henry-VIII-Young-KingEnrico VIII scrisse questa “The King’s Ballad” (“The Kynges Balade“) nel 1509 appena dopo la sua incoronazione a re d’Inghilterra (quando era diciottenne): erano i tempi della gioventù e dei divertimenti a corte, un susseguirsi di feste, banchetti, passatempi e sport all’aria aperta! La prima versione giunge dal “Henry VIII Manuscript” (c. 1513) in cui sono raccolte 14 composizioni di suo pugno “By the King’s Hand”. Sebbene la canzone sia nata come composizione cortese, si è subito diffusa tra il popolo a causa della sua aria orecchiabile, e non si contano poi varianti e arrangiamenti lungo i vari secoli e fino ai giorni nostri.

Il brano è l’esaltazione della gioia di vivere in “allegra brigata” passando il tempo in “sane e aristocratiche” attività “sportive” che all’epoca erano la caccia, il gioco del tennis, i tornei cavallereschi e le danze (il re si è dimenticato di annoverare il sesso, ma è nei sottotitoli), così il re nei primi anni del regno si comporta più da principe e si lascia guidare dalla passione e dagli ardori giovanili e chi oserebbe contraddirlo?

GUIDA ALL’ASCOLTO
Sebbene sia uno tra i brani documentati “By the King’s Hand” nella Serie-Tv-cult “The Tudor” si preferisce ritrarre il re mentre compone “Lady Greensleeves” (vedi) (ma l’attribuzione e solo un aneddoto).

Per ascoltare la melodia come doveva essere eseguita in epoca elisabettiana:
ASCOLTA Tom Hines in “Songs from Shakespeare’s Plays, and Songs of His Time.” 1961

Il brano è ancora nel repertorio dei gruppi di musica antica interpretato spesso a tre voci (ASCOLTA King Singers), e tuttavia preferisco ascoltare queste versioni più contemporanee: la prima magistrale di Ian Anderson il menestrello del rock-prog:
ASCOLTA Jethro Tull in Stormywatch 1979 (titolo “King Henry’s Madrigal”) un “madrigal-prog” del XVI secolo o come dice Ian Anderson “Un rock’n’roll del XVI secolo ispirato da quel figlio di puttana di Enrico VIII

Poi un altro menestrello (insossidabile) del rock che alla veneranda età di cinquant’anni è passato al Renaissance rock: alcuni dicono che se Dio volesse mettersi a suonare la chitarra si incarnerebbe in Ritchie Blackmore
ASCOLTA Blackmore’s night in Under a violet moon 1999 il secondo cd del gruppo: il brano inizia con un eco di trombe lontane sostenute da un ritmo del rullante al “galoppo” ad evocare la caccia e lo sport all’aria aperta tra i quali si insinuano i raffinati e discreti fraseggi di chitarra
ASCOLTA Nox Arcana in Winter’s Knight 2005 la interpretano come un gotico valzer portato dal tappeto delle tastiere quasi come un carillon

Pastime with good company
I love and shall unto I die;
Grudge who list(1), but none deny,
So God be pleased thus live will I.
For my pastance(2),
Hunt, song, and dance.
My heart is set: All goodly sport
For my comfort, Who shall me let?(3)Youth must have some dalliance,
Of good or illé(4) some pastance;
Company methinks(5) then best
All thoughts and fancies to dejest(6):
For idleness, Is chief mistress Of vices all. Then who can say
But mirth and play Is best of all?

Company with honesty
Is virtue vices to flee:
Company is good and ill
But every man hath his free will.
The best ensue, The worst eschew,
My mind shall be: Virtue to use,
Vice to refuse, Shall I use me.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Il tempo libero in buona compagnia amo e amerò fino alla morte; si lamenti chi vuole(1), ma nessuno me lo neghi, così a Dio piacendo io vivrò. Per il mio tempo libero, caccio, canto e danzo, il mio cuore è pronto: tutto il buon tempo (è) per il mio benessere, chi mi ostacolerà(3)?I giovani devono avere qualche frivolezza un passatempo nel bene o nel male credo che la compagnia sia il meglio per superare tutti i pensieri e le fantasie: che la pigrizia è la signora somma di tutti i vizi. Allora chi può dire tuttavia che l’allegria e il divertimento non siano il meglio di tutto?

Un’onesta compagnia è la virtù, che fugge i vizi: la compagnia è buona o cattiva ma ogni uomo ha il suo libero arbitrio. Il meglio seguire, il peggio evitare sarà mio intento: la virtù ad usare, il vizio a rifiutare, (così) mi adopererò

NOTE
1) il motto «Qui qu’en groigne, ainsi sera, car tel est mon plaisir» = Grumble all you like this is how it is going to be”. in italiano “Anche se qualcuno si lamenta, così sarà, poiché questa è la mia volontà” era tra le affermazioni preferite di Anna Bolena
2) pastance= pastime
3) Who’s going to stop me? The question of why Henry chose shall over other modal verbs is trickier. Whenever modal verbs are used in English, an abundance of possible meanings and nuances arises. I would say that this is a possible interpretation. – Who will me let? (focuses on the will (intentions, mind-set) of the subject of the sentence, – Shall is about determined futures rather than futures intended by the subject of the sentence or merely predicted on the balance of probabilities. Shall may hint that that the subject of the sentence might feel an obligation, possibly a moral obligation, to stop Henry enjoying himself (shall in a sense relating to the modern use of should to express expectations). Alternatively, I shall let you! might imply It is my will to stop you, and furthermore my will has the power to affect the future. (tratto da qui)
4) illè=ill
5) me thinks= I believe
6) dejest= digest

FONTI
http://www.academia.edu/2990225/Henry_VIIIs_Lyrics_from_the_Henry_VIII_ MS_London_British_Library_Additional_Manuscript_31 http://noxarcana.com/wintersknight.html
(Cattia Salto ottobre 2014)

We three kings of Orient are

magiNella tradizione cristiana, i Magi fanno visita a Gesù bambino poco dopo la sua nascita, portando in dono oro, incenso e mirra. Nel Vangelo di San Matteo i Magi vengono “da oriente” per adorare Cristo, “il re dei Giudei“. La festa che celebra il loro arrivo a Betlemme cade, come tutti sanno, il 6 gennaio (La dodicesima notte diventata anche festa della Befana) e, in alcuni paesi è la data in cui i bambini ricevono i loro regali di Natale.
Sono lì per adempiere ad una profezia fatta da Balaam chiamato da Balak il re di Moab per maledire gli Ebrei nell’esodo dall’Egitto, in modo da frenare la marcia delle tribù ebraiche verso la terra promessa. Il mago giunto su un picco roccioso del deserto transgiordanico (nonostante i capricci della sua asina che per ben tre volte s’era impuntata e rifiutata di proseguire oltre), dopo aver celebrato il sacrificio consueto, apre la bocca per recitare la maledizione su Israele, e invece ne profetizza il destino glorioso: «Io lo vedo, ma non ora, io lo contemplo, ma non da vicino: una stella spunta da Giacobbe, uno scettro sorge da Israele» (libro dei Numeri 24,17). Di per sé il testo allude alla futura dinastia davidica; ma nella traduzione della Bibbia dall’ebraico in aramaico, la nuova lingua parlata dagli Ebrei, la frase diventa «Un re spunta da Giacobbe; un Messia sorge da Israele». E la frase diventa un’attesa messianica.
(per restare in tema di profezie Isaia 7:14 continua)

I Magi seguono la stella che brilla da Oriente verso Occidente, chiedono informazioni nei pressi di Gerusalemme e alla fine trovano Gesù a Betlemme “Entrati nella casa, videro il bambino con Maria sua madre, e prostratisi lo adorarono. Poi aprirono i loro scrigni e gli offrirono in dono oro, incenso e mirra. Avvertiti poi in sogno di non tornare da Erode, per un’altra strada fecero ritorno al loro paese” (Matteo 2,11)
Fu la vox-populi a farli diventare tre come i doni offerti a Gesù:
1) Kaspar, Caspar, Gaspar, Gathaspa, Jaspar o Jaspas.
2) Melchior, Melichior o Melchyor
3) Balthasar, Bithisareuna o Balthassar.
Nelle chiese orientali diventano Hor, Karsudan e Basanater, una tradizione armena (il Vangelo armeno dell’Infanzia) identifica i Magi come Balthasar proveniente dall’Arabia, Mechior proveniente dalla Persia e Gasper proveniente dall’India.

Nell’antichità venivano chiamati “magi” gli studiosi delle scienze occulte, che un tempo si dedicavano anche allo studio dell’astronomia, della matematica, della fisica, della chimica, e nel contesto della nascita sono preferibilmente ricordati come i Saggi (termine meno scomodo di quello di mago) sebbene non giudei, che riconoscono la venuta del Messia. I Magi “che vengono da Oriente” (da qualche parte dell’Impero Persiano) rappresentano tutti gli altri popoli che tramite la conversione accolgono la salvezza di Dio. Non sono mai stati Re anche se Isaia aveva profetizzato che “Cammineranno i popoli alla tua luce, i re allo splendore del tuo sorgere” e nel Salmo 72  si legge “I re di Tarsis e delle isole gli pagheranno il tributo, il re di Seba e di Saba gli offriranno doni. A lui tutti i re si prostreranno, lo serviranno tutte le nazioni”.

Adorazione Magi, Giotto – Cappella degli Scrovegni

WE THREE KINGS

Il titolo originale del brano è “Three Kings of Orient” scritto dal reverendo John Henry Hopkins Jr pubblicato per la prima volta nel 1863 (New York). Il brano era stato scritto per una recita teatrale, forse nel 1857 ma venne incluso solo nel 1863 nella raccolta curata dallo stesso autore “Carols, Hymns and Songs”. I tre Re sono guidati da una stella mistica e descrivono in prima persona i loro doni, svelandone il significato. Brano molto popolare non solo in America è interpretato da solisti di ogni genere musicale, dai Beach Boys ai Jethro Tull!

La versione strumentale di Jethro Tull in “The Jethro Tull Christmas Album” 2003 (un cd da collezionare per l’Inverno) tra il folk, il jazz e la musica classica. Nel Cd inoltre c’è anche l’ottima “A Christmas Song” che prende l’avvio da “Once in a Royal David’s CIty” (vedi)

ASCOLTA Blackmore’s Night in “Winter Carols”  (strofe I, III, II, I)

ASCOLTA Celtic Woman (strofe I, II, V)


I
We three kings of Orient are
Bearing gifts we traverse afar
Field and fountain, moor (1) and mountain
Following yonder star (2)
II
Born a King on Bethlehem’s plain
Gold I bring to crown Him again
King forever, ceasing never
Over us all to rein
O Star of wonder, star of night
Star with royal beauty bright
Westward leading,
still proceeding
Guide us to thy Perfect Light
III
Frankincense to offer have I
Incense owns a Deity nigh (3)
Pray’r and praising, all men raising
Worship Him, God most high
IV
Myrrh is mine, its bitter perfume
Breathes of life of gathering gloom
Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying
Sealed in the stone-cold tomb
V
Glorious now behold Him arise
King and God and Sacrifice (4)
Alleluia, Alleluia
Earth to heav’n replies
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I INSIEME:
Siamo i  tre Re d’Oriente
e portiamo doni da terre lontane
per campi e fiumi,
colline e montagne
inseguendo una stella  lontana.
II GASPARE:
E’ nato un re nella piana di Betlemme, io porto l’Oro per incoronarlo ancora Re per sempre, perché non smetta mai di regnare su tutti noi
O Stella meravigliosa, stella della Notte
stella rilucente d’oro zecchino
Nel dirigerti verso Occidente
c’indichi il cammino
e ci guidi verso la Luce di Dio

III MELCHIORRE:
Io ho incenso per le offerte,
incenso che è vicino a Dio
chi lo prega e loda, tutti gli uomini ad adorare, Dio l’Altissimo
IV BALDASSARRE:
La Mirra è il mio dono, dall’aspro profumo, per i suoi ultimi respiri  di dolore, di lacrime, di sangue, di morte sigillati nella tomba di fredda pietra.
V INSIEME:
E lui risorgerà nella Gloria
Re e Dio e l’Agnello
“Alleluia, Alleluia”
la Terra replica al Cielo


NOTE
1) moor è la brughiera che in questo caso indica le terre collinose
2) Gli studiosi della Bibbia hanno cercato di capire che cosa voleva indicare Matteo nel suo Vangelo con la “stella” che guidava i Magi. Tre sono le ipotesi: 1. La stella cometa era un fenomeno miracoloso che potevano vedere solo i Magi; 2. La stella cometa era un vero fenomeno astronomico verificatosi nel cielo; 3. La stella cometa del testo era solo un simbolo della venuta nel mondo di Gesù… il testo non parla mai di stella “cometa”, ma solo di “stella” (astron in greco). Sembra che la tradizione della stella “cometa” sia nata da Giotto nel 1303-1305 quando egli dipinse a Padova nella cappella degli Scrovegni una raffigurazione della natività con sopra la capanna una stella con la scia, appunto una stella “cometa”. Inoltre questa “stella” ha un comportamento anormale per essere un vero fenomeno astronomico: prima guida i Magi che provengono dall’Oriente verso Gerusalemme (quindi segue un percorso da est verso ovest), poi scompare quando i Magi arrivano a Gerusalemme. Infatti Erode e tutti gli abitanti della città non ne sapevano niente. Poi la “stella” ricompare quando i Magi lasciano Gerusalemme e li guida verso Betlemme (viaggia quindi questa volta da nord verso sud) e poi si ferma sopra la grotta dove nasce Gesù.
Tutte queste perplessità fanno pensare alla maggioranza dei biblisti che la “stella” della natività deve essere interpretata in senso simbolico: la “stella” rappresenta il Messia cioè Gesù stesso che viene nel mondo. Qui si fa riferimento ad una simbologia usata spesso nel testo biblico: Gesù è la luce che viene nel mondo a vincere le tenebre. (tratto da vedi)
3) nigh non è un refuso per night, ma una parola desueta per “near”, letteralmente “vicino a Dio”: l’incenso (come le piante aromatiche) fa parte dei riti sacrificali agli dei da gettare nel fuoco per purificare l’aria e far salire le preghiere verso l’alto
4) agnello sacrificale

continua

FONTI
http://matteomiele.wordpress.com/2011/09/18/santi-magi-doriente/

John Barleycorn lo spirito del grano

Read the post in English

John Barleycorn (in italiano Giovanni Chicco d’Orzo) è una canzone tradizionale diffusa in Inghilterra e in Scozia, incentrata su questo personaggio popolare, incarnazione dello spirito della birra e del whisky. (vedi) Esistono diverse versioni testuali raccolte in varie epoche; la più antica che si conosce risale al 1460.
Come spesso accade con le ballate più popolari si parla di famiglia in riferimento ad un insieme di testi e melodie collegati tra di loro o imparentati.

Il diagramma tracciato da Pete Wood è ben documentato e si rimanda al suo John Barleycorn revisited per l’approfondimento: la prima ballata che identifica un uomo con lo spirito dell’orzo è Allan-a-Maut (Allan del Malto) e proviene dalla Scozia.
La prima ballata che riporta il nome John Barleycorn è invece del 1624, stampata a Londra “A Pleasant new Ballad.To be sung evening and morn, of the bloody murder of Sir John Barleycorn” abbreviata in The Pleasant Ballad: come sottolinea Pete Wood, tutti gli elementi che caratterizzano la versione attuale della ballata sono già presenti, il giuramento dei cavalieri per uccidere John, la pioggia che lo disseta, e il sole che lo riscalda per dargli energia, il mugnaio che lo macina tra due pietre.

Originale screenprint by Paul Bommer (da qui)

LA MORTE-RINASCITA DEL RE ORZO

spirito-granoSi narra la morte del Re dell’Orzo secondo miti e credenze che risalgono all’inizio della civiltà contadina, usanze che sono state seguite in Inghilterra in queste forme fino ai primi decenni del ‘900.
Secondo James George Frazier ne “Il ramo d’oro”, anticamente “John” era scelto tra i giovani della tribù e trattato come un re per un anno; al tempo prestabilito era però ucciso, seguendo un macabro rituale: il suo corpo veniva trascinato per i campi in modo che il sangue imbevesse la terra e nutrisse l’orzo.

Più recentemente nella tradizione celtica contadina lo spirito del grano entrava nel mietitore che tagliava l’ultimo covone (e simbolicamente uccideva il dio) e doveva essere sacrificato proprio con le modalità descritte nella canzone (o quantomeno in modo figurato e simbolico). continua
Tuttavia lo spirito del Grano-Orzo non muore mai perchè rinasce l’anno successivo con il nuovo raccolto, la sua forza e il suo ardore sono contenuti nel whisky che si ottiene dalla distillazione del malto d’orzo!

JOHN BARLEYCORN

In merito alla melodia Pete Wood osserva:
“The Pleasant ballad” was set to the tune “Shall I Lie Beyond Thee?” on the broadside.63  This tune is quoted by a number of sources by a variety of very similar titles, including “Lie Lulling Beyond Thee” .  It is this writer’s belief from a variety of considerations, including Simpson 64 that these are one and the same tune.  There has been some confusion regarding the use of the tune “Stingo” for various members of the family.  Several publications say that John Barleycorn should be sung to this tune, (including Dixon), and some people have assumed this was the tune for “The Pleasant Ballad.”  These impressions seem to have originated from Chappell 65, who meant that “Stingo” was the tune for another member of the family “The Little Barleycorne”, a view which accords with his own comments on the version in the Roxburghe Ballads 66, with Simpson, and Baring-Gould who says ‘[Stingo] is not the air used in the broadsides nor in the west of England’ 67.  Two further tunes, “The Friar & the Nun” and “Twas when the seas were roaring”, are mentioned by Simpson.  Mas Mault has been suggested to be set to the tune “Triumph and Joy”, the original title of “Greensleeves”. 68

In realtà ben 45 diverse melodie sono state utilizzate nei secoli per questa ballata, e Pete Wood analizza le quattro melodie più diffuse.

 MELODIA 1

La versione di John Stafford del 1906 pubblicata da Sharp in English Folk Songs è probabilmente la melodia che più si avvicina all’epoca di Giacomo I
The Young Tradition

MELODIA DIVES AND LAZARUS

La versione di Shepherd Haden diventata “standard” per essere stata inclusa nel The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs.
Traffic (nel video con molte antiche stampe e immagini in tema) una versione che non ha perso per nulla il suo smalto! Imparata da Mike Waterson

testo Traffic
I
There was three men come out of the West
Their fortunes for to try
And these three men made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn(1) must die.
II
They ploughed, they sowed, they harrowed him in
Throwing clods all on his head
And these three men made a solemn vow
John barleycorn was Dead.
III
They’ve left him in the ground for a very long time
Till the rains from heaven did fall
Then little Sir John’s sprung up his head
And so amazed them all
IV
They’ve left him in the ground till the Midsummer
Till he’s grown both pale and wan
Then little Sir John’s grown a long, long beard
And so become a man.
V
They hire’d men with their scythes so sharp
To cut him off at the knee.
They’ve bound him and tied him around the waist
Serving him most barb’rously
VI
They hire’d men with their sharp pitch-forks
To prick him to the heart
But the drover he served him worse than that
For he’s bound him to the cart.
VII
They’ve rolled him around and around the field
Till they came unto a barn
And there they made a solemn mow
Of Little Sir John Barleycorn
VIII
They’ve hire’d men with their crab-tree sticks
To strip him skin from bone
But the miller, he served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
IX
Here’s Little sir John in the nut-brown bowl(2)
And brandy in the glass
But Little Sir John in the nut-brown bowl’s
Proved the stronger man at last
X
For the hunts man he can’t hunt the fox
Nor so loudly blow his horn
And the tinker, he can’t mend Kettles or pots
Without a little of Sir John Barleycorn.
Traduzione italiana di Alberto Truffi
I
C’erano tre uomini che venivano da occidente,
per tentare la fortuna
e questi tre uomini fecero un solenne voto:
John Barleycorn (1) deve morire.
II
Lo avevano arato, lo avevano seminato, l’avevano ficcato nel terreno
e avevano gettato zolle di terra sulla sua testa e questi tre uomini fecero un voto solenne
John Barleycorn era morto.
III
Lo lasciarono giacere per un tempo molto lungo,
fino a che scese la pioggia dal cielo
e il piccolo sir John tirò fuori la sua testa
e lasciò tutti di stucco.
IV
L’avevano lasciato steso fino al giorno di mezza estate
e fino ad allora lui era sembrato pallido e smorto e al piccolo sir John crebbe una lunga lunga barba e
così divenne un uomo.
V
Avevano assoldato uomini con falci veramente affilate
per tagliargli via il collo
l’avevano avvolto e legato tutto attorno,
trattandolo nel modo più brutale.
VI
Avevano assoldato uomini con i loro forconi affilati
che l’avevano conficcato nella terra
e il caricatore lo trattò peggio
di tutti
perché lo legò al carro.
VII
Andarono con il carro tutto intorno al campo
finchè arrivarono al granaio
e fecero un solenne giuramento
sul povero John Barleycorn.
VIII
Assoldarono uomini con bastoni uncinati
per strappargli via la pelle dalle ossa
e il mugnaio lo trattò
peggio di tutti
perché lo pressò tra due pietre.
IX
E il piccolo sir John con la sua botte di noce (2)
e la sua acquavite nel bicchiere
e il piccolo sir John con la sua botte di noce
dimostrò che era l’uomo più forte.
X
Dopo tutto il cacciatore non può suonare il suo corno
così forte per cacciare la volpe
e lo stagnaio non può riparare un bricco o una pentola
senza un piccolo (sorso) di grano d’orzo.
NOTE
(1) John Grano d’Orzo, personificazione del whisky e della birra
(2) La botte di legno di noce o di rovere usata tutt’oggi per invecchiare il whisky

Jethro Tull live

Damh The Bard in The Hills They Are Hollow

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODIA 3

La versione di Robert Pope ripresa da Vaughan Williams nel suo Folk Song Suite
versione per coro e orchestra

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODIA 4

come collezionata nel Shropshire
Fred Jordan live

Jean-François Millet - Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868
Jean-François Millet – Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868

JOHN BARLEYCORN, LA VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS

La versione pubblicata da Robert Burns nel 1782, rielabora l’antico canto popolare e diventa la base delle successive versioni (vedi inizio)

Le prima 3 strofe sono simili alla versione standard, a parte i tre re che arrivano dall’oriente per fare il solenne giuramento di uccidere John Barleycorn, infatti nella versione inglese i tre uomini arrivano dall’Ovest: a me personalmente l’ipotesi che Burnes volesse indicare i 3 Re Magi … sembra poco pertinente al profondo substrato pagano della storia: non è certo il Cristianesimo (o il culto del Dio della Luce) a voler uccidere il Re del Grano, a meno che non si voglia identificare il re del Grano con il Cristo (un “blasfemo” paragone che è stato subito rimosso dalle successive versioni).

La storia è la dettagliata trasformazione dello spirito del grano, cresciuto forte e sano durante l’estate, mietuto e trebbiato appena arriva l’autunno, e trasformato in alcol; e la molto più dettagliata descrizione (sempre rispetto alla versione standard) dei piaceri che esso fornisce agli uomini, affinchè essi possano trarre dalla bevanda ebbrezza ed ispirazione. Burns fu notoriamente un grande estimatore di whisky e l’ultima strofa è proprio nel suo stile!

La melodia indicata è Lull[e] Me Beyond Thee alte melodie che si adattano al testo sono “Stingo” (John Playford, 1650) e “Up in the Morning Early
La versione dei Tickawinda riprende in parte il testo cantando le strofe I, II, III, V, VII, XV

Testo di Robert Burns
I
There was three kings into the east,
Three kings both great and high,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn should die.
II
They took a  plough and plough’d him down,
Put clods upon his head,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn was dead
III
But the cheerful Spring came kindly on,
And show’rs began to fall;
John Barleycorn got up again,
And sore surpris’d them all
IV
The sultry suns  of Summer came,
And he grew  thick and strong,
His head weel   arm’d wi’ pointed spears,
That no one  should him wrong.
V
The sober Autumn enter’d mild,
When he grew wan and pale;
His bending joints and drooping head
Show’d he began to fail.
VI
His coulour sicken’d more and more,
He faded into age;
And then his enemies began
To show their deadly rage.
VII
They’ve taen a weapon, long and sharp,
And cut him by the knee;
Then ty’d him fast upon a cart,
Like a rogue for forgerie(1).
VIII
They laid him down upon his back,
And cudgell’d him full sore;
They hung him up before the storm,
And turn’d him o’er and o’er.
IX
They filled up a darksome pit
With water to the brim,
They heaved in John Barleycorn,
There let him sink or swim
X
They laid him out upon the floor,
To work him farther woe,
And still, as signs of life appear’d,
They toss’d him to and fro.
XI
They wasted, o’er a scorching flame,
The marrow of his bones;
But a Miller us’d him worst of all,
For he crush’d him between two stones.
XII
And they hae taen his very heart’s blood,
And drank it round and round;
And still the more and more they drank,
Their joy did more abound.
XIII
John Barleycorn was a hero bold,
Of noble enterprise,
For if you do but taste his blood,
‘Twill make your courage rise.
XIV
‘Twill make a man forget his woe;
‘Twill heighten all his joy:
‘Twill make the widow’s heart to sing,
Tho’ the tear were in her eye.
XV
Then let us toast John Barleycorn,
Each man a glass in hand;
And may his great posterity
Ne’er fail in old Scotland!
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre re dall’oriente,
tre grandi re e potenti
e fecero un voto solenne:
John Barleycorn deve morire.
II
Presero un aratro e lo ararono,
gettarono zolle di terra sulla sua testa
e fecero un voto solenne
John Barleycorn era morto.
III
Ma la dolce primavera venne
e la pioggia scese dal cielo
John Barleycorn si alzò di nuovo
e lasciò tutti di stucco
IV
Venne il sole afoso d’Estate,
e lui crebbe robusto e forte
con la testa irta di lance appuntite
e che nessuno gli dia torto.
V
L’Autunno serio arrivò mite
allora lui divenne pallido e smorto
piegato alle giunture e la testa cadente
aveva incominciato a deperire.
VI
Il suo incarnato sbiadiva sempre più,
lui iniziò a invecchiare
e i suoi nemici cominciarono
a mostrare la loro furia mortale.
VII
Avevano preso una falce, lunga e affilata,
per tagliarlo al ginocchio;
poi lo legarono in fretta su un carro
come un ladro per il patibolo.
VIII
Lo hanno adagiato sulla schiena
e colpito con un randello;
lo hanno appeso prima del temporale
e lo hanno rigirato ancora ed ancora.
IX
Hanno riempito una fossa buia
con acqua fino all’orlo
e ci hanno gettato John Barleycorn
lì lo lasciarono a nuotare o ad affondare.
X
Lo hanno gettato sul pavimento
per procurargli ancora più dolore,
e ancora, mentre lui dava segni di vita
lo hanno gettato avanti e indietro.
XI
Hanno bruciato sulla fiamma
il midollo delle sue ossa;
ma il Mugnaio lo trattò peggio di tutti
perché lo pressò tra due pietre
XII
Ed essi avevano preso il suo sangue d’eroe
e lo bevvero rigirando (il bicchiere)
e ancora più lo bevevano
più gioia ricevevano.
XIII
John Barleycorn era un eroe coraggioso
di nobile ardire
perciò se tu assaggerai il suo sangue
il tuo coraggio crescerà.
XIV
Egli fa dimenticare all’uomo il suo dolore,
aumentare ogni sua gioia:
egli fa cantare il cuore della vedova
sebbene abbia le lacrime agli occhi
XV
Allora brindiamo a John Barleycorn
tutti con un bicchiere in mano
e che la sua grande discendenza
non possa mai mancare nella vecchia Scozia!

NOTA
1) i condannati a morte erano trasportati sul luogo del patibolo su di un carro per il pubblico dileggio

Steeleye Span in Below the Salt 1972 (la versione inglese)


I (Spoken)
There were three men
Came from the west
Their fortunes for to tell,
And the life of John Barleycorn as well.
II
They laid him in three furrows deep,
Laid clods upon his head,
Then these three man made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn was dead.
III
The let him die for a very long time
Till the rain from heaven did fall,
Then little Sir John sprang up his head
And he did amaze them all.
IV
They let him stand till the midsummer day,
Till he looked both pale and wan.
The little Sir John he grew a long beard
And so became a man.
CHORUS:
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Fa la la la lay o
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Sing fa la la la lay
V
They have hired men with the scythes so sharp,
To cut him off at the knee,
The rolled him and they tied him around the waist,
They served him barbarously.
VI
They have hired men with the crab-tree sticks,
To cut him skin from bone,
And the miller has served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
VII
They’ve wheeled him here,
they’ve wheeled him there,
They’ve wheeled him to a barn,
And thy have served him worse than that,
They’ve bunged him in a vat.
VIII
They have worked their will on John Barleycorn
But he lived to tell the tale,
For they pour him out of an old brown jug
And they call him home brewed ale(1).
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I (Parlato)
C’erano tre uomini
che venivano da occidente,
per tentare sia la fortuna
che la vita di John Barleycorn
II
Lo hanno steso in tre solchi profondi
e ricoperto con zolle di terra
e quei tre uomini fecero un giuramento solenne,
John Barleycorn era  morto.
III
Lo lasciarono giacere per un tempo molto lungo, fino a che scese la pioggia dal cielo e il piccolo sir John tirò fuori la sua testa e lasciò tutti di stucco
IV
Lo lasciarono riposare fino al giorno di mezza estate, e fino ad allora lui era sembrato pallido e smorto e al piccolo sir John crebbe una lunga barba e così divenne un uomo
Ritornello
Fa la la la, che bel giorno
canta fa la la la lay
Fa la la la, che bel giorno
canta fa la la la lay
V
Avevano assoldato uomini con falci veramente affilate
per tagliarlo all’altezza del ginocchio,
l’avevano avvolto e legato tutto attorno ai fianchi,
trattandolo nel modo più brutale.
VI
Assoldarono uomini con bastoni uncinati
per strappargli via la pelle dalle  ossa
e il mugnaio lo trattò peggio di tutti
perché lo pressò tra due pietre
VII
Lo hanno spinto qui
lo hanno spinto là
lo hanno spinto in un fienile
e lo trattarono peggio di tutti
perchè lo tapparono per bene dentro un tino
VIII
Hanno fatto la loro volontà su John Barleycorn
ma lui visse per raccontare la sua storia,
che lo hanno versato in un boccale di coccio
e lo hanno chiamato birra fatta in casa!

NOTA
1) la birra si distingueva in origine in “beer” (con il luppolo) e “ale” (senza luppolo). La bevanda più antica del mondo ottenuta dalla fermentazione di vari cereali. I suoi processi di lavorazione partono da una fermentazione spontanea dell’amido (ossia lo zucchero) prevalente componente nei cereali, quando essi vengono a contatto con l’acqua, a causa dei lieviti selvatici contenuti nell’aria. E così come nel pane, alimento femminile, TERRA, ACQUA, ARIA e FUOCO si combinano magicamente per dare vita a un cibo divino che fortifica e inebria.
Il termine inglese di homebrewing ovvero l’arte della birra fatta in casa si traduce in italiano con un’astrusa parola: domozimurgia e domozimurgo è il produttore di birra casalingo in cui domo, è la radice latina per “casa”; zimurgo è colui il quale pratica la “zimurgia“, ovvero la scienza dei processi di fermentazione. Il domozimurgo quindi è colui che tra le proprie mura domestiche, studia, applica e sperimenta le alchimie della fermentazione. Fare la birra per il proprio autoconsumo (compreso quello degli immancabili amici e parenti) è assolutamente legale oltre che divertente e relativamente semplice sebbene non si finisca mai di imparare attraverso lo scambio delle esperienze e la sperimentazione continua

E infine il COLLAGE  delle versioni di Tickawinda, Avalon Rising, John Renbourn, Lanterna Lucis Viriditatis, Xenis Emputae, Travelling Band, Louis Killen, Traffic

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/barleycorn.htm
http://www.musicaememoria.com/JohnBarleycorn2.htm
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/j_barley.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14888
http://www.omniscrit.com/2013/01/who-was-john-barleycorn-folk-song-and.html

(Cattia Salto – integrazione 2012 e agosto 2013)

Lady Greensleeves

Read the post in English

Il brano Greensleeves giunge dal rinascimento inglese (con innegabili influenze musicali italiane) e ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo molto ricco e di una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i  generosi regali.

Era l’anno 1580 che vide un susseguirsi di pubblicazioni  di un canto d’amore di un gentiluomo alla sua Lady Greensleeves,  [in italiano la Signora dalle Maniche Verdi]; Richard Jones e Edward White si contendevano  le stampe di una canzone di gran moda, nel mese di settembre, lo stesso giorno Jones con  “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” e White con “A ballad,  being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his   frende“, poi dopo pochi giorni, ancora White con  un’altra versione: “Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves” e  qualche mese dopo Jones  con la pubblicazione di “A merry newe Northern   Songe of Greene Sleeves“; questa volta la replica venne da William Elderton,  che, nel febbraio del 1581, scrisse la “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” .
In ultimo la versione riveduta e ampliata da Richard Jones  con il titolo “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” inclusa nella collezione ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites’  del 1584, fu quella che diventò la versione finale, ancora oggi eseguita  (almeno per quanto riguarda la melodia e per buona parte del testo con ben 17  strofe).

LA MELODIA

La melodia nasce per liuto, lo strumento per eccellenza della musica  rinascimentale (e barocca) che ha visto in Inghilterra una pregevole fioritura con autori del calibro di John Jonson e di John Dowland (consiglio l’ascolto del Cd di Sting Labirinth). Come evidenziato nello studio approfondito di Ian Pittaway l’antenato di Greensleeves è il Passamezzo antico.
Verso la fine del XV secolo, gli strumenti a pizzico come il liuto stavano appena iniziando a sviluppare una nuova tecnica da aggiungere al loro repertorio espressivo, suonando corde per accordi piuttosto che suonando le note del periodo medievale. Uno degli accordi che si sviluppò fu il passamezzo antico (c’era anche il passamezzo moderno), che nacque in Italia all’inizio del XVI secolo prima di diffondersi in tutta Europa. Oggi è un po’ come il blues, ci sono una prefissara sequenza di accordi di base sulla quale viene aggiunta una melodia. (tradotto da qui)
Il coro però di Greensleeves segue l’andamento melodico di una Romanesca che a sua volta è stata una variante del passamezzo.

Melodia per liuto in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” scritto da Adriaen Smout per i Paesi Bassi  nel 1595

Baltimore Consort nella versione strumentale in stile  rinascimentale con andamento a ballo

Una coreografia della danza la ritroviamo solo  in epoca più tarda, nell'”English Dancing Master” di John Playford (sia nell’edizione del 1686 e poi pubblicata a più riprese nel Settecento) come english country dance

LA LEGGENDA

anne-boleyn-roseLa leggenda  vuole che sia stato Enrico VIII, nel 1526, a  scrivere “Greensleeves”  per Anna Bolena, proprio  all’inizio della loro relazione, quando lei lo faceva sospirare (e gli anni  furono sette prima che i due si sposassero).
Un’ipotesi suggestiva in quanto sia la melodia che il testo ben si adattano al personaggio, che di suo ha scritto svariati brani ancora oggi nel repertorio  di molti artisti di musica antica; tuttavia la  poesia non è stata trascritta in nessun manoscritto dell’epoca e quindi non possiamo essere certi dell’attribuzione.
L’equivoco è stato generato da William Chappell che nel suo “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (Londra: Chappell & Co, 1859) attribuisce la melodia al re, mal interpretando una citazione di Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th’ Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.”(in Skialethia, or a Shadow of Truth, 1598: la ballata “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” risale al tempo di Enrico VIII (King Harries) e, secondo Chappell è sempre stata cantata sulla melodia Greensleeves.

Così nella Serie Tv “The Tudors” si segue la leggenda e noi possiamo ammirare Jonathan Rhys Meyers tutto assorto mentre “trova” la melodia sul liuto…
The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Per restare in tema il gruppo tedesco  “Gregorian“, con le immagini del film “The Tudors” (strofe I, III, VIII, IX)

L’ORIGINE IRLANDESE?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublino: Browne e Nolan, 1905) è stato il primo a presumere (senza addurre prove) l’irlandesità della melodia.  “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music however), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.”
Da allora l’idea della paternità irlandese ha preso sempre più vigore tant’è che il brano è presente nelle compilations di musica celtica  etichettato come irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

Lirica cortese o uno scherzo pesante?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-SIl testo ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo verso una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i suoi generosi e principeschi regali; più ironicamente, si può interpretare come il lamento di un gentiluomo verso la moglie o l’amante bisbetica!
Roberto Venturi propende per un contesto un po’ più piccante
Già ai tempi di Geoffrey Chaucer e dei Racconti di Canterbury (ricordiamo che Chaucer visse dal 1343 al 1400) l’abito verde era considerato tipico di una “donna leggera”, leggasi di una prostituta. Si tratterebbe quindi di una giovane donna di promiscui costumi; Nevill Coghill, il celebre ed eroico traduttore in inglese moderno dei Canterbury Tales, spiega -in riferimento ad un’interpretazione di un passo chauceriano- che, all’epoca, il colore verde aveva precise connotazioni sessuali, particolarmente nella frase A green gown, una gonna verde. Si trattava, in estrema pratica, delle macchie d’erba sul vestito di una donna che praticava (o subiva) un rapporto sessuale all’esterno, in un prato, “in camporella” come si direbbe oggigiorno. Se di una donna si diceva che aveva “la gonna verde”, in pratica era un pesante ammiccamento e le si dava di leggera se non tout court della puttana.
La canzone sarebbe quindi la lamentazione di un amante tradito e abbandonato, o di un cliente respinto; insomma, come dire, qualcosa di tutt’altro che regale (sebbene in ogni epoca i re siano stati generalmente i primi puttanieri del Regno). Un’altra possibile interpretazione è che l’amante tradito, o respinto, si sia voluto come vendicare sulla poveretta indirizzandole una deliziosa canzoncina in cui le dà della puttana mediante la metafora delle “maniche verdi”.” (Riccardo Venturi da qui)

Moltissimi gli interpreti, con versioni in stile antico e moderno (anche Yngwie Malmsteen la suona con la sua chitarra e Leonard Cohen ne propone una riscrittura nel 1974 ) di una melodia antica che non ha mai perso il suo fascino e popolarità.
Oggi il testo viene raramente eseguito e  solo per due o quattro strofe, ma è un brano amato dai gruppi corali che lo cantano più estesamente.

Nella versione in ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, dalla raccolta di Israel G. Young (una ventina di strofe vedi testo qui) ci si dilunga sui regali che il nobiluomo fa alla sua bella per vezzeggiarla:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” con “sleeves of satin”, che la fanno essere “our harvest queen”, “garters” decorate d’oro e d’argento, “gelding”, e servitori “men clothed all in green”, e non ultimo tante leccornie ( “dainties”).

Le proposte per l’ascolto sono veramente tante e fare una cernita è ardua impresa (vedi qui), così mi limiterò a un paio di suggerimenti (il primo di parte!)

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The   Visit 1991 (strofe I, III)
Jethro Tull in Christmas Album 2003 versione strumentale

David Nevue un arrangiamento per pianoforte stupefacente!

Da non perdere la traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (sommo poeta e traduttore) (qui) del Nouo Sonetto Cortese su la Signora da le Verdi Maniche. Su la noua Melodia di Verdi Maniche.
Verdi Maniche era ogni mia Gioja,
Verdi Maniche, la mia Delizia.
Verdi Maniche, lo mio Cor d’Oro;
Chi altra, se non la Signora da le Verdi Maniche?


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
Traduzione italiano
coro(1)
Greensleeves era la gioia mia
Greensleeves era la mia delizia,
Greensleeves era il mio cuore d’oro,
chi se non la mia Signora dalle Maniche Verdi?(2)
I
Ahimè amore mio, non mi rendete giustizia, a respingermi con scortesia
vi ho amata per tanto tempo
deliziandomi della vostra compagnia.
II
I vostri voti avete spezzato,
come il mio cuore.
Oh perché così mi  avete rapito?
Ora resto in un mondo a parte
e il mio cuore resta in prigione
III
Ero pronto al vostro fianco, a concedervi ciò che bramavate e avevo impegnato vita e terre, per restare nelle vostre buone grazie.
IV
La gonna di zendalo bianco(4)
con sfarzosi ricami d’oro,
la gonna di seta bianca
vi ho comprato con gioia.
V
Se così intendete disprezzarmi,
ancor più m’incantate
e anche così, continuo a rimanere
un amante in prigionia
VI
I miei uomini erano tutti di verde vestiti , ed erano al vostro servizio
tutto ciò era galante da vedersi
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VII
Voi non potreste desiderare cosa terrena senza che l’abbiate prontamente, la vostra musica sempre suonerò e canterò
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VIII
Pregherò Iddio lassù
che voi possiate accorgervi della mia costanza e che una volta prima
che io  muoia voi possiate infine amarmi
IX
Ed ora Greensleeves  vi saluto, addio
Pregherò Iddio che voi prosperiate
sono ancora il vostro fedele amante
venite ancora da me ed amatemi

NOTE
1) l’ordine in cui sono cantate le prime due frasi del coro a volte sono  invertite e iniziano in senso contrario
2) Nel medioevo il colore verde era il simbolo  della rigenerazione e quindi della giovinezza e del vigore fisico, significava “fertilità” ma anche “speranza” e accostato  all’oro indicava il piacere. Era il colore della medicina per i suoi poteri  rivitalizzanti. Colore dell’amore allo stadio nascente, nel  Rinascimento era il colore usato dai giovani specialmente a Maggio; nelle donne  era anche il colore della castità. E tale attribuzione mal si accosta all’altro significato più promiscuo  di “donnina sempre pronta a rotolarsi nell’erba”. E il fascino della ballata sta proprio nella sua ambiguità!
Il verde è anche il colore che nelle fiabe/ballate connota una creatura fatata.
Le parole gaeliche “Grian Sliabh” (letteralmente tradotte come “sole montagna” ovvero una “montagna esposta a sud, soleggiata”)  si pronunciano Green Sleeve (il brano è peraltro molto popolare in Irlanda soprattutto come slow air). Grian è anche il nome di un fiume che scorre dalle Sliabh Aughty (contea Clare e Galway)
3) le espressioni sono proprie della lirica cortese
4) lo zendalo è un velo di seta

Nella versione estesa i regali dello spasimante sono molti e costosi assai ed è tutto un lagnarsi di “oh quanto mi costi bella mia!”
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

FONTI
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm