Tam Lin & Janet by Ewan MacColl

The traditional ballad of the Elven Knight Tam Lin, is of Scottish origin and dates back to the late Middle Ages. (first part introduction and texts / versions list). A very long ballad that goes beyond forty stanzas.
In the first episode I analyzed the version of the Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span (both of which follow roughly the textual version in Child Ballad # 39A) but they sing a little more than twenty verses. To know the whole story we have to look at the Scottish side.
La ballata tradizionale del Cavaliere elfico Tam Lin, è di origine scozzese e risale al tardo Medioevo. (prima parte introduzione). Una lunghissima ballata che supera la quarantina di strofe.
Nella prima puntata ho analizzato la versione dei Fairport Convention e degli Steeleye Span (i quali entrambi seguono grossomodo la versione testuale in Child Ballad #39A) che cantano però poco più di una ventina di strofe. Per conoscere tutta la storia bisogna guardare al versante scozzese.
 

CHILD#39B: The Young Tamlane

Compared to the story told in the previous post (here) we know more details about the aristocratic origins of Janet: she is the owner of the Wood, donated by her father, and lives in her castle in sweet pastimes, surrounded from the courtisans. In Spring she meets Tam Lin in the greenwood and when her pregnancy is evident Janet returns to the forest to look for abortive plants, because she certainly can not marry an elf, but Tam Lin reveals her that he was a noble man and he is becaming an Elf for a whim of the Fairy Queen. So once Tam Lin has conquered the girl’s heart, he convinces her to free him from the spell.
Rispetto alla storia narrata nel post precedente (qui) si aggiungono ulteriori dettagli in merito alle origini aristocratiche di Janet (in italiano Giovanna oppure Vanna): lei è la proprietaria del Bosco, donatogli dal padre, e vive nel suo castello in dolci svaghi, attorniata dalla corte e dalle sue dame di compagnia. In Primavera però sente il richiamo del Bosco e inoltrandosi nella parte più nascosta e buia incontra Tam Lin, il guardiano di un pozzo sacro. Janet non si limita a cogliere le rose e quando la gravidanza risulta evidente dal gonfiore sotto alle vesti, la fanciulla non vuole dire il nome del padre e rifiuta il matrimonio riparatore. In questa versione ritorna nel bosco per cercare piante abortive, perché di certo non può sposarsi con un elfo, senonchè Tam Lin le rivela di essere stato un uomo, anche di un certo rango e di essere diventato Elfo per un capriccio della Regina delle Fate.
Così una volta che Tam Lin ha conquistato il cuore della fanciulla la convince a liberarlo dall’incantesimo .

Janet and the snake [Vanna e il serpente] Jill Karla Schwarz

Ewan MacColl
This long ballad reported and commented on by Sir Walter Scott, is performed just as it probably happened in the Middle Ages. The text is taken partly from the Manuscript Glenriddell (1791). In its length the song becomes almost hypnotic, today we are not used to hear stories telling through singing, but it was once customary that evening entertainment in the castles was played by a bard (with his harp) alternating tales, songs, slow air and dance music.
Questa lunghissima ballata riportata e commentata anche da Sir Walter Scott, è eseguita con l’ausilio della sola voce, proprio come probabilmente accadeva nell’antichità. Il testo è ripreso in parte dal Manoscritto Glenriddell (1791) Nella sua lunghezza la canzone diventa quasi ipnotica, oggi non siamo abituati ad ascoltare narrare le storie mediante il canto, ma un tempo era consuetudine che l’intrattenimento serale nei castelli venisse svolto, dal bardo di corte o itinerante, con un “programma” vario fatto di racconti e di ballate cantate, di slow air e musica da danza e il semplice accompagnamento di un arpa.

Scots version *
I forbid ye, maidens a
That wear gold in your hair
Tae come or gae by Carterhaugh
For young Tam Lin is there.
There’s  nane that gaes tae Carterhaugh
But pays to him their fee,
Either their rings or green Mantlel
Or else their maidenheid.
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little abune her knee,
and she has gane to Carterhaugh
as fast as she could hie
She hadnae pu’d a double rose
A rose but and a briar
When oot and started Young Tam Lin,
Says, “Lady, ye’ll pu’ nae mair.”
‘Why pu’   ye the rose, lady,
And why break ye the wand?
And why come ye tae Carterhaugh
Withooten my command?”
“Carterhaugh is mine,” she said,
My daddy gie tae me,
And I will come tae Caterhaugh
Withoot the lief o’ thee.
He’s taen her by the milk-white haund
And by the grass-green sleeve,
and laid her doon upon a bank,
and didnae ask her leave.
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
a little abune her knee,
And she has gane tae her daddy’s hoose
As fast as she could hie.
There were fowre-and-twenty ladies fair/
A-playing’ at the ba’,
And Janet gaed like ony queen,
A flowr amang them a’.
There were fowre-and-twenty ladies fair
A-playing’ at the chess,
And Janet gaed amang them a’
As green as ony grass.
Oot spak then an auld grey knicht,
Stood owre the castle wa’,
And said, “Alas, dear Janet
But I fear ye’ve gotten a fa’,
Your petticoat is gey shorter
and we’ll be blamed a’.”
“O Haud  yer tongue, ye old grey knicht
And an ill deith may ye dee
Faither my bairn on wha I will
I’ll faither nane on thee.”
Then oot spak her auld faither,
Says, “Janet, you’re beguiled.
Your petticoat is gey shorter
I fear ye gang wi’ child.”
“O if I gang wi’ bairn, faither,
It’s I will tak’ the blame.
There’s no’ a knicht aboot your ha’
Sha’ bear my bairnie’s name.
Janet as kilted her green kirtle
a little abune her knee,
And she’s has gane tae Carterhaugh
as fast as she could hie.
She hadnae pu’d a double rose
A rose but and a briar
When oot and started Young Tam Lin,
Says, “Janet, ye’ll pu’ nae mair.
Why pu’ ye the rose, Janet,
Amang the leaves sae green?
A’ for to kill the bonnie babe
That we gat us between.”
“Tell me, noo, Tam Lin,” she said,
“For’s His sake wha died on tree,
Gin ever ye were in holy kirk
or else in Christendee?”
“Roxburgh was my grandfaither
And wi’ him I did ride,
And it fell oot upon a day
That wae did me betide.
Ay, it fell oot upon a day,
A cauld day and a snell,
When we were fae the hunting come
That fae my horse I fell.
The Queen o’ Elfinland passed by,
Took me wi’ her to dwell,
E’en whaur there is a pleasant place
For them that in it dwell,
Though at the end o’ seiven year
They pay their soul to Hell.
The nicht it is auld Hallow E’en
When elfin folk do ride,
And them that would their true-loves win/
At Miles Cross they maun bide.”
“But tell me noo, Tam Lin,” she said,
“When ye’re amang the thrang,
Hoo should I ken my ain true-love
amang that unco band? “
“Some will ride the black, the black,
And some will ride the broon,
But I’ll be on the milk-white horse
Shod wi’ the siller shoon.
The ae hand will be gloved, Janet
the other will be bare,
And by these tokens’ I’ll gie ye,
Ye’ll ken that I am there.
The first company that passes by,
say “na” and let them gae,
The second company that passes by,
Then let them gang their way,
But the third company that passes by
Then I’ll be yin o’ they.
Ye’ll hie ye tae my milk-white steed
and pu’ me quickly doon,
Throw your green kirtle owre me
To keep me fae the rain
They’ll turn me in your airms, lady
Tae an adder and a snake,
But haud me fast unto yer breist
Tae be your worldy mate.
They’ll turn me in your airms, lady
A spotted toad  to be,
But haud me fast unto your breist
T’enjoy your fair body.
They’ll turn me in your airms, lady
Tae a mither-naked man,
Cast your green kirtle owre me
To keep me frae the rain.
First put me in a stand o’ milk
Syne in a stand o’ water,
and haud me fast unto your breist
I am your bairn’s father.”
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
a little abune her knee
and she has gane tae Miles Cross
as fast as she could hie.
The first company that passed her by
She said “na” and let them gae,
The second company that passed her by/
She let them gang their way
But the third company that passed her by/
Then he was yin o’ they.
She’s heid her to his milk-white steed
And pu’d him quickly doon,
Cast her green kirtle owre him
To keep him fae the rain.
They’ve turned him in his lady’s airms
Tae an adder and a snake,
She held him fast unto heir breist
He was her worldy mate.
They’ve turned him in his lady’s airms
A spotted toad to be,
She held him fast unto heir breist
T’enjoy her fair body.
They’ve turned him in his lady’s airms
Tae a mither-naked man,
She’s cast her green kirtle owre him
To keep him fae the rain.
She’s put him in a stand o’ milk,
Syne in a stand o’ water,
She’s held him fast unto her breist,
He was her bairn’s faither.
Oot spak the Queen O’ Elfinland
Oot o’ a bush o broom,
“O, wha’ has gotten young Tam Lin
Has gotten a stately groom”
Oot spak the Queen o’ Elfinland
Oot o’ a thorny tree,
“O’, wha has gotten young Tam Lin
Has taen my love fae me.
Gin I had kent, Tam Lin,” she said
“A lady would borrow thee,
I would hae torn oot thy twa grey e’en
Put in twa e’en o’ a tree.
Gin I had kent, Tam Lin,” she said
“When first we came tae home,
I would hae torn oot that hairt o’ flesh,
Put in a hairt o’ stane.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Attente fanciulle
che portate l’oro tra i capelli (1)
nel venire o andare a Carterhaugh (2)
il giovane Tam Lin si trova!
Tutte coloro che vanno a Carterhaugh
un pegno devono lasciare:
o l’anello o il verde mantello
o la loro verginità.
Vanna si rimboccò la veste verde
appena sopra il ginocchio (3)
per andare a Carterhaugh,
più svelta che poteva.
Aveva già colto una rosa
una rosa con il rametto
ed ecco, le apparve il giovane Tam Lin:
“Donna, non ne prendere più!
Perché raccogli la rosa, signora,
e perché spezzi i rami?
E perché vieni a Carterhaugh,
senza il mio permesso? (4)”
Carterhaugh è mia”- disse lei
“mio padre a me la diede
e verrò a Carterhaugh
senza la tua volontà”
La prese per la mano bianca come giglio (5) e per la manica verde-erba
e la stese su una riva
senza chiederle il permesso
Vanna si rimboccò la veste verde
appena sopra il ginocchio,
per andare al palazzo del padre
più svelta che poteva..
C’erano ventiquattro belle dame
che giocavano a palla (6)
e Vanna procedeva come regina
un fiore tra le belle.
Ventiquattro belle dame
giocavano agli scacchi;
e Vanna procedeva tra di loro
più verde del filo d’erba.
Parlò un vecchio cavaliere grigio
sugli spalti del castello:
“Ahimè, cara Vanna,
ma temo che hai commesso uno sbaglio,
la tua gonna è troppo corta
e il biasimo ricadrà su tutti noi!”.
“Frenate la lingua, cavaliere grinzoso,
che peste vi colga!
Sarà il padre chi voglio,
ché nessuno di voi lo e’ di mio figlio.”
Parlò allora il vecchio padre 
e disse:” Vanna, sei stata sedotta
la tua gonna è troppo corta
temo che aspetti un bambino.”
“Se aspetto un bambino, padre,
io sola ne porto il biasimo:
non c’e’ cavaliere nel tuo palazzo
che possa dargli il nome.
Vanna si rimbocca la veste verde
appena sopra il ginocchio,
e corre a Carterhaugh
più veloce che può.
Aveva colto due rose,
solo una sola rosa o due,
che comparve il giovane Tam Lin
dicendo “Vanna non coglierne più.
Perché cogli le rose, Vanna,
nei boschi d’alberi verdi?
Per uccidere il bel bimbo
forse, che e’ nato fra noi?”
“Dimmi, ora Tam Lin, – lei disse-
per amore di chi e’ morto in croce,
sei mai stato in una chiesa consacrata,
o tra i battezzati?” (7)
“Mio nonno era di Roxbrugh
e cavalcavo con lui;
ma giunse un giorno
in cui male mi colse:
Si, giunse un giorno,
un giorno freddo e pungente.
tornavamo dalla caccia
e caddi dal mio cavallo;
La regina delle Fate stava passando,
e mi prese a vivere con lei,
bella è la terra delle fate
per coloro che vi dimorano,
ma quando scadono i sette anni (8)
si paga un tributo all’Inferno.
Nella notte della vigilia d’Ognissanti,
cavalcherà il popolo delle Fate
e se vuoi conquistare l’amore
devi attenderli al Bivio della Croce. (9)”
“Ma dimmi ora , Tam Lin, – lei disse-
in mezzo a tanti cavalieri
come riconoscere il mio vero amore
tra quella schiera strana?”
“Alcuni cavalcheranno il cavallo nero,
e altri il morello,
ma io sarò sul destriero biancolatte (10)
e porterò calzari d’argento .
In una mano avrò un guanto, Vanna,
e l’altra sarà nuda,
e questi sono i segni che ti do
e tu saprai chi sono.
La prima schiera che passa
di “no” e lasciala andare,
la seconda schiera che passa
lasciala andare per la sua strada,
ma la terza schiera che passa
allora io sarò tra loro.
Allora ferma il mio cavallo bianco-latte
e tirami giù veloce,
getta il tuo mantello verde su di me
e nascondimi alla vista.
Mi muterò tra le tue braccia, signora (11)
in una vipera e in un serpente,
ma tienimi stretto al seno,
sarà il tuo compagno umano.
Mi muterò tra le tue braccia, signora
in un rospo pieno di macchie
ma tienimi stretto al seno,
per godere del tuo bel corpo.
Mi muterò tra le tue braccia, signora
in un nudo cavaliere
getta il tuo manto verde su di me
e nascondimi alla vista.
Prima mettimi in una tinozza di latte (12)
poi in una d’acqua
e tienimi stretto al tuo petto
sono il padre del tuo bambino”
Vanna si rimbocca la veste verde
appena sopra il ginocchio,
e andò in cerca del Bivio della Croce
più veloce che poteva
La prima schiera che le passò vicino
disse “no” e la lasciò andare
la seconda schiera che le passò vicino
la lasciò andare per la sua strada
ma la terza schiera che le passò vicino,
allora egli era tra di loro.
Corse lesta verso il cavallo biancolatte
e trascinò a terra il cavaliere
gettò il suo mantello verde su di lui
e lo nascose alla vista.
Si mutò tra le braccia della sua signora
in una vipera e un serpente,
ma ella lo tenne stretto al petto
sarà il suo compagno umano.
Si mutò tra le braccia della sua signora
in un rospo pieno di macchie
ma ella lo tenne stretto al petto
per godere del suo bel corpo
Si mutò tra le braccia della sua signora
in un nudo cavaliere
lei gettò il manto verde su di lui (13)
e lo nascose alla vista.
Lo mise in una tinozza di latte
poi in una tinozza di acqua
e lo tenne stretto al petto
egli era il padre del suo bambino
Parlò allora la Regina delle Fate
da un cespuglio di ginestra (14):
“Chi si e’ preso il giovane Tam Lin
si e’ preso un amante nobilissimo.”
Parlò ancora la Regina delle Fate
da un roveto:
“Chi si e’ preso il giovane Tam Lin
ha preso il mio amore. (15)
Ma se avessi saputo, Tam Lin,
che una dama ti avrebbe liberato
ti avrei strappato i begli occhi grigi
e messo al posto due occhi di legno (16).
Ma se avessi saputo, Tam Lin,
che alla fine saresti ritornato a casa
ti avrei strappato il tuo cuore di carne
e messo al posto un cuore di pietra”

NOTE
* from here
1) In the Middle Ages it was customary for maidens to wear gold clasps (or golden nets, headbands) in their long hair; the minstrel then addresses the virgin girls to warn them not to venture into the forest of Carterhaugh because it is inhabited by an elf (it is known that the elves are excellent lovers and eager to conquer the virtue of virgins maidens!) 
era costume per le ragazze da marito portare dei fermagli d’oro (o retine dorate, cerchietti) nei capelli; il menestrello quindi si rivolge alle fanciulle vergini per avvertirle di non avventurarsi nel bosco di Carterhaugh perché è abitato da un elfo (è noto che gli elfi siano ottimi amanti nonché bramosi di conquistare la virtù di vergini fanciulle!)
2) the story is set in a real and well-identified place, the Carterhaugh wood still existing in Selkirk (in the Scottish Border) where the Ettrick and Yarrow rivers flow together (see)
la storia è ambientata in un luogo reale e ben identificato, il bosco di Carterhaugh tuttora esistente a Selkirk (nel Border scozzese) dove confluiscono i fiumi Ettrick e Yarrow (vedi)
3) it is a drapery of the over-skirt of those that go for the greater in Renaissance costumes, or the girl to move better in the forest has raised the surcoat and holds it with her hands
si tratta di un drappeggio della sopra-gonna di quelli che vanno per la maggiore nei costumi rinascimentali, oppure la fanciulla per poter muoversi meglio tra il bosco si è rialzata la sopravveste e la trattiene con le mani
4) before entering the greenwood (the sacred wood) it is necessary to ask permission of the fairies that inhabit it, Lady Janet being the owner of the forest behaves incautiously.
prima di entrare nel greenwood ossia nel bosco sacro è necessario chiedere il permesso delle fate che lo abitano, Lady Janet essendo la proprietaria del bosco si comporta in modo incauto.
5) typical code phrase used in ballads to make it clear to listeners that the man and the woman are going to have sex  prendere per la mano bianca come il giglio: tipica frase in codice utilizzata nelle ballate per far capire agli ascoltatori che l’uomo e la donna stanno per fare sesso
6) a commonplace of traditional ballads: the players are always 24 in number
il gioco con la palla è un commonplace delle ballate tradizionali, i giocatori sono sempre 24 di numero
7) she want to ascertain the nature of Tam Lin: has he always been a fairy creature or was previously a human being (baptized and therefore in the light of true faith)?
la donna vuole accertarsi sulla natura di Tam Lin: è sempre stata una creatura fatata o prima era un essere umano (battezzato e quindi nella luce della vera fede)?
8) seven years is a symbolic period to indicate a punishment, once it was also the duration of an apprenticeship to learn a trade, but also the legal duration to be able to declare a missing person legally dead. Is a transitional position of Tam Lin thus emerging: a prisoner, a magician’s apprentice or a man waiting to pass definitively in the Fairy World?
The period is about to expire with the night of Halloween, one of the most important Celtic festivals with that of Beltane: the winter festival (called Samhain).
The young knight went to hunt with impunity in the sacred wood, profaning the taboo of inviolability, so the fairy queen is keeping him prisoner. Here is quoted, very Christianly, the tribute (the tenth) that the fairies must pay to the devil, an allusion to the human sacrifices that the pagans due to their deities! This explains, in a Christian perspective, the fairy abductions: the love of the dame sans merci leads straight to hell!
sette anni è un periodo simbolico per indicare una punizione, una volta era anche la durata di un apprendistato per imparare un mestiere, ma anche la durata giuridica per poter dichiarare legalmente morta una persona scomparsa. Viene così a delinearsi una posizione transitoria di Tam lin: un prigioniero, un apprendista mago o un uomo in attesa di passare definitivamente nel Mondo delle Fate?
Il periodo sta per scadere con la notte di Halloween, una delle feste celtiche più importante con quella di Beltane: ossia la festa dell’Inverno (detta Samhain). In effetti il giovane cavaliere è andato a cacciare impunemente nel bosco sacro, profanando il tabù dell’inviolabilità, così la regina delle fate lo tiene prigioniero. Qui è citato, molto cristianamente, il tributo che le fate devono versare al diavolo, un allusione ai sacrifici umani che si credeva facessero i pagani alle divinità boschive! Si spiegano così, in un ottica cristiana, i rapimenti fatati: l’amore della dame sans merci porta dritto all’inferno!
9) Mile Cross or Old Mile are places near the Ettrick River in the Carterhaugh wood near Selkirk (see)
Mile Cross o Old Mile sono luoghi nei pressi dell’Ettrick River nel bosco di Carterhaugh vicino a Selkirk (vedi)
10) the white horse reserved to Tam Lin indicates his particular beauty, his purity as a human not yet completely transformed into an elf
il cavallo bianco riservato a Tam Lin indica la sua particolare bellezza, la sua purezza in quanto umano non ancora trasformato completamente in elfo 
11) the animals in which the elf is transformed have a negative and witchcraft connotation both the snake and the toad are considered magical animals in the Middle Ages to be used in the potions and for the spells (especially those of love or of evil eye). These animals are clear references to the cult of the mother goddess especially for their powers of “transformation” and fruitfulness. The toad and the golden ball are the protagonists of the fairytale / ballad of Prince Frog (see)
gli animali in cui viene trasformato l’elfo hanno una connotazione negativa e stregonesca sia il serpente che il rospo sono considerati nel Medioevo animali magici da utilizzare nelle pozioni e per gli incantesimi (soprattutto quelli d’amore o di malocchio). Questi animali sono evidenti riferimenti al culto della dea madre soprattutto per i loro poteri di “trasformazione” e di fecondità. Il rospo e la palla dorata sono i protagonisti della fiaba/ballata del Principe Ranocchio (vedi)
12) this verse recalls the sacred well in the word “stand” that had to be a container large enough to hold a man.
In some larger versions (and even more widely in the fairytale version of the story) we know that the elf, in addition to undergo transformations in animals, eventually becomes an incandescent bar (or flaming sword), so burning to challenge the endurance of the pain by the brave Janet.
sempre senza citare il pozzo e la sua acqua questa strofa però lo richiama con quel “stand” che ho tradotto come tinozza (o vasca) e che doveva essere un contenitore abbastanza grande da poter contenere un uomo. Un po’ elaborata come procedura (trascinare delle grosse tinozze piene di liquido per un bosco!) ma in alcune versioni più estese (e ancora più diffusamente nella versione fiabesca della storia) sappiamo che l’elfo oltre a subire delle trasformazioni in animali diventa alla fine una barra incandescente (o anche spada fiammeggiante), così bruciante da sfidare la capacità di sopportazione del dolore da parte della coraggiosa Janet. (così lo “stand” è diventato un semplice, anche se più prosaico, secchio).
049As a final act Janet must throw the bar into the sacred well, from which Tam Lin will re-emerge completely naked (and reborn). Some interpretations want to see a sort of ancient ritual sharing of the mystery of birth: the girl is initiated to sexual knowledge in Beltane and then to the birth in Samain.
In fact during her initiatory trial she is not only pregnant, but next to give birth!
Come atto finale Janet deve gettare la barra nel pozzo sacro, dal quale riemergerà Tam Lin completamente nudo (e rinato). Alcune interpretazioni vogliono vedere una sorta di antica condivisione rituale del mistero della nascita: la fanciulla viene iniziata alla conoscenza sessuale a Beltane e successivamente al parto a Samain. In effetti durante la sua prova iniziatica lei è non solo incinta, ma prossima a partorire!
13) it is the green mantle of Janet to protect the man “reborn” from the queen of fairies, which precisely because of its magical color will hide his escape (but also a bit ‘of realism it takes after all we are in November!)
è il mantello verde di Janet a proteggere l’uomo “rinato” dalla regina delle fate, che proprio per il suo colore magico lo coprirà nella fuga (ma anche un po’ di realismo ci vuole dopotutto siamo a novembre!)
14) broom è la ginestra, ma siamo in novembre e il cespuglio doveva essere piuttosto spoglio
15) the fairy attributes to the beauty of the young the reason for his abduction, however Tam Lin was not a slave to the wishes of the fairy, because she had left his human heart.
la fata attribuisce alla bellezza del giovane il motivo del suo rapimento, tuttavia Tam Lin non era uno schiavo ai voleri della fata, perchè lei gli aveva lasciato il suo cuore umano.
16) ccording to the courtly theories on love we know that comes from the look, so with the wooden eyes Tam Li could have never fall in love
secondo le teorizzazioni cortesi sull’amore sappiamo che nasce dallo sguardo, così con gli occhi di legno Tam Li non avrebbe mai potuto innamorarsi 

 Alastair McDonald in Heroes & Legends of Scotland 1997

*
I
Oh heed my warning, maidens all
that wear gold in yer hair,
Tae come or gae by Carterhaugh
For young Tam Lin is there.
II
But Janet’s kilted her green gown
a little above the knee,
and she’s away to Cauterhaugh,
the young Tam Lin tae see.
III
She met him by the grassy grove,
she’s kissed him tenderly.
He’s laid her low among the flow’rs,
no more a maid is she.
IV
Now ere my bairn is born Tam Lin,
ye’ll surely marry me.
Now, Janet dear, though thee I love,
this thing it canna be my love.
This thing, it canna be.
V
For onct when I’d a huntin’ gone,
twas fray my horse I fell.
The Queen o’ Faeries she caught me,
in yon green hill ta dwell.
VI
And at the end of seven years,
she pays a tithe tae Hell,
and should she ken, I’ve lain w’ ye,
I’m feared to dee my sel’ my love,
I’m feared ta dee ma sel’.
VII
Then Janet pulled the double rose
and swore the bairn must die.
Now Janet dear there’s one way yet,
ta save the bairn and I.
VIII
Just at the murk and the midnight hour,
the faery folk will ride.
Then, pull me frae the milk white steed,
and ye shall be my bride my love.
And ye shall be my bride.
IX
Oh gloomy gloomy was the night,
and eerie was the way
when Janet hid among the trees,
the faery fold tae spy.
X
Twas first she saw the black, black steed,
and then she saw the brown.
But Tam raid on the milk white steed
and she pulled him tae the ground.
XI
The faeires changed him in her arms,
a burning coal of fire,
but Janet held him tae her breast,
to be her heart’s desire.
XII
The faeries changed him in her arms,
a wolf and then a snake,
but Janet held him tae her breast,
all for her true love’s sake.
XIII
The faeries changed him in her arms,
a peregrine and wild,
but still she held him tae her breast,
the faether o’ her child.
XIV
They changed him in her arms at last,
a wild and naked man,
but still she held him tae her breast,
and so she won Tam Lin, Tam Lin.
And so she won Tam Lin.
XV
Was up then spake the Elfin queen,
an angry queen was she.
For Janet stole the bonniest knight
in all her company.
XVI
Had I but known Tam Lin she said,
before I let my home,
I would have changed yer heart of flesh,
for one of hardest stone Tam Lin.
For one of Hardest stone.

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Fate attenzione al mio avviso, fanciulle
che portate l’oro tra i capelli 
nell’andare e venire da Carterhaugh 
s’incontra il giovane Tam Lin!
II
Ma Vanna si rimboccò la veste verde
appena sopra il ginocchio 
per andare a Carterhaugh,
a trovare il giovane Tam Lin.
III
Lo incontrò in un boschetto vede
e lo baciò teneramente
lui la sdraiò tra i fiori
e lei non è più una vergine
IV
“Ora prima che il bambino nasca Tam Lin,
di certo mi sposerai.”
“Cara Vanna, anche se ti amo
ciò non può essere mia cara,
ciò non può essere mia cara
V
Perchè un tempo che a caccia andavo,
caddi da cavallo.
La regina delle Fate mi prese
per farmi dimorare in quel tumulo verde
VI
E alla fine di sette anni
pagherà la sua decima all’Inferno,
e se lei sapesse che ho giaciuto con te
temo che toccherà a me, mia cara,
temo che toccherà a me”
VII
Allora Vanna colse la rosellina
e giurò che il bambino sarebbe morto
“Ora cara Vanna c’è ancora una possibilità
per salvare il bambino e me
VIII
Nella buia mezzanotte
la schiera delle fate andrà a cavallo.
Allora tirami giù dal destriero bianco
e diventerai la mia sposa, mia cara,
diventerai la mia sposa”
IX
Oh buia era la notte
e inquietante il cammino
quando Vanna si nascose tra gli alberi
per spiare il passaggio delle fate
X
Dapprima vide lo stallone nero
e poi vide quello morello
ma Tam Lin cavalcava sul destriero bianco
e lei lo tirò giù a terra
XI
Le fate lo trasformarono tra le sue braccia
in un ardente tizzone infuocato
ma Vanna lo tenne stretto al suo seno
era colui che il cuore desiderava
XII
Le fate lo trasformarono tra le sue braccia
in un lupo e un serpente,
ma Vanna lo tenne stretto al petto
era il suo vero amore
XIII
Le fate lo trasformarono tra le sue braccia
in un falco pellegrino
ma ella lo tenne stretto al petto
era il padre del suo bambino
XIV
Si mutò tra le sue braccia alla fine
in un nudo cavaliere
ma ancora lei lo teneva stretto al petto
e così conquistò Tam Lin,
e così conquistò Tam Lin,
XV
Parlò allora la Regina delle Fate
ed era una regina adirata
perchè Vanna prese il più bel cavaliere
di tutta la sua schiera
XVI
“Ma se avessi saputo, Tam Lin,-disse-
prima di lasciare la mia dimora
avrei mutato il tuo cuore di carne
in uno di pietra, Tam Lin
in uno di pietra durissima”

NOTE
* from here

GLASGOW REEL

It is an instrumental tune also called Tam Lin, very fast and obsessive: there are those who hypothesize (with Sir Walter Scott in mind) that the story of Tam Lin developed as a ballad sung by the single voice with an instrumental dance to end. Super popular for its liveliness that every violinist sooner or later learns to play, as well as an inevitable tune in the irish dance, reworked in all the sauces
E’ un brano strumentale chiamato anche Tam Lin, decisamente veloce e ossessivo: c’è chi ipotizza (con Sir Walter Scott in testa) che la storia di Tam Lin si sviluppasse in modo monocorde come ballata cantata dalla sola voce e si concludesse con la danza strumentale. Super popolare per la sua vivacità che ogni violinista prima o poi impara a suonare, nonché pezzo immancabile nell’irish dance, rielaborato in tutte le salse

Celtic Sands live

Rising Gael

Ilse de Ziah

 LINK

http://walterscott.eu/education/ballads/supernatural-ballads/1344-2/
https://tam-lin.org/library/scott_text.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64647

Tam Lin by Fairport Convention vs Steeleye Span

The traditional ballad of the Elven Knight Tam Lin, is of Scottish origin and dates back to the late Middle Ages.
A melody called “Young Thomlin” dates back to the 1600s, but historians stated the origin of the ballad since the 13th century. The ballad was transcribed by Robert Burns in 1792 (in Johnson’s Scots Musical Museum) and is one of the ballad variants collected by Francis James Child in his “The English and Scottish Popular Ballads”, Child Ballad # 39 A (42 stanzas)
Musical Notation

A ballad that is also a fairy tale for children full of hidden meanings and symbolism.
(first part introduction and texts / versions list)
[La ballata tradizionale del Cavaliere elfico Tam Lin, è di origine scozzese e risale al tardo Medioevo. 
Una melodia dal nome “Young Thomlin” è del 1600, ma gli storici riallacciano l’origine della ballata fin dal XIII secolo. La ballata è stata trascritta da Robert Burns nel 1792 (in Johnson’s Museum) e costituisce una delle varianti collezionate da Francis James Child in “The English and Scottish Popular Ballads“, Child Ballad # 39 A (42 strofe)
Musical Notation

Una ballata che è anche una fiaba per bambini ricca di significati nascosti e simbolismi.
(prima parte introduzione e elenco testi/ versioni)]

THE SEASON OF LOVE
[LA STAGIONE DELL’AMORE]

Stephanie Law: Janet in the sacred wood picks up a rose. Although it is not explicitly mentioned the month of May it is quite clear that the season in which the beautiful Janet and the elf meet is Spring, since roses have just blossomed: we are in the realm of fairies – who love roses – and therefore they make them grow where they want, we imagine them in the wild variety, the small roses with five petals. [Janet nel bosco sacro raccoglie una rosa. Anche se non è espressamente citato il mese di Maggio è del tutto evidente che la stagione in cui si incontrano la bella Janet e l’elfo è la primavera, essendo appena sbocciate le rose: siamo nel regno delle fate -che amano le rose- e quindi le fanno crescere dove vogliono, ce le immaginiamo nella varietà selvatica (rosa canina), le piccole roselline dai cinque petali ]

The whole first part of the ballad is a clear allusion to the first sexual experience, voluntarily sought by the girl who enters the sacred wood attracted by the scent of wild roses, it is Spring and with the awakening of Nature also the blood flows faster in the veins and the heart beats by love: the rose is also the “rose of roses” and the cloak that covers the modesty of the woman (and represents the paternal protection) must be left in pawn and then lost, I do not therefore complety agree with the interpretations that they see the relationship between the two as a male violence, indeed there are all the signs of an ancient ritual of sexual initiation.
Tutta la prima parte della ballata è una chiara allusione alla prima esperienza sessuale, volontariamente ricercata dalla fanciulla che si addentra nel bosco sacro attratta dal profumo delle rose selvatiche, è Primavera e con il risveglio della Natura anche il sangue scorre più velocemente nelle vene e il cuore batte smanioso d’amore: la rosa è anche “la rosa delle rose” femminile e il mantello che copre il pudore della donna (e rappresenta la protezione paterna) deve essere lasciato in pegno e quindi perso, non concordo perciò con le interpretazioni che vedono il rapporto tra i due come una violenza da parte maschile, anzi ci sono tutti i segni di un antico rituale di iniziazione sessuale.

THE END OF SUMMER
[LA FINE DELL’ESTATE]

Stephanie Law: dettaglio della schiera fatata, la regina delle fate

The second part takes place on Winter during the Celtic feast of Samain, and it’s about the test that our heroine must overcome to free the elf: the illusions of the fairy queen will make her believe that she is witnessing the transformation of Tam Lin into a dragon (or snake) and in bear; but she will have to show courage and true love to keep the knight with her arms (in the extended version Janet will have to make one last effort and throw the knight into the water of the sacred well.)
A similar theme of transmutation in animals is present in the Cretan tale of Thetis and Peleus, the parents of Achilles, and in fact the two stories are similar but in the Greek myth the woman is a nereid and she’ll transform before becoming human.
La seconda parte si svolge nell’inverno durante la festa celtica di Samain, con le prove che la nostra eroina deve superare per liberare l’elfo: le illusioni della regina delle fate le faranno credere di assistere alla trasformazione di Tam Lin in drago (o serpente) e in orso; ma lei dovrà dare prova di coraggio e di grande amore e tenere stretto a sè il cavaliere fino a quando comparirà nudo tra le sue braccia (nella versione estesa Janet dovrà compiere un ultimo sforzo e gettare il cavaliere nelle acque del pozzo.)
Un tema simile di trasmutazione in animali è presente nella favola cretese di Thetis e Peleus ovvero i genitori di Achille, e in effetti i due racconti sono simili ma nel mito greco è la donna ad essere una nereide e a trasformarsi prima di poter diventare umana.

However, always looking for traces of ancient teachings in the ballad, we can read the second part as a metaphor of childbirth.
Sempre però cercando nella ballata le tracce di antichi insegnamenti, possiamo leggere la seconda parte come una metafora del parto.

StephanieLawTamLin-TheFaeryHostLarge

In the illustration (fairytale, dreamy) of Stephanie Law we see the fairies riding on the bridge, (and the white horse of Tam Lin). The moon is waning, but the detail is wrong because the night of Samain coincides with the new moon. The ballad does not have a happy ending because the fairy queen casts a mortal curse on the woman.
Nella illustrazione (fiabesca, sognante) di Stephanie Law vediamo il passaggio della schiera fatata sul ponte, ove si distingue il cavallo bianco di Tam Lin. La luna è calante, ma il dettaglio è errato perché la notte di Samain coincide con la luna nuova (la data una volta non era fissa, ma era regolata sul calendario lunare). La ballata non ha un lieto fine perché la regina delle fate lancia una maledizione mortale sulla donna.

Fairport Convention (voice Sandy Denny) in “Liege and Lief” , 1969. There are no words, simply mythical!
Non ci sono parole, semplicemente mitici!

Fairport Convention in “Fairport’s Sense of Occasion” album (2007)

English version*
I
“I forbid you maidens all
that wear gold in your hair (1)
To travel to Carter Hall (2)
for young Tam Lin is there
II
None that go by Carter Hall
but they leave him a pledge
Either their mantles of green
or else their maidenhead”.
III
Janet tied her kirtle green
a bit above her knee
And she’s gone to Carter Hall
as fast as go can she.
IV
She’d not pulled a double rose,
a rose but only two
When up there came young Tam Lin
says “Lady, pull no more”.
V
“And why come you to Carter Hall
without command from me?” (3)
“I’ll come and go”, young Janet said,
“and ask no leave of thee”.
VI
Janet tied her kirtle green
a bit above her knee
And she’s gone to her father
as fast as go can she
VII
Well, up then spoke her father dear
and he spoke meek and mild
“Oh, and alas, Janet,” he said,
“I think you go with child” (4)
VIII
“Well, if that be so,” Janet said,
“myself shall bear the blame
There’s not a knight in all your hall
shall get the baby’s name
IX
For if my love were an earthly knight
as he is an elfin grey
I’d not change my own true love
for any knight you have”
X
Janet tied her kirtle green
a bit above her knee
And she’s gone to Carter Hall
as fast as go can she
XI
“Oh, tell to me, Tam Lin,” she said,
“why came you here to dwell?”
“The Queen of Faeries caught me
when from my horse I fell
XII
And at the end of seven years (5)
she pays a tithe to hell
I so fair and full of flesh
and feared it be myself
XIII
But tonight is Hallowe’en
and the faery folk ride
Those that would their true love win
at Miles Cross they must buy.
XIV
So first let past the horses black
and then let past the brown
Quickly run to the white steed (6)
and pull the rider down
XV
For I’ll ride on the white steed,
the nearest to the town
For I was an earthly knight,
they give me that renown
XVI
Oh, they will turn me
in your arms to a newt or a snake
But hold me tight and fear not,
I am your baby’s father.
XVII
And they will turn me
in your arms into a lion bold
But hold me tight and fear not
and you will love your child.
XVIII
And they will turn me
in your arms into a naked knight
But cloak me in your mantle
and keep me out of sight.”
XIX
In the middle of the night
she heard the bridle ring
She heeded what he did say
and young Tam Lin did win
XX
Then up spoke the Faery Queen,
an angry queen was she
“Woe betide her ill-farred face,
an ill death may she die”
XXI
“Oh, had I known, Tam Lin,” she said,
“what this knight I did see
I have looked him in the eyes 
and turned him to a tree”
Traduzione italiana in rima di Maurizio**
I
Attente voi tutte fanciulle
che avete il capello dorato (1)
all’Argine dei Biancospini (2)
che da Tamlino è abitato!
II
Chi passa per i Biancospini
un pegno lasciare dovrà:
Il verde mantello che porta
o la sua verginità.
III
Giovanna con la veste verde
che scopre le gambe di un po’
all’Argine dei Biancospini
corre più svelta che può.
IV
Aveva già colto una rosa
un’altra voleva staccare
Ed ecco, le appare Tamlino:
“Donna, non me le toccare!
V
Perché vieni qui ai Biancospini
se non hai l’invito da me? (3)”
“Io vado dovunque mi pare,
non devo chiederlo a te!”
VI
Giovanna con la veste verde
che scopre le gambe di un po’
a casa dai suoi genitori
corre più svelta che può.
VII
Il padre la guarda e le parla,
la voce è un sommesso bisbiglio
“Ahimè mia Giovanna” le dice
“Credo che tu aspetti un figlio.” (4)
VIII
“Se è vero” risponde Giovanna
“Io sola e soltanto so come,
nessuno dei tuoi cavalieri
può dare al bimbo il suo nome.
IX
Se solo il mio amore
non fosse un elfo verdastro e fatato!
Perché non lo voglio cambiare
con chi è del nostro casato.”
X
Giovanna con la veste verde
che scopre le gambe di un po’
All’Argine dei Biancospini
corre più svelta che può”Tamlino,
XI
Raccontami” dice
“Perché vivi qui in questo stallo?”
“La Fata Regina mi prese
quando cascai dal cavallo.
XII
Al settimo anno (5) lei deve
pagare all’inferno un balzello,
un uomo piacevole e forte:
temo che io sarò quello.
XIII
Ma questa è la notte dei Santi
e tu mi puoi ancora salvare,
ché passa il corteo delle fate:
devi a un incrocio aspettare.
XIV
Tu lascia passare i cavalli
che han pelo nero o marrone,
Ma quando vedrai quello bianco (6)
tira giù chi è sull’arcione,
XV
perché io sarò il cavaliere
che ti troverai fra le mani:
Il bianco destriero è un onore
solo per gli esseri umani.
XVI
Allora sarò trasformato
in drago o serpente fischiante
ma stringimi senza temere,
pensa che sono il tuo amante.
XVII
Allora sarò trasformato
in orso o leone ferino
ma stringimi senza temere,
son il padre del tuo bambino.
XVIII
Infine sarò trasformato
in un cavaliere spogliato
avvolgimi nel tuo mantello,
tienimi bene celato(7)”
XIX
Giovanna nella notte fonda
ascolta il corteo scalpitare
fa come Tamlino le ha detto
e lo riesce a salvare.
XX
La Fata Regina si volta
le parla con voce furiosa:
“Tu sia maledetta,
tu muoia di morte assai dolorosa.
XXI
Se avessi saputo, Tamlino,
di avere da te questo sdegno
ti avrei trasformato con gli occhi
in un bel pezzo di legno!”

NOTE
* lyrics: Child Ballad # 39A ; Fairport Convention  
**tratto da vedi –un’altra traduzione in italiano qui
1) In the Middle Ages it was customary for maidens to wear gold clasps (or golden nets, headbands) in their long hair; the minstrel then addresses the virgin girls to warn them not to venture into the forest of Carterhaugh because it is inhabited by an elf (it is known that the elves are excellent lovers and eager to conquer the virtue of virgins maidens!)
wear gold in your hair: il traduttore italiano scrive “capello dorato”. Nel Medioevo era costume per le ragazze da marito portare dei fermagli d’oro (o retine dorate, cerchietti) nei capelli; il menestrello quindi si rivolge alle fanciulle vergini per avvertirle di non avventurarsi nel bosco di Carterhaugh perché è abitato da un elfo (è noto che gli elfi siano ottimi amanti nonché bramosi di conquistare la virtù di vergini fanciulle!).
2) the story is set in a real and well-identified place, the Carterhaugh wood still existing in Selkirk (in the Scottish Border) where the Ettrick and Yarrow rivers flow together (see)
la storia è ambientata in un luogo reale e ben identificato, il bosco di Carterhaugh tuttora esistente a Selkirk (nel Border scozzese) dove confluiscono i fiumi Ettrick e Yarrow (vedi)
3) before entering the greenwood (the sacred wood) it is necessary to ask permission of the fairies that inhabit it, Lady Janet being the owner of the forest behaves incautiously. The gift requested by the fairies is symbolic: the cloak that covers the modesty of the woman (and represents the paternal protection) must be left in a pledge and then lost.
prima di entrare nel greenwood ossia nel bosco sacro è necessario chiedere il permesso delle fate che lo abitano, Lady Janet essendo la proprietaria del bosco si comporta in modo incauto. Il dono richiesto dalle fate è simbolico: il mantello che copre il pudore della donna (e rappresenta la protezione paterna) deve essere lasciato in pegno e quindi perso. 
4) The sexual relationship between the two here is not explicit, but the father after a while notices the pregnancy of his daughter and she proudly claims the paternity to the elf not accepting any other shotgun wedding.
Il rapporto sessuale tra i due qui non è esplicitato, ma il padre dopo un po’ si accorge della gravidanza della figlia ed ella rivendica con orgoglio la paternità all’elfo non accettando nessun altro matrimonio riparatore.
5) seven years is a symbolic period to indicate a punishment, once it was also the duration of an apprenticeship to learn a trade, but also the legal duration to be able to declare a missing person legally dead. Is a transitional position of Tam Lin thus emerging: a prisoner, a magician’s apprentice or a man waiting to pass definitively in the Fairy World?
The period is about to expire with the night of Halloween, one of the most important Celtic festivals with that of Beltane: the winter festival (called Samhain).
The young knight went to hunt with impunity in the sacred wood, profaning the taboo of inviolability, so the fairy queen is keeping him prisoner. Here is quoted, very Christianly, the tribute (the tenth) that the fairies must pay to the devil, an allusion to the human sacrifices that the pagans due to their deities! This explains, in a Christian perspective, the fairy abductions: the love of the dame sans merci leads straight to hell!
sette anni è un periodo simbolico per indicare una punizione, una volta era anche la durata di un apprendistato per imparare un mestiere, ma anche la durata giuridica per poter dichiarare legalmente morta una persona scomparsa. Viene così a delinearsi una posizione transitoria di Tam lin: un prigioniero, un apprendista mago o un uomo in attesa di passare definitivamente nel Mondo delle Fate? Il periodo sta per scadere con la notte di Halloween, una delle feste celtiche più importante con quella di Beltane: ossia la festa dell’Inverno (detta Samhain). 
Un giovane cavaliere è andato a cacciare impunemente nel bosco sacro, profanando il tabù dell’inviolabilità, così la regina delle fate lo tiene prigioniero. Qui è citato, molto cristianamente, il tributo (la decima) che le fate devono versare al diavolo, un’allusione ai sacrifici umani che si credeva facessero i pagani alle divinità boschive! Si spiegano così, in un ottica cristiana, i rapimenti fatati: l’amore della dame sans merci porta dritto all’inferno!
6) the white horse reserved to Tam Lin indicates his particular beauty, his purity as a human not yet completely transformed into an elf
il cavallo bianco riservato a Tam Lin indica la sua particolare bellezza, la sua purezza in quanto umano non ancora trasformato completamente in elfo 
7)  it is the green mantle of Janet to protect the man “reborn” from the queen of fairies, which precisely because of its magical color will hide his escape (but also a bit ‘of realism it takes after all we are in November!)
è il mantello verde di Janet a proteggere l’uomo “rinato” dalla regina delle fate, che proprio per il suo colore magico lo coprirà nella fuga (ma anche un po’ di realismo ci vuole dopotutto siamo a novembre!)

Steeleye Span in  “Tonight’s the Night…, Live” 1992
the song is divided into two parts (12 + 12) and also the melody changes, first more rhythmic and lively, it becomes slow and twilight in the second part, the last 4 stanzas change again: it is the curse of the fairy, almost a spoken
il brano è diviso in due parti (12+12) e anche la melodia cambia, prima più cadenzata e vivace, diventa lenta e crepuscolare nella seconda parte, le ultime 4 strofe cambiano ancora: è la maledizione della fata, quasi un parlato


I
oh, I forbid you maidens all
that wear gold in your hair.
to come or go by Carterhaugh
for young tam lin is there.
II
If you go by Carterhaugh
you must leave him a wad.
either your rings or green mantle
or else your maidenhead.
III
she’s away o’er gravel green
and o’er the gravel brown.
she’s away to carterhaugh
to flower herself a gown.
IV
she had not pulled a rosy rose
a rose but barely one.
when by came this brisk young man
says, lady let alone.
V
how dare you pull my rose, madam?
how dare you break my tree?
how dare you come to carterhaugh
without the leave of me?
VI
well may I pull the rose, she said
well may I break the tree.
for carterhaugh it my father’s
I’ll ask no leave of thee.
riff
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
VII
he’s taken her by the milk-white hand
and there he’s laid her down.
and there he asked no leave of her
as she lay on the ground.
VIII
oh tell me, tell me, then she said
oh tell me who art thee.
my name it is tam lin, he said
and this is my story.
IX
As it fell out upon a day
a-hunting I did ride.
there came a wind out of the north
and pulled me betide.
X
And drowsy, drowsy as I was
the sleep upon me fell.
the queen of fairies she was there
and took me to herself.
riff
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
XI
at the end of every seven years
they pay a tithe to hell.
and I’m so fair and full of flesh
I’m feared ‘twill be myself.
XII
Tonight it is good halloween
the fairy court will ride.
and if you would your true love win
at miles cross, you must bide.
riff
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
oh, in carterhaugh, in carterhaugh
XIII
Gloomy was the night
and eerie was the way.
this lady in her green mantle
to miles cross she did go.
XIV
With the holy water in her hand
she cast the compass round.
at twelve o’clock the fairy court
came riding o’er the mound.
XV
First came by the black steed
and then came by the brown.
then Tam lin on the milk-white steed
with a gold star in his crown.
XVI
She’s pulled him down into her arms
and let the bridle fall.
The queen of fairies she cried out
Young Tam lin is away.
XVII
They’ve shaped him in her arms
an adder or a snake.
she’s held him fast and feared him not
to be her earthly mate.
XVIII
They’ve shaped him in her arms again
fire burning bold.
she’s held him fast and feared him not
till he was iron cold.
XIX
They’ve shaped him in her arms
to a wood black dog so wild.
she’s held him fast and feared him not
the father of her child.
XX
They’ve shaped him in her arms
at last into a naked man.
she’s wrapped him in the green mantle
and knew that she had him won.
riff
The queen of fairies she cried out
young Tam lin is away.
XXI
Had I known, had I known, Tam lin
long before, long before you came from home.
had I known, I would have taken out your heart
and put in a heart of stone.
XXII
Had I known, had I known, Tam lin
that a lady, a lady would steal thee.
had I known, I would have taken out your eyes
and put in two from a tree.
XXIII
Had I known, had I known, Tam lin
that I would lose, that I would lose the day.
had I known, I would have paid my tithe to hell
before you’d been won away.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
E’ proibito a tutte le fanciulle
che portano l’oro nei capelli 
di venire o andare a Carterhaugh
che il giovane Tam Lin vi dimora!
II
Se andate a Carterhaugh
un pegno dovete lasciare:
o l’anello o il verde mantello
o la vostra verginità.
III
Lei scappò sul sentiero verde
e sul sentiero di terra
scappò a Carterhaugh
per decorare di fiori il vestito
IV
Aveva appena colto una rosa
una rosa soltanto
quando questo bel giovane appare
e dice: “Donna, lascia stare!
V
Come osi cogliere le mie rose, madama?
Come osi spezzare i miei rami?
Come osi venire a Carterhaugh
senza il mio permesso?”
VI
“Io posso cogliere le rose
e posso spezzare i rami
perchè Carterhaugh è di mio padre
e non ti chiederò il permesso”
riff
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
VII
La prende per la bianca mano
e la stende a terra
e là non le chiede il permesso
mentre lei giace a terra
VIII
“Dimmi oh dimmi -poi disse lei-
dimmi il tuo nome”
“Il mio nome è Tam Lin- disse lui-
e questa è la mia storia
IX
Accadde un giorno
che cavalcavo per la caccia,
venne un vento dal nord
e mi spinse via
X
E intontito come ero
cadde su di me il sonno
la regina delle fate era là
e mi prese con se
riff
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
XI
Alla fine di ogni sette anni
si paga un tributo all’inferno
e io sono così bello e forte
che temo toccherà a me
XII
Stanotte è la notte di Halloween
e la corte fatata cavalcherà
e se vuoi conquistare il tuo vero amore
al Bivio della Croce devi aspettare
riff
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
oh, a carterhaugh, a carterhaugh
XIII
Tenebrosa era la notte
e scura era la strada
questa dama nel suo mantello verde
andò al Bivio della Croce
XIV
Con l’acqua santa in mano
posò la bussola 
a mezzanotte in punto la corte fatata
venne cavalcando dal tumulo
XV
Per primo passò il destriero nero
e poi quello baio
e quindi Tam Lin sul destriero bianco
con una stella dorata sulla corona
XVI
Lei lo attirò tra le sue braccia
e fece cadere la briglia.
Gridò la regina delle Fate
“Il giovane Tam lin è scappato”
XVII
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia
in una vipera o un serpente
ma lei lo tenne stretto e senza temerlo
era il suo compagno umano
XVIII
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia ancora
in un feroce fuoco ardente
ma lei lo tenne stretto e senza temerlo
finchè divenne freddo ferro
XIX
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia 
in un cane nero del bosco e selvaggio
ma lei lo tenne stretto e senza temerlo 
era il padre di suo figlio
XX
Si trasformò tra le sue braccia 
infine in un uomo nudo
e lei lo avvolse nel mantello verde
e seppe di averlo conquistato
riff
Gridò la regina delle Fate
“Il giovane Tam lin è scappato”
XXI
“Se avessi saputo, se avessi saputo Tam Lin
molto tempo prima quando arrivasti da casa
se avessi saputo, ti avrei cavato il cuore
e messo un cuore di pietra
XXII
Se avessi saputo, avessi saputo Tam Lin 
che una dama, una dama ti avrebbe rubato,
se l’avessi saputo ti avrei cavato gli occhi
e messi altri due di legno
XXIII
Se avessi saputo, avessi saputo Tam Lin
che ti avrei perduto che ti avrei perduto un giorno, se l’avessi saputo avrei pagato
il mio tributo all’inferno prima”

Broomfield Hill: about virtue!

Child Ballad # 43:
Broomfield Hill (in italiano:la collina delle ginestre)

Melodia: ‘Jock Sheep’

 

Una leggenda, di origine scozzese racconta di un uomo che chiede alla sua fidanzata la “prova d’amore” prima di sposarsi. La ragazza su consiglio di una vecchia saggia, accetta la prova, ma tra i cespugli di ginestra. Il ragazzo stordito dal profumo dei fiori, cade presto in un sogno profondo. Al risveglio, convinto di aver posseduto la ragazza come voleva, acconsente alle nozze.


L’aneddoto richiama chiaramente la ballata “Broomfield hill” diffusa in molte parti dell’Europa medievale, un gentiluomo sfida una fanciulla da marito: di certo perderà la sua virtù se si recherà ad un appuntamento con lui nel bosco o nella brughiera!
La scommessa che l’uomo è sicuro di vincere, si basa sul presupposto che quando una donna indugia per la brughiera o nel bosco, è perchè sta cercando qualcuno con cui fare sesso; forse persiste tutt’ora nella mentalità di certi maschi, il concetto che una donna seppur stuprata sia comunque responsabile della violenza subita (chiamiamolo “concorso di colpa”?)
Che l’uomo sia un gentiluomo ricco e piacente o magari anche il suo fidanzato, il senso della sfida non cambia: la donna è cosa fragile incapace di resistere alle tentazioni del sesso e in ogni caso non in grado di difendersi.
La scommessa si basa su una cifra spropositata di soldi e sembrerebbe quasi un “do ut des” in cambio della verginità della fanciulla, ma la fanciulla fa ricorso alla magia e l’uomo cade in un sonno innaturale. Al risveglio l’uomo trova l’anello (e non un anello qualunque, ma quello di fidanzamento) della fanciulla e si rende conto di aver perso la scommessa, così rimprovera il suo servitore per non averlo svegliato.

LA FIABA

La Ballata è in realtà una fiaba in cui l’eroina dimostra di non aver paura del bosco (l’età adulta, la sessualità) e riesce a sconfiggere con l’astuzia (la magia)  il “lupo cattivo” (l’elfo con il corno); in  alcune versioni è in effetti lei a lanciare la sfida al cavaliere e poi chiede aiuto alla madre o ad una donna anziana (la strega) che la istruiscono sull’uso della ginestra come erba magica. E come in ogni favola intervengono anche degli animali parlanti, sono i “compagni di caccia” del cavaliere,  il suo fedele destriero, il segugio e il falco (o l’astore) addestrato, rimproverati per non essere intervenuti a destarlo dal sonno

LA GINESTRA, PIANTA CELTICA

fiore-ginestra_mIn genere nelle ballate quanto l’argomento è di natura sessuale vengono utilizzati nomi di erbe e fiori nel ritornello, proprio per avvertire l’ascoltatore.

La finestra è una pianta insignificante nella sua struttura di giunco, ( per la sua forma cespugliosa, folta e tondeggiante) che si accende di giallo fin dal mese di marzo (nei climi mediterranei), inondando la campagna di un intenso profumo: i fiori sembrano farfalle dorate pronte a spiccare il volo… (SCHEDA )

VERSIONE SCOZZESE

Nelle note Ewan Mac Coll scrive: ” The earliest traditional versions were noted in Scotland a quarter of a century later and the ballad was still apparently common there up to the beginning of the I9th century. During the present century, however, its popularity has declined in Scotland but appears to have grown in England, particularly in the south-west. It is still found, though infrequently, in North America and Canada. In our version A, the attempts of the hound, horse and hawk to arouse the sleeping man are omitted and the use of magic to induce deep sleep is merely hinted at in stanza 5. The sly humour implicit in the explanation given for the knight’s deep sleep (stanza 7) reduces the magical element even further.”

Ewan MacColl The Broomfield Hill (in The English and Scottish Popular Ballads Vol. 2– 1965)


I
There was a knecht
and a lady bricht
Set trysts among the broom (1),
The ane to be there at twelve o’ the clock,
And the other one true at noon (3).
Chorus
Oh, leeze be the and thoo and a’
And madam will ye do?

And the seal of me is abracee (3)
Fair maiden, I’m for you.
II
I’ll wager you, my bonny lass,
Five hundred pound and ten,
That ye’ll no come to the top o’ the hill
And come back a maid again.
III
I’ll tak’ your wager, bonny lad,
Five hundred pound and ten,
That I’ll gang up to the top o’ the hill
And come back a maid again.
IV
As she walked up that high, high hill
‘Twas at the hour of noon,
And there she saw her true lover(4),
A sleepin’ in the broom.
V
Nine times she walked around his hied(5),
Nine times around his feet,
Nine times she kissed his bonny red mou’,
And on, but it was sweet(6).
VI
When he awoke frae his muckle sleep,
And oot o’ his unco dreams(7), /Says he, “My freres, where’s my true love
That has been here and gane?”
VII
“If ye slept mair in the nicht, maister,(8)
Ye’d wauken mair i’ the day.
If he’d awakened frae your sleep
She wouldna’ hae gotten away!”
VIII
“If ye’d hae waukened me frae my sleep, O’ her I’d taen my will,
Though she’d hae died the very next day(9), I would hae gotten my fill.”
IX
“Oh, greetin’, greetin'” went she out,
But lauchin’ came she in,
‘Twas all for her body’s safety
And the wager she did win.
X
So the wager’s laid and the wager’s paid,
Five hundred pound and ten,
‘Twas a’ for her body’s safety
And the wager she did win.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’erano un cavaliere
e una splendida dama
che avevano un appuntamento tra i campi di ginestra
l’uno andò alle 12 precise
l’altra alle 3
CORO
Che accada quel che accada
signora, lo farete?
Ti darò il mio marchio 
bella fanciulla, sono quello per te
II
“Scommetto con voi, bella fanciulla
510 sterline
che non andrete in cima alla collina
per ritornare ancora fanciulla”
III
“Accetto la vostra scommessa, bel giovanotto, 510 sterline
che andrò in cima alla collina
per ritornare ancora fanciulla”
IV
Quando lei andò sulla cima del colle
erano le 3 (del pomeriggio)
e là vide l’amante
che dormiva tra la ginestra
V
Nove volte camminò intorno alla sua testa
e nove volte intorno ai suoi piedi
nove volte lei baciò la sua bella bocca rossa
e oh com’era dolce!
VI
Quando si svegliò dal lungo sonno
e dai sogni inquieti disse
“Mio scudiero, dov’è la mia amante
che è stata qui e se nè andata?”
VII
“Se voi aveste dormito di più la notte, padrone ,
sareste stato più sveglio di giorno;
vi sareste svegliato dal vostro sonno
ed ella non l’avrebbe fatta franca”
VIII
“Se tu mi avessi svegliato dal sonno
avrei fatto ciò che volevo di lei,
anche se fosse morta il giorno dopo,
avrei preso la mia soddisfazione”
IX
“Oh piangete, piangete” lei sbucò fuori e ridendo si fece avanti.
Fu tutto in cambio della sua verginità
e la scommessa lei vinse.
X
Così la scommessa è persa e la scommessa è pagata
510 sterline
in cambio della sua verginità
e la scommessa lei vinse.

NOTE
1) Nelle ballate la ginestra ha una precisa allusione sessuale, forse per la forma del fiore che richiama la vulva femminile. Con la ginestra si facevano le scope nel Medioevo così con il termine inglese “broom” si indica entrambi: sulle scope volavano le streghe e la ginestra allude a una sessualità diabolica o quantomeno selvaggia, libera da regole. La brughiera è come il “greenwood” è un luogo “fuori legge” fuori dalla società civile dove accadono incontri fatati e illeciti, ma vissuti con una primitiva o primordiale innocenza.
2) sembrerebbe un’incongruenza perchè entrambi si presentano alla stessa ora, ma se il significato attuale di “noon” è mezzogiorno, nel medioevo indicava la nona ora cioè le 3 del pomeriggio.
3) il ritornello non-sense viene da Last Leaves of Traditional Ballads and Ballad Airs Greig and Keith (1925) erroneamente attribuito da Gavin Greig a ‘The Broomfield Hill’; anche scritto come abrakee oppure “Come sell a me my ebrachee”, è un po’ arduo trovare il significato di termini probabilmente malamente compresi dagli stessi interpreti.
4) true lover è in generale il/la fidanzato/a, in questo caso la scommessa sembrerebbe essere più una schermaglia tra due innamorati, con lui impaziente di ottenere “la prova d’amore” come si diceva un tempo, e lei che invece tergiversa per arrivare illibata al matrimonio. Senonchè è un tipico appellativo delle ballate riservato a coloro che sono in procinto di fare sesso quindi è più corretto tradurre come amante
5) la fanciulla  compie un incantesimo. Per far si che il sonno sia prolungato dall’effetto tranquillante già in atto, spande ulteriori rametti di ginestra introno alla testa e ai piedi dell’uomo e traccia un cerchio magico
6) il pensierino di lasciarsi andare doveva esserle passato per la testa..
7) la frase sembra suggerire che il sonno non era naturale, ma magicamente indotto
8) in altre versioni sono i fedeli compagni di caccia ossia il destriero, il cane e il falco a essere rimproverati e a rispondere; il servitore con quest’affermazione sminuisce (e ridicolizza) indirettamente il valore del sortilegio messo in atto dalla donna
9) la brutalità della frase ci lascia esterrefatti. Indubbiamente l’uomo si sente molto frustrato per non essere riuscito a far valere la sua mascolinità!! Ma alla luce di altre versioni possiamo ritenere che questa frase stia a significare bel altro: ovvero la rottura dell’imene femminile.

Malinky in Flower&Iron 2008. Stessa melodia e testo leggermente diverso: qui si aggiunge il dettaglio dell’anello lasciato come prova da parte della fanciulla e l’aspetto favolistico degli animali parlanti con i quali l’uomo sfoga la frustrazione per la sconfitta.


I
“I’ll wager, I’ll wager wi’ you,
fair maid(1)
Five hundred merks and ten
That ye winna go tae the bonnie broom fields
And return back a maiden again”
Chorus
Leatherum thee thou and aw
Madam, I’m wi’ you
And the seal o’ me be abrachee
Fair maiden, I’m for you

II
“I’ll wager, I’ll wager wi’ you,
kind sir
Five hundred merks and ten
That I will go tae the bonnie broom fields
And return back a maiden again”
III
When she cam tae the bonnie broom hills
Her lover  lay fast asleep
Wi’ his silvery bells and the gay old oak
And the broomstick under his heid(2)
IV
Nine times ‘roond the croon o’ his heid
And nine times ‘roond his feet
Nine times she kissed his rosy lips
And his breath wis wondrous sweet
V
She’s taen the ring frae her finger
Placed it on his breist bane(3)
And a’ for a token that she’d been there
That she’d been there and gane
VI
Greetin’, oh greetin’ gaed she oot
An’ a-singin’ cam she in
‘Twas a’ for the safety o’ her body
And the wager she had won
VII
“Whaur wis ye, ma bonnie gray hound
That I coft ye sae dear?
Ye didna wauken me frae ma sleep
Whan ye kent ma love was here”
VIII
“I scraped ye wi’ ma fit, maister
And ma collar bell, it rang
And still the mair that I did scrape
Awauken wid ye nane”
IX
“Haste and haste, ma gude white steed
Tae come the maiden till
Or a’ the birds o’ the gude green wood O’ your flesh shall hae their fill”
X
“Ye needna burst yer gude white steed
Wi’ racing ower the howm
Nae bird flies faster through the wood
Than she fled through the broom (4)”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
“Scommetto con voi,
bella fanciulla
510 sterline
che non andrete nei campi della bella ginestra
senza ritornare ancora fanciulla”
Coro
Che accada quel che accada
signora sono con voi
e vi darò il mio marchio
bella fanciulla, sono quello per voi

II
“Accetto la vostra scommessa,
gentile signore,
510 sterline
che andrò nei campi della bella
ginestra
per ritornare ancora fanciulla”
III
Quando lei andò nei campi della bella ginestra
il suo amante giaceva addormentato
con la cintura d’argento, e il bel vecchio mantello
e il ramo di ginestra sotto la testa
IV
Nove volte camminò intorno alla sua testa e nove volte intorno ai suoi piedi
nove volte lei baciò le sue rosse labbra
e il suo respiro era meravigliosamente dolce
V
Lei prese il suo anello dal dito
e lo mise sul suo petto
e tutto per la testimonianza che era stata là,
che era stata là e se n’era andata
VI
“Oh piangete, piangete” lei sbucò fuori
e cantando si fece avanti.
Fu tutto in cambio della sua verginità
e la scommessa lei vinse
VII
“Che è stato mio bel segugio grigio
che tenni così caro?
Tu non mi hai svegliato dal sonno
quando sapevi che la mia innamorata era qui”
VIII
“Ti ho raspato con la zampa, padrone
e ho fatto tintinnare il mio collare di campanellini  e sebbene io ti abbia raspato non ti sei svegliato”
IX
“Allora affrettati mio buon destriero bianco
per andare fin dalla fanciulla
o tutti gli uccelli del bosco
faranno della tua carne il loro pasto”
X
“Non c’è bisogno che minacci il tuo buon destriero bianco
per correre a casa
perchè nessun uccello vola più veloce per il bosco
di lei che fuggì per la brughiera “.

NOTE
1)  maid è il termine che indica la fanciulla da marito con chiaro riferimento alla sua illibatezza
2) il profumo della ginestra inalato dall’uomo, lasciato a lungo in impaziente attesa è la causa del sonno improvviso
3) breist bane= breastbone, letteralmente sterno
4) il cavallo lo avvisa che è inutile inseguire la ragazza perchè lei ormai è in salvo

La versione scozzese della ballata non è tuttavia completa e per ascoltare tutta la storia vi rimando alle versioni inglesi

continua (parte seconda)

FONTI
http://walterscott.eu/education/ballads-of-love-and-loss/the-broomfield-hill/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/broomfield.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/broomfie.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thebroomfieldhill.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_43
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/32542/8;jsessionid=812324A683FEF6C1CE8605902FA08E7B
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37413
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17084
http://womenarepersons.blogspot.it/2011/11/broomfield-hill-historical-analysis.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=722&lang=it

Lord Randal

A folk ballad that inaugurates a narrative genre collected in multiple variations called “The will of the poisoned man“: the story of a dying son, because he has been poisoned, who returns to his mother to die in his bed and make a will; in all likelihood the ballad starts from Italy, passes through Germany to get to Sweden and then spread to the British Isles (Lord Randal) until it lands in America.
During the “Folk Revival” of the 1960s and 1970s Bob Dylan has transformed the traditional Scottish ballad “Lord Randal” into the American folk song “A Hard Rain’s a-skirt Fall“.

[Una ballata popolare che inaugura un genere narrativo ripreso in molteplici varianti detto “il testamento dell’avvelenato”: la  storia di un figlio morente, perchè è stato avvelenato, che ritorna dalla madre per coricarsi a letto e fare testamento; con tutta  probabilità la ballata parte dall’Italia, passa per la Germania per arrivare  in Svezia e poi diffondersi nelle isole britanniche (Lord Randal) fino a sbarcare in  America.
Com’è noto ai più, Bob Dylan ha trasformato la ballata tradizionale scozzese “Lord Randal” nella folksong americana d’autore “A Hard Rain’s a-gonna Fall” durante il “Folk Revival” degli anni 60-70, mantenendovi la metrica e il messaggio, pur sviluppando un argomento diverso (l’ha trasformata in una canzone contro la guerra)]

This is how Riccardo Venturi teaches us “This ballad may have originated very far from the moors and lochs, and very close to our home [Italy].The poison, in fact, is a very strange weapon in the fierce ballads of Britain, where they kill themselves with sword, it is a subtle, ‘feminine’ means of killing, and it is not by chance that it has always been considered, on a popular level, a really Italian thing. However, there is another hypothesis on the origin of the ballad, which would like to trace back the story to Ranulf, Count of Chester (mentioned by the farmer Sloth in ‘Piers Plowmanì by William Langland together with the’ Rhymes of Robin Hood ‘). Some versions lack the will of the moribund hunter, but the legacies are of the most varied.

[Così c’insegna Riccardo VenturiQuesta ballata può avere avuto origine molto lontano dalle brughiere e dai lochs, e molto vicino a casa nostra. Il veleno, infatti, è un’arma assai strana nelle fiere ballate britanniche, dove ci si ammazza a colpi di spada; è un mezzo subdolo, ‘femminile’ di uccidere, e non a caso è stato sempre considerato, a livello popolare, proprio degli italiani.”
E prosegue “Esiste comunque un’altra ipotesi sull’origine della ballata, che la vorrebbe far risalire alle vicende di Ranulf, conte di Chester (menzionate dal contadino Sloth nel ‘Piers Plowmanì di William Langland assieme alle ‘Rhymes of Robin Hood’). Alcune versioni mancano del testamento del cacciatore moribondo, ma i lasciti sono dei più svariati.”
[Randal (Ranulph) III, sesto conte di Chester morì nel 1232 forse avvelenato dalla moglie che si sposò poco dopo con il suo amante.]
Sir Walter Scott associò la ballata con la morte di Thomas Randolph (Randal), Conte di Murray (Moray), che morì nel 1332 in modo inaspettato (e ci fu chi pensò al veleno).]

The ballad collected by the professor Child at number 12 is widespread in popular tradition and there are many textual variations combined with as many melodies.

[La ballata raccolta dal professor Child al numero 12 è ampiamente diffusa presso la tradizione popolare e si conoscono numerosissime varianti testuali abbinate ad altrettante numerose melodie.]

SCOTTISH VERSION (Child # 12)
[LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE]

The ballad is to be considered strictly connected with the theme of “the Concealed Death” or the dying hero who returns from hunting and makes a will (Lord Olaf ).
So Giordano Dall’Armellina writes in his book “European Ballads from Boccaccio to Bob Dylan”: “our hero, to prove to be worthy to pass into the world of adults and become a” real man “, challenges the taboo and goes to hunt right in the greenwood, but he cannot catch anything; or because he is hungry or more likely he is under a spell, he will accept the fried eels that he believes are given to him by his true-love.From a rational point of view it would have been an absurd story: what is she doing in the greenwood with a pan? It is likely that the woman the hero encounters is death in the cloak of a fairy. If we want to translate the tale from a psychoanalytic point of view, we can assume that the fairy, by looking like his true-love, becomes a projection of the hero’s unconscious. Lord Randal is punished for two different reasons: he has not overcome the trial through which he would have entered the world of the adults, and he has broken a taboo, while at the same time his lady punishes him because he has shown not being able to take care of her. On the contrary it is her who feeds him, and humiliates him by offering him the symbol of his missed manhood. Before him, the hawks and the dogs will die, the same animals that accompanied Oluf in some Scandinavian versions of the Concealed death, equally guilty for not being able to help him. “

[La ballata è da considerarsi considerare strettamente connessa con il tema della Morte occultata ovvero dell’eroe morente che torna dalla caccia e che fa testamento (vedi Lord Olaf).
Così Giordano Dall’Armellina scrive nel suo libro  “Ballate Europee da Boccaccio a Bob Dylan”:“il nostro eroe, per dimostrare di essere degno di passare nel mondo degli adulti e di diventare un “vero uomo”, sfida il tabù e va a cacciare proprio nel greenwood. Tuttavia non riesce a prendere niente e, o perché affamato o più probabilmente perché sotto incantesimo, accetterà le anguille fritte che lui crede gli siano date dalla sua innamorata. Da un punto di vista razionale sarebbe stata una storia assurda. Che ci fa l’innamorata di Lord Randal nel greenwood con una padella e delle anguille? È presumibile che la donna che l’eroe incontra sia la morte nei panni di una fata. Tradotto in termini psicanalitici la fata, prendendo le sembianze della sua innamorata, diventa una proiezione dell’inconscio dell’eroe. Lei lo punisce non solo per non aver superato la prova, ma anche per aver infranto il tabù. Nello stesso tempo anche la sua dama lo punisce poiché ha dimostrato di non essere in grado di prendersi cura di lei. Anzi, è lei che lo nutre e lo umilia offrendogli il simbolo della sua mancata virilità. Prima di lui moriranno i falchi e i cani, gli stessi animali che accompagnavano Oluf in alcune versioni scandinave della morte occultata, ugualmente colpevoli per non essere stati in grado di aiutarlo.“]

12 Lord Randal
Arthur Rackham

The illustration by Arthur Rackham portrays Lord Randal while at the table eating the eels with some dogs alongside him (waiting for leftovers or having just eaten the poisoned morsel); next to a lady with a treacherous look, who is supposed to be his wife, looks at him stealthily. The illustrator thus resolves the incongruity of a banquet with fried eel in pan into the greenwood, that the son says he ate shortly before arriving at his mother’s house. In the typical temporal jumps of ballads in fact the son could very well have gone hunting in the woods, then being returned to his home and having eaten with his wife, then being gone to his mother’s house to make a will. In this way, rationalizing the ballad it is a simple history of conjugal revenge poisoning.

[L’illustrazione di Arthur Rackham ritrae Lord Randal mentre è a tavola a mangiare le anguille con al fianco i suoi cani (che aspettano per gli avanzi o che hanno appena mangiato il boccone avvelenato); accanto una dama dallo sguardo perfido, che si presume sia la moglie, lo osserva furtivamente. L’illustratore così risolve l’incongruenza di un bacchetto con anguille fritte in padella nel folto del bosco che il figlio dice di aver mangiato poco prima di arrivare a casa della madre. Nei tipici salti temporali delle ballate infatti il figlio potrebbe benissimo essere andato a caccia nel bosco poi essere tornato alla sua dimora e aver mangiato con la moglie, poi essere andato alla casa della madre per fare testamento. Razionalizzando così la ballata la si riduce ovviamente ad una semplice storia di avvelenamento per vendetta coniugale.]

Giordano Dall’Armellina

Lucy Ward live, she is performing the traditional song ‘Lord Randall’ with great talent
[intensa e lacerante interpretazione della giovane cantautrice]

Roanoke (Ilaria Paladino & Nicola Alianelli)

Emily Smith Lord Donald (I, II, III, VI, IX, X)


I
“O where ha you been,
Lord Randal (Lord Donald), my son?
And where ha you been,
my handsome (bonnie) young man?”
“I ha been at the greenwood(1);
mother, mak my bed soon,
For I’m wearied wi hunting,
and fain wad lie doon
. (2)
II
“An wha met ye there (3)?
And wha met ye there?”
“O I met wi my true-love;”
III
“And what did she give you (4)?
And wha did she give you?”
“Eels fried in a pan; mother”
IV
“And what gat your leavins?
And wha gat your leavins?”
“My hawks and my hounds”
V
“And what becam of them?
And what becam of them?”
“They stretched their legs out and died”
VI
“O I fear you are poisoned(5)!
I fear you are poisoned!”
“O yes, I am poisoned
For I’m sick at the heart,
and fain wad lie down
.”(6)
VII
“What d’ye leave to your mother?
What d’ye leave to your mother?”
“Four and twenty milk kye”
VIII
“What d’ye leave to your sister?
What d’ye leave to your sister?”
“My gold and my silver”
IX
“What d’ye leave to your brother?
What d’ye leave to your brother?”
“My houses and my lands”
X
“What d’ye leave to your true-love (7)?
What d’ye leave to your true-love?”
“I leave her hell and fire”
Traduzione italiano di Giordano Dall’Armellina
I
“O dove sei stato,
Lord Randal, figlio mio?
O dove sei stato, mio bel giovanotto?”
“Sono stato nel bosco sacro;
madre mia, presto fammi il letto,
che sono stanco di cacciare
e volentieri mi stenderei
.”
II
“E chi hai incontrato?
E chi hai incontrato?”
“Ho incontrato la mia innamorata”
III
“E che cosa ti ha dato?
E che cosa ti ha dato?”
“Anguille fritte in padella”
IV
“E chi si è preso gli avanzi?
E chi si è preso gli avanzi?”
“I miei cani e i miei falchi”
V
“E cosa ne è stato di loro?
E cosa ne è stato di loro?”
“Hanno tirato le cuoia e sono
morti”
VI
“Temo tu sia avvelenato!
Temo tu sia avvelenato!”
“Sì, sono avvelenato,
sento male al cuore
e vorrei coricarmi
.”
VII
“Cosa lasci a tua madre?
Cosa lasci a tua madre?”
“Ventiquattro mucche da latte”
VIII
“Cosa lasci a tua sorella?
Cosa lasci a tua sorella?”
“Il mio oro e l’argento”
IX
“Cosa lasci a tuo fratello?
Cosa lasci a tuo fratello?”
“Le mie case e le mie terre”
X
“Cosa lasci alla tua dama?
Cosa lasci alla tua dama?”
“Le lascio l’inferno e le fiamme”

NOTE
1) the greenwood is not just a common forest, but a sacred one the entrance to Otherword. Dall’Armellina notes “It was the thickest part of the forest where the Celts believed there was the entrance to the world of the dead and to Fairyland. That entrance could be identified with a hollow trunk, a hole in the ground, a well and was defended and protected by fairies and elves. On Halloween night the spirits of the dead used to come out of the greenwood to pay a visit to the living ones. The people were afraid of going to the greenwood and if they could, they avoided it. I remember Robin Hood also hiding in the greenwood and that the soldiers of Nottingham’s sheriff, dared not come in for fear of the fairies and the spirits of the dead. The stories about Robin Hood, all deriving from ballads, are not by chance called The Greenwood Stories.
In any case if they ventured to pass by it, they would not speak in a loud voice so as not to disturb the spirits of the dead, they would not damage nature and above all, they would not hunt. According to local beliefs, they were taboos that, if broken, could cause death”
[il greenwood non è solo la foresta oscura, ma è il bosco sacro, la parte più nascosta che cela l’ingresso all’Altromondo celtico. Così racconta Dall’Armellina “Il greenwood era la parte più nascosta e fitta del bosco dove i celti credevano vi fosse l’ingresso del mondo dei morti e della terra delle fate e degli elfi (Fairyland). Tale ingresso, che poteva essere identificato in un tronco d’albero cavo, in una buca nel terreno, in un pozzo, era difeso e protetto dalle fate e dagli elfi. Nella notte di Halloween gli spiriti dei morti uscivano da questi antri naturali con le fate e gli elfi per far visita ai vivi. La gente temeva queste creature soprannaturali e se poteva evitava di inoltrarsi nel greenwood. Ricordo che anche Robin Hood si nascondeva nel greenwood e che i soldati dello sceriffo di Nottingham non osavano entrarci per paura delle fate e degli spiriti dei morti. I racconti riguardanti Robin Hood, tutti derivanti da ballate, non a caso si chiamano The greenwood stories.
In ogni caso, se vi si fossero avventurati, sapevano che non avrebbero potuto parlare ad alta voce, danneggiare il bosco, né tanto meno cacciare. Secondo le credenze locali erano dei tabù che, se infranti, avrebbero potuto causare la morte.”]
3) Emily Smith version
Wha did ye meet in the green woods
I met wi my sweethairt
4) or
What did ye hae for your dinner?
I had eels boiled in bree
5) In Celtic tradition, fairy food is magical with often hallucinogenic powers; those who taste it will not be able to eat other food, dying of hunger (did anorexics eat fairy food?)
[Nella tradizione celtica il cibo delle fate è magico con poteri spesso allucinogeni; coloro che lo assaggiano non potranno mangiare altro cibo terrestre e finiscono per morire di fame (gli anoressici hanno mangiato  cibo fatato?)]
6) variation of the refrain [variazione del ritornello]
7) Emily Smith 
What will ye leave tae your sweethairt
A noose in yon high tree

Amhrán na hEascainne 

Amhrán na hEascainne (The Song of the Eel) is the Irish Gaelic version of the folk ballad called “the Poisoned Man”

[Amhrán na hEascainne (La canzone dell’anguilla) è la versione in gaelico irlandese della popolarissima ballata detta dell’Avvelenato]

Port BBC Liam Ó Maonlaí
[Per Port la trasmissione della BBC Liam Ó Maonlaí (da The Hothouse Flowers) con Julie Fowlis]

Irish version

LINK
Giordano Dall’Armellina: “Ballate Europee da Boccaccio a Bob Dylan”.
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/english-and-other-versions–12-lord-randal.aspx
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_12
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/
bamepec/multimedia/saggio2.htm

http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/37.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/107.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/lordrandall.html

http://www.macsuibhne.com/amhran/teacs/181.htm