Archivi tag: Matthew White

Outlander, chapter 34: The Dowie Dens of Yarrow

 Leggi in italiano

FROM OUTLANDER BOOK

The Dowie Dens of Yarrow – a ballad from the Scottish Border. Murtagh teaches this song to Claire when they travel together looking for Jamie after he is taken by the Watch.
(continue “The Search” Outlander Tv season I)

“The Dowie Dens of Yarrow”, “The Dewy Dens of Yarrow” or  “The Breas of Yarrow”, “The Banks of Yarrow” exists in many variants in Child’s book ( The O Braes’ Yarrow Child ballad  IV, # 214). The story was also told in the poem by William Hamilton, published in Tea-Table Miscellany (Allan Ramsay, 1723) and also in  Reliques (Thomas Percy, vol II 1765): Hamilton was inspired by an old Scottish ballad of the oral tradition (see)
Kenneth S. Goldstein commented “Child printed nineteen texts of this beautiful Scottish tragic ballad, the oldest dating from the 18th century. Sir Walter Scott, who first published it in his Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1803), believed that the ballad referred to a duel fought at the beginning of the 17th century between John Scott of Tushielaw and Walter Scott of Thirlestane in which the latter was slain. Child pointed out inaccuracies in this theory but tended to give credence to the possibility that the ballad did refer to an actual occurrence in Scott family history that was not too far removed from that of the ballad tale.
In a recent article, Norman Cazden discussed various social and historical implications of this ballad (and its relationship to Child 215, Rare Willie Drowned in Yarrow), as well as deriding Scott’s theories as to its origin.” (see Mainly Norfolk)
ETTRICK FOREST
The area is a sort of “Bermuda triangle” of the Celtic world, a strip of land rich in traditional tales of fairy raptures and magical apparitions!
(see also the Tam lin ballad)

The hero of the ballad was a knight of great bravery, popularly believed to be John Scott, sixth son of the Laird of Harden. According to history, he met a treacherous and untimely death in Ettrick Forest at the hands of his kin, the Scotts of Gilmanscleugh in the seventeenth century.

Newark Castle sullo Yarrow: not the castle of the ballad but a possible setting

THE AGREEMENT OVER  YARROW’S VALLEY

The song describes a young man (perhaps a border reiver) killed in an ambush near the Yarrow river by the brothers of the woman he loved. In some versions, the lady rejects nine suitors in preference for a servant or ploughman; the nine make a pact to kill the her real lover, in other they are men sent by the lady’s father.The reiver manages to kill or wound his assailants but eventually falls, pierced by the youngest of them.

The lady may see the events in a dream, some versions of the song end with the lady grieving, in others she dies of grief.
The structure is the classical one of the ancient ballads with the revealing of the story between the questions and answers of the protagonists and the commonplace of the death announced to the parents.

Paton-Yarrow
Sir Joseph Noel Paton: The Dowie Dens of Yarrow

So many textual versions and different melodies, which I have grouped into three strands.

FIRST VERSION

The melody was collected by Lucy Broadwood  from John Potts of Whitehope Farm, Peeblesshire, published in The Journal of the Folk Song Society, vol.V (1905).

Matthew White (Canadian countertenor): Skye Consort in the Cd “O Sweet Woods 2013”, the arrangement is very interesting, with a Baroque atmosphere that echoes the era in which the first version is traced. Only verses I, II, IV, V, VI, VIII and XIV are performed

Mad Pudding in Dirt & Stone -1996 (except V verse) listen

I
There lived a lady in  the north (1);
You could scarcely find her marrow (2).
She was courted by nine noblemen
On the dewy dells (3) of Yarrow (4)
II
Her father had a bonny ploughboy (5)
And she did love him dearly.
She dressed him up like a noble lord
For to fight for her on Yarrow(6).
III
She kissed his cheek, she kamed his hair,
As oft she had done before O (7),
She gilted him with a right good sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
As he climbed up yon high hill
And they came down the other,
There he spied nine noblemen
On the dewy dells of Yarrow.
V
‘Did you come here for to drink red wine,
Or did you come here to borrow?
Or did you come here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow?’
VI
‘I came not here for to drink red wine,
And I came not here to borrow,
But I came here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow’
VII
‘There are nine of you and one of me,
And that’s but an even number,
But it’s man to man I’ll fight you all
And die for her on Yarrow’
VIII
Three he drew and three he slew
And two lie deadly wounded,
When a stubborn knight crept up behind
And pierced him with his arrow.
IX
‘Go home, go home, my false young man,
And tell your sister Sarah
That her true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow’
X
As he gaed down yon high hill
And she came down the other,
It’s then he met his sister dear
A-coming fast to Yarrow.
XI
‘O brother dear, I had a dream last night,’
‘I can read it into sorrow;
Your true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow.’
XII
This maiden’s hair was three-quarters long (8),
The colour of it was yellow.
She tied it around his middle side (9)
And she carried him home to Yarrow.
XIII
She kissed his cheeks, she kamed his hair
As oft she had done before O,
Her true lover John lies dead and gone,
on the dewy dells of Yarrow.
XIV
O mother dear, make me my bed,
And make it long and narrow,
For the one that died for me today,
I shall die for him tomorrow
XV
‘O father dear, you have seven sons;
You can wed them all tomorrow,
For the fairest flower amongst them all (9)
Is the one that died on Yarrow.

NOTE
1) the north is not only a geographical location but a code word  in balladry for a sad story
2) marrow= a companion, a bosom friend, a kindred spirit (a husband)
3) dowue, dewy= sad, melancholy, dreary, dismal
Dens, dells= a narrow valley or ravine, usually wooded, a dingle
4) Yarrow is a river but also an officinal herb, Achillea millefolium. So the definition of the place “the valleys of the Yarrow” becomes more vague but also symbolic: the yarrow is a plant associated with death, and in popular beliefs the sign of a mourning.
From the healing powers already known in the times of Homer and used by the Druids, the plant is the main ingredient of a magic potion worthy of the secret recipe of the Panoramix druid. It is said that in the Upper Valle del Lys (Valle d’Aosta, Italy) the Salassi were great consumers of a drink that infused courage and strength. It became known as Ebòlabò and it is a drink still prepared by the inhabitants of the valley based on “achillea moscata”.
5) In some versions the boy is a country man but not necessarily a peasant, rather a cadet son of a small country nobility. Near Yarrow (Yarrow Krik) there is still a stone with an ancient inscription near a place called the “Warrior’s rest“.
6) Matthew White
“She killed here with a single sword
On the dewy dells of Yarrow”
7) the typical behavior of a devoted wife who looks after, combs and dresses her husband, the same care and devotion that she will give to the corpse
8)  In the Middle Ages the girls wore very long hair knotted in a thick braid
9) some interpret the verse as an expression of mourning in which the girl cuts her long hair (that reaches her knees) up to her waist. The phrase literally means, however, that she uses her hair to carry away the corpse interweaving them like a rope. The image is a little grotesque for our standards, but it must have been a common practice at the time
10) the verse says that the handsome peasant was the bravest of all, certainly not the brother!

“ERICA FUNESTA”

Second version: the lady makes a dream in which she is picking up the red heather on the slopes of the Yarrow, an omen of misfortune.
A Scottish legend explains how the common  heather has become white: Malvina, daughter of a Celtic bard, was engaged to a warrior named Oscar. Oscar was killed in battle, and the messenger that delivered the news gave her heather as a token of Oscar’s love. As her tears fell on the heather, it turned white.  Since then the white heather is the emblem of faithful love; the resemblance to the Norse legend of Baldur and the mistletoe is surprising.

Karine Powart version shows us the most extensive text of the ballad that the Pentangle translate into English and reduce to 7 verses

Bert Jansh  Yarrow, in Moonshine (1973).

 The Pentangle in Open the Door, 1985 ( I, II, III, IV, VI, VIII, XIII)

I
There was a lady in the north
You scarce would find her marrow
She was courted by nine gentlemen
And a plooboy lad fae Yarrow
II
Well, nine sat drinking at the wine
As oft they’d done afore O
And they made a vow amang themselves
Tae fight for her on Yarrow
III
She’s washed his face, she’s combed his hair,/ As she has done before,
She’s placed a brand down by his side,
To fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
So he’s come ower yon high, high hill
And doon by the den sae narrow
And there he spied nine armed men
Come tae fight wi’ him on Yarrow
V
He says, “There’s nine o’ you and but one o’ me/ It’s an unequal marrow”
But I’ll fight ye a’ noo one by one
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow
VI (1)
So it’s three he slew and three withdrew
An’ three he wounded sairly
‘Til her brother, he came in beyond
And he wounded him maist foully
VII
“Gae hame, gae hame, ye fause young man
And bring yer sister sorrow
For her ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
VIII
“Oh mither, (2) I hae dreamed a dream
A dream o’ doul and sorrow
I dreamed I was pu’ing the heathery bells (3)
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
IX
“Oh daughter dear, I ken yer dream
And I doobt it will bring sorrow
For yer ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
X
An’ so she’s run ower yon high, high hill
An’ doon by the den sae narrow
And it’s there she spied her dear lover John
Lyin’ pale and deid on Yarrow
XI
And so she’s washed his face an’ she’s kaimed his hair
As aft she’d done afore O
And she’s wrapped it ‘roond her middle sae sma’ (4)
And she’s carried him hame tae Yarrow
XII
“Oh haud yer tongue, my daughter dear/ What need for a’ this sorrow?
I’ll wed ye tae a far better man
Than the one who’s slain on Yarrow”
XIII
“Oh faither, ye hae seven sons
And ye may wed them a’ the morrow
But the fairest floo’er amang them a’
Was the plooboy lad fae Yarrow”
XIV
“Oh mother, mother mak my bed
And mak it saft and narrow
For my love died for me this day
And I’ll die for him tomorrow”

NOTE
8) qui il verso risulta un po’ oscuro mancando il particolare dei lunghi capelli di lei annodati in treccia che diventano corde da traino per portare il cadavere a casa
1) The Pentangle
It’s three he’s wounded, and three withdrew,
And three he’s killed on Yarrow,
2) The Pentangle say “father
3) heather bell is the name of the  Erica cinerea ; a Scottish legend explains how the common  heather has become white: Malvina, daughter of a Celtic bard, was engaged to a warrior named Oscar. Oscar was killed in battle, and the messenger that delivered the news gave her heather as a token of Oscar’s love. As her tears fell on the heather, it turned white.  Since then the white heather is the emblem of faithful love; the resemblance to the Norse legend of Baldur and the mistletoe is surprising.

THE HEATHERY HILLS OF YARROW

It’s Bothy band version that begins the story from the ambush and develops the dialogue between the lady and her relatives until her tragic death.
Bothy band (Tríona Ní Dhomhnaill voice) in After hours, 1979

I
It’s three drew and three slew,
And three lay deadly wounded,
When her brother John stepped in between,
And stuck his knife right through him.
II
As she went up yon high high hill,
And down through yonder valley,
Her brother John came down the glen,
Returning home from Yarrow.
III
Oh brother dear I dreamt last night
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
I dreamt that you were spilling blood,
On the dewy dens of Yarrow.
IV
Oh sister dear I read your dream,
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
For your true love John lies dead and gone
On the heathery hills of Yarrow.
V
This fair maid’s hair being three quarters long,
And the colour it was yellow,
She tied it round his middle waist,
And she carried him home from Yarrow.
VI
Oh father dear you’ve got seven sons,
You can wed them all tomorrow,
But a flower like my true love John,
Will never bloom in Yarrow.
VII
This fair maid she being tall and slim,
The fairest maid in Yarrow,
She laid her head on her father’s arm,
And she died through grief and sorrow.

References
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Child%27s_Ballads/214
http://literaryballadarchive.com/PDF/Hamilton_1_Braes_of_Yarrow_f.pdf
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C214.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thedowiedensofyarrow.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/145.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/484.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/67.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/polwart/dowie.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/families/scotts_harden.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9870
http://fallingangelslosthighways.blogspot.it/2013/04/the-eildon-hills-sacred-mountains-of.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46972

GALLOWS POLE & GOLDEN BALL

“The Maid Freed From The Gallows”, “Gallows Pole” oppure “The Hangman” è una ballata molto popolare in America e sembra in prima battuta avere radici nel delta del Mississippi, una canzone degli schiavi afroamericani, (tra gospel e blues) in cui un prigioniero che sta per essere impiccato, chiede a parenti e amici di comprare la sua libertà; in origine invece era un’antica storia  del Vecchio Continente risalente al Medioevo in cui è una fanciulla ad essere in attesa di giudizio per aver perso  un bene prezioso che le era stato affidato (fuor di metafora la sua verginità); solo l’amante potrà restituirle l’onore (dietro il pagamento in denaro) e salvarla dall’impiccagione. Il pagamento poteva essere un  risarcimento alla famiglia di lei per il torto subito, in quanto un tempo in tutte le società patriarcali la castità delle fanciulle aveva un valore sociale e contrattuale grazie al possesso e controllo sul genere femminile.
L’oro nelle ballate (indossato ad esempio come monile tra i capelli) finisce per identificare una qualità morale delle fanciulle vergini: la purezza e la castità.

LA FIABA INGLESE: THE GOLDEN BALL

Liga Kļaviņa

Ritroviamo la storia nella fiaba classica riportata da Joseph Jacobs con il titolo “The Golden Ball”: due sorelle incontrano un bell’uomo vestito con abiti sontuosi (probabilmente una creatura fatata) che affida ad ognuna di loro una palla dorata dicendo di custodirla con cura a costo della loro vita. La sorella più giovane mentre ci gioca la fa cadere oltre il confine delle mura dentro ad un parco e quando riesce a salire sulle mura, vede la palla correre per il prato fino a entrare dentro ad una casa. (la situazione descritta richiama  la ballata su Sir Ugo)
Chiede aiuto al fidanzato perchè vada a recuperare la palla e il fidanzato nei pressi del muro incontra una vecchina che gli svela che l’unico modo per riprendere la palla è di trascorrere tre notti nella vecchia casa.  La prime due notti il giovanotto affronta i giganti tagliandoli in due con la sua spada (e vede delle strane creature dette “bogles” aggirarsi per il cortile  ); la terza notte  i bogles giocano con la palla dorata proprio sotto al suo letto e il giovane, tirando fendenti con la spada, riesce a metterli in fuga e recupera così la palla d’oro.
E’ il ragazzo ad essere messo alla prova per dimostrare di essere pronto al matrimonio e giganti e goblin sono le paure (anche di natura sessuale) che deve sconfiggere per poter diventare adulto.

I BOGLES

I Bogles sono dei folletti cattivi del folklore scozzese, dispettosi e pericolosi ma non malvagi e William Henderson nel suo libro “Folklore of the Northen Counties” spiega “non danno fastidio a nessuno tranne che agli assassini e a coloro che cercano d’imbrogliare le vedove e gli orfani” così bogle o bogil è il termine localizzato nel Border per il goblin un folletto burlone entrato nell’immaginario fantasy odierno grazie a films e giochi di ruolo: oggi però il goblin è diventato un essere crudele e puteolente (vedasi Il signore degli Anelli).

LA FORCA

Nel frattempo la ragazza viene portata sul patibolo per l’impiccagione e lei supplica il boia per avere un po’ più di tempo dicendo: “ecco sento mia madre che arriva e riporterà la palla d’oro”, ma la madre non ha la palla e non è andata per liberarla anzi è lì per assistere all’esecuzione. Poi il padre e il fratello e poi la sorella, tutti i suoi congiunti arrivano presso la forca per  disapprovare il comportamento della ragazza, che ha perso la verginità (la biglia o palla d’oro zecchino) con tanta leggerezza;
infine è la volta del fidanzato che riporta la palla e la libera.
Questo andamento progressivo della storia (una tra le tipiche tecniche costruttive delle ballate popolari) ) si traduce  nella ripetizione ossessiva della strofa, che resta inalterata tranne la sostituzione di un parente.

Ora in certe illustrazioni i bogles assomigliano a tanti ranocchi e in effetti la fiaba si può accomunare a quella più conosciuta del Principe Ranocchio scritta dai fratelli Grimm. continua
Nella tradizione italiana ritroviamo anche la versione invertita della storia in cui è la rana ad essere una principessa: è il giovane principe a gettare la biglia d’oro zecchino che finisce nello stagno preferito dalla ranocchia.

THE GOLDEN BALL

In effetti il gioco con la “golden ball” è un commonplace delle ballate antiche diventato un generico “playing the ball” quale tipico passatempo dei ragazzi e delle giovinette nelle vie cittadine o nei parchi dei castelli.

ASCOLTA Rubus “Golden Ball” in Nine Witch Knots 2008.
(testo: tradizionale – melodia: Portman; arrangiamento: Portman, Newey, Andropolis, Schrimshaw.)
Così riportano nelle note: ‘The Golden Ball’, found in George Kinloch’s The Ballad Book is a variation of ‘The Maid Freed from the Gallows’, also known as ‘Prickle Holly Bush’. In this variation, as in the chantefable of the same title found in Joseph Jacobs’ More English Fairy Tales, the protagonist asks her family for her golden ball, often a symbol of lost youth. A linden tree replaces the usual gallows tree and, most striking of all, it is transformed from a tale of true love to a celebration of super-grannies; for it is non other than the grandmother who hobbles over the hills, clutching the golden ball, just in time to save her granddaughter‘s neck. Kinloch gave no melody or source for his text, but I imagine a formidable old woman in a rocking chair impressing her grandchildren with the hangman’s marks still on her neck. (tratto da qui)

ecco la trascrizione del testo ad orecchio


She looked over to the high high hill
she ..  manys the day
here she saw her father a-coming from the highway
“Father, have you found my golden ball,
And have you come to set me free?
Or have you come to see me hung,
upon the linden tree?”
“I’ve not found your golden ball,
And I’ve not come to set you free.
But I have come to see you hung,
upon the linden tree.”
etc. for mother, brother, sister, grand-mother
“Yes, I have found your golden ball,
And I have come to set you free.
I’ve not come to see you hung,
upon the linden tree”.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
Guardava dall’alto della collina
..
qui vide il padre arrivare lungo la strada maestra
“Padre avete trovato la mia palla d’oro zecchino
e siete venuto a liberarmi?
O siete venuto per vedermi impiccata sotto al tiglio (1)?
“Non ho trovato la tua palla d’oro
non sono venuto a liberarti,
ma sono venuto per vederti impiccata sotto al tiglio”
continua con la madre, fratello e la sorella  e infine la nonna
“Si io ho trovato la tua palla d’oro
e sono venuta a liberarti
e non a vederti penzolare
dal tiglio”

NOTE
1) Il tiglio è un albero molto longevo, può vivere fino a 1000 anni.
Per molti popoli europei dei tempi antichi, in particolare per i popoli slavi, il tiglio è un albero sacro. Le città tedesche avevano spesso nel loro punto centrale un piccolo gruppo di tigli destinato a luogo d’incontro . Era anche usanza piantarli nei luoghi destinati per gli incontri commerciali, poiché si considerava che la presenza del tiglio potesse donare calma e benessere alle persone e quindi favorire la comprensione nelle relazioni. Gli antichi consideravano il tiglio così benefico per gli uomini, che veniva ritenuto un simbolo di amicizia e fedeltà. Veniva piantato nei giardini intorno alle case credendo che il tiglio potesse proteggere dal malocchio. (Anna Zacchetti tratto da qui)

Nella tradizione britannica la ballata diventa “The Prickle Holly Bush
ASCOLTA Matthew White e il bel canto molto poetico anche il video

I
O, the prickeli (1) bush,
it pricks my heart full sore;
If I ever get out of this prickeli bush,
I’ll never get in it any more.
II
Hangsman, stay your hand,
o stay it for awhile;
for I think I see my father
coming o’er yonder side.
III
Father, have you brought me gold
or silver to set me free?
To save my body from the cold, cold ground
and my neck from the gallows tree.
IV
No, I have not brought you gold
or silver  to set you free,
to save your body from the cold, cold ground
and your neck from the gallows tree.
V
Hangsman, stay your hand,
o stay it for awhile;
for I think I see my true love
coming o’er yonder side.
VI
True love, have you brought me gold
or silver to set me free?
To save my body from the cold, cold ground
and my neck from the gallows tree.
VII
Yes, I have brought you gold
and silver to set you free,
to save your body from the cold, cold ground
and your neck from the gallows tree.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Oh il cespuglio di rovi (1)
mi punge e graffia  il cuore
se mai riuscissi a uscire da questo rovo, non ci entrerò mai più (2)
II
“Boia ferma la tua mano
o fermala per un momento:
perchè credo di vedere mio padre
venire da lontano”
III
“Padre mi hai portato l’oro o l’argento per liberarmi?
Per salvare il mio corpo dalla fredda, fredda terra
e il mio collo dalla forca?”
IV
“No, non ho portato l’oro o l’argento per liberarti,
e salvare il tuo corpo dalla fredda, fredda terra
e il tuo collo dalla forca”
V
“Boia ferma la tua mano
o fermala per un momento:
perchè credo di vedere il mio innamorato
venire da lontano”
VI
“Amore mio mi hai portato l’oro o l’argento per liberarmi?
Per salvare il mio corpo dalla fredda, fredda terra
e il mio collo dalla forca?”
VII
“Si, ho portato l’oro o l’argento per liberarti,
e salvare il tuo corpo dalla fredda, fredda terra
e il tuo collo dalla forca”

NOTE
1) prickly: pungente cioè con le spine; ma anche un Prickle Holly Bush, cioè un cespuglio di agrifoglio: l’agrifoglio è un albero dalla simbologia maschile, legato all’amore fraterno e alla paternità
2) la fanciulla ha imparato la lezione

ASCOLTA The Watersons in cui il condannato in attesa di impiccagione è un uomo e il canto inizia con
“Oh, slack your horse,” cries George,
“Come slack it for a while,
For I think I see my father
Coming over yonder style.”
accomunando così la canzone a Geordie e alle ballate sul bracconaggio

continua

FONTI
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/95-the-maid-freed-from-the-gallows.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/500-years-of-the-maid-freed-from-the-gallows–1928.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/the-maid-freed-from-the-gallows–krappe-1941.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/the-gallows-and-the-golden-ball-an-analysis.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/-the-golden-ball-and-the-hangmans-tree.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/the-golden-ballyorkshire-henderson-baring-gould.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/prickly-bush-notes-on-childrens-game-songs-1915.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/de-tale-ob-de-golen-ball–owen-1893-.aspx
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch095.htm
https://www.mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thepricklybush.html
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/authors/jacobs/moreenglish/goldenball.html
http://smartkids123.com/the-golden-ball-english-fairy-tales-by-flora-annie-steel/
https://ericwedwards.wordpress.com/2013/12/08/bogles-bugbears-and-boggarts/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=157721

THE DOWIE DENS OF YARROW: le ballate del Border scozzese

Read the post in English

DA LA STRANIERA, CAPITOLO 34

Murtagh insegna The Dowie Dens of Yarrow a Claire mentre vanno in cerca di Jamie catturato dalla Vigilanza (le giubbe rosse).
(Continua con l’episodio “The Search” nella Outlander Tv stagione I)

Il testo proviene della tradizione scozzese delle border ballads, brano noto anche come “The Dowie Dens of Yarrow”, “The Dewy Dens of Yarrow” o come “The Breas of Yarrow” oppure “The Banks of Yarrow” compare in varie versioni nella raccolta delle ballate del professor Francis James Child. (IV volume: The O Braes ‘Yarrow Child ballad # 214) e la sua origine potrebbe essere settecentesca. Secondo quanto riportato da sir Walter Scott, la ballata narra di un uccisione accaduta realmente durante  una partita di caccia nella foresta di Ettrick (nel 1500 o ai primi del 1600), per una faida famigliare tra John Scott di Tushielaw e Walter Scott di Thirlestane. Una teoria smentita dal professor Child.
La storia è stata narrata anche nella poesia di William Hamilton, pubblicata in Tea-Table Miscellany di Allan Ramsay nel 1723 e anche nel II volume di Reliques di Thomas Percy (1765): Hamilton si era ispirato a una vecchia ballata scozzese della tradizione orale (vedi)

L’area è una specie di “triangolo delle Bermude” del mondo celtico, un lembo di terra ricco di racconti tradizionali sui rapimenti fatati e magiche apparizioni! (vedasi anche la ballata di Tam lin)
Yarrow è il nome di un fiume ma anche di un’erba officinale, l’achillea. Quindi la definizione del luogo “le valli dell’achillea” diventa più vaga ma anche simbolica: l’achillea è una pianta associata alla morte, e nelle credenze popolari sognarla equivale a un lutto in famiglia se la donna è sposata o alla perdita dell’innamorato.
Secondo la leggenda l’eroe della ballata era John Scott sesto e ultimo figlio del Laird di Harden, ma noto nella tradizione locale come barone di Oakwood (tenuta di Kirkhope) ucciso dagli Scott di Gilmanscleugh durante una partita di caccia nella foresta di Ettrick (la vicenda risale alla fine del 1500 o ai primi del 1600).

Newark Castle sullo Yarrow: non il castello della ballata ma una possibile ambientazione

L’AGGUATO PRESSO LO YARROW

Si racconta dell’uccisione di un giovanotto, forse un border reiver, in un’imboscata presso il fiume Yarrow tesa dai fratelli della donna che lui amava. Nelle varie versioni la dama respinge nove pretendenti che si mettono d’accordo per uccidere il suo vero innamorato, oppure sono gli stessi fratelli della donna, o ancora gli uomini inviati dal padre, a tendere l’imboscata. Il ragazzo riesce a uccidere o ferire un buon numero dei suoi assalitori ma infine cade, trafitto nella schiena dalla mano dal più giovane di loro.

Paton-Yarrow
Sir Joseph Noel Paton: The Dowie Dens of Yarrow

La vicenda è evocata come in sogno da parte della donna che al risveglio si precipita sulle colline e incontra il fratello recante la notizia della morte del suo innamorato. Nel tragico finale annuncia la sua morte imminente alla madre, tanto era il dolore per la perdita.

La struttura è quella classica delle ballate antiche, diffuse per larga parte d’Europa in epoca medievale con lo svelarsi della storia tra domande e risposte dei protagonisti e il commonplace della morte annunciata ai genitori.

Versioni testuali e melodie diverse con molte interpretazioni,  che ho raggruppato in tre filoni

PRIMA VERSIONE

La melodia è stata collezionata da Lucy Broadwood che la raccolse da John Potts di Whitehope Farm, Peeblesshire, pubblicata in The Journal of the Folk Song Society, vol.V (1905).

ASCOLTA Matthew White (controtenore canadese): Skye Consort nel Cd “O Sweet Woods” 2013, l’arrangiamento è molto interessante, dall’atmosfera barocca che riecheggia l’epoca in cui si fa risalire la prima versione. Sono eseguite però solo le strofe I, II, IV, V, VI, VIII e XIV

ASCOLTA Mad Pudding in Dirt & Stone -1996 (tranne la V strofa) in versione integrale su Spotify. Strepitosa versione del gruppo canadese -Columbia britannica-fondato nel 1994, bravissimi ma poco conosciuti.


I
There lived a lady in  the north;
You could scarcely find her marrow.
She was courted by nine noblemen
On the dewy dells of Yarrow
II
Her father had a bonny ploughboy
And she did love him dearly.
She dressed him up like a noble lord
For to fight for her on Yarrow.
III
She kissed his cheek, she kamed his hair,
As oft she had done before O,
She gilted him with a right good sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
As he climbed up yon high hill
And they came down the other,
There he spied nine noblemen
On the dewy dells of Yarrow.
V
‘Did you come here for to drink red wine,
Or did you come here to borrow?
Or did you come here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow?’
VI
‘I came not here for to drink red wine,
And I came not here to borrow,
But I came here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow’
VII
‘There are nine of you and one of me,
And that’s but an even number,
But it’s man to man I’ll fight you all
And die for her on Yarrow’
VIII
Three he drew and three he slew
And two lie deadly wounded,
When a stubborn knight crept up behind
And pierced him with his arrow.
IX
‘Go home, go home, my false young man,
And tell your sister Sarah
That her true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow’
X
As he gaed down yon high hill
And she came down the other,
It’s then he met his sister dear
A-coming fast to Yarrow.
XI
‘O brother dear, I had a dream last night,’
‘I can read it into sorrow;
Your true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow.’
XII
This maiden’s hair was three-quarters long,
The colour of it was yellow.
She tied it around his middle side
And she carried him home to Yarrow.
XIII
She kissed his cheeks, she kamed his hair
As oft she had done before O,
Her true lover John lies dead and gone,
on the dewy dells of Yarrow.
XIV
O mother dear, make me my bed,
And make it long and narrow,
For the one that died for me today,
I shall die for him tomorrow
XV
‘O father dear, you have seven sons;
You can wed them all tomorrow,
For the fairest flower amongst them all/ Is the one that died on Yarrow.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una dama nel Nord
che non aveva un marito (1)
ed era corteggiata da nove nobili
nelle tristi valli (2) dello Yarrow (3)
II
Suo padre aveva un grazioso contadinello (4) che lei amava teneramente, lo vestì da nobiluomo perché si battesse per lei a Yarrow (5)
III
Lo baciò sulla guancia, gli accarezzò
i capelli
come faceva di solito (6),
gli fece dono di una buona spada
perché si battesse per lei a Yarrow
IV
Mentre lui saliva sull’alta collina
loro scendevano dall’altra
e là vide i nove gentiluomini
sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow
V
Sei venuto qui per bere del vino
rosso,

o per chiedere un prestito?
O sei venuto qui con una sola
spada

per batterti per lei a Yarrow?”
VI
Non sono venuto qui per bere
del vino rosso, o per chiedere un prestito,
ma sono venuto qui con una sola spada
per battermi per lei a Yarrow
VII
Siete nove contro uno,
e non siamo in forze equivalenti,
ma vi combatterò uno per volta
e morirò per lei a Yarrow
VIII
Tre li trafisse e tre li uccise
e due li ferì in modo mortale
quando un cavaliere tenace gli arrivò da dietro,
e lo colpì con la freccia
IX
A casa, a casa,  mio giovane
traditore

vai a dire a tua sorella Sara
che il suo amore John è morto e sepolto
sulle tristi valli di Yarrow
X
Allora lui si precipitò giù dal’alta collina
e lei scese già dall’altra
e così incontrò la cara sorella
che arrivava in fretta a Yarrow
XI
O caro fratello, ho fatto un sogno la notte scorsa
 e non posso sopportare il dolore
ll tuo amante John è morto stecchito
sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow
XII
I capelli della fanciulla erano lunghi fino alle ginocchia (7)
e di colore biondo,
li annodò intorno alla sua vita (8)
e lo riportò a casa dallo Yarrow
XIII
Gli baciò le guance e gli pettinò
i capelli
come aveva sempre fatto
il suo vero amore John era morto stecchito, sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow
XIV
O madre cara, preparami il letto
e fallo lungo e stretto
per colui che è morto per me oggi,
io morirò per lui domani
XV
O padre caro, hai sette figli,
li potrai sposare tutti domani,
ma il fiore più bello di tutti (9)
è quello morto a Yarrow”

NOTE
1) marrow= parola arcaica per compagno, amico o amante; nel contesto traducibile anche come “marito”
2) dowie -dewey qui scritto come dewy è un termine scozzese diffuso anche nella Northumbria inglese per “triste o noioso”. Dens o dells è un altro termine scozzese per indicare una” stretta valle ricca di boschi” tipica della zona
3) Yarrow è il nome di un fiume ma anche di un’erba officinale, l’achillea. Quindi la definizione del luogo “le valli dell’achillea” diventa più vaga ma anche simbolica: l’achillea è una pianta associata alla morte, e nelle credenze popolari sognarla equivale a un lutto in famiglia se la donna è sposata o alla perdita dell’innamorato. Dai poteri cicatrizzanti noti già ai tempi di Omero e utilizzata dai Druidi, la pianta è l’ingrediente principale di una pozione magica degna della ricetta segreta del druido Panoramix. Si narra infatti che nella Alta Valle del Lys (Valle d’Aosta) i Salassi fossero grandi consumatori di una bevanda che infondeva coraggio e forza. Divenne nota con il nome di Ebòlabò (letto come ebolebo) e si tratta di una bevanda ancora preparata dagli abitanti della valle a base di achillea moscata. (vedi scheda)
4) In alcune versioni il ragazzo è un uomo di campagna ma non necessariamente un contadinello, piuttosto un figlio cadetto di una piccola nobiltà di campagna. Nei dintorni di Yarrow (Yarrow Krik) si trova ancora una pietra con un’antica iscrizione nei pressi di un posto chiamato il “Riposo del Guerriero“.
5) nella versione di Matthew White dice “She killed here with a single sword/On the dewy dells of Yarrow”
6) si descrive il tipico comportamento di una moglie devota che accudisce, pettina e veste il marito, la stessa cura e devozione che riserverà al cadavere
7) I capelli lunghi fino a tre quarti dell’altezza vuol dire che arrivano alle ginocchia. Era usanza una volta che le fanciulle portassero i lunghi capelli annodati in una spessa treccia
8) alcuni interpretano il verso come un’espressione di lutto in cui la fanciulla si taglia i suoi lunghissimi capelli fino alla vita. La frase letteralmente però significa che lei usa i capelli per trasportare via il cadavere intrecciandoli come una corda. L’immagine è un po’ grottesca per i nostri standard ma doveva essere una prassi comune al tempo; tant’è che viene riportata anche in un altra ballata
9) il verso vuole semplicemente dire che il bel contadinello era il più valoroso tra tutti, non certo che era il fratello!

L’ERICA FUNESTA

Seconda versione: la dama racconta di essersi vista in sogno mentre coglieva l’erica rossa sui pendii dello Yarrow, anche questo sogno è da interpretarsi come presagio di sventura.
Una leggenda scozzese spiega come la comune erica rosata sia diventata bianca: sono state le lacrime di Malvina per il suo Oscar ferito a morte dopo il suo duello con Cairbar nell’Ulster. Il prode guerriero figlio di Ossian diede a un compagno d’armi un ramo di erica violetta affinchè lo portasse a Malvina per dimostrarle l’amore eterno che nutriva per lei . E Malvina con la forza del suo amore e la disperazione del suo cuore fece scolorire i fiori bagnandoli di lacrime. Da allora l’erica bianca fu emblema dell’amore fedele; la somiglianza con la leggenda norrena di Baldur e del vischio è sorprendente.
Il sogno della fanciulla è così funesto poichè l’erica cenerina è rossa presagio della morte in duello del suo innamorato.

La versione di Karine Powart ci riporta il testo più esteso della ballata che i Pentangle traducono in inglese e riducono a 7 strofe
ASCOLTA Karine Powart 2007 (tutte le strofe tranne la III)

ASCOLTA Bert Jansh non male questa versione intitolata solo Yarrow, in Moonshine (1973).

ASCOLTA The Pentangle dopo la reunion in Open the Door, 1985 (strofe I, II, III, IV, VI, VIII, XIII)


I
There was a lady in the north
You scarce would find her marrow
She was courted by nine gentlemen
And a plooboy lad fae Yarrow
II
Well, nine sat drinking at the wine
As oft they’d done afore O
And they made a vow amang themselves
Tae fight for her on Yarrow
III
She’s washed his face, she’s combed his hair,/ As she has done before,
She’s placed a brand down by his side,
To fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
So he’s come ower yon high, high hill
And doon by the den sae narrow
And there he spied nine armed men
Come tae fight wi’ him on Yarrow
V
He says, “There’s nine o’ you and but one o’ me/ It’s an unequal marrow”
But I’ll fight ye a’ noo one by one
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow
VI
So it’s three he slew and three withdrew
An’ three he wounded sairly
‘Til her brother, he came in beyond
And he wounded him maist foully
VII
“Gae hame, gae hame, ye fause young man
And bring yer sister sorrow
For her ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
VIII
“Oh mither, I hae dreamed a dream
A dream o’ doul and sorrow
I dreamed I was pu’ing the heathery bells
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
IX
“Oh daughter dear, I ken yer dream
And I doobt it will bring sorrow
For yer ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
X
An’ so she’s run ower yon high, high hill
An’ doon by the den sae narrow
And it’s there she spied her dear lover John
Lyin’ pale and deid on Yarrow
XI
And so she’s washed his face an’ she’s kaimed his hair
As aft she’d done afore O
And she’s wrapped it ‘roond her middle sae sma’
And she’s carried him hame tae Yarrow
XII
“Oh haud yer tongue, my daughter dear/ What need for a’ this sorrow?
I’ll wed ye tae a far better man
Than the one who’s slain on Yarrow”
XIII
“Oh faither, ye hae seven sons
And ye may wed them a’ the morrow
But the fairest floo’er amang them a’
Was the plooboy lad fae Yarrow”
XIV
“Oh mother, mother mak my bed
And mak it saft and narrow
For my love died for me this day
And I’ll die for him tomorrow”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era una dama nel  Nord
che non aveva un marito (1)
ed era corteggiata da nove nobili
e da un contadinello (4) di Yarrow (3)
II
Beh i nove stavano a bere del vino
come facevano prima (di andare a caccia) e si scambiarono la promessa reciproca
di combattere per lei sullo Yarrow
III
Lei gli lavò il viso, gli pettinò i capelli
come faceva di solito (5),
e lo cinse con una spada
perché si battesse per lei a Yarrow
IV
Mentre lui saliva sull’alta, alta collina
e scendeva i pendii di Yarrow
vide i nove uomini armati
per combattere contro di lui a Yarrow
V
Disse “Siete nove contro uno,
e non siamo in forze equivalenti,
ma vi combatterò uno per volta
sulle tristi (2) valli dello Yarrow”
VI (10)
Tre li uccise e tre li mise
in fuga
e tre li ferì a morte
finchè il fratello di lei si mise in mezzo
e lo pugnalò con furia
VII
Vai a casa, vai a casa giovane
sleale
e porta la triste notizia a tua sorella
che il suo vero amore sta pallido e esangue sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow”
VIII
O madre (11) ho fatto un sogno
e temo che porterà sventura
ho sognato di raccogliere
l’erica rossa  (12)
sulle tristi valli di Yarrow
IX
“O cara figlia, conosco il tuo sogno
e temo che porterà sventura
perchè il tuo vero amore sta pallido e esangue sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow”
X
Mentre lei saliva sull’alta, alta collina
e scendeva nella stretta valle
là vide il suo caro amore
John
che stava pallido e morto sullo Yarrow
XI
Lei gli lavò il viso, gli pettinò
i capelli
come faceva di solito (5),
si annodò (i  capelli)  intorno alla esile vita (8)
e lo riportò a casa dallo Yarrow
XII
“Frena la tua lingua, figlia cara
perchè tutto questo dolore?
Ti mariterò a un uomo migliore
di quello che è stato ucciso sullo Yarrow”
XIII
O padre caro, hai sette figli,
li potrai sposare domani,
ma il fiore più bello di tutti (9)
era il contadinello di Yarrow
XIV
“O madre, madre cara fammi il letto
e fallo soffice e stretto
perchè il mio amore è morto per me oggi
e io morirò per lui domani”

NOTE
8) qui il verso risulta un po’ oscuro mancando il particolare dei lunghi capelli di lei annodati in treccia che diventano corde da traino per portare il cadavere a casa
10) la strofa dei Pentangle dice
It’s three he’s wounded, and three withdrew,
And three he’s killed on Yarrow,
Till her brother John, came in behind.
And pierced his body through.
(Tre li trafisse e tre li fece
recedere e due li uccise sullo Yarrow
finchè il fratello di lei John si mise in mezzo, e lo pugnalò)
11) i Pentangle dicono “Father”
12) heather bell è il nome dell’erica cenerina che vive su  suoli rocciosi e rupi (vedi scheda); una leggenda scozzese spiega come la comune erica rosata sia diventata bianca: sono state le lacrime di Malvina per il suo Oscar ferito a morte dopo il suo duello con Cairbar nell’Ulster. Il prode guerriero figlio di Ossian diede a un compagno d’armi un ramo di erica violetta affinchè lo portasse a Malvina per dimostrarle l’amore eterno che nutriva per lei . E Malvina con la forza del suo amore e la disperazione del suo cuore fece scolorire i fiori bagnandoli di lacrime. Da allora l’erica bianca fu emblema dell’amore fedele; la somiglianza con la leggenda norrena di Baldur e del vischio è sorprendente.
Il sogno della fanciulla è così funesto perchè l’erica cenerina è rossa presagio della morte in duello del suo innamorato.

THE HEATHERY HILLS OF YARROW

Terza versione
E’ la versione della Bothy band che inizia il racconto dall’agguato e svolge il dialogo tra la dama e i suoi parenti fino alla sua tragica morte.

ASCOLTA Bothy band (voce Tríona Ní Dhomhnaill) in After hours, 1979, un bel video con immagini mozzafiato della Scozia


I
It’s three drew and three slew,
And three lay deadly wounded,
When her brother John stepped in between,
And stuck his knife right through him.
II
As she went up yon high high hill,
And down through yonder valley,
Her brother John came down the glen,
Returning home from Yarrow.
III
Oh brother dear I dreamt last night
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
I dreamt that you were spilling blood,
On the dewy dens of Yarrow.
IV
Oh sister dear I read your dream,
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
For your true love John lies dead and gone
On the heathery hills of Yarrow.
V
This fair maid’s hair being three quarters long,
And the colour it was yellow,
She tied it round his middle waist,
And she carried him home from Yarrow.
VI
Oh father dear you’ve got seven sons,
You can wed them all tomorrow,
But a flower like my true love John,
Will never bloom in Yarrow.
VII
This fair maid she being tall and slim,
The fairest maid in Yarrow,
She laid her head on her father’s arm,
And she died through grief and sorrow.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Tre li trafisse e tre li uccise
e tre erano feriti a morte
quando il fratello di lei John si mise in mezzo
e lo colpì deciso con un coltello.
II
Mentre lei saliva sull’alta, alta collina
e scendeva i pendii di Yarrow
suo fratello John scendeva nella valle
per ritornare dallo Yarrow
III
O caro fratello ho fatto un sogno ieri notte e temo che porterà sventura
ho sognato che tu spargevi sangue
sulle tristi (2) valli di Yarrow
IV
O sorella cara, ho visto il tuo sogno
e temo che porterà dolore
perchè il tuo amante John è morto stecchito

sulle colline d’edera dello Yarrow
V
I capelli della fanciulla erano lunghi fino alle ginocchia (7)
e di colore biondo,
li annodò intorno alla sua vita (8)
e lo riportò a casa
dallo Yarrow
VI
O padre caro, hai sette figli,
li potrai sposare tutti domani,
ma un fiore come il mio vero amore John
non fiorirà più a Yarrow
VII
Questa bella fanciulla era alta e slanciata la più bella fanciulla  a Yarrow
appoggiò il capo sulle braccia del padre e morì per il grande dolore

FONTI
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Child%27s_Ballads/214
http://literaryballadarchive.com/PDF/Hamilton_1_Braes_of_Yarrow_f.pdf
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C214.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thedowiedensofyarrow.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/145.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/484.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/67.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/polwart/dowie.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/families/scotts_harden.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9870
http://fallingangelslosthighways.blogspot.it/2013/04/the-eildon-hills-sacred-mountains-of.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46972