Archivi tag: Dave Swarbrick

The Ship in Distress sea ballad

Leggi in italiano

“You Seamen Bold” or “The Ship in Distress” is a sea song that tries to describe the horrors suffered on a ship adrift in the ocean and without more food on board. Probably the origin begins with a Portuguese ballad of the sixteenth century (in the golden age of the Portuguese vessels), taken from the French tradition with the title La Corte Paille.

This further version was very popular in the south of England
A. L. Lloyd writes ‘The story of the ship adrift, with its crew reduced to cannibalism but rescued in the nick of time, has a fascination for makers of sea legends. Cecil Sharp, who collected more than a thousand songs from Somerset, considered The Ship in Distress to be the grandest tune he had found in that country.’ (from here)
Louis Killen

Martin Carhty & Dave Swarbrick from But Two Came By 1968Marc Almond from Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013

I
You seamen bold who plough the ocean
See dangers landsmen never know.
It’s not for honour and promotion;
No tongue can tell what they undergo.
In the blusterous wind and the great dark water
Our ship went drifting on the sea,
Her rigging (1) gone, and her rudder broken,
Which brought us to extremity (2).
II
For fourteen days, heartsore and hungry,
Seeing but wild water and bitter sky,
Poor fellows, they stood in a totter,
A-casting lots as to which should die.
The lot (3) it fell on Robert Jackson,
Whose family was so very great.
‘I’m free to die, but oh, my comrades,
Let me keep look-out till the break of day.’
III
A full-dressed ship like the sun a-glittering(4)
Came bearing down to their relief.
As soon as this glad news was shouted,
It banished all their care and grief.
The ship brought to, no longer drifting,
Safe in Saint Vincent, Cape Verde, she gained.
You seamen all, who hear my story,
Pray you’ll never suffer the like again (5).

NOTES
1) Marc say  headgear
2) extremity: bring to the extremes to be intended also in a moral sense
3 )the one who pulled the shorter straw was the “winner”, and sacrificed himself for the benefit of the survivors, this practice was called  ”the custom of the sea”: to leave the choice of the sacrificial victim to fate, it excluded the murder by necessity from being a premeditated murder
4) the juxtaposition between the two verses with the man ready for the sacrifice and sighting at dawn of the ship that will rescue them, it wants to mitigate the harsh reality of cannibalism, a horrible practice to say but that is always lurking in the moments of desperation and as an extreme resource for survival. In reality we do not know if the ship was only dreamed of by the sacrificial victim.
5) surviving sailors rarely resume the sea after the cases of cannibalism (see for example the Essex whaling story). In 1884 an English court condemned two of the three sailors of the “Mignonette” yacht who had killed Richard Parker, the 17-year-old cabin boy (the third had immunity because he agreed to testify); the death sentence was commuted at a later time in six months in prison. A curious case is that Edgar Allan Poe in 1838 in “The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket ” tells of four survivors forced into a lifeboat who decide to rely on the “law of the sea”, the cabin boy that pulled the shorter straw was called Richard Parker!

Little Boy Billy
The Banks of Newfoundland

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theshipindistress.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/sea_bold.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/05/04/the-ship-in-distress/
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/anche-i-cannibali-hanno-un-cuoree-se-lo-mangiano-luca-luca-nave
http://www.canestrinilex.com/risorse/dudley-and-stephens-case-1884-mignonette/

Staines Morris to the Maypole haste away

Leggi in italiano
In the TV series “The Tudors” an outdoor May Day has been set up, with the picturesque dancers of the Morris Dance, their rattles and handkerchiefs, the archery, the fight of the roosters, the dances with the ribbons around the May pole, performed by graceful maidens with flower crowns in their hair. The background music is titled “Stanes Morris”, in the video follow two reproductions, the first of  Les Witches group, the second a little slower of The Broadside Band.

The May poles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were very tall and decorated with green garlands, ribbons or two-color striped paintings: the tradition is rooted in England, Italy, Germany and France, a real focal point of the rousing activities at his feet , symbolic fulcrum of the group of dancers.

john-cousen-dancing-round-the-maypole-on-the-village-green-in-elizabethan-times
John Cousen: Ballando intorno al palo del Maggio in epoca elisabettiana

TO THE MAYPOLE HASTE AWAY (Staine Morris )

The melody is a dance reported in “The English Dancing Master” by John Playford, first edition of 1651, but already danced at the court of Henry VIII or in the Elizabethan era. In the video it is a Morris Dance while Playford describes it as a country dance (for instructions see)
Morris Dance version
It was William Chappell in his “Popular Music of the Old Time” of (1855-56) to combine the Tudor melody with the text “Maypole song” written in 1655 by Robert Cox for the comedy “Actaeon and Diana” . So Chappell writes “This tune is taken from the first edition of The Dancing Master. It is also in William Ballet’s Lute Book (time of Elizabeth); and was printed as late as about 1760, in a Collection of Country Dances, by Wright.
The Maypole Song, in Actæon and Diana, seems so exactly fitted to the air, that, having no guide as to the one intended, I have, on conjecture, printed it with this tune.

The text invites young people in following Love to dance and sing around the May Pole.
Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from ‘Prince Heathen.’ 1969 (simply perfect!)

Shirley Collins from Morris On, 1972, the folk rock experiment of a group of excellent trad musicians John Kirkpatrick, Richard Thompson, Barry Dransfield, Ashley Hutchings  and Dave Mattacks.

Lisa Knapp & David Tibet from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017  (amazing version with a further step ahead of the 70s rock rework)

MAYPOLE SONG
I
Come, ye young men, come along
with your music, dance and song;
bring your lasses in your hands,
for ‘tis that which love commands.
Refrein:
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday,
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday
II
‘Tis the choice time of the year,
For the violets now appear:
Now the rose receives its birth,
And pretty primrose decks the earth.
III
Here each bachelor may choose
One that will not faith abuse
Nor repay, with coy disdain
Love that should be loved again
IV
And when you are reckoned now
For kisses you your sweetheart gave
Take them all again and more
It will never make them poor
V
When you thus have spent your time,
Till the day be past its prime,
To your beds repair at night,
And dream there of your day’s delight.

second part: JOAN TO THE MAYPOLE

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html 
Traditional Music (con spartito)
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/stainesmorris.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60673

Bedfordshire May Day carols

Leggi in italiano

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]
The Lord and the Lady and the Moggers
On 1st May several customs were observed. Children would go garlanding, a garland being, typically, a wooden hoop over which a white cloth was stretched. A looser piece of cloth was fastened at the top which was used to cover the finished garland. Two dolls were fastened in the middle, one large and one small. Ribbons were sewn around the front edge and the rest of the space was filled with flowers. The dolls were supposed to represent the Virgin Mary and the Christ child. The children would stop at each house and ask for money to view the garland.

Another custom, prevalent throughout the county if not the country, was maying. It was done regularly until the outbreak of the First World War and, sporadically, afterwards. Young men would go around at night with may bushes singing May carols. In the morning a may bush was attached to the school flag pole, another would decorate the inn sign at the Crown and others rested against doors, designed to fall in when they were opened. Those maying included a Lord and a Lady, the latter the smallest of the young men with a veil and bonnet. The party also included Moggers or Moggies, a man and a woman with black faces, ragged clothes and carrying besom brushes. (from here)

VIDEO Here is a very significant testimony of Margery “Mum” Johnstone from  Bedforshide collected by Pete Caslte, with two May songs

Maypole dancers dance during May Day celebrations in the village of Elstow, Bedfordshire, in 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

From the testimony of Mrs Margery Johnstone this May Garland or “This Morning Is The 1st of May” was transcribed by Fred Hamer in his “Gay Garners”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017


MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

The carol is known as “The May Day Carol” or “Bedford May Carol” but also “The Kentucky May Carol” (as preserved in the May tradition in the Appalachian Mountains) and was collected in Bedfordshire.
A first version comes from  Hinwick as collected by Lucy Broadwood  (1858 – 1929) and transcribed into “English Traditional Songs and Carols” (London: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton from “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL
I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady, as in Cambridgshire, the contaminations with the creed of the dominant religion are inevitable
2) this sweet and fresh cream in a glass is a typically Elizabethan vintage-style drink-dessert still popular in the Victorian era, the Syllabub. The Mayers once offered “a syllabub of hot milk directly from the cow, sweet cakes and wine” (The James Frazer Gold Branch). And so I went to browse to find the historical recipe: it is a milk shake, wine (or cider or beer) sweetened and perfumed with lemon juice. The lemon juice served to curdle the milk so that it would form a cream on the surface, over time the recipe has become more solid, ie a cream with the whipped cream flavored with liqueur or sweet wine (see recipes) 

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste: in the background a tray full of syllabus glasses

3) the reference to the dew is not accidental, the tradition of May provides a bath in the dew and in the wild waters full of rain. The night is the magic of April 30 and the dew was collected by the girls and kept as a panacea able to awaken the beauty of women!! (see Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002, same tune of Cambridgeshire May Carol (not completely transcribed)

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY CAROL
I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady..
2) Syllabub (see above)
3) the stanza derives from “The Moon Shine Bright” version published by William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) see

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane from “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 ( I, II, III e IX) with The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
The song is reproposed in the Blog “A Folk song a Week”   edited by Andy Turner himself in which Andy tells us he had learned the song from the collection of Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred collected it from “Chris Marsom and others” – Mr Marsom had by that time emigrated to Canada, but Fred met him on a visit to his native Northill, Bedfordshire. Fred’s notes say “The Day Song is much too long for inclusion here and the Night Song has the same tune. It was used by Vaughan Williams as the tune for No. 638 of the English Hymnal, but he gave it the name of “Southill” because it was sent to him by a Southill man. Chris Marsom who sang this to me had many tales to tell of the reception the Mayers had from some of the ladies who were strangers to the village and became apprehensive at the approach of a body of men to their cottage after midnight on May Eve.”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (track 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy writes in the sleeve notes “May Song came from a Cynthia Gooding record which I lost 16 years ago, words stuck in my head.” (from II to VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) according to the previous religion, water received more power from the Beltane sun. Celts made pilgrimages to the sacred springs and with the spring water they sprinkled the fields to favor the rain.

Kerfuffle from “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

Cannibalismo in mare: You Seamen Bold

Read the post in English

“You Seamen Bold” oppure “The Ship in Distress” è una canzone del mare che cerca di descrivere gli orrori patiti su di una nave alla deriva nell’oceano e senza più viveri a bordo. Probabilmente l’origine prende l’avvio da una ballata portoghese del XVI secolo (nell’era d’oro dei vascelli portoghesi) ripresa alla tradizione francese con il titolo La Corte Paille.

Quest’ulteriore versione era molto popolare nel sud dell’Inghilterra
A. L. Lloyd scrive ‘La storia della nave alla deriva, con il suo equipaggio ridotto al cannibalismo ma salvato all’ultimo minuto, ha un fascino per i creatori di leggende marinare. Cecil Sharp, che raccolse oltre un migliaio di canzoni dal Somerset, considerò The Ship in Distress come la più grande melodia che avesse trovato in quel paese.’ (tratto da qui)
Louis Killen
Martin Carhty & Dave Swarbrick  in But Two Came By 1968Marc Almond in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
You seamen bold who plough the ocean
See dangers landsmen never know.
It’s not for honour and promotion;
No tongue can tell what they undergo.
In the blusterous wind and the great dark water
Our ship went drifting on the sea,
Her rigging (1) gone, and her rudder broken,
Which brought us to extremity (2).
II
For fourteen days, heartsore and hungry,
Seeing but wild water and bitter sky,
Poor fellows, they stood in a totter,
A-casting lots as to which should die.
The lot (3) it fell on Robert Jackson,
Whose family was so very great.
‘I’m free to die, but oh, my comrades,
Let me keep look-out till the break of day.’
III
A full-dressed ship like the sun a-glittering(4)
Came bearing down to their relief.
As soon as this glad news was shouted,
It banished all their care and grief.
The ship brought to, no longer drifting,
Safe in Saint Vincent, Cape Verde, she gained.
You seamen all, who hear my story,
Pray you’ll never suffer the like again (5).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Voi lupi di mare che solcate l’oceano
vedete pericoli che i terricoli mai conosceranno.
Non è per l’onore o la carriera
nessuna lingua può raccontare cosa ebbero a patire: nel vento di burrasca e nelle vaste acque oscure,
la nostra nave andò alla deriva
con il sartiame andato e il timone
rotto
il che ci portò fuori rotta
II
Per quattordici giorni, disperati e affamati,
non vedendo che acqua e cielo scuro, poveri compagni, in piedi a stento.
Si tirò a sorte chi doveva morire.
La sorte cadde su Robert Jackson,
la cui famiglia era di valore.
“Sono pronto a morire, ma oh, miei compagni, lasciatemi guardare fino allo spuntar del giorno”
III
Una nave a vele spiegate scintillante come il sole
venne a portare loro soccorso.
non appena la lieta notizia fu gridata
bandirono tutte le loro preoccupazioni e il dolore. La nave li portò, non più alla deriva, al sicuro a Saint Vincente, Capo Verde.
Voi marinai tutti che ascoltare la mia storia, pregate di non soffrire mai  lo stesso.

NOTE
1) Marc dice  headgear (motore)
2) extremity: portare agli estremi da intendesi anche in senso morale
3) quello che tirava la paglia più corta era il “vincitore”, e si sacrificava per il bene dei sopravvissuti, questa pratica era definita “legge del mare“: lasciare alla sorte la scelta della vittima sacrificale  escludeva l’omicidio per necessità dall’omicidio premeditato, assolvendo di fatto i sopravvissuti
4) la giustapposizione tra le due strofe con l’uomo pronto per il sacrificio e l’avvistamento all’alba della nave che li soccorrerà, vuole mitigare la cruda realtà del cannibalismo, una pratica orribile a dirsi ma che è sempre in agguato nei momenti di disperazione e come risorsa estrema per la sopravvivenza. In realtà non sappiamo se la nave sia solo stata sognata dalla vittima sacrificale e la vera nave giunta chissà quanti giorni dopo a trarre in salvo i sopravvissuti.
5) raramente i marinai sopravvissuti riprendono il mare dopo i casi di cannibalismo (vedasi ad esempio la vicenda della baleniera Essex). Nel 1884 un tribunale inglese condannò due dei tre marinai dello yacht “Mignonette” che avevano ucciso Richard Parker, il mozzo diciassettenne per sfamarsi, (il terzo ebbe l’immunità perché accettò di testimoniare); la condanna a morte venne commutata in un secondo tempo in sei mesi di carcere. Caso curioso è che Edgar Allan Poe nel 1838 nelle “Le avventure di Arthur Gordon Pym” racconta di quattro naufraghi  costretti in una scialuppa di salvataggio che decidono di affidarsi alla “legge del mare”, il mozzo che tirò la pagliuzza più corta si chiamava  Richard Parker!

continua: Little Boy Billy
continua: The Banks of Newfoundland

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theshipindistress.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/sea_bold.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/05/04/the-ship-in-distress/
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/anche-i-cannibali-hanno-un-cuoree-se-lo-mangiano-luca-luca-nave
http://www.canestrinilex.com/risorse/dudley-and-stephens-case-1884-mignonette/

RAMBLING SAILOR OR TRIM RIGGED DOXY?

Il galante soldato (o marinaio) che gira per mari e monti alla ricerca di fanciulle da corteggiare è un topico delle ballate del 700-800, questa in particolare ampiamente diffusa nei broadsides.
Durante il folk revival e la contestazione giovanile degli anni 60-70 questa tipologia di canti popolari era molto diffusa nei folk-club, ma in origine  il canto doveva trattarsi di una parodia ovvero erano le vanterie di un borioso sergente reclutatore convinto di essere un grande seduttore! (vedi prima parte)

La versione marinaresca della ballata prende una piega un po’ più esplicita e sboccata. Il testo si differenzia su due filoni principali uno più simile alla versione “rambling soldier” l’altro con il titolo di “Trim Rigged Doxy”

TRIM RIGGED DOXY

Si tratta di una forebitter song ammiccante e in chiave umoristica, la versione divulgata da Martin Carthy alla fine degli anni 60 racconta più nel dettaglio l’incontro amoroso tra l’ardito e bollente marinaio e una “trim-rigged doxy”; ma il finale non è per niente lieto: marinaio derubato e lasciato con il “bompresso” (per dirla come il marinaio) in fiamme!!

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick 1966


I
Oh, I am a sailor brisk and bold,
Long time I’ve sailed the ocean.
Oh, I’ve fought for king and the country too,
For honour and promotion.
So now, my brother shipmates, I bid you all adieu,
No more will I go to sea with you;
But I’ll ramble the country through and through
And I’ll be a rambling sailor.
II
Oh, it’s off to a village then I went
Where I saw lassies plenty;
Oh, I boldly stepped up to one of them
To court her for her beauty.
Oh, her cheeks, they were like the rubies red;
She’d a feathered bonnet a-covering her head.
Oh, I put the hard word on her(1) but she said she was a maid,
The saucy little trim-rigged doxy (2).
III
“Oh, I can’t and I won’t go along with you (3),
You saucy rambling sailor.
Oh, my parents, they would never agree
For I’m promised to a tailor.”
But I was hot shot eager to rifle her charms.
“A guinea,” says I, “for a roll in your arms.”
The deal was done and upstairs we went,
Myself and the trim-rigged doxy.
IV
Oh, it was haul on the bowline (4), let your stays’ls fall (5),
We was yardarm to yardarm (6) bumpin’.
My shot locker empty, asleep I fell
And then she fell into robbin’;
Oh, she robbed all my pockets of everything I had,
She even stole my new boots from underneath the bed,
And she even stole my gold watch from underneath my head,
The saucy little trim-rigged doxy.
V
And it’s when I awoke in the morning bright,
Oh, I started to roar like thunder.
My gold watch and my money too
She bore away for plunder.
But it wasn’t for my watch nor my money too,
For them I don’t value but I tell you true,
I think her little fire-bucket burned my bobstay(7), through
That saucy little trim-rigged doxy.
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un marinaio vispo e ardito
a lungo ho navigato per mare,
ho combattuto per il re e anche per il paese
per l’onore e la carriera.
Così adesso, miei fratelli di mare, dico a tutti addio,
non andrò più per mare con voi:
ma viaggerò per il paese
in lungo e in largo
e sarò un marinaio vagabondo
II
Oh così andai in un villaggio
dove vidi ragazze a volontà;
mi avvicinai con coraggio a una di loro,
a corteggiarla per la sua beltà.
Oh le sue guance erano come rossi rubini,
portava un cappellino con la piuma per ricoprirle il capo.
Oh cercai di sedurla (1) ma lei disse di essere una fanciulla
-la donnina navigata con un bell’armamentario! (2)
III
“Oh non posso e non voglio essere d’accordo (3) con te
tu impertinente marinaio vagabondo.
Oh i miei genitori non acconsentiranno mai
perché io sono promessa a un sarto
Ma io ero un pezzo grosso desideroso di darci dentro
Una ghinea – dissi – per un giro tra le tue braccia
L’accordo fu preso e di sopra andammo,
me stesso e la donnina ben equipaggiata
IV
E fu un alare la bolina (4), e un issare fiocchi e controfiocchi (5),
sbattemmo pennone contro pennone (6)
e diedi fuoco alle polveri, poi caddi addormentato e allora lei mi derubò:
oh mi ripulì le tasche
di ogni avere
rubò persino i miei nuovi stivali da sotto il letto,
e rubò anche il mio orologio d’oro da sotto il cuscino,
la donnina navigata ben equipaggiata
V
E quando mi svegliai alla luce
del sole
oh iniziai a gridare forte come il tuono
il mio orologio d’oro e anche i miei soldi
mi ha derubato
Ma non era per l’orologio e neanche per i soldi
che a loro non do peso, ma a dire il vero
temo mi abbia attaccato lo scolo (7)
quella donnina navigata ben equipaggiata!

NOTE
1) tipica espressione australiana “Chiedere un favore, fare una proposta (indecente)”
2) per il significato di doxy vedi mudcat , nella traduzione ho voluto mantenere un termine “nautico”
3) la ragazza prima si professa fanciulla (maid nel senso di vergine) dichiarando di non voler concludere nessun affare con il marinaio, mentre in realtà cerca di alzare il prezzo della sua prestazione
4) Alare è un termine nautico che si dice per tirare con forza una cima (per i terricoli un cavo) orizzontalmente o verticalmente “alare la bolina”   è quando si tira verso prora il lato verticale sopra vento delle vele quadre, in modo che prendano il vento il meglio possibile, così l’andatura di bolina, nella navigazione a vela, è la rotta di una nave che naviga stringendo al massimo possibile il vento.
5) Staysail sono un tipo di velatura di forma triangolare che si usano per sfruttare al meglio il vento ovvero i fiocchi e controfiocchi; equivalente all’espressione italiana coi fiocchi e controfiocchi, eccellente, di gran soddisfazione, ma anche nel senso di fatto alla perfezione, completo di ogni cosa.
6) yardarm to yardarm letteralmente “pennone contro pennone” significa gomito a gomito, nel senso di molto vicini, nel contesto potrebbe evocare un arrembaggio.
7) ho tradotto in modo più libero la frase che letteralmente dice “il suo piccolo braciere (secchio per il fuoco) bruciò tutto il mio bompresso”. bobstay qui ha il significato di bowsprit anche se tecnicamente è uno strallo. Un’altra malattia venerea diffusa e ben più letale era al tempo la sifilide, ed è più probabile che proprio quella si sia beccato il nostro audace marinaio!

continua terza parte

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ramblingsailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108324
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/week-31-the-rambling-sailor/
https://www.8notes.com/scores/6023.asp?ftype=gif
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61414
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44919
https://thesession.org/tunes/12050
https://thesession.org/tunes/2696

LOWLAND LOW (The Island Lass) SEA SHANTY

“Lowland Low” consciuto anche come “The Island Lass” è un halyard chantey cioè un canto marinaresco ai tempi dei grandi velieri utilizzato nei lavori per alare, orientare o serrare le vele; il canto è documentato solo da Stan Hugill nel suo “Shanties from the Seven Seas” in cui scrive di averlo imparato da uno chanteyman (o shantyman) detto Tobago Smith

ASCOLTA Ian Campbell & Dave Swarbrick in Farewell Nancy 1964

ASCOLTA Bryan Ferry & Antony Hegarty “Lowlands Low” in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006


Our packet is The island lass,
Low lands lowlands lowlands low(1).
There’s a laddie(2) howlin’ at the main topmast,
Low lands lowlands lowlands low.
The old man hails from Barbados(3).
He’s got the name of Hammer Toes(4).
He gives is us bread as hard as brass.
Our junk’s as salt as Balaam(5)’s ass(6).
The monkey(7)’s rigged in a soldier’s clothes.
Now, where he got ’em from, no one knows.
We’ll haul ’em high and let ’em dry.
We’ll trice ’em up into the sky.
It’s up aloft that yard(8) must go.
Up aloft from down below.
Lowlands, me boys, and up she goes.
Get changed, me boys, to your shore-going clothes.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il nostro postale è la Island Lass
Terre basse, terre basse(1), basse
c’è un ragazzo che ala all’albero di gabbia
Terre basse, terre basse, basse
Il capitano fa vela per le Barbados(3)
si chiama Hammer Toes(4)
ci da del pane duro come l’ottone
la nostra carne secca è salata come l’asino(6) di Balaam(5).
La scimmia(7) è travestita con gli abiti da soldato
dove li abbia presi non si sa!
Le issiamo in alto e le facciamo distendere,in un attimo saranno su nel cielo.
E’ su in alto che il pennone (8) deve andare, su in altro da giù in basso
terre basse ragazzi, e a posto lei va
andatevi a cambiare ragazzi, con i vestiti da libera uscita

NOTE
1) oppure nigger
2) nel Settecento-Ottocento con questo termine generico si indicavano le colonie olandesi, e più in generale molte terre e isole nelle Indie Occidentali, in questo caso le Antille
3) isoletta delle Piccole Antille, chiamata la “Piccola Inghilterra” dei Caraibi
4) letteralmente è “dita a martello“, è una patologia che colpisce il piede e a volte anche la mano. Si manifesta attraverso una deformità delle dita del piede che assume un aspetto curvo simile ad un martello o la forma di artiglio
5) profeta biblico famoso l’episodio che lo vede con la sua asina; in altre versioni il verso diventa “Our junk’s as salt as a Portland lass
6) ass (come dicono gli Americani/Canadesi) = asino o arse (come dicono gli Inglesi)= culo?
7) ovviamente si riferisce al capitano, brutto come una scimmia. Era prerogativa dello shantyman mettere in burla i difetti del capitano e degli altri ufficiali, lamentarsi per il pessimo vitto e tirare su il morale dell’equipaggio con qualche battuta
8) yard= pennone; è l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge le vele e prende il nome dalla relativa vela, alzando il pennone si distende la relativa vela

FONTI
https://ismaels.wordpress.com/2009/05/12/rogue%E2%80%99s-gallery-the-art-of-the-siren-28/
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=124
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=434

GLASGERION (JACK ORION)

Ballata tradizionale inglese
Child Ballad #67
Musica: A. L. Lloyd (1961)

Glasgerion, è il bardo gallese Keraint (Geraint the Blue Bard )-qualificato dall’aggettivo “glas” ossia Azzurro (erano infatti i Bardi -perlomeno quelli in cima alla gerarchia (ossia di nobili natali) – a vestirsi d’azzurro -come carattere distintivo del loro status sociale) “Keraint il Bardo Azzurro” è citato nei Mabinogion: Keraint figlio di Owain, Principe di Glamorgan visse probabilmente nell’VIII- IX secolo.
Ohibò ecco da dove viene il Principe Azzurro delle fiabe!! Senonchè “azzurro“, in lingua gallese, significa “più importante, principale” e infatti 500 anni dopo Chaucher lo colloca nel suo “House of Fame” accanto ad Orfeo (o almeno così ritengono gli studiosi identificando il Glaskirion di Chaucer con il bardo gallese).

George Sheridan Knowles - Glasgerion 1892

NEL BLU TINTO DI BLU

Glasten o glas ma un tempo woad ossia “erba selvatica” detta glastum da Plinio, è il colore blu ottenuto dagli antichi Celti  un blu verde-grigio  (o azzurro-verde) dalla lavorazione dell’erba guada, un’erba detta anche erba gialla per via del colore delle sue infiorescenze, l’Isatis tinctoria delle Brassicaceae (la famiglia dei cavoli per intenderci).
Il colorante si trova nelle foglie le quali si raccolgono con frequenti tagli (4-5 all’anno) – e secondo tradizione l’ultimo taglio si faceva  l’equinozio d’autunno (e nel Medioevo cristiano con il giorno di San Michele Arcangelo)
A parte i reperti tessili datati al V secolo a.C. anche Giulio Cesare e Plinio descrivono l’usanza dei Celti di tingersi i corpi prima della battaglia con il guado.
La pianta oltre che nel Nord europa fu coltivata anche in molte regioni italiane fino a quanto venne soppiantata dall‘indaco indiano portato da Marco Polo dai suoi viaggi in Oriente, una pianta di maggior resa tintoria.
La coltivazione dell’erba guada è stata oggi ripresa e valorizzata sia in Francia che in Italia con ottimi risultati.

Nell’antichità greca e romana il blu era considerato un colore poco prestigioso confuso con il verde e il grigio, finchè poco dopo l’Anno Mille mutarono i gusti e la percezione estetica riguardante tale colore.
Perché il blu diventasse un colore significativo, capace di trasmette idee e suscitare emozioni, furono necessarie nell’Europa cristiana almeno due cose: che le materie di base per la pittura e la tintura delle stoffe non fossero più un bene raro e difficile da distillare come nell’antichità; e che nuove abitudini si sedimentassero nell’inconscio collettivo trasformando la sensibilità ed il gusto degli individui. Lo storico francese Michel Pastoureau ha datato al 1100 il punto di svolta riguardo al colore blu. Grazie allo sviluppo del commercio e dei mezzi di produzione materiale nacque una nuova sensibilità religiosa e culturale, ed il colore blu si impose sulla scena europea per rimanerci fino ai giorni nostri. Il primo segnale che qualcosa stava cambiando lo diede, in pittura, il mantello della Vergine: precedentemente era stato quasi sempre dipinto di bruno, violetto o bianco in segno di lutto ed  afflizione. Poi, improvvisamente, diventò ovunque di un bel blu chiaro e luminoso, trasformandosi in un simbolo di purezza e misericordia. Vestirsi di blu ormai non era più una stravaganza. Ma nessun libro – scrive Pastoureau- nessuna opera d’arte e nessun avvenimento esercitò tale influenza sulla moda quanto il libro di Goethe “I dolori del giovane Werter”, pubblicato nel 1774. Per almeno 10 anni il capo più richiesto dai giovani di tutta Europa fu proprio “l’abito alla Werter” e cioè la marsina blu che l’eroe indossava quando conobbe Carlotta. Lo stesso Goethe vestiva spesso di blu, e nella sua Teoria dei Colori definì l’associazione del blu e del giallo come l’armonia cromatica assoluta. Ma non fu il solo: al pari del grande scrittore tedesco tutto il movimento romantico portò un culto assoluto al colore blu. Per i romantici il blu costellava la poesia, il sogno, la melanconia, il languore assetato di assoluto.  (tratto da qui)

LA BALLATA

La ballata in Reliques of Ancient English Poetry di Sir Thomas Percy risale sicuramente al medioevo e il nostro Bardo è coinvolto in una vicenda tragicomica: vezzeggiato ospite alla mensa del Re, riesce a sedurre con il suo canto la bella Principessa la quale lo invita a recarsi nella sua camera nel cuore della notte.
Il servitore del Bardo approfitta dell’occasione e gioca d’anticipo entrando per primo nella camera della principessa,  la prende così per terra, senza tante buone maniere. Poi torna negli alloggi del Bardo e lo sveglia per esortarlo ad andare all’appuntamento fissato. Nel vederlo ritornare la Principessa sulle prime si mostra sorpresa e poi scopre di essere stata violata dal servitore del Bardo e preferisce uccidesi. Glasgerion va dal  paggio e lo uccide e poi volge la lama su di sè. Una storia come piaceva a quei tempi con tanto spargimento di sangue e uccisioni di giovani vite e rigide regole di comportamento sociale da far rispettare!

In seguito Glasgerion diventa Jack Orion ovvero Jack O’Rian, ed è proprio la versione tardo settecentesca della ballata ad essere stata rimaneggiata e messa in musica da Andrew Lancaster Lloyd (1961)
È la versione interpretata e fatta conoscere da Bert Jansch nel 1966, nell’album omonimo. Probabilmente di origine tardosettecentesca, si tratta di una versione un po’ edulcorata nel linguaggio ma comunque che non si allontana da quella più antica tramandata dal Folio Percy. La storia di questa versione è comunque controversa e riflette interventi arbitrari moderni che non sono stati infrequenti nel Folk revival degli anni ’60. Fu infatti nel 1961 che, basandosi su una autentica versione stampata prima che la ballata scomparisse del tutto dalla tradizione orale, che lo studioso e folklorista Albert Lancaster Lloyd (1908-1982) compose una versione “modernizzata” e una melodia adatta (della versione più antica e anche di quelle più tarde non si è mai conosciuta la musica). Lloyd, che era anche cantante in proprio, la incise nel 1966 nell’album First Person con Dave Swarbrick (“Swarb”) al fiddle: fu questa versione che fu poi ripresa da Bert Jansch e dai Pentangle. Nel 1968 era stata interpretata anche da Martin Carthy, ancora con Dave Swarbrick al fiddle, nell’album But Two Came By. In una nota nel libretto dell’album, Martin Carthy osserva interessantemente: ‘The song in its traditional form was, according to evidence at our [his and A. L. Lloyd’s] disposal, not very widespread, which serves to highlight one of the curious features of the folk revival, that is, the many songs which were not at all common in tradition are very commonly sung in the revival and vice versa.’ Nel 1970, infine, la sua versione più famosa e nella quale viene generalmente ricordata: quella dei Pentangle in Cruel Sister, interpretata a tre voci da Bert Jansch, John Renbourn e Jacqui McShee. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA su Spotify A.L. Lloyd & Dave Swarbrick ·  in English & Scottish Folk Ballads 2006. Nella versione di LLoyd vengono omesse le strofe del suicidio della principessa e del bardo, apparentemente l’unico a morire è il servo.


I
Jack Orion was as good fiddler
As ever fiddled on a string,
And he could drive young women mad
With the tune his wires would sing.
II
He could fiddle the fish out of salt water
Or water from a marble stone,
Or the milk out of a maiden’s breast
Though baby she had none.
III
So he sat and played in the castle hall
And fiddled them all so sound asleep,
Except it was for the young countess,
And for love she stayed awake.
IV
And first he played a slow, slow air
And then he played it brisk and gay,
And, “O dear love,” behind her hand
This lady she did say.
V
“Ere the day has dawned and the cocks have crown
And flapped their wings so wide,
It’s you may come up to my bedroom door/ And stretch out at my side.”
VI
So he lapped his fiddle in a cloth of green/ And he stole out on his tip toe,
And he’s off back to his young boy Tom
As fast as he could go.
VII
Ere the day has dawned and the cocks have crown
And flapped their wings so wide,
I’m bid to go to that lady’s door
And stretch out at her side.
VIII
Well lie down, rest you, my good master,
Here’s a blanket to your hand.
And I’ll waken you in as good a time
As any cock in the land.”
IX
And Tom took the fiddle into his hand,
Fiddled and he sang for a full hour,
Till he played his master fast asleep
And he’s off to that lady’s bower.
X
And when he come to the countess’ door
He twirled so softly at the pin,
And the lady true to her promise
Rose up and let him in.
XI
Well he didn’t take that lady gay
To bolster or to bed,
But down upon her bedroom floor
Right soon he had her laid.
XII
And he neither kissed her when he came
Nor yet when from her he did go,
But in and out of her bower window
The moon like a coal did glow.
XIII
“Oh ragged are your stockings, love,
And stubble is your cheek and chin,
And tangled is that yellow hair
That I saw late yestre’en.”
XIV
“My stockings belong to my boy Tom
And they were the first come to my hand,
And I tangled all my yellow hair
When coming against the wind”
XV
He took his fiddle into his hand,
So saucy there he sang,
And he’s off back to his own master
As fast as could run.
XVI
“Well up, well, my master dear,
For while you sleep and snore so loud
There’s not a cock in all this land
But has flapped his wings and crowed.”
XVII
Jack Orion took the fiddle into his hand/ And he fiddled and he played so merrily,/ And he’s off away to the lady’s house/ As fast as go could he.
XVIII
Well, when he come to the lady’s door
The fiddler twirled upon the pins,
Saying softly, “Here’s your own true love,
Rise up and let me in.
XIX
She says,“Surely you didn’t leave behind
A bracelet or a velvet glove,
Or are you returned back again
To taste more of me love?”
XX
Jack Orion swore a bloody oath,
“By oak and ash and bitter thorn,
Lady, I never was in your room
Since the day that I was born.”
XXI
Oh then it was your little foot page
That falsely has beguiled me,
And woe that the blood of that ruffian boy
Should spring in my body.”
XX
And home then went Jack Orion, crying,
“Tom, my lad, come here to me!”
And he hanged that boy from his own gatepost
High as the willow tree.
tradotto da Riccardo Venturi*
I
Jack Orion era il miglior violinista(1)
Che mai avesse suonato su corda,
Faceva impazzire le giovani donne
Quando suonava una melodia sul suo violino
II
Avrebbe fatto uscire i pesci dall’acqua salata/O acqua da una lastra di marmo,
O latte dal petto di una vergine
Sebbene mai avesse avuto figli (2)
III
E continuò a suonare nella sala del castello/ Finché, suonando, non li fece addormentar tutti;/tutto a causa della giovane principessa/ Che per amore se ne stava sveglia.
IV
E prima suonò una melodia (3) solenne e lenta/ E poi ne fece sgorgare una allegra;/ E “Oh Amore caro” di nascosto la dama gli diceva.
V
“All’alba, quando i galli avranno cantato
E ben sbattuto le loro ali,
allora vieni ed entra in camera mia
per distenderti al mio fianco.”

VI
Ripose il violino in una tela verde
e, muovendosi con circospezione,
corse via dal suo giovane servo Tom, più veloce del vento.
VII
All’alba, quando i galli avranno cantato
E ben sbattuto le loro ali,
Sono stato invitato a entrare da quella dama
Per distendermi al suo fianco.”
VIII
“Giaci pure nel tuo letto, caro padrone,
ecco prendi una coperta;
ti sveglierò al momento giusto
meglio di un gallo.”
IX
E Tom prese il violino in mano
suonò e cantò per una buona ora
suonò finchè il suo padrone prese sonno e così se ne andò dalla dama.
X
E quando giunse alla camera della signora
Toccò leggermente il battente;
La signora fu fedele alla sua parola,
Si alzò e lo fece entrare.
XI
Beh, non prese quella bella signora
Sul capezzale e neanche sul letto,
La rovesciò giù sul pavimento
E rapidamente la montò.
XII
Non le diede un bacio né all’arrivo
E neppure quando andò via;
Splendeva la luna come brace
Guizzando dentro e fuori dalla finestra.
XIII
“Le tue calze sono stracciate, amore,
Hai le guance ispide di barba,
Pieni di nodi sono i tuoi capelli biondi
Che ho visto solo ieri sera.”
XIV
“Le calze sono del mio paggio Tom,
Sono le prime che mi son capitate in mano,
e mi sono annodato i biondi capelli
mentre venivo controvento.”
XV
Tom prese il violino in mano
E cantò in modo insolente,
Poi tornò alla casa del suo padrone
Il più veloce che poté.
XVI
“Svegliati, svegliati, mio buon padrone,
perchè mentre dormivi sodo e russavi
nessun gallo del paese ha cantato
e  sbattuto le ali”

XVII
Jack Orion prese il violino in mano
suonò e cantò contento
e se ne andò dalla dama
più veloce del vento.
XVIII
E quando giunse alla porta
il violinista toccò il battente;
dicendo piano: “Ecco il tuo vero amore
alzati e fammi entrare
XIX
“Oh, lai lasciato qui da me
Il tuo braccialetto o un guanto?
Oppure sei tornato
Per fare ancora l’amore con me?”
XX
Jack Orion tirò una bestemmia sanguinosa (4) “Sulla quercia, le ceneri e le amare spine Signora, non sono mai stato in casa tua/ Dal giorno che sono nato.”
XXI
“Oh, allora è stato il tuo paggetto
Che mi ha ingannata così crudelmente,
Che sventura che il sangue di quel furfante/ Scorra dentro al mio corpo (5).”
XX
Jack Orion corse a casa,
gridando,
 “Tom, ragazzo mio, vieni qua da me.”
e impiccò quel servo al proprio cancello
in alto come il salice

NOTE
* traduzione di  Riccardo Venturi per il testo dei Pentangle (sotto), adattato da Cattia Salto sulla versione di Bert Lloyd
1)  lo strumento in origine era l‘arpa bardica
così recita la versione del foglio Percy [traduzione di Riccardo Venturi da qui]

Glasgerion was a kings owne sonne,
And a harper he was good,
He harped in the kings chamber
Where cappe and candle yoode,
And soe did hee in the Queens chamber
Till ladies waxed wood.
Glasgerion era l’unico figlio d’un re,
Era un buon suonatore d’arpa;
Suonava l’arpa alla corte del re
Dove passavan calici e candelabri,
E così fece nelle stanze della regina
Facendo impazzire le dame.

2) Le Arpe magiche sono molto citate nella mitologia celtica, arpe dotate di straordinari poteri che  suscitano forti emozioni negli uomini e negli animali e compiono incantesimi sulle cose inanimate. continua
3) le tre melodie suonate dal bardo riprendono pari pari le melodie suonate dal Dio Dagda con la sua arpa magica denominata “sussurro del dolce albero di mele”. Così racconta la leggenda: durante la battaglia di Mag Tured tra i Fomori, leggendari abitanti dell’Irlanda e i Thuata DŽeDanann, i figli della dea Dana, dai quali discende il popolo irlandese, i Fomori rubarono l’arpa al dio Dagda.  In una rocambolesca sortita nel campo nemico lo stesso dio Dagda accompagnato dal dio Lugh e Ogma, chiama a sè con un’invocazione magica l’arpa e suona le tre fondamentali e nobili melodie musicali per le quali si riconoscono gli arpisti: la melodia del pianto, quella del riso, e quella del sonno.
4) Così commenta Riccardo Venturi: “Cioè sulla quercia con la quale era stata fabbricata la croce di Gesù, sulle sue ceneri e sulle spine della corona.  Per i puritani standard inglesi, anche moderni, si tratta di una bestemmia veramente sanguinosa
5) in realtà è lo sperma di un umile servo quello che scorre nella vagina della principessa: nei tempi antichi le pulzelle nobili venivano tranquillamente stuprate dagli eserciti conquistatori, per questo si toglievano la vita quando il nemico sfondava le porte della città o del mastio. Se sopravvivevano venivano degradate a servire come serve o vendute come schiave.

ASCOLTA Pentangle Jack Orion in Cruel Sister, 1967. In una versione a tre voci Bert Jansch (il narratore), John Renbourn (il bardo e lo scudiero), Jacqui McShee (la principessa). Così commenta Alberto di Musica e Memoria: “Questa ballata tradizionale nell’LP Cruel Sister occupa una intera facciata e segna la adozione, per la prima volta, della chitarra elettrica con distorsore (al minuto 14:46) da parte dei Pentangle, forse per adeguarsi in qualche modo allo stile folk-rock allora imperante (Fairport Convention, Steeleye Span), mentre sino ad allora erano stato fedeli ai soli strumenti acustici e al massimo alla chitarra elettrificata stile jazz.” (tratto da qui)
La versione portata nel gruppo da Bert Jansch (che l’aveva registrata nel 1966 nel suo album dal titolo omonimo) è più tragica e dettagliata.

ASCOLTA Fairport Convention – Jack O’Rion 1978

I
Jack Orion was as good a fiddler
As ever fiddled on a string
He could make young women mad
To the tune his fiddle would sing
II
He could fiddle the fish out of salt water
Or water from a marble stone
Or milk from out of a maiden’s breast
Though baby she’d got none
III
He’s taken his fiddle into his hand
He’s fiddled and he’s sung
And oft he’s fiddled unto the King
Who never thought it long
IV
And he sat fiddling in the castle hall
He’s played them all so sound asleep
All but for the young princess
And for love she stayed awake
V
And first he played at a slow grave tune
And then a gay one flew
And many’s the sigh and loving word
That passed between the two
VI
Come to my bower, sweet Jack Orion
When all men are at rest
As I am a lady true to my word
Thou shalt be a welcome guest
VII
He’s lapped his fiddle in a cloth of green
A glad man, Lord, was he
Then he’s run off to his own house
Says, Tom come hither unto me
VIII
When day has dawned and the cocks have crown
And flapped their wings so wide
I am bidden to that lady’s door
To stretch out by her side
IX
Lie down in your bed, dear master
And sleep as long as you may
I’ll keep good watch and awaken you
Three hours before ‘tis day
X
But the rose up that worthless lad
His master’s clothes did don
A collar he’s cast about his neck
He seemed the gentleman
XI
Well he didn’t take that lady gay
To bolster nor to bed
But down upon the bower floor
He quickly had her laid
XII
And he neither kissed her when he came
Nor when from her he did go
And in and out of her window
The moon like a coal did glow
XIII
Ragged are your stockings love
Stubbly is your cheek and chin
And tangled is that yellow hair
That I saw yestereen
XIV
The stockings belong to my boy Tom
They’re the first come to my hand
The wind has tangled my yellow hair
As I rode o’er the land
XV
Tom took his fiddle into his hand
So saucy there he sang
Then he’s off back to his master’s house
As fast as he could run
XVI
Wake up, wake up my good master
I fear ‘tis almost dawn
Wake up, wake up the cock has crowed ‘Tis time that you were gone
XVII
Then quickly rose up Jack Orion
Put on his cloak and shoon
And cast a collar about his neck
He was a lord’s true son
XVIII
And when he came to the lady’s bower
He lightly rattled the pin
The lady was true to her word
She rose and let him in
XIX
Oh whether have you left with me
Your bracelet or your glove?
Or are you returned back again
To know more of my love?
XX
Jack Orion swore a bloody oath
By oak and ash and bitter thorn
Saying, lady I never was in your house
Since the day that I was born
XXI
Oh then it was your young footpage
That has so cruelly beguiled me
And woe that the blood of the ruffian lad
Should spring in my body
XXII
Then she pulled forth a little sharp knife
That hung down at her knee
O’er her white feet the red blood ran/ Or ever a hand could stay
And dead she lay on her bower floor
At the dawning of the day
XXIII
Jack Orion ran to his own house
Saying, Tom my boy come here to me
Come hither now and I’ll pay your fee
And well paid you shall be
XXIV
If I had killed a man tonight
Tom I would tell it thee
But if I have taken no life tonight
Tom thou hast taken three
XXV
Then he pulled out his bright brown sword
And dried it on his sleeve
And he smote off that vile lad’s head
And asked for no man’s leave
XXVI
He set the sword’s point to his breast
The pommel to a stone
Through the falseness of that lying lad
These three lives were all gone.
tradotto da Riccardo Venturi *
I
Jack Orion era il miglior violinista (1)
Che mai avesse suonato su corda,
Faceva impazzire le giovani donne
Quando suonava una melodia sul suo violino
II
Avrebbe fatto uscire i pesci dall’acqua salata
O acqua da una lastra di marmo,
O latte dal petto di una vergine
Sebbene mai avesse avuto figli (2)
III
Prese il suo violino in mano
E si mise a suonare e a cantare;
E spesso suonava al cospetto del Re
Che mai se ne aveva a annoiare.
IV
E continuò a suonare nella sala del castello/ Finché, suonando, non li fece addormentar tutti;
E tutto questo a causa della giovane principessa/ Che per amore se ne stava sveglia.
V
E prima suonò una melodia solenne e lenta (3)/ E poi ne fece sgorgare una allegra;/ E molti furono i sospiri e le parole d’amore
Che scorsero fra quei due.
VI
“Vieni in camera mia, dolce Jack Orion,
Quando tutti saranno a riposare;
Sono una donna fedele alla mia parola,
Sarai un ospite ben gradito.”
VII
Ripose il violino in una tela verde
E, com’è vero Iddio, era un uomo felice;
Poi corse via a casa sua
E disse, “Tom, vieni qui da me
VIII
All’alba, quando i galli avranno cantato
E ben sbattuto le loro ali,
Sono stato invitato a entrare da quella dama
Per distendermi al suo fianco.”
IX
“Giaci pure nel tuo letto, caro padrone,
E dormi quanto più puoi;
Farò buona guardia e ti sveglierò
Tre ore prima che faccia giorno.”
X
Invece si alzò, quell’indegno ragazzo,
E indossò i vestiti del suo padrone;
Si mise pure un colletto al collo,
Sembrava proprio un gentiluomo.
XI
Beh, non prese quella bella signora
Sul capezzale e neanche sul letto,
La rovesciò giù sul pavimento
E rapidamente la montò.
XII
Non le diede un bacio né all’arrivo
E neppure quando andò via;
Splendeva la luna come brace
Guizzando dentro e fuori dalla finestra.
XIII
“Le tue calze sono stracciate, amore,
Hai le guance ispide di barba,
Pieni di nodi sono i tuoi capelli biondi
Che ho visto solo ieri sera.”
XIV
“Le calze sono del mio paggio Tom,
Sono le prime che mi son capitate in mano,/ I capelli me li ha annodati il vento/ Mentre cavalcavo per la campagna.”
XV
Tom prese il violino in mano
E cantò in modo insolente,
Poi tornò alla casa del suo padrone
Il più veloce che poté.
XVI
“Svegliati, svegliati, mio buon padrone,
Temo che sia quasi l’alba,
Svegliati, svegliati, il gallo ha cantato,
È ora che tu vada.”
XVII
Allora si alzò veloce Jack Orion,
Si infilò il mantello e le scarpe,
E si mise un colletto al collo (6),
Era davvero figlio di un signore.
XVIII
E quando giunse alla camera della signora
Toccò leggermente il battente;
La signora fu fedele alla sua parola,
Si alzò e lo fece entrare.
XIX
“Oh, lai lasciato qui da me
Il tuo braccialetto o un guanto?
Oppure sei tornato
Per fare ancora l’amore con me?”
XX
Jack Orion tirò una bestemmia sanguinosa (4)“Sulla quercia, le ceneri e le amare spine:
-Disse – Signora, non sono mai stato in casa tua
Dal giorno che sono nato.”
XXI
“Oh, allora è stato il tuo paggetto
Che mi ha ingannata così crudelmente,
Che sventura che il sangue di quel furfante
Scorra dentro al mio corpo (5)”
XXII
Allora sguainò un pugnaletto acuminato
Che teneva appeso al ginocchio.
Sui suoi candidi piedi scorse il sangue
Prima che mano la potesse fermare;
E morta giacque sul pavimento della camera
Mentre spuntava il giorno.
XXIII
Jack Orion corse a casa,
Disse, “Tom, ragazzo mio, vieni qua da me./ Vieni qua che ti devo pagare,
E ben pagato tu sarai.
XXIV
Se io avessi ucciso un uomo stanotte
Tom, io te lo avrei detto; Ma tu non hai preso una sola vita, stanotte,/Tom, tu stanotte ne hai prese tre.”
XXV
E allora sguainò la sua spada brunita e lucente
E se la asciugò sulla manica;
Poi troncò la testa a quel ragazzo dappoco
E non chiese il permesso a nessuno.
XXVI
Si appoggiò la punta della spada al petto
E l’impugnatura a una pietra;
Per la falsità di quel ragazzo bugiardo
Quelle tre vite se n’eran tutte andate.

NOTE
* (da qui)
6) la moda del collare in pizzo inizia con il 500 detto collare a lattughe diventato poi la più rigida gorgiera, formata da parecchi strati sovrapposti di bianco lino o di pizzo. Viene però sostituito ben presto dal collare di pizzo a bavera, sempre prezioso ma decisamente più pratico. Il cantastorie non manca occasione di ribadire la differenza di ceto sociale tra il nobile e il servitore perchè nel Medioevo la nobiltà si arrogava un diritto di superiorità “di sangue” sul volgo (il sangue blu delle fiabe): questa superiorità era portatrice di qualità morali oltre che di buone maniere (e non faceva difetto l’arroganza).

Il racconto tragico diventa una storiella comica nella versione intitolata Do Me Ama, una fo’c’sle song  dalle origini settecentesche. continua 

FONTI
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/67-glasgerion.aspx
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/recordings–info-67-glasgerion.aspx
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/arpa-celtica.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=48292&lang=it
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=48292&lang=it#agg229803
http://www.musicaememoria.com/pentangle_cruel_sister.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/jackorion.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_67
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/j/jackorio.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32313
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18386
http://www.dyeinghousegallery.com/tingere-lindaco-ecco-si-fa/
http://www.oikos-group.it/contenuti/colore/colore-e-societa/storia-archivio

Carole di Primavera nel Bedforshide

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow may day songs 
Helston Furry Dance

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]Il Primo Maggio si seguivano alcune tradizioni. I bambini portavano la ghirlanda del Maggio ossia un cerchio formato con rami decorati con nastri e fiori, nel centro erano appese due bamboline, una grande che rappresentava la Vergine Maria e una più piccola che rappresentava Cristo bambino, un panno bianco era fissato sulla sommità per coprire tutta la ghirlanda. I bambini si fermavano ad ogni casa e chiedevano dei soldi per mostrare la ghirlanda sollevando il panno.
Un’altra tradizione diffusa in tutta la contea era il Maying, si faceva regolarmente fino allo scoppio della prima guerra mondiale e dopo solo sporadicamente: i giovani andavano in giro la notte con i rami del Maggio e cantavano i canti del Maggio, al mattino un ramo del maggio era attaccato al palo portabandiera della scuola, un altro decorava l’insegna della locanda “at the Crown” e altri erano appoggiati contro le porte in modo che finissero in casa quando si aprivano. Questi maggianti includevano un Signore e una Signora (il più giovane dei ragazzi con un velo sul volto e una cuffietta), tra i mummers anche i Moggers o Moggies un uomo e una donna con le facce annerite vestiti di stracci e con le scope 
(tradotto da qui)

VIDEO Ecco una testimonianza molto significativa di Margery “Mum” Johnstone dal Bedforshide raccolta da Pete Caslte, con due canzoni del Maggio

La danza del Palo durante  la festa del Maggio a Elstow, Bedfordshire, nel 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

Ancora dalla testimonianza della signora Margery Johnstone questa May Garland ovvero “This Morning Is The 1st of May” trascritta da Fred Hamer  nel suo  “Garners Gay”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Stamattina è il Primo di Maggio
il momento più importante dell’anno
e se vivrò e resterò qui
vi visiterò un altro anno
II
I campi e i prati
sono così verdi
come il tenero porro
il nostro Padre del Cielo li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
III
L’uomo tuttavia è solo un uomo, la sua vita è breve, è molto simile a un fiore
è qui oggi e domani non c’è più,
così tutto finisce nel giro di un ora.
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, devo andare
non posso restare più a lungo
vieni e — la mia bambola del Maggio
e guarda il mio ramo del Maggio
V
Ho una borsa in tasca
che è legata con un nastro di seta
e tutto ciò che le manca
è un po’ del tuo denaro
da infilare dentro

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

La carol è conosciuta con il nome più generico di “The May Day Carol” o “Bedford May Carol” ma anche come “The Kentucky May Carol” (come preservata nella tradizione del maggio nei Monti Appalachi) ed è stata raccolta nel Bedfordshire.
Una prima versione ci viene dalla tradizione di Hinwick come collezionata da Lucy Broadwood  (1858 –  1929)  e trascritta in “English Traditional Songs and Carols” ( Londra: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton in “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017


I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ho vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e  ora  ritorno ancora qui
per portarvi il ramo del maggio
II
Lo spino del Maggio mia cara, dico,
è davanti alla tua porta
non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
III
Vai nella dispensa e portami una coppa,
una coppa della tua dolce crema,
e se dovessi restare in città
ritornerò da voi un altro anno.
IV
Le siepi e i campi sono così verdi
e ogni foglia è rifiorita
il Nostro Padre dei Cieli li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
V
E quando sarò morto e nella tomba
e ricoperto dalla fredda terra
l’usignolo si fermerà a cantare
e il tempo trascorrerà via
VI
Prendi la Bibbia in mano
e leggi un capitolo
e quando il giorno del giudizio verrà
il Signore penserà a te
VII
Ho una borsa sul braccio destro
stretta con un nastro di seta
non vuole altro che un po’ d’argento
da infilare dentro
VIII
E ora che la canzone è quasi finita
non posso restare più a lungo
Dio vi benedica, grandi e piccini
e vi auguro un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna, come nella versione del Cambridgshire, inevitabili le contaminazioni con il credo della religione dominante
2) questa crema dolce e fresca in bicchiere è una bevanda-dessert tipicamente inglese d’epoca elisabettiana ancora popolare in epoca vittoriana, il Syllabub. Un tempo ai Mayers si offriva “una syllabub di latte caldo direttamente dalla mucca, torte dolci e vino” (Il ramo d’Oro James Frazer). E così sono andata a curiosare per ritrovare la ricetta storica: si tratta di un  frappè di latte, vino (o sidro o birra) zuccherato e profumato con succo di limone. Il succo di limone serviva a far cagliare il latte in modo che si formasse una crema in superficie,  nel tempo la ricetta è diventata più solida, cioè una crema con la panna montanta aromatizzata con del liquore o vino dolce (vedi ricette)

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste sullo sfondo un vassoio pieno di bicchieri di syllabubs

3) il riferimento alla rugiada non è casuale , la tradizione del maggio prevede il bagno nella rugiada e nelle acque selvatiche ricche di pioggia. La notte è quella magica del 30 aprile e la rugiada veniva raccolta dalle fanciulle e conservata come un toccasana in grado di risvegliare la bellezza femminile! (vedi Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002 la melodia è la stessa della Cambridgeshire May Carol (purtroppo il mio orecchio non riesce a distinguere bene alcune frasi.. lasciate in punteggiatura)


I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Un ramo del Maggio, così bello e allegro, sta davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio, ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
II
Alzati, bella fanciulla e fai entrare il Maggio perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino, potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
III
?
?
IV
Se non una coppa di crema fredda  (dateci) un boccale di birra scura
e se continueremo a  restare in città
ritorneremo da voi un altro anno.
V
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
siamo qui oggi e domani non ci saremo più
saremo tutti morti nel giro di un ora
VI
La luna brilla luminosa, le stelle si accendono
tra poco sarà giorno
così ricordatevi ..
e vi auguriamo un gioioso Maggio

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna.
2) il Syllabub (vedi sopra)
3) la strofa deriva da “The Moon Shine Bright” versione pubblicata da William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) vedi

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane in “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 (strofe I, II, III e IX) e a seguire The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
La canzone viene riproposta nel Blog “A Folk song a Week”   curato dallo stesso Andy Turner  in cui Andy ci dice di aver appreso la canzone dalla raccolta di Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred la collezionò da “Chris Marsom e altri” – Mr Marsom era già emigrato in Canada,ma Fred lo incontrò in visita a Northill, il suo paese natale nel Bedfordshire. Le note di Fred dicono “The Day Song è troppo lunga per essere inclusa qui e la Night Song ha la stessa melodia. E’ stata usata da Vaughan Williams come la melodia No. 638 nell’ English Hymnal, ma con il nome di “Southill” perchè gli era stata mandata da un uomo di Southill. Chris Marsom che me la cantò aveva molte storielle sull’accoglienza delle signore forestiere che vivevano da poco nel villaggio perchè si spaventavano quando i Maggianti si avvicinavano alla loro casa nel cuore della notte alla vigilia del 1° Maggio”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick in “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (traccia 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy scrive nelle note dell’album “May Song viene dalla registrazione di Cynthia Gooding che ho perso circa 16 anni fa, ma le parole mi sono rimaste in testa.” (strofe da II a VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati mia graziosa fanciulla
e prendi il nostro spino del Maggio
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti una allegra ghirlanda (il ramo del maggio)
III
Lo spino del Maggio portiamo in giro (porta l’allegria)
e sta davanti alla tua porta non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato per il lavoro di nostro Signore
IV
Alzati bella fanciulla per far entrare il Maggio, perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
V
Le porte del paradiso sono spalancate
per far fuggire la rugiada
è qui oggi, puntuale
e cade su di me e te
VI
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
non ci sono proroghe oggi c’è
e poi svanisce nel giro di un’ora
VII
E quando sarai morto
e nella tomba
sarai ricoperto dalla fredda terra
i vermi mangeranno la tua carne, buonuomo
e le tue ossa si consumeranno.
VIII
La canzone è finita ed è tempo di andare, non posso restare più a lungo. Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!
IX
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) secondo la precedente religione l’acqua riceveva maggior potere dal sole di Beltane. Si facevano pellegrinaggio alle sorgenti sacre e con l’acqua della sorgente si aspergevano i campi per favorire la pioggia.

Kerfuffle in “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati, dolce fanciulla,
a prendere lo Spino del Maggio,
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce
e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte del giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti il ramo del maggio
III
Un ramo del Maggio ti abbiamo portato, ed è davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio,
ma è ben sbocciato
per mano di Nostro Signore
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

SIR PATRICK SPENS

the-shipwreckChild ballad #58
Sir Patrick Spens

Una ballata tradizionale dalle antiche origini storicamente riguardante una spedizione navale per ordine del re di Scozia, è la cronaca di uno sventurato viaggio in mare che si conclude con un naufragio. Gli studiosi non sono concordi nell’individuare con precisione i personaggi coinvolti nella vicenda, alcuni ipotizzano si trattasse della missione diplomatica incaricata al trasporto di Margherita figlia di Alessandro III di Scozia data in sposa ad Erik II re di Norvegia; era l’agosto del 1281 e sulla via del ritorno, probabilmente ad autunno inoltrato, la nave affondò al largo delle Isole Ebridi. Altri invece  che la vicenda si riferisca all’altra Margherita, nota come la “Vergine della Norvegia” figlia dei due, che morì in mare nei pressi delle isole Orcadi nel settembre del 1290 all’età di 7 anni.
Per altri invece il re è Giacomo VI, che nell’agosto del 1589 inviò i suoi emissari al “matrimonio per procura” con Anna di Danimarca. La spedizione che doveva portare la sposa in Scozia fu dispersa in mare a causa di una tempesta e la nave di Anna riuscì a sbarcare sulle coste della Norvegia. A ottobre il re partì personalmente per cercare la moglie e la raggiunse a Oslo il 19 novembre.
Sull’isola Papa Stronsay (Isole Orcadi) a Knowle Earl c’è una tomba che viene ricordata dagli abitanti del luogo come la tomba di Sir Patrick Spens.

La ballata ha numerose varianti e melodie abbinate: quella interpretata da Ewan MacColl  nella versione imparata dal padre è quella più epica!

ASCOLTA Un’altra versione collezionate dalla tradizione orale scozzese negli archivi Tobar an Dualchais

Due sono però le melodie riprese a partire dal folk revival americano degli anni 70: quella dei Fairport Convention e quella di Nic Jones.

PRIMA VERSIONE: FAIRPORT CONVENTION

La prima release  ufficiale del brano è in Full House   1970 con Dave Swarbrick come voce solista, seguita da una bonus track in Liege & Lief 2002 con la voce di  Sandy Danny.
La melodia è la stessa della ballata Hughie Graeme   (versione di Ewan MacColl)
Il testo riprende i tratti più salienti della  ballata: il perentorio ordine del re nel mandare un comandante esperto del  mare in un pericoloso viaggio (o per una missione particolarmente delicata e  della massima importanza); il tentativo di Spens di declinare l'”invito” adducendo il pretesto di non essere l’uomo più adatto per l’impresa; il presagio nefasto della mezza luna e l’avvistamento della sirena; l’ultimo pensiero alla moglie che attenderà invano il suo ritorno
ASCOLTA Fairport Convention in Liege & Lief 2002

I
The King sits in Dunfirmline town, drinking of a blood Red wine
“Where can I get a steely skipper
to sail this might boat of mine?”
II
Then up there spoke a bonny boy,
sitting at the King’s right knee/”Sir Patrick Spens is the very best seaman/that ever sailed upon the sea”
III
The King has written a broad letter
and sealed it up with his own right hand
Sending word unto Sir Patrick
to come to him at his command
IV
“An enemy then this must be
who told the lie concerning me
For I was never a very good seaman,/nor ever do intend to be”
V
“Last night I saw the new moon clear/with the old moon in her hair/And that is a sign since we were born/that means there’ll be a deadly storm”
VI
They had not sailed upon the deep a day,/a day but barely free/When loud and boisterous blew the winds/and loud and noisy blew the sea
VII
Then up there came a mermaiden,
a comb and glass all in her hand
“Here’s to you my merry young men
for you’ll not see dry land again”
VIII
“Long may my lady stand
with a lantern in her hand
Before she sees my bonny ship come/sailing homeward to dry land”
IX
Forty miles off Aberdeen,
the waters fifty fathoms deep
There lies good Sir Patrick Spens
with the Scots lords at his feet

Traduzione di Cattia Salto *
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un capitano d’acciaio
per far salpare questa mia nave?”
II
S’alza a parlare un bel fanciullo
che stava al fianco destro del Re:
“Tra i marinai che conoscano il mare
Sir Patrick Spens è di certo il migliore.”
III
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
firmandolo di sua propria mano
e l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
perchè si rimettesse al suo comando.
IV
“Un nemico di certo deve essere,
che ha mentito su di me perchè io non sono un buon marinaio,
e mai ho preteso di esserlo”
V
“La luna nuova, l’ho vista bene iersera con quella vecchia tra i capelli (1); e questo è da sempre un segno per indicare che ci sarà un’orrenda tempesta”
VI
Non avevano navigato che un giorno quando soffiò forte un vento di tempesta e il mare si sollevò alto e impetuoso.
VII
Allora venne una sirena con il pettine e lo specchio tra le mani;
“Ecco per voi, cari giovanotti
non vedrete più la terraferma”.
VIII
“A lungo, la mia sposa attenderà
con la lanterna in mano
prima di vedere la mia bella nave
veleggiare verso la terraferma”.
IX
Quaranta miglia al largo di Aberdeen l’acqua è profonda cinquanta metri; là giace il bravo Sir Patrick Spens, ed i signori scozzesi ai suoi piedi.

NOTE
*dalla traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (qui)
1) è opinione dei marinai scozzesi che vedere la sagoma scura della luna nuova con una piccola porzione di falce della luna vecchia sia segno di tempesta.

SECONDA VERSIONE: NIC JONES

La versione testuale è più articolata della precedente, la missione resta sempre segreta ed è conservata nel testo della lettera recapitata a Sir Patrick mentre si trova sulla spiaggia; nel leggere le prime righe egli si mettere a ridere pensando ad uno scherzo, ma arrivato alla fine della lunga lettera piange per la crudeltà della sorte: il re gli ha  impartito l’ordine di comandare una piccola flotta di 7 navi in una stagione inadatta ai viaggi per mare: nella ballata resterà sempre vago il ruolo diplomatico di Spens che più probabilmente è un semplice comandante di vascello e buon marinaio ma non un nobile essendo l’appellativo di Sir un aggiunta gratuita o più tarda (riferita alla nobiltà d’animo e alla sua condotta valorosa).

Pur nella drammaticità della cronaca non mancano ironiche pennellate ai danni della nobiltà scozzese, la prima nella VII strofa, una sorta di “visione” da parte di Spens in cui immagina i Lord preoccupati di bagnarsi le scarpe mentre stanno per annegare, e i loro cappelli piumati galleggiare sull’acqua dopo che la nave è affondata; e nell’ultima strofa in cui l’abisso accoglie i corpi dei nobili.. ai piedi di Spens, in una sorta di giustizia divina.

Magistrale e “cinematografica” come nota Roberto Venturi, la scena delle donne in attesa, che non sanno ancora ciò che è accaduto ai loro sposi: un dolore solo annunciato con la forza evocativa dell’immagine. Concludo citando le parole di Riccardo Venturi:
“Sir Patrick Spens è da molti anche vista come il contrasto tra il Potere e la Ragione, con il Re che, bevendo il suo prezioso vino, ordina all’esperto marinaio una cosa assurda e pericolosa senza neanche chiedere il suo parere; con i nobili che, in una situazione tanto tragica, altro non pensano che ai loro bei vestiti ed alle scarpe; con i poveri marinai che periscono tragicamente per assolvere al loro dovere. Ma tutto sfuma con un tono dolente, di rassegnazione: così è stato, e così doveva essere.”

MU6
James Archer: The Legend of Sir Patrick Spens, 1870

ASCOLTA Nic Jones in Ballad and Song 1970

La melodia è quella contenuta nei due volumi “Traditional Ballad Airs” pubblicati alla fine del XIX secolo da Dean William Christie, Vol I pag 6 (per scaricare i volumi vedi)

I
The King he sits in Dunfermline town,/A-drinking the blood-red wine;/”O where will I get a fine mariner/To sail seven ships of mine?”
II
And then up spoke a fine young man,/Sat at the King’s right knee: “Sir Patrick Spens is the best mariner/has ever sailed the seas.”
III
So the King has a-written a broad letter,/And signed it with his own hand, And he’s sent it off to Sir Patrick Spens,/a-walking all on the strand.
IV
And the very first line that Patrick he read/ a little laugh then gave he,/
And the very last line that Patrick read/The salt tears filled his eyes.
V
‘Oh who is he that’s done this deed
And told the King of me?
For never was I a good mariner
and never do intend to be’
VI
“Late yestreen I saw the new moon,
With the old moon in her arms,
And I fear, I fear, a deadly storm
our ship’n she will come to harm.”
VII
O our Scots nobles were licht laith
To weet their cork-heil’d schoone;
Bot lang owre a’ the play wer playd
Their hats they swam aboone.
VIII
“But rise up, rise up my merry men all./Our little ship she sails in the morn/Whether it’s a-windy, or whether it’s a-wet
or whether there’s a deadly storm”
IX
And they hadn’t been a-sailing a league or more,/ A league but barely nine./’Til the wind and wet and sleet and snow
coming a-blowing up behind.
X
“O where can I get a little cabin boy
to take the helm in hand?
While I go up to the topmast high
and see if I can ‘t spy land”
XI
“Come down, come down Sir Patrick Spens
We fear that we all must die
For in and out of the good ship’s hull/The wind and the ocean fly”
XII
And the very first step that Patrick he took
The water it came to his knees
And the very last step that Patrick he took
They drowned they were in the seas
XIII
And many was the fine feathered bed/That floated on the foam
And many was the little Lord’s son
That never never more came home
XIV
And long long may their Ladies sit
With their fans all in their hands
Before they see Sir Patrick Spens
Come a-sailing along the strand
XV
For it’s fifty miles to Aberdeen shore
It’s fifty fathoms deep
And there does lie Sir Patrick Spens
With the little Lords at his feet

Tradotto da Cattia Salto*
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un buon marinaio
per far salpare sette delle mie navi?”
II
S’alza a parlare un bel giovanotto
che stava al fianco destro del Re:
“Sir Patrick Spens è il miglior marinaio che abbia mai solcato i mari ”
III
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
firmandolo di sua propria mano
e l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
che camminava sulla spiaggia.
IV
La prima riga che Sir Patrick lesse
scoppiò a ridere proprio di gusto;
ma la seconda riga che lesse,
gli occhi gli si empiron di pianto.
V
“Oh chi è stato a farmi questo,
e ha parlato di me al Re? Perchè io non sono un buon marinaio, e mai ho preteso di esserlo”
VI
“La luna nuova, l’ho vista bene iersera con quella vecchia tra le braccia (1); e io temo un’orrenda tempesta a danno delle nostre navi.”
VII
Eran restii, quei nobili scozzesi
a bagnarsi i loro tacchi di sughero;
ma prima che tutto fosse finito i loro cappelli galleggiavan sull’acqua.
VIII
“Ma alzatevi, alzatevi miei valenti compagni la nostra cara nave salperà al mattino
che ci sia vento o pioggia
o anche un’orrenda tempesta!”
IX
E non avevano percorso che una lega o poco più di nove
quando il vento e la pioggia,
il nevischio e la neve vennero a rincorrerli
X
“Dove posso trovare un mozzo
che prenda il timone in mano?
Mentre vado sulla coffa
e cercare di avvistare una terra”
XI
“Scendi, scendi Sir Patrick Spens
temiamo tutti di morire
perchè dentro e fuori allo scafo della nave vento e oceano si riversano”
XII
E al primo passo che Sir Patrick Spens fece,
l’acqua gli arrivò alle   ginocchia
e l’ultimo passo che Sir Patrick Spens fece,
erano annegati nell’oceano
XIII
E molti furono i bei letti di piume
che galleggiarono sulle onde
e molti furono i figli di Lord
che mai, mai più ritornarono a casa
XIV
A lungo, a lungo le loro spose
staranno con il ventaglio in mano in attesa di vedere Sir Patrick Spens veleggiare verso terra.
XV
Cinquanta miglia al largo di Aberdeen
l’acqua è profonda cinquanta metri;
là giace Sir Patrick Spens,
con i nobili ai suoi piedi.

NOTE
*dalla traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (qui)
1) Il verso è citato anche da Samuel Taylor Coleridge in “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”

TERZA VERSIONE: SIR WALTER SCOTT

Aggiungo all’ascolto ancora due interpretazioni, anche per le varianti testuali contenute: fu Sir Walter Scott nel suo Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border – Volume 1 a ricamare sul riscontro storico della cronaca e ad aggiungere i riferimenti alla Norvegia 

 Jim Malcolm in Home (2002) Melodia di Jim Malcom.


I
The king sits in Dunfermline town
Drinking the blude-red wine;
“Whare will I find a skeely skipper
To sail this new ship o mine?”
And up and spak the eldest knicht
From where he sat by the king’s richt knee;/”Sir Patrick Spens is the best sailor/That ever sail’d the sea.”
II
The king has written a braid letter
And seal’d it with his hand
And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens
Who was walking on the strand.
The first word that Sir Patrick read
So loud, loud laugh did he;
The neist word that Sir Patrick read
The tears blinded his e’e.
Chorus (repeat):
“To Noroway, to Noroway
To Noroway o’er the faem
The king’s daughter o Noroway
it’s you must bring her hame.”
III
“O wha is this has done this deed
And tauld the king o me
To send us out, this time of year
To sail upon the sea?”
“Be it wind, weet, hail, or sleet
Our ship must sail the faem;
The king¹s daughter o Noroway
‘Tis we must bring her hame.”
IV
“Mak ready all my merry men
our gude ship sails the morn.”
“Alas alack, my master dear,
for I fear a deadly storm.
I saw the new moon late yestreen
Wi’ the auld moon in her arm;
And if we gang to sea the morn
I fear we’ll come to harm.”
V
They hadna sail’d a league, a league
A league but barely three
The darkness grew the wind blew loud
And gurly grew the sea.
The ankers brak, the topmast lap
And it was sic a deadly storm:
The waves cam owre the broken ship
Till a’ her sides were sorely torn.
VI
O laith o laith, were our Scots lords
To wet their cork-heel’d shoon;
But lang afore the play was play’d
They wat their hats aboon.
And mony was the feather bed
That flatter’d on the faem;
And mony was the gude lord’s son
That never mair cam hame.
VII
O lang, lang may the ladies sit
Wi’ their fans into their hand
Before they see Sir Patrick Spens
Come sailing to the strand.
Half-owre, to Aberdour
Tis fifty fathoms deep;
And there lies Sir Patrick Spens
Wi’ the Scots lords at his feet.
Tradotto da Riccardo Venturi*
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
Bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un buon marinaio
Per far salpare questa mia nuova nave?” S’alza a parlare un anziano cavaliere (1) Che stava al fianco destro del Re: “Tra i marinai che conoscano il mare Sir Patrick Spens è di certo il migliore.”
II
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
Firmandolo di sua propria mano
E l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
Lui camminava sulla spiaggia.
La prima riga che Sir Patrick lesse
Scoppiò a ridere proprio di gusto;
Ma la seconda riga che lesse,
Gli occhi gli si empiron di pianto.
CORO
“Per la Norvegia, la Norvegia
per la Norvegia sulle onde del mare
la figlia del re di Norvegia (2)
devi riportare a casa”
III
“Chi è stato a farmi questo,
e ha parlato di me al Re?
Mandarci fuori in questa stagione (3),
a solcare il mare?
Che ci sia vento o pioggia o grandine e nevischio, la nostra nave deve navigare sulle onde; 
la figlia  del re della Norvegia dobbiamo riportare a casa”
IV
“Presto, presto, miei valenti compagni,
Dobbiam salpare domattina;”
“Che cosa dici, mio comandante?
Io temo un’orrenda tempesta.
“La luna nuova, l’ho vista iersera
Con quella vecchia tra le braccia;
Ed ho paura, mio comandante
Che passeremo una grande sciagura.”
V
E non avevano percorso una lega o poco più di tre
che l’oscurità crebbe, il vento soffiò forte e la tempesta gonfiò il mare
L’ancora si spezzò, l’albero maestro s’inclinò ed era proprio un’orrenda tempesta: le onde soverchiarono la nave danneggiata, finchè i suoi fianchi si rovesciarono
VI
Eran restii, quei nobili scozzesi
A bagnarsi i loro tacchi di sughero;
Ma prima che tutto fosse finito
I loro cappelli galleggiavan sull’acqua.
E molti furono i bei letti di piume
che galleggiarono sulle onde
e molti furono i figli di Lord
che mai più ritornarono a casa
VII
A lungo, a lungo le loro spose
staranno con il ventaglio in mano in attesa di vedere Sir Patrick Spens veleggiare verso terra.
Laggiù, laggiù, vicino a Aberdour
L’acqua è profonda cinquanta metri;
Là giace il bravo Sir Patrick Spens,
Ed i signori scozzesi ai suoi piedi.

NOTE
* integrazione di Cattia Salto
1) quella del vecchio cavaliere è un topico per indicare un consigliere del Re di provata esperienza
2) Sir Scott propende per il viaggio di ritorno in Scozia di Margherita “Vergine della Norvegia” in qualità di nuova regina dopo la morte senza eredi del nonno Alessandro III.
3) in questo verso si fa riferimento alla consuetudine, diventata anche legge, di non andare per i mari del Nord da ottobre a febbraio, i mesi più pericolosi per le frequenti tempeste

ASCOLTA Anaïs Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer in Child Ballads 2013


I
The king sits in Dumfermline town
Drinking the blood red wine
Where can I get a good captain
To sail this ship of mine?
Then up and spoke a sailor boy
Sitting at the king’s right knee
“Sir Patrick Spens is the best captain
That ever sailed to sea”
II
The king he wrote a broad letter
And he sealed it with his hand
And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens
Walking out on the strand
“To Norroway, to Norroway
To Norway o’er the foam
With all my lords in finery
To bring my new bride home”
III
The first line that Sir Patrick read
He gave a weary sigh
The next line that Sir Patrick read
The salt tear blinds his eye
“Oh, who was it? Oh, who was it?
Who told the king of me
To set us out this time of year
To sail across the sea”
IV
“But rest you well, my good men all
Our ship must sail the morn
With four and twenty noble lords
Dressed up in silk so fine”
“And four and twenty feather beds
To lay their heads upon
Away, away, we’ll all away
To bring the king’s bride home”
V
“I fear, I fear, my captain dear
I fear we’ll come to harm
Last night I saw the new moon clear
The old moon in her arm”
“Oh be it fair or be it foul
Or be it deadly storm
Or blow the wind where e’er it will
Our ship must sail the morn”
VI
They hadn’t sailed a day, a day
A day but only one
When loud and boisterous blew the wind
And made the good ship moan
They hadn’t sailed a day, a day
A day but only three
When oh, the waves came o’er the sides
And rolled around their knees
VII
They hadn’t sailed a league, a league
A league but only five
When the anchor broke and the sails were torn
And the ship began to rive
They hadn’t sailed a league, a league
A league but only nine
When oh, the waves came o’er the sides
Driving to their chins
VIII
“Who will climb the topmast high
While I take helm in hand?
Who will climb the topmast high
To see if there be dry land?”
“No shore, no shore, my captain dear
I haven’t seen dry land
But I have seen a lady fair
With a comb and a glass in her hand”
IX
“Come down, come down, you sailor boy/I think you tarry long
The salt sea’s in at my coat neck
And out at my left arm”
“Come down, come down, you sailor boy/It’s here that we must die
The ship is torn at every side
And now the sea comes in”
X
Loathe, loathe were those noble lords
To wet their high heeled shoes
But long before the day was o’er
Their hats they swam above
And many were the feather beds
That fluttered on the foam
And many were those noble lords
That never did come home
XI
It’s fifty miles from shore to shore
And fifty fathoms deep
And there lies good Sir Patrick Spens
The lords all at his feet
Long, long may his lady look
With a lantern in her hand
Before she sees her Patrick Spens
Come sailing home again
Tradotto da Riccardo Venturi*
I
Sta il Re nella città di Dumferling
Bevendo vino, rosso come il sangue:
“Dove lo trovo un buon marinaio
Per far salpare questa mia nave?”
S’alza a parlare un marinaio
Che stava al fianco destro del Re:
“Tra i marinai che conoscano il mare
Sir Patrick Spens è di certo il migliore.”
II
Il Re ha scritto un ordine ufficiale
Firmandolo di sua propria mano
E l’ha mandato a Sir Patrick Spens,
Lui camminava sulla spiaggia.
“Per la Norvegia, la Norvegia
per la Norvegia sulle onde del mare
con tutti i nobili in pompa magna
a portare a casa la mia nuova moglie”
III
La prima riga che Sir Patrick lesse
Scoppiò a ridere proprio di gusto;
Ma la seconda riga che lesse,
Gli occhi gli si empiron di pianto.
“Chi è stato a farmi questo,
e ha parlato di me al Re?
Mandarci fuori in questa stagione,
e mettersi in mare?”
IV
“Ma riposate bene miei compagni, la nostra nave deve salpare al mattino; con ventiquattro nobili signori vestiti di bella seta.

E ventiquattro letti di piume su cui appoggiare le loro teste, via via a portare a casa la nuova moglie del Re”
V
“Temo mio caro capitano
temo che avremo di che pentirci
vidi iersera la luna nuova
Con quella vecchia tra le braccia”
“Faccia bello o faccia brutto
o faccia un’orrenda tempesta e il vento soffi a volontà, la nostra nave deve partire al mattino”
V
Non era trascorso che un giorno di navigazione, solo un giorno
quando il vento soffiò forte e tempestoso, e fece gemere la nave.
Non era trascorso che un giorno di navigazione, o forse tre
quando le onde si riversarono dalle fiancate
e salirono fino alle ginocchia
VII
E non avevano percorso una lega o poco più di tre
che l’ancora si spezzò, e le vele si strapparono
e la nave si sfasciò.
E non avevano percorso una lega o poco più di nove
quando le onde si riversarono dalle fiancate
e salirono fino al mento
VIII
“Chi sale sulla coffa
mentre tengo il timone?
Chi sale sulla coffa
a vedere se c’è della terra ferma?”
“Nessuna spiaggia, nessuna spiaggia mio caro capitano, non ho visto terra ferma, ma ho visto una bella dama con un pettine e uno specchio in mano”
IX
“Scendi, scendi mozzo,
credo che sei rimasto abbastanza
il mare è arrivato al collo
e ho solo fuori il mio braccio sinistro”
“Scendi, scendi mozzo,
è qui che dobbiamo morire
la nave è squassata da ogni parte
e il mare è entrato”
X
Eran restii, quei nobili scozzesi
A bagnarsi i loro tacchi di sughero;
Ma prima che tutto fosse finito
I loro cappelli galleggiavan sull’acqua.
E molti furono i bei letti di piume
che galleggiarono sulle onde
e molti furono i figli di Lord
che mai più ritornarono a casa
XI
A cinquanta miglia dalla costa
e a cinquanta metri di profondità;
Là giace il bravo Sir Patrick Spens,
Ed i signori ai suoi piedi.
A lungo, a lungo la sua sposa
starà con una lanterna in mano
in attesa di vedere Sir Patrick Spens
Veleggiare verso terra.

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch058.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/sandy.denny/songs/sirpatrickspens.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=24503&lang=en
http://sites.williams.edu/sirpatrickspens/the-library/
http://sairam-english-literature.blogspot.it/2009/06/ballad-sir-patrick-spens-poem-summary.html
http://rmangum2001.wordpress.com/2010/05/16/sir-patrick-spens/
http://sites.williams.edu/sirpatrickspens/origins/
http://www.papastronsay.com/island/
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_58
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8429
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63902

LE DANZE DEL MAGGIO: TO THE MAYPOLE HASTE AWAY

Read the post in English
Nella serie-tv “The Tudors” è stata allestita una Festa del Maggio all’aperto, con i pittoreschi danzatori delle Morris Dance, i loro sonagli e fazzolettini, il tiro con l’arco, la lotta dei galli, le danze con i nastri intorno al palo di maggio, eseguita da leggiadre fanciulle con le coroncine di fiori tra i capelli. La musica in sottofondo è intitolata “Stanes Morris”, nel video seguono due riproduzioni, la prima del gruppo Les Witches, la seconda un po’ più lenta dei The Broadside Band.

I pali del Maggio nel XVI-XVII secolo erano molto alti e decorati con ghirlande verdi, nastri o dipinti a strisce bicolori: la tradizione è radicata in Inghilterra, Italia, Germania e Francia, vero e proprio punto focale delle attività che fervevano ai suoi piedi, fulcro simbolico del gruppo dei danzatori.

john-cousen-dancing-round-the-maypole-on-the-village-green-in-elizabethan-times
John Cousen: Ballando intorno al palo del Maggio in epoca elisabettiana

TO THE MAYPOLE HASTE AWAY (Staine Morris )

La melodia è una danza riportata in “The English Dancing Master” – John Playford prima edizione del 1651 ma già danza alla corte di Enrico VIII o di epoca elisabettiana. Nel video è una Morris Dance mentre il Playford ce la descrive come una country dance (per le istruzioni della danza vedi)
La versione Morris Dance

E’ stato  William Chappell con il suo “Popular Music of the Olden Time” di  (1855-56) ad abbinare alla melodia d’epoca Tudor il testo “Maypole song” scritto nel 1655 da Robert Cox per la commedia “Atteone e Diana”. Così scrive Chappell “Questo brano è tratto dalla prima edizione di The Dancing Master. E’ anche nel Lute Book  di di William Ballet (all’epoca elisabettiana); e fu stampato attorno al 1760 in una raccolta di Country Dances, di Wright.
La Maypole Song, in “Atteone e Diana” sembra adattarsi perfettamente alla melodia così di mia iniziativa l’ho stampata con questa melodia.

Il testo invita i giovani ad abbandonarsi ad Amore per danzare e cantare intorno al Palo del Maggio..
Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick in ‘Prince Heathen.’ 1969 (semplicemente perfetto!)

 Shirley Collins in Morris On, 1972, l’esperimento folk rock di un gruppetto di eccellenti musicisti trad John Kirkpatrick, Richard Thompson, Barry Dransfield, Ashley Hutchings e Dave Mattacks.

Lisa Knapp & David Tibet in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017  (stupefacente versione con un ulteriore passo avanti rispetto alla rielaborazione rock anni 70)

MAYPOLE SONG
I
Come, ye young men, come along
with your music, dance and song;
bring your lasses in your hands,
for ‘tis that which love commands.
Refrein:
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday,
Then to the Maypole haste away
for ‘tis now a holiday
II
‘Tis the choice time of the year,
For the violets now appear:
Now the rose receives its birth,
And pretty primrose decks the earth.
III
Here each bachelor may choose
One that will not faith abuse
Nor repay, with coy disdain
Love that should be loved again
IV
And when you are reckoned now
For kisses you your sweetheart gave
Take them all again and more
It will never make them poor (1)
V
When you thus have spent your time,
Till the day be past its prime,
To your beds repair at night,
And dream there of your day’s delight.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Venite, voi giovinetti, venite
con musica, danze e canti
portate le vostre fanciulle per mano
perchè ciò amor comanda
Ritornello
Affrettatevi allora al Palo di Maggio
perché è giorno di festa
Affrettatevi allora al Palo di Maggio
perché è giorno di festa.
II
E’ la stagione preferita dell’anno
quando le violette fanno capolino:
nascono i boccioli delle rose
e le belle primule decorano la terra.
III
Qui ogni cavaliere sceglierà
colei che non abuserà della sua fede,
né ricompenserà, con scortesia
Amore che sarà riamato
IV
E quando conterete
i baci della vostra innamorata
riprendeteli  tutti e altri ancora
che vi sembreranno sempre pochi
V
Così dopo il sollazzo
finchè il giorno sarà sfiorito
al vostro letto ritornate per la notte
e sognate le delizie del giorno

NOTE
1) tutta la strofa richiama Catullo: “Dammi mille baci, poi cento poi altri mille, poi ancora cento poi altri mille, poi cento ancora. Quindi, quando saremo stanchi di contarli, continueremo a baciarci senza pensarci..”

seconda parte: JOAN TO THE MAYPOLE

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html Traditional Music (con spartito)
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/stainesmorris.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60673