Shamrock shore

Leggi in italiano

Two texts in search of an author, with the same title “Shamrock shore” we distinguish two different songs, both as text and as melody, the first reported by PW Joyce at the end of the nineteenth century is an irish emigration song, the second ever traditional is also an emigration song, but above all a protest song, the social and political denunciation of the Irish question.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Already at the end of the 1800s P. W. Joyce reported it in his  “Ancient Irish Music” to then republish it in 1909, so he writes “This air, and one verse of the song, was published for the first time by me in my Ancient Irish Music, from which it is reprinted here. It was a favourite in my young days, and I have several copies of the words printed on ballad-sheets“. Again P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) reports further text
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

The Irish emigrant arrives in London, the tune is that generally known with the title of”Erin Shore” (see)

Horslips from Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

More than a song, a political rant about the need for the independence of Ireland and the evils of landlordism.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore

NOTES
1) The song is obviously post-Union (1800), because it refers to the dissolved Irish Parliament
2) the plague of landlordism
3)  in 1846 the entire crop of potatoes (basic diet of the Irish) was all destroyed due to a fungus, the peronospera; the “great famine” occurred (1845-1849 which some historians prolonged until 1852) which lasted for several years and almost halved the population; those who did not die of hunger were lucky if the
y could leave for England or Scotland, but more massive was the migration to America
4) ‘tithes and taxes’ paid in support of the Irish Church, so the song pre-dates the Act of Disestablishment in 1869
5) the years of large-scale industrial expansion (with relative upgrading of infrastructure) began in Britain starting from 1840-50
6) John Bull is the national personification of the Kingdom of Great Britain

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm

LITTLE DRUMMER BY FRANK HARTE

Ho sentito questa ballata nella versione dei Planxty che la registrarono nel loro album “Cold Blow and the Rainy Night” (1974) Nelle note di copertina leggiamo “Frank Harte of Dublin taught us The Little Drummer, it tells of a novel style of courtship where the scorned lover threatens to shoot himself on finding that his chosen bride is reluctant to have him.”
“Little Drummer” (da non confondersi con la christmas carol The Little Drummer Boy ) è una courting song un po’ melodrammatica tipica del sentimentalismo irlandese: un giovane tamburino resta colpito da una bellezza a passeggio per il porto e detto fatto il giorno dopo si mette tutto in tiro per conquistarla; lei fa la preziosa e si atteggia a gran dama, lui minaccia di spararsi un colpo in testa, lei casca ai suoi piedi e i due corrono a sposarsi.
Non è una ballata tra le più note ma è finita nella soundtrack della sea shanty edition di Assassin’s Creed Rogue, il video gioco ambientato al tempo della guerra dei sette anni tra Francia e Inghilterra, in particolare sul fronte nord americano, per il controllo del Nuovo Mondo (1752-1761).

ASCOLTA Planxty 1974

La ballata deve essere stata portata in America dagli emigranti irlandesi e la ritroviamo tra i boscaioli  della Pennsylvania settentrionale e del sud di New York; Ellen Stekert la registrò nel suo album “Song of a New York Lumberjack” (1958) avendola ascoltata da Ezra “Fuzzy” Barhight un boscaiolo in pensione che viveva a  Cohocton, New York che così inizia
“Early one morning, one bright summers’ day
Twenty-four ladies were making their way
A regiment of soldiers were marching nearby
The drummer on one of them cast a rude eye
And it’s so hard fortune.” continua
ma la versione della ballata in Assassin’s Creed Rogue non è quella americana bensì quella dublinese di Frank Harte


I
One fine summer’s morning both gallant and gay
Twenty-four ladies (1) went out on the quay
A regiment of soldiers it did pass them by
A drummer and one of them soon caught his eye
II
He went to his comrade and to him did say
“Twenty-four ladies I saw yesterday
And one of those ladies she has me heart won,
And if she denies me then surely I’m done”

III
“Go to this lady and tell her your mind
Tell her she has wounded your poor heart inside
Go and tell her she’s wounded your poor heart, full sore,
And if she denies you what can she do more?”
IV  (2)
So early next morning the young man arose,
Dressed himself up in a fine suit of clothes,
A watch in his pocket and a cane in his hand
Saluting the ladies he walked down the strand
V
He went up to her and he said “Pardon me,
Pardon me lady for making so free,
Oh me fine honored lady, you have me heart won,
And if you deny me then surely I’m done.”

VI
“Be off little drummer, now what do you mean (3)?
For I’m the lord’s daughter of Ballycasteen.
Oh, I’m the lord’s daughter that’s honored, you see,
Be off little drummer, you’re making too free.”
VII
He put on his hat and he bade her farewell
Saying “I’ll send my soul down to heaven or hell
For with this long pistol that hangs by my side,
Oh, I’ll put an end to my own dreary life.”
VIII
“Come back little drummer, and don’t take it ill,
For I do not want to be guilty of sin,
To be guilty of innocent blood for to spill.
Come back little drummer, I’m here at your will.
IX
We’ll hire a car and to Bansheer we’ll go (4).
There we’ll be married in spite of our foes.
Oh, but what can they say when it’s over and done,
But I fell in love with the roll of your drum?”
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
In un bel mattino d’estate tutte intrepide e allegre
24 dame passeggiavano per la banchina del porto
un reggimento di soldati tosto passò loro accanto
e una di loro catturò lo sguardo del tamburino
II
Andò dal suo commilitone
e gli disse
Ho visto 24 dame ieri
e una di loro mi ha conquistato
il cuore
e se lei mi respinge sarò di certo finito!

III
Va da questa dama e dille i tuoi propositi, dille che ti ha ferito nel profondo del cuore
va e dille che ha lacerato il tuo povero cuore dolente
e se lei ti respinge che cosa altro potrà fare?”
IV
Così  il mattino seguente il tamburino si alzò,
si vestì con un bel
completo
l’orologio nel taschino e un bastone in mano,
salutando le dame
passeggiava per la via maestra
V
Andò da lei e disse
Chiedo scusa,
perdonatemi per la mia franchezza
Oh mia bella dama degna di rispetto,
voi avete conquistato il mio cuore
e se mi respingerete sarò di certo finito”

VI
“Smamma piccolo tamburino, adesso che mi significa?
Sono figlia di un Signore
di Ballycasteen.
sono una rispettabile figlia di Lord
come vedi

smamma piccolo tamburino e non prenderti tante libertà”
VII
Lui si mise il cappello e la salutò dicendo
“Spedirò la mia anima in cielo
o all’inferno

con questa pistola appesa al mio fianco
metterò fine alla mia desolata, giovane vita”
VIII
“Torna indietro giovane tamburino non prenderla così male,
non voglio essere responsabile del peccato, 
essere responsabile per il sangue innocente versato, torna indietro giovane tamburino, sono alla tua mercè.
XI
Noleggeremo un calesse e andremo a Bansheer
là ci sposeremo in barba ai nostri nemici
perchè che cosa avranno da dire quando sarà tutto finito se non che mi sono innamorata del rullare del tuo tamburo?”

NOTE
1) nelle ballate le brigate sono sempre 24 di numero per lo più giovanette o giovanetti intenti nel gioco della palla (vedi)
2) strofa saltata in Assassin’s Creed
3) nonostante le sue pretese di nobiltà a me questa “dama” mi sembra più una popolana!
4) oggi viene da tradurre car come automobile, ma siccome la ballata risale quantomeno all’Ottocento è più probabile che si tratti di un calesse;  nella versione di Ellen Stekert dice
‘Oh, we’ll go to the stable and saddle a horse
To London we’ll ride, and married we’ll be!
And what will we say when the deed it is done?
I’ll tell them that you won me with a roll of your drum .’

FONTI
http://www.folkways.si.edu/ellen-stekert/songs-of-a-new-york-lumberjack/american-folk/music/album/smithsonian
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6190
https://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/little-drummer/
https://www.itma.ie/goilin/singer/harte_frank

La terra del verde trifoglio

Read the post in English

Due testi in cerca di autore, con lo stesso titolo “Shamrock shore” distinguiamo due diverse canzoni, sia come testo che come melodia, la prima riportata da P. W. Joyce alla fine dell’Ottocento è una irish emigration song, la seconda sempre tradizionale è anche una emigration song ma soprattutto una party song di protesta, la denuncia sociale e politica della questione irlandese.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Già alla fine del 1800 P. W. Joyce la riporta nella sua raccolta “Ancient Irish Music” per poi ripubblicarla nel 1909, così scrive “Una delle mie ballate preferite della mia gioventù di cui ho diverse copie delle parole stampate sui fogli volanti “.
Ancora P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) riporta ul ulteriore testo
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

L’emigrante irlandese sbarca a Londra, la melodia è quella generalmente conosciuta con il titolo di “Erin Shore” (vedi)

Horslips in Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore…
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
All’inizio della primavera quando gli uccellini cantano e gli agnellini si divertono e giocano, presi la mia decisione di abbandonare gli amici per andare al molo di Dublino.
Mi imbarcai come passeggero e partii per l’Inghilterra, dissi addio a tutti i miei amici e lasciai la terra del trifoglio.
II
Nella bella Londra mi rifugiai,
per cercare un po’ di divertimento laggiù, trovavo che fosse un bel posticino e gradevole alla vista,
le donne del posto piacevoli da guardare con indosso delle costose pellicce, ma niente vidi che si sarebbe potuto paragonare alla fanciulle della terra del trifoglio

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

Più che una canzone una concione politica sulla necessità dell’indipendenza dell’Irlanda e sui mali del latifondismo.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters (7) stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto*
I
Voi fieri giovani figli dell’isola di Erin
spero che prestiate attenzione per un momento : sono i torti della cara vecchia Irlanda che vi andò a riferire
nero e maledetto fu il giorno in cui il nostro parlamento fu abolito e tutti i nostri guai e le sofferenze iniziarono da allora.
Perchè i nostri figli robusti e le nostre belle figlie devono recarsi in altri paesi e lasciare la loro terra natia alle spalle, con dolore condannati
a cercare un lavoro, devono viaggiare
lontano, molto lontano dalla loro casa
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio
II
L’Irlanda è benedetta con l’abbondanza, ma la gente è oppressa, a tutti quei tiranni maledetti dobbiamo obbedire, per compiacere i boriosi padroni che delle nostre case e delle nostre terre s’impadroniranno  per mettere 50 fattorie in una e portarci tutti via, senza riguardo ai pianti della vedova, alle lacrime della madre e ai lamenti dell’orfano.
In migliaia siamo stati cacciati da casa, che mi rattrista il cuore, siamo stati costretti dalla carestia e dalla malattia a emigrare attraverso i mari
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
III
Il nostro sostentamento portato via per pagare le decime e le tasse
per sostenere la chiesa protetta dalla legge a cui loro aderiscono
e la nostra gentry inglese, è risaputo,
vanno in altri paesi e i soldi della vecchia Irlanda vanno sperperando in lungo e in largo. Perchè se i nostri possidenti restassero a casa e non viaggiassero per altri paesi, costruirebbero opifici e fabbriche qui per dare lavoro alla povera gente; perchè se avessimo il commercio e l’economia, per me nessun’altra nazione si potrebbe paragonare a quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
IV
L’inglese si vanta, ride con disprezzo
e dice che l’irlandese è nato
per essere sempre scontento perchè in sull’isola non andremo mai daccordo,
eppure bandiremo i tiranni dalla nostra terra
e da buone sorelle ci alzeremo a chiedere i diritti dell’Irlanda.
Quindi uniamoci tutti
e  il nostro parlamento al College Green si riunirà per le assemblee
e giorni felici nell’isola di Erin avremo presto ancora una volta
e la cara vecchia Irldanda presto sarà
una grande e gloriosa nazione
e pace e benedizioni presto sorrideranno alla terra del trifoglio

NOTE
1) la canzone è stata scritta dopo il 1800 e l’atto di unione con il regno di Gran Bretagna ( Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda)
2) la piaga del latifondismo
3)  nel 1846 l’intero raccolto delle patate (dieta base degli irlandesi) andò tutto distrutto a causa di un fungo, la peronospera; sopravvenne “la grande carestia” (1845-1849 che alcuni storici prolungano fino al 1852) che durò per vari anni e dimezzò quasi la popolazione; chi non moriva di fame era fortunato se riusciva a partire per l’Inghilterra o la Scozia, ma più massiccia fu la migrazione in America continua
4) decime obbligatorie per il sostenamento della Chiesa Anglicana. Solo sotto il primo ministero Gladstone fu tolto (1869) alla Chiesa episcopale irlandese il riconoscimento di confessione ufficiale e fu promulgata la prima legge (Land Act) protettiva dei fittavoli.
5) gli anni dell’espansione industriale su grande scala (con relativo potenziamento delle infrastrutture)  iniziano in Gran Bretagna a partire dal 1840-50
6) John Bull è la personificazione nazionale del Regno di Gran Bretagna, il nomigliolo nasce nel 1700 a rappresentare il tipo del gentiluomo di campagna, uomo d’affari capace e onesto ma collerico e di umore variabile, amante dello scherzo e della buona tavola.(Treccani)
7) letteralmente “in armonia come sorelle”, non colgo però l’allusione

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm

PADDY’S LAMENTATION OR BY THE HUSH, MY BOYS

(vedi prima parte)
L’emigrazione massiccia delle popolazioni del continente europeo nei territori americani durante il 1800 e per buona metà del 1900, come quella delle popolazioni del continente africano o del Medio Oriente verso l’Europa dei nostri tempi, sono la lotta per la sopravvivenza di gruppi sociali svantaggiati, i quali trovavano ad aspettarli gruppi sociali detentori del potere e della ricchezza (legali e illegali) pronti per lo più a sfruttarli: i poveri, i disperati sono così disumanizzati, trasformati in merce e forza- lavoro sottopagata, o ridotta allo stato di schiavitù.

Nell’America della Speranza Irlandesi (e Italiani e soprattutto Cinesi) lavorarono rischiando la vita ogni giorno (si calcola che 1/3 della forza lavoro irlandese morì a causa della dinamite fatta brillare con la miccia troppo corta, forse per imperizia ma soprattutto per economizzare) per la costruzione della rete ferroviaria del paese America vedi.
Nell’America della Speranza gli Irlandesi furono mandati a combattere nella Guerra di Secessione.

THE DRAFT RIOT IN GANGS OF NEW YORK

La rivolta che scoppiò a New York (the Draft Riot) nel luglio del 1863 fu una reazione popolare alla leva resa obbligatoria dal Congresso nel mese di marzo. Prima di quella data l’arruolamento era a base volontaria, anche se gli incentivi di tre pasti al giorno e un premio d’ingaggio, potevano attirare i più poveri e i disoccupati. Se però uno stato mancava la sua quota di soldati assegnata, subentrava la legge del 1863 e così si sorteggiava la rimanenza tra i maschi bianchi di età compresa tra i 20 e i 35 anni (i più ricchi potevano però farsi esonerare pagando 300 dollari o mandando un sostituto al proprio posto). La nuova legge acuì il malcontento degli Irlandesi in particolare di New York e sembrò loro che la lotta del Sud per l’Indipendenza fosse equivalente a quella irlandese contro l’Inghilterra (indubbiamente c’erano anche i timori che la manodopera afro-americana liberata finisse per “portare via” il lavoro o a far scendere ancora di più i salari). La folla devastò i locali della Commissione federale per la circoscrizione, distrusse i negozi e le abitazioni se la prese con le persone benvestite o ritenute responsabili della situazione e per buona misura i neri vennero bastonati e  impiccati ai lampioni. L’ordine venne ristabilito solo con l’esercito (alcuni reparti che avevano appena combattuto a Ghettysburg) con il rastrellamento strada per strada, con perquisizioni casa per casa, dei quartieri “caldi” e con le sparatorie sulla folla (stime realistiche parlano di un migliaio di morti).

(nella scena del film il termine per indicare i rivoltosi è mob che sottintende il concetto di organizzazione criminale, l’irish mob ossia la mafia irlandese si è originata proprio dalle gangs di irlandesi in America, così a New York operavano i Forty Thieves, i Dead Rabbits e i Whyos, poi arrivarono gli italiani e gli ebrei)

Così nella canzone “Paddy’s lamentation” un soldato irlandese che ha combattuto per Lincoln si ritrova senza una gamba e senza la pensione d’invalidità e maledice l’America perchè lo ha mandato a combattere, senza avergli lasciato la possibilità di scelta. Alcuni ritengono che la canzone sia stata scritta proprio negli anni successivi alla guerra quando i soldati mutilati si trovarono in difficoltà a riscuotere la promessa pensione.
Non mi voglio addentrare negli aspetti della guerra civile americana e nemmeno sul fatto che gli irlandesi si ritrovarono inevitabilmente a combattere tra di loro sui due fronti (come accadde anche per gli italiani: la maggior parte degli italiani che combatterono per l’unione provenivano dal distretto di New York, mentre dalla parte confederata c’erano per lo più i resti dell’esercito borbonico), quanto chiarire un paio di punti utili alla comprensione dei versi.

Questa volta, nonostante mi piaccia molto l’interpretazione di Sinead O’Connor, non ho dubbi sulla versione da selezionare per l’ascolto

Mary Black & The Chieftains in “Long Journey Home” 1998. Mary Black ha inciso una versione precedente con i De Dannan (come preferiscono farsi chiamare) nel 1984  qui nella quale è cantata anche la V strofa.

Nella versione per il film “Long Journey Home” di Thomas Lennon, Paddy Moloney ha preferito non inserire la V strofa, quella in cui si maledice l’America, in effetti l’America è diventata la patria di migliaia d’irlandesi che oggi sono irlandesi americani fieri dello loro origini (stimato come secondo gruppo di ascendenza europea per consistenza dopo i tedeschi americani), ma anche grati alla terra che li ha accolti. A conti fatti le condizioni che trovarono nella nuova terra erano migliori della fame e disperazione che si lasciavano alle spalle; in America emigrarono anche famiglie di ricchi proprietari terrieri (che avevano perso la fiducia di trovare in Irlanda una prospettiva di ripresa per il futuro), così nell’Ulisse di Joyce leggiamo questo di lamento “Dove sono oggi quei venti milioni mancanti di Irlandesi che ci dovrebbero essere qui oggi invece di quattro, le nostre tribù perdute? E le nostre ceramiche e i tessuti, i migliori del mondo? E la nostra lana che si vendeva a Roma ai tempi di Giovenale e il nostro lino e il nostro damasco dei telai di Antrim e i nostri merletti di Limerick..

tra le versioni maschili

ASCOLTA Paul Brady in “The Gathering” 1977
ASCOLTA Frank Harte in “Daybreak and a Candle – End” 1987 in versione integrale su Spotify con il titolo di “By the Hush Me Boys”


I
“And it’s by the hush”(1), me boys, and sure that’s to hold your noise
And listen to poor Paddy’s sad narration
I was by hunger pressed(2), and in poverty distressed
So I took a thought I’d leave the Irish nation
CHORUS
Here’s you boys, now take my advice
To America I’ll have ye’s not be comin’
There is nothing here but war, where the murderin’ cannons roar
And I wish I was at home in dear old Dublin
II
Well I sold me horse and cow, my little pigs and sow
My little plot of land I soon did part with
And me sweetheart Bid McGee, I’m afraid I’ll never see
For I left her there that morning broken-hearted
III
Well meself and a hundred more, to America sailed o’er
Our fortunes to be made we were thinkin’
When we got to Yankee land, they shoved a gun into our hands
Sayin’ “Paddy, you must go and fight for Lincoln”
IV
General Meagher(3) to us he said, if you get shot or lose a leg
Every mother’s son of yous(4) will get a pension
Well myself I lost me leg, they gave me a wooden peg
And by God this is the truth to you I mention
V
Well I think meself in luck, if I get fed on Indian buck(5)
And old Ireland is the country I delight in
To the devil, I would say, God curse Americay
For the truth I’ve had enough of your hard fightin'(6)
Traduzione  di Lorenzo Masetti *
I
Beh c’è silenzio, ragazzi miei, e sono sicuro che eviterete di fare rumore
per ascoltate la triste storia del povero Paddy:
ero stremato dalla fame e tormentato per la povertà,
così mi venne in mente di lasciare
l’Irlanda
CORO
Ecco ragazzi, seguite il mio consiglio,
in America, vi dico, non andate, non c’è nient’altro qui che guerra, dove i cannoni assassini tuonano
e vorrei essere a casa nella vecchia cara Dublino
II
Bene ho venduto il mio cavallo e la mucca, i maialini e la scrofa,
dal mio piccolo pezzo di terra presto mi separai
ed il mio amore Bid McGee, mi dispiace, non la rivedrò
perché la lasciai lì quel mattino col cuore spezzato.
III
Bene, io e altri cento, partimmo per l’America,
pensavamo che saremmo andati a fare fortuna,
quando arrivammo nella terra degli Yankee,
ci misero in mano dei fucili “Paddy, devi andare a combattere per Lincoln”.
IV
Il generale Meagher ci disse, “se venite feriti o perdete una gamba,
ogni figlio di mamma tra di voi prenderà una pensione”.
Beh io stesso ho perso la gamba, me ne hanno data una di legno
e per Dio vi sto raccontando la verità.
V
Bene mi ritengo fortunato, se ho da mangiare grano indiano
e la vecchia Irlanda è il paese che mi dà gioia;
al diavolo, voglio dire, Dio maledica l’America
per la verità ne ho avuto abbastanza del vostro duro combattere

NOTE
*  tratta da qui e parzialmente riveduta
1) da gaelico ‘Bí i do thost’ ossia ‘be quiet’
2) durante la grande carestia irlandese (vedi) ci fu un flusso di emigranti sempre più massiccio a iniziare del 1845 principalmente verso le colonie del Canada e in ogni porto dell’est degli Stati Uniti (in particolare Boston e New York)
3) il generale Thomas Francis Meagher fu a capo del “Irish American 69th Infantry Regiment” (“Fighting 69th”), durante la guerra di secessione. Da allora, il reggimento ha combattuto in tutte le guerre americane (e quindi in Afghanistan e Iraq). Il reggimento é parte della Guardia Nazionale dello stato di New York.
Thomas Francis Meagher. This colorful character, whose equestrian statue now stands before the state capitol, was a brash adventurer who came here with an international reputation and an appetite for even greater glories. Descended from a wealthy Irish family, young Meagher became a leading figure in the Irish independence movement, a noted orator, and an ally of the famous Daniel O’Connell. He narrowly escaped execution by the British because of his revolutionary activities and was banished instead to the penal colony of Tasmania. After escaping from Tasmania, Meagher came eventually to New York, and he soon rose to prominence there as a leader among the thousands of Irish immigrants in that city. During the Civil War, he became famous as the organizing commmander and general of the Irish Brigade. This hard charging outfit saw fierce action at such battles as Malvern Hill and Antietam…practically annihilated in the suicide charge at Fredericksburg. (tratto da qui). Alla fine della guerra fu nominato governatore del Montana
4) yous invece di you è una espressione tipica della cittadina di Walkerville
5) “Indian buck“: indian è l’aggettivo che insieme a “corn” qualificava il mais, in Europa detto granoturco, anche se non ha niente a che vedere con la Turchia, a ben vedere il mais avrebbe dovuto chiamarsi “grano indiano” perchè proveniente da quelle che al tempo erano dette Indie Occidentali, ovvero “grano americano”
Alberto Guidorzi scrive (qui):
“Il mais arrivò in Spagna già nel 1493, cioè con i primissimi viaggi di Colombo, ma solo con gli insediamenti spagnoli nelle regioni temperate delle Americhe, avvenute 30 o 40 anni dopo la scoperta del nuovo continente, in Europa arrivano le varietà precoci che meglio si adatteranno (al clima). E’ solo così che il mais si diffuse nel bacino del Mediterraneo [una fascia geografica che comprende Spagna, Francia, Italia, Penisola Balcanica, Ucraina, Caucaso.]. Tuttavia i botanici rinascimentali non poterono non notare che la pianta aveva affinità con piante recentemente riscoperte quali il sorgo, la saggina, il miglio ed il panico, ma che erano di origine euroasiatica e pertanto, visto anche che ciò coincideva con l’avanzata turca, simbolo di un popolo diverso proveniente da sud, si preferì assegnare al nuovo cereale una provenienza diversa da quella vera, chiamando appunto il mais “granoturco”. Altra particolarità da segnalare è che il mais fungeva da cereale alimentare degli equipaggi delle navi durante il viaggio transcontinentale di ritorno.
Il mais tuttavia per almeno un secolo non ebbe mercato, vale a dire che era seminato negli orti per un uso famigliare, ma i ricchi nobili, proprietari dei terreni, rifiutavano di ricevere mais in conto d’affitto appunto perché merce non mercantile, a differenza del frumento, tanto era la poca considerazione come cibo umano. E’ in questo modo che il mais si è affermato solo come cibo dei poveri e anche come pianta per uso zootecnico. Non sembri inoltre strano come il mais sia un esempio storico della reazione di rifiuto che viene riservato a tutto ciò che è nuovo in fatto di cibo. All’inizio non si disconobbe l’utilità del mais, ma lo si fece detenere dal diavolo, infatti, secondo racconti popolari spagnoli, San Martino l’avrebbe portato via al diavolo in occasione di una scommessa e nelle Lande francesi la cosmologia popolare descrive il mais non come un dono di Dio, ma come una pianta data agli uomini dal maligno e che dagli utilizzatori, avrebbe preteso alla loro morte il possesso dell’anima. Forse è per questo che il primo uso fu zootecnico, nel senso che la pianta verde era somministrata al bestiame o agli animali di bassa corte e per molto tempo fu seminata in terreni non destinati alla coltivazione delle piante alimentari, quali quelle a riposo. L’uso quasi esclusivo presso i diseredati durante le carestie del XVIII sec. fece il resto per demonizzare ulteriormente il mais, anche perchè ben presto cominciarono a verificarsi i primi casi di pellagra(*). A tutto ciò si aggiunse la nomea di pianta depauperatrice dei terreni e quindi incoltivabile nei terreni dati in affitto per proibizione dei proprietari. Tuttavia di questa pianta i contadini non potevano fare senza, perché produceva di più in quantità e soprattutto il seme costava poco, a differenza di quello del frumento. In questo contesto di sfiducia la pianta del mais mantenne la valenza di alimento subumano per almeno un secolo e mezzo, restando comunque una coltura di nicchia al punto tale che ciò determino la creazione di numerosissime popolazioni locali gelosamente custodite e fenotipicamente ben caratterizzate.”
L’alimentazione basata quasi esclusivamente sulla polenta di mais provocò il diffondersi della pellagra fra i mezzadri del Nord Italia dalla fine del ‘700. La malattia non si sviluppò nelle popolazioni native americane perchè procedevano ad un trattamento speciale
E’ molto ingegnoso il processo che veniva (e che viene tuttora usato) in tutte le Americhe detto nixtamalizzazione. I chicchi di mais essiccati vengono inzuppati e cotti in una soluzione alcalina, solitamente a base di idrossido di calcio. Questo ammorbidisce il pericarpo, la parte esterna del chicco, rendendo più semplice la macinatura. Il processo trasforma il mais da semplice fonte di amido (zucchero) in un impasto nutrizionalmente più completo: aumenta la biodisponibilità di calcio, ferro, rame e zinco (anche con l’aiuto del vasellame) oltre che di niacina (evitando così il rischio di ammalarsi di pellagra), riboflavina ed altre vitamine. Lo sviluppo di alcune miceti (funghi) è un altro dei lati positivi del procedimento: lasciando fermentare l’impasto si produce un’ulteriore aumento del valore nutritivo con l’aggiunta di amminoacidi quali lisina e triptofano. Fagioli, verdure, frutta, chili e mais così preparato (nixtamal) erano in grado di fornire una dieta nutrizionalmente soddisfacente senza il bisogno di ricorrere alle proteine animali. (tratto da qui)
5) come intendere questa strofa? Il soldato irlandese dopo essersi lamentato di aver ricevuto solo una gamba di legno e non la promessa pensione d’invalidità ha preferito ritornare in Irlanda a fare la fame piuttosto che continuare a vivere sul suolo americano? Oppure si ritiene comunque fortunato perchè in America ha da mangiare (anche se il cibo dei poveri) e si consola pensando alla sua Irlanda..
Nel primo caso l’Indian buck è il “granoturco” che arrivava dall’America con gli aiuti (per la grande carestia) e che per quanto si tratti di un cereale molto digeribile (adatto in particolare nei casi di deperimenti organici) tuttavia avrebbe potuto creare qualche problema agli stomaci non fenotipizzati degli Irlandesi. Nel secondo caso si tratta del cibo dei poveri l’unico che l’ex soldato disoccupato poteva permettersi di mangiare.
Le due interpretazioni hanno entrambe senso e come sempre per le canzoni popolari lasciano il campo alla valutazione di ogni interprete e ascoltatore.

FONTI
“Song of the North Woods” di Dr. László Vikár, 2004 (qui)
“La genesi della potenza americana. Da Jefferson a Wilso”n di Loretta Valtz Mannucci
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=2770&lang=it http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-ByTheHush.html http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/ByTheHush.pdf http://thomaslennonfilms.com/documentary/the-irish-in-america-long-journey-home/ http://www.thechieftains.com/main/long-journey-home/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4988 http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/p/paddysla.html

Spanish Lady in Dublin City

“Spanish lady” is a traditional song spread in Ireland, England, and Scotland, starting from 1770 we find a series of editions printed in London and Dublin of an “erotic” song (“bawdy song”) titled “The Frisky Songster” or “The Ride in London” in which they talk about a “damsel pretty” reproducing the situation of “Madam, I am come to court you“.
Then in 1913 the Irish poet Joseph Campbell wrote a poem entitled “Spanish Lady” starting from two stanzas collected on the field in Donegal a few years before; in 1930 Herbert Hughes rewrote part of the text with a melodic arrangement for voice and piano adding a nonsense choir.
“Spanish lady” è il titolo di una canzone tradizionale diffusa in Irlanda, Inghilterra, e Scozia riconducibile sicuramente al 1700. A partire dal 1770 troviamo infatti una serie di edizioni stampate a Londra e Dublino di una canzone “erotica” (bawdy song) intitolata “The Frisky Songster” oppure “The Ride in London” in cui si parla di una procace fanciulla (“damsel pretty”) riproducente la situazione di “Madam, I am come to court you“.
Finchè nel 1913 il poeta irlandese Joseph Campbell scrisse una poesia intitolata “Spanish Lady” a partire da due strofe raccolte sul campo nel Donegal qualche anno prima; nel 1930 Herbert Hughes riscrive parte del testo facendone un arrangiamento melodico per voce e pianoforte aggiungendo un coro nonsense.

Both versions spread in the popular area and end up being mingled
Entrambi le versioni si diffondono in ambito popolare e finiscono per venire mischiate.
DaveSwarbrickMartin Carthy & Diz Disley (in “Rags, Reels & Airs” 1967) an amazing instrumental version, in which the violin seems to speak and laughing
in uno stupefacente arrangiamento strumentale in cui il violino sembra che parli e rida

A detailed analysis of the texts is reported by Richard Matteson on Bluegrass Messengers, on my blog I just identify seven major versions from the contributions of various authors between 1700 and 1970.
Un’analisi approfondita sui testi è riportata da Richard Matteson nel sito di Bluegrass Messengers, in questa trattazione mi limiterò a individuare sette principali versioni a partire dai contributi di vari autori tra il 1700 e il 1970.

Adrien Henri Tanoux (1865-1923) Spanish Lady

THE PLOT (LA TRAMA)

An old Irishman remembers the few occasions in his youth to spy a Spanish lady; so sensational was their fortuitous meeting, that just a few images of her (she who washes her feet, combs her hair, goes hunting for butterflies), were so upsetting to make him burn with passion; we can understand his feeling if we take into account that, in the male imaginary of the time, the Spanish woman embodied the ideal of a woman with an exotic and passionate beauty.
Un irlandese, ormai vecchio, ricorda le poche occasioni che ebbe in gioventù di vedere una donna spagnola; così sensazionale fu l’incontro fortuito con la bella, che poche immagini di lei sbirciate da una finestra o dalle sbarre di una cancellata (lei che si lava i piedi, si pettina i capelli, che va a caccia di farfalle), furono così conturbanti da farlo ardere dalla passione; possiamo comprendere il suo turbamento se teniamo conto che, nell’immaginario maschile del tempo, la donna spagnola incarnava l’ideale di donna dalla bellezza esotica e passionale.

FIRST VERSION (PRIMA VERSIONE): DUBLIN CITY

The song is extremely popular in Dublin and for its light-hearted and cheerful tone is a typical pub song even if you do not talk about alcohol at all!
La canzone è estremamente popolare a Dublino e per il suo tono scanzonato e allegro è una tipica canzone da pub anche se non si parla affatto di alcool!

Dominic Behan in his Topic LP “Down by the Liffeyside.” 1959 

It is the version that circulated in the British Isles in the 1960s, the verses are those of the Irish poet Joseph Campbell while the nonsense refrain is taken up by Hughes.
E’ la versione che circolò nelle Isole Britanniche negli anni del 1960, i versi sono quelli del poeta irlandese Joseph Campbell mentre il ritornello senza senso è ripreso da Hughes


Chorus 

Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay
I (1)
As I went down through Dublin City
At the hour of twelve at night
Who should I see but the Spanish lady
Washing her feet by candle light?
First she washed them, then she dried them, over a fire of angry coals
In all my life I ne’er did see
Such a maid so neat about the soles
II 
I stopped to look but the watchman(2) passed.
And said he, “Young fellow, now the night is late.
Along with you home or I will wrestle you
Straightway through the Bridewell gate (3).”
I threw a kiss to the Spanish lady,
Hot as a fire of angry coals,
In all my life I ne’er did see
Such a maid so neat about the soles.
III
Now she’s no mott(4) for a Poddle swaddy (5)
With her ivory comb and her mantle fine
But she’d make a wife for the Provost Marshall
Drunk on brandy and claret wine
I got a look from the Spanish lady,
Cold as a fire of ashy coals,
In all my life I ne’er did see
Such a maid so neat about the soles.
IV 
I’ve wandered north and I’ve wandered south
By Stonybatter(6) and Patrick’s Close(7),
up and around the Gloucester Diamond (8)
and back by Napper Tandy’s house(9).
Old age has laid her hand on me
Cold as a fire of ashy coals
But where  is the Spanish Lady,
The maid so neat about the soles?
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
CORO
Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay

Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino,
a mezzanotte, 
chi ti trovo, se non la Dama Spagnola, 
che si lavava i piedi al lume di candela? 
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò 
su un fuoco di braci ambrate,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
II 
Mi fermai ad ammirarla ma il guardiano passò e disse: “Giovanotto, adesso si è fatto tardi
andatevene a casa vostra oppure vi sbatterò
senza indugio nella Prigione di Bridewell”.
Ho lanciato un bacio alla dama spagnola, 
caldo come un fuoco di  carbone rovente, 
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più 
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
III
Non è ciccia per l’umile Paddy
con il suo pettine d’avorio e il bel mantello
Ma sarà la moglie del Capo della polizia, 
ubriaco di brandy e di vino chiaretto;
diedi uno sguardo alla Dama Spagnola
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più 
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
IV
Ho vagato per il Nord e per il Sud
per Stonybatter e Patrick’s Close
su e in giro per Gloucester Diamond
e indietro per la casa di Napper Tandy
La vecchiaia mi ha raggiunto
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
ma dove è la Dama Spagnola
la donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso?

NOTE
1) the fragment collected on the field by Joseph Campbell in Donegal (1911) [è il frammento raccolto sul campo da Joseph Campbell nel Donegal (1911)]
2) the patrol watch? [la guardia di ronda?]
3)”The Richmond Pen” or “Richmond Gaol” was the prison where the rebel Irish were held starting from 1835 originally called Remand Prison or Bridewell. In 1893 it was transformed into the Wellington Barracks (later renamed Griffith and now home to Griffith College)
“The Richmond Pen” o “Richmond Gaol” era la prigione in cui venivano detenuti gli irlandesi ribelli a partire dal 1835 originariamente detta Remand Prison o Bridewell. Nel 1893 venne trasformata nella Wellington Barracks (poi rinominata Griffith e oggi sede del Griffith College)

4) a ‘mott’ is a girl friend or mistress
5) “Paddy Squaddy’ = a local working class lad [from Poddle, a small river in Dublin]
6) Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) is a district of Dublin on the north bank of the Lieffey river
[Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) è un quartiere di Dublino sulla riva Nord del fiume Lieffey]
7) small street near the St. Patrick’s Cathedral [stradina nei pressi della cattedrale di San Patrizio]
8) Gloucester Place and Gloucester Street were the heart of the Monto, the red light district of Dublin “which comprised the area enclosed by Summerhill in the north, Talbot Street in the South, Marlborough Street to the west and Buckingham Street / Portland Row to the east “(from here) [Gloucester Place e Gloucester Street erano il cuore del Monto, il quartiere a luci rosse di Dublino che comprendeva l’area racchiusa da Summerhill a nord, Talbot Street a sud, Marlborough Street a ovest e Buckingham Street / Portland Row a est” ]
9) Napper Tandy was an eighteenth-century Irish revolutionary, one of the founders of the “United Irishmen”, a champion of free trade and a turbulent figure who died in 1803 Napper Tandy fu un rivoluzionario irlandese del Settecento, uno dei fondatori dei “United Irishmen”, paladino del libero commercio e personaggio turbolento morto nel 1803]

SECOND VERSION [SECONDA VERSIONE]: THE DUBLINER

The Dubliners

The Kilkennys (live)

Gaelic Storm (I, II, IV, V)

Celtic Thunder in Myths & Legends (I, II, IV, V)

The three moments in which the protagonist meets the mysterious Spanish lady correspond to three phases of the male age or three times of the day: sunrise, morning and sunset.
I tre momenti in cui il protagonista incontra la misteriosa donna spagnola corrispondono a tre fasi dell’età maschile ovvero a tre momenti del giorno: l’inizio del nuovo giorno, il mattino e il tramonto.


Chorus 

Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay
I (1)
As I went down through Dublin City
At the hour of twelve at night
Who should I see but the Spanish lady
Washing her feet by candlelight
First she washed them, then she dried them, over a fire of amber coal
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so sweet about the soul
II (2)
As I went back through Dublin City
At the hour of half past eight
Who should I spy but the Spanish lady
Brushing her hair outside the gate
First she brushed it, then she combed it
On her hand was a silver comb
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so fair since I did roam
III (3)
I stopped to look but the Watchman  passed,
He said “Young fellah, now the night is late
Along with ye home or I will wrestle you
Straight back through the Bridewell gate(4)”
I threw a kiss to the Spanish lady
Hot as a fire of angry coal (5)
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so sweet about the soul.
IV (6)
As I came back through Dublin City
As the sun began to set
Who should I spy but the Spanish lady
Catching a moth in a golden net
When she saw me, then she fled me
Lifting her petticoat over her knee
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so shy as the Spanish Lady.
V (7)
I’ve wandered north and I’ve wandered south through Stonybatter(8) and Patrick’s Close(9), up and around the Gloucester Diamond (10)
and back by Napper Tandy’s house(11).
Old age has laid her hand on me
Cold as a fire of ashy coals
But where o where is the Spanish Lady,
Neat and sweet about the soul?
(The maid so neat about the sole?)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
CORO
Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay
I (1)
Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino,
a mezzanotte
chi ti trovo, se non la Dama Spagnola, 
che si lavava i piedi a lume di candela? 
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò 
su un fuoco di braci ambrate
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così piacevole
II (2)
Quando ritornai a Dublino
alle otto e mezzo (di mattino)
chi osservai, se non la Dama Spagnola,
che si spazzolava i capelli fuori dal cancello? Prima li spazzolava, poi li pettinava,
tenendo nella mano un pettine d’argento,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più/ una donzella così bella per quanto abbia viaggiato.
III (3)
Mi fermai ad ammirarla ma il guardiano passò e disse: “Giovanotto, adesso si è fatto tardi
andatevene a casa vostra oppure vi risbatterò, subito nella prigione di Bridewell“.
Ho lanciato un bacio alla Dama spagnola, 
caldo come un fuoco di  carbone rovente, in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così piacevole.
IV (6)
Mentre andai di nuovo a Dublino
quando il sole incominciava a tramontare, 
chi ti trovo, se non la Dama Spagnola,
che catturava una falena in un retino d’oro?
Quando mi vide allora veloce mi scappò sollevando la veste fino al ginocchio,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più, /una donzella così timida come la Dama Spagnola
V (7)
Ho vagato a Nord e a Sud
per Stonybatter e Patrick’s Close
su e in giro per Gloucester Diamond
e indietro per la casa di Napper Tandy.
La vecchiaia mi ha raggiunto
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
ma dove, oh dov’è la Dama Spagnola
magnifica e piacevole nell’aspetto?

NOTE
1) the fragment collected on the field by Joseph Campbell in Donegal (1911) [è il frammento raccolto sul campo da Joseph Campbell nel Donegal (1911)]
2)  Joseph Campbell 
3) stanza that partly reproduces the verses of Herbert Hughes. [strofa che riprende in parte i versi di Herbert Hughes. ]
4)”The Richmond Pen” or “Richmond Gaol” was the prison where the rebel Irish were held starting from 1835 originally called Remand Prison or Bridewell. In 1893 it was transformed into the Wellington Barracks (later renamed Griffith and now home to Griffith College)
“The Richmond Pen” o “Richmond Gaol” era la prigione in cui venivano detenuti gli irlandesi ribelli a partire dal 1835 originariamente detta Remand Prison o Bridewell. Nel 1893 venne trasformata nella Wellington Barracks (poi rinominata Griffith e oggi sede del Griffith College)
5) Campbell writes instead [Campbell scrive invece]:
Hot as the fire of cramsey coals
I’ve seen dark maids though never one
So white and neat about the sole.
6)  Herbert Hughes
7) stanza written by Joseph Campbell but with the different name of some neighborhoods [strofa scritta da  Joseph Campbell però con il nome diverso di alcuni quartieri]
the second and third verse [il secondo e il terzo verso]
By Golden Lane and Patrick’s Close,
The Coombe, Smithfield and Stoneybatter,
8) Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) is a district of Dublin on the north bank of the Lieffey river
[Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) è un quartiere di Dublino sulla riva Nord del fiume Lieffey]
9) small street near the St. Patrick’s Cathedral [stradina nei pressi della cattedrale di San Patrizio]
10) Gloucester Place and Gloucester Street were the heart of the Monto, the red light district of Dublin [Gloucester Place e Gloucester Street erano il cuore del Monto, il quartiere a luci rosse di Dublino ]
11) Napper Tandy was an eighteenth-century Irish revolutionary, one of the founders of the “United Irishmen”, a champion of free trade and a turbulent figure who died in 1803 [ Napper Tandy fu un rivoluzionario irlandese del Settecento, uno dei fondatori dei “United Irishmen”, paladino del libero commercio e personaggio turbolento morto nel 1803]

THIRD VERSION [TERZA VERSIONE]: “Twenty, Eighteen”

The third version was recorded by Frank Harte in 1973, the text takes the poetry of Campbell but with the chorus “Twenty, Eighteen”; the melody has a different rythm from the one with which we usually associate the song. In all likelihood, the version derives in turn from Burl Ives‘ Dublin City, recorded in 1948 (the version circulating in America)
La terza versione fu registrata da Frank Harte nel 1973, il testo riprende la poesia di Campbell ma con il coro “Twenty, Eighteen”; la melodia ha una cadenza diversa da quella con cui siamo soliti associare il brano. Con buona probabilità la versione deriva a sua volta dalla “Dublin City” di Burl Ives registrata nel 1948 ( la versione che circolava in America )

Frank Harte in Through Dublin City 1973
He writes in the notes [Così scrive nelle note]
 For too long this fine old Dublin song has been sung mainly by choral groups and concert sopranos. I remember the song from childhood and it has grown as I heard verses of it year after year. In some versions the last verse ends—She had 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 none
She had 19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 3 and 1,
meaning “she had the odds and the evens of it“—in other words she had everything.
Per troppo tempo questa bella vecchia canzone di Dublino è stata cantata principalmente da gruppi corali e soprani. Ricordo la canzone fin dall’infanzia ed è cresciuta sentendone vari versi anno dopo anno. In alcune versioni l’ultimo strofa termina-
Lei aveva 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 nessuno

Lei aveva 19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 3 e 1,
che significa “lei aveva buon gioco” – in altre parole lei aveva tutto.

Triona & Maighread ni Domhnaill in Idir An Dá Sholas, 2000 


I
As I was walking through Dublin City
About the hour of twelve at night
It was there I saw a fair pretty female
Washing her feet by candlelight
II

First she washed them, then she dried them
Over a fire of ambery coals
And in all my life I never did see
A maid so neat about the soles
Chorus(1):
She had twenty eighteen sixteen fourteen
Twelve ten eight six four two none
She had nineteen seventeen fifteen thirteen
Eleven nine seven five three and one
III
I stopped to look but the watchman passed
Says he, “Young fellow, the night is late
And along with you home or I will wrestle you
Straight away to the Bridewell gate(2)
IV

I got a look from the Spanish lady
Hot as a fire of ambery coals
And in all my life I never did see
A maid so neat about the soles
Chorus

V
As I walked back through Dublin City
As the dawn of day was o’er
Oh whom should I spy but the Spanish lady
When I was weary and footsore
VI

She had a heart so filled with loving
And her love she longed to share
And in all my life I never did meet
A maid who had so much to spare
Chorus

VII
I have wandered north and I’ve wandered south/By Stoneybatter(3) and Patrick’s Close(4)
And up and around by the Gloucester Diamond(5)/Back by Napper Tandy’s house(6)
VIII

Old age has laid her hand upon me
Cold as a fire of ashey coals
And gone is the lovely Spanish lady
Neat and sweet about the soles
Second Chorus
‘Round and around goes the wheel of fortune
Where it rests now wearies me
Oh fair young maids are so deceiving
Sad experience teaches me
Chorus
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino,
alle dodici di notte,
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
che si lavava i piedi a lume di candela.
II
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò
su un fuoco di braci ambrate
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
Coro (1)
Aveva 20, 18, 16, 14
12, 10, 8, 4, 2 niente
aveva 19, 17, 15, 13
11, 9, 7, 5, 3 e 1
III
Mi fermai ad ammirarla ma il guardiano passò
e disse: “Giovanotto, si è fatto tardi
andatevene a casa vostra oppure vi sbatterò immediatamente nella prigione di Bridewell
IV
Ho lanciato uno sguardo alla Dama Spagnola,
caldo come un fuoco di carbone rovente,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
Coro
V
Mentre andai di nuovo a Dublino
quando il sole incominciava a tramontare,
chi avrei spiato, se non la Dama Spagnola,
mentre ero stanco e con il male ai piedi?
VI
lei aveva un cuore pieno d’amore
e il suo amore desiderava condividerlo,
in tutta la mia vita non incontrai mai più,
una donzella che aveva così tanto da offrire
Coro
VII
Ho vagabondato a Nord e ho vagabondato a Sud
per Stonybatter e Patrick’s Close
su e in giro per Gloucester Diamond
e indietro per la casa di Napper Tandy
VIII
La vecchiaia mi ha raggiunto
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
e andata è la bella Dama Spagnola
magnifica e piacevole nell’aspetto
Secondo coro
Gira e rigira la ruota della fortuna,
dove si ferma ora mi ha stancato,
oh le belle donzelle sono così ingannevoli,
come l’amara esperienza m’insegna
Coro

NOTE
1) in the refrain perhaps the woman counts the money she has earned [nel ritornello forse la donna conta i soldi che ha guadagnato]
2) “The Richmond Pen” or “Richmond Gaol” was the prison where the rebel Irish were held starting from 1835 originally called Remand Prison or Bridewell. “The Richmond Pen” o “Richmond Gaol” era la prigione in cui venivano detenuti gli irlandesi ribelli a partire dal 1835 originariamente detta Remand Prison o Bridewell.
3) Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) is a district of Dublin on the north bank of the Lieffey river
[Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) è un quartiere di Dublino sulla riva Nord del fiume Lieffey]
4) small street near the St. Patrick’s Cathedral [stradina nei pressi della cattedrale di San Patrizio]
5) Gloucester Place and Gloucester Street were the heart of the Monto, the red light district of Dublin [Gloucester Place e Gloucester Street erano il cuore del Monto, il quartiere a luci rosse di Dublino ]
6) Napper Tandy was an eighteenth-century Irish revolutionary, one of the founders of the “United Irishmen”, a champion of free trade and a turbulent figure who died in 1803 [ Napper Tandy fu un rivoluzionario irlandese del Settecento, uno dei fondatori dei “United Irishmen”, paladino del libero commercio e personaggio turbolento morto nel 1803]


SPANISH LADY: bawdy version
[la versione malandrina]

In this version our suitor goes far beyond the simple peek!
In addition to the gallant night he must also defend himself in a duel and so warns visitors to Dublin: “Be careful not to lose your head for the beauties that are combing by staying at the window .. you could lose your life!
Una versione da “uomo di mondo” è quella in cui il nostro corteggiatore si spinge ben più in là della semplice sbirciatina!
Oltre alla notte galante il nostro “spaccone” deve anche difendersi in duello e così ammonisce i visitatori di Dublino: “Fate attenzione a non perdere la testa per le bellezze che si pettinano stando alla finestra.. potreste perdere la vita!”

 Christy Moore


I
As I went out by Dublin City
at the hour of 12 at night

Who should I see but a Spanish lady
washing her feet by candlelight

First she washed them then she dried them all by the fire of amber coal
In all my life I ne’er did see
a maid so sweet about the soul

II
I asked her would she come out walking
and went on till “the Grey cocks crew”

A coach I stopped then to instate her
and we rode on till the sky was blue

Combes of amber in her hair were
and her eyes knew every spell

In all my life I ne’re did see
a woman I could love so well

III
But when I came to where I found her
and set her down from the halted coach

Who was there with his arms folded but the fearful swordsman Tiger Roche (1)
Blades were out ‘twas thrust and cut,
never a man gave me more fright

Till I lay him dead on the floor
where she stood holding the candlelight

IV
So if you go to Dublin City
at the hour of twelve at night

Beware of the girls who sit in their windows combing their hair in the candlelight
I met one and we went walking,
I thought that she would be my wife

When I came to where I found her,
if it wasn’t for my sword I’d have lost my life.

traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino
a mezzanotte
chi ti trovo se non la Dama Spagnola,
che si lavava i piedi al lume di candela?
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò
su un fuoco di braci ambrate
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai
una donzella dall’aspetto così amabile.
II
Le chiesi se voleva uscire per una passeggiata
e andare fino al ” Grey cocks crew”
fermai una carrozza davanti a lei
e noi girammo finchè il cielo divenne chiaro, aveva pettini d’ambra nei capelli
e i suoi occhi conoscevano ogni incantesimo,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donna che avrei potuto amare così tanto.
III
Ma quando ritornammo nel punto in cui la trovai e la feci scendere dalla carrozza,
chi c’era con le braccia conserte se non Tiger Roche, il terribile spadaccino?
Le spade furono sguainate pronte e affilate,
mai un uomo mi ha fatto più paura,
finchè lo lasciai morto sul pavimento
dove lei stava in attesa con un candeliere.
IV
Così se andate a Dublino
a mezzanotte,
attenzione alle fanciulle che siedono alla finestra pettinandosi i capelli al lume di candela, ne incontrai una mentre stavo passeggiando e pensai che sarebbe stata mia moglie, 
quando ritornai al punto in cui l’avevo trovata, se non fosse stato per la mia spada, avrei perso la vita!

NOTE
tiger-roche1) David “Tiger” Roche was a fascinating adventurer who lived in the eighteenth century. Son of a gentleman, officer at sixteen, hero of the Indian Wars, degraded with ignominy by theft, repeatedly tried for murder, chronically in debt, hunter of dowry … The prototype of Barry Lyndon so to speak.
 [Il dublinese David “Tiger” Roche era un affascinante avventuriero vissuto nel Settecento. Figlio di un gentiluomo, ufficiale a sedici anni, eroe delle Indian Wars, degradato con ignominia per furto, ripetutamente processato per omicidio, cronicamente indebitato, cacciatore di dote… Il prototipo di Barry Lyndon per intenderci.]

The song is so popular that the Spanish Lady changes address depending on the city the song comes from, we have versions from Galway, but also  Belfast, Chester– second part
La canzone è così popolare che la Dama Spagnola cambia  indirizzo a seconda della città da cui proviene la canzone, abbiamo così versioni da Galway, ma anche a Belfast, Chester continua

LINK
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/8e-the-spanish-lady.aspx
http://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/thespanishlady.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44796 http://thesession.org/tunes/1117
http://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/spanish-lady/