Archivi tag: whale song

Blood Red Roses, a whale shanty

Leggi in italiano

Ho Molly, come down
Come down with your pretty posy
Come down with your cheeks so rosy
Ho Molly, come down”
(from Gordon Grant “SAIL HO!: Windjammer Sketches Alow and Aloft”,  New York 1930)

To introduce two new sea shanties in the archive of Terre Celtiche blog I start from Moby Dick (film by John Huston in 1956) In the video-clip we see the “Pequod” crew engaged in two maneuvers to leave New Bedford, (in the book port is that of Nantucket) large whaling center on the Atlantic: Starbuck, the officer in second, greets his wife and son (camera often detaches on wives and girlfriends go to greet the sailors who will not see for a long time: the whalers were usually sailing from six to seven months or even three – four years). After dubbing Cape of Good Hope, the”Pequod” will head for Indian Ocean.
It was AL Lloyd who adapted  “Bunch of roses” shanty for the film, modifying it with the title “Blood Red Roses”. It should be noted that at the time of Melville many shanty were still to come

Albert Lancaster Lloyd, Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger

It’s round Cape Horn we all must go
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
For that is where them whalefish blow
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
It’s frosty snow and winter snow
under’s many ships they ‘round Cape Horn
It’s your boots to see again
let you them for whaler men

oswald-brierly
Oswald Brierly, “Whalers off Twofold Bay” from Wikimedia Commons. Painting is dated 1867 but it shows whaling and the Bay as it was in the 1840s

Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage)


Me bonnie bunch of Roses o!
Come down, you blood red roses, come down (1)
Tis time for us to roll and go
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
We’re bound away around Cape Horn (2), Were ye wish to hell you aint never been born,
Me boots and clothes are all in pawn (3)/Aye it’s bleedin drafty round Cape Horn.
Tis growl ye may but go ye must
If ye growl to hard your head ill bust.
Them Spanish Girls are pure and strong
And down me boys it wont take long.
Just one more pull and that’ll do
We’ll the bullie sport  to kick her through.

NOTES
1) this line most likely was created by A.L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick, reworking the traditional verse “as down, you bunch of roses”, and turning it into a term of endearment referring to girls (a fixed thought for sailors, obviously just after the drinking). I do not think that in this context there are references to British soldiers (in the Napoleonic era referring to Great Britain as the ‘Bonny bunch of roses’, the French also referred to English soldiers as the “bunch of roses” because of their bright red uniforms), or to whales, even if the image is of strong emotional impact:“a whale was harpooned from a rowing boat, unless it was penetrated and hit in a vital organ it would swim for miles sometimes attacking the boats. When it died it would be a long hard tow back to the ship, something they did not enjoy. If the whale was hit in the lungs it would blow out a red rose shaped spray from its blowhole. The whalers refered to these as Bloody Red Roses, when the spray became just frothy bubbles around the whale as it’s breathing stopped it looked like pinks and posies in flower beds” (from mudcat here)
2) Once a obligatory passage of the whaling boats that from Atlantic headed towards the Pacific.
3) as Italo Ottonello teaches us “At the signing of the recruitment contract for long journeys, the sailors received an advance equal to three months of pay which, to guarantee compliance with the contract, it was provided in the form of “I will pay”, payable three days after the ship left the port, “as long as said sailor has sailed with that ship.” Everyone invariably ran to look for some complacent sharks who bought their promissory note at a discounted price, usually of forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind. “The purchasers, boarding agents and various procurers,” the enlisters, “as they were nicknamed,” were induced to ‘seize’ the sailors and bring them on board, drunk or drugged, with little or no clothes beyond what they were wearing, and squandering or stealing all sailor advances.

Sting from “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys” ANTI 2006. 
The textual version resumes that of Louis Killen and this musical interpretation is decidedly Caribbean, rhythmic and hypnotic ..


Our boots and clothes are all in pawn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

It’s flamin’ drafty (1) ‘round Cape Horn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

Oh, you pinks and posies Go down,
you blood red roses, Go down
My dear old mother she said to me,
“My dearest son, come home from sea”.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn we all must go
‘Round Cape Horn in the frost and snow.
You’ve got your advance, and to sea you’ll go
To chase them whales through the frost and snow.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn you’ve got to go,
For that is where them whalefish blow(2).
It’s growl you may, but go you must,
If you growl too much your head they’ll bust.
Just one more pull and that will do
For we’re the boys to kick her through

NOTES
1) song in this version is dyed red with “flaming draughty” instead of “mighty draughty”. And yet even if flaming has the first meaning “Burning in flame” it also means “Bright; red. Also, violent; vehement; as a flaming harangue”  (WEBSTER DICT. 1828)

Jon Contino

“Go Down, You Blood Red Roses” is a game for children widespread in the Caribbean and documented by Alan Lomax in 1962

(second part)

LINK
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/debunking-myth-that-go-down-you-blood.html
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/coming-down-with-bunch-of-roses-lyrics.html

http://songbat.com/archive/songs/english-americas/blood-red-roses
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/bloodredroses.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34080 http://www.well.com/~cwj/dogwatch/chanteys/Blood%20Red%20Roses.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/blood.htm http://will.wright.is/post/1367066738/jon-contino

In the Holy Ground Once More

Leggi in italiano

For a sailor “the promised land” (Holy Ground in the Bible) is nothing more than an area of the harbour or a street full of inns, pubs and taverns where to have fun with drinks, women and songs!
The one preferred by the Irish whalers, resumes the melody and part of the text of another sea shanty titled “Off to Sea Once More” or “Go to see Once More” (from uncertain origins too). There the sailor regrets being forced to go to sea again, because he has already spent all the money getting drunk and being robbed by a whore, in “The Holy Ground Once More” the sailor, being already on a whaler in the Arctic Sea, regrets not being on the Holy Ground!

The Wolfe Tones from Rifles of the IRA 1969

I
As I rolled(1) into Frisco, boys,I went upon the street
I drank and gambled all night long, as drunk as I could be
I drank and gambled all night long, till I could drink no more
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like
to be back in the Holy Ground once more

CHORUS
Once more, boys, once more,
the Holy Ground once more
II
I shipped on the Angeline, me boys, down for the Arctic Sea
Where cold winds blow, amid frost and snow,
Was as cold as it could be, where cold winds blow
Amid frost and snow, but the good old ship she did roll
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like
to be back in the Holy Ground once more

III
We weren’t long in the Arctic Sea, when we had spied a whale
With harpoon in my icy hands, to hit I dare not fail
With harpoon in my icy hand, I shot but I struck before
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like
to be back in the Holy Ground once more

IV
When you’re aboard a whaling ship, with storms  and gales afore
Your mind is in some public house, that lies upon the shore
Your mind is in some public house, that lies upon the shore
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like
to be back in the Holy Ground once more


NOTES
1) in the sea shanty the term rolling is used to indicate the somewhat oscillating walk typical of the sailor due to long periods spent on the rolling ships

http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/holy-ground/
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/go-to-sea-once-more/

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15375

The Cold Coast of Greenland 

The Spermwhale Fishery (o più correttamente The Cold Coast of Greenland)  è una variante di una canzone molto popolare nelle Isole Britanniche con il titolo “The Low Lands of Holland“: là  è la storia di una donna che la notte stessa delle nozze è abbandonata dallo sposo, il quale si arruola in marina per andare a combattere nelle “Lowlands of Holland”; qui lo sposo viene ingaggiato per andare in Groenlandia a caccia di balene. Ciò che non si evince direttamente in questa variante è la morte del giovane mentre è intento alla caccia: il suo corpo resterà per sempre in Groenlandia sepolto dal mare o dai ghiacci.

Il canto è infatti un lament in cui la giovane sposa  dichiara il suo eterno amore per il marito morto in mare in cui afferma che mai più si risposerà.

ASCOLTA Shirley Collins in False True Lovers 1959 (strofe I, VI, V)

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl in Whailing Ballads (su Spotify)


I
Last night I was a-married
and on my marriage bed;
There came a bold sea-captain
and he stood at my bedhead,
Crying, “Arise, arise, you married man, and come along with me
To the cold, cold coast of Greenland
to the spermwhale  fishery.”
II
She held her love all in her arms,
a-thinking he might stay
Till the cruel captain came again;
he was forced to go away.
“It’s many a bright and bold young man must sail this night with me
To the cold, cold coast of Greenland and the sperm whale fishery.”
III
Her love he went on shipboard
and a lofty ship was she,
With a score of bold young whalermen to bear him company,
But the mainmast and the rigging they lie buried in the sea (1)
Off the cold, cold coast of Greenland in the sperm whale fishery.
IV
Said the father to the daughter,
“What makes you so lament?
There’s many a lad in our town
can give your heart content.”
“There is no lad in our town, no lord nor duke,” said she,
“Can ease my mind now the stormy wind has twined my love from me.”
V
No shoes nor stockings I’ll put on,
no comb go in my hair(2)
Nor any lamp or candle burn in my chamber bare.
Nor shall I lie with any young man
until the day I die
Now the cold, cold coast of Greenland lies between my love and me.
VI
Now Greenland is a dreadful place (3)
a land that’s never green;
It’s a wild inhabitation for a lover to be in.
Where the keen winds blow
and the whalefish go and daylight’s seldom seen;
And the cold, cold coast of Greenland lies between my love and me.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
La sera che mi ero appena sposata
accanto al mio letto di nozze
venne un coraggioso capitano
e stava ritto al capezzale
dicendo: “Alzati alzati, giovane sposo
e vieni con me
nelle fredda, fredda terra della Groenlandia  a pesca del capodoglio”.
II
Lei afferrò il suo amore tra le braccia
sperando che potesse restare, ma il capitano crudele ritornò e lui fu costretto ad imbarcarsi “Più di un forte e coraggioso giovanotto deve salpare questa notte con me, per la  fredda, fredda terra della Groenlandia  a pesca del capodoglio”.
III
Il suo amore salì a bordo
su una nave maestosa
con una ventina di balenieri giovani e coraggiosi ad accompagnarlo,
ma l’albero maestro e il sartiame finirono sepolti in mare
al largo della  fredda, fredda terra della Groenlandia  a pesca del capodoglio
IV
Disse il padre alla figlia
“Perchè ti lamenti così?
Ci sono molti giovani nella nostra città
che possono farti felice”
“Non c’è uomo, in città, ne gransignore o duca – disse lei- che possano farmi cambiare idea, il vento di tempesta ha legato il mio amore e me”
V
Nè scarpe, nè calze metterò, non mi pettinerò i capelli
e nemmeno lampada o candela brucerà nella mia spoglia stanza.
Non dormirò con un altro uomo fino al giorno della mia morte
la fredda, fredda terra della Groenlandia sta tra il mio amore e me.
VI
La Groenlandia è un posto terribile,
una terra che mai fiorisce;
un posto selvaggio perchè ci resti un innamorato.
Dove i venti spietati soffiano
e va la balena e la luce del sole è vista di rado
e la fredda, fredda terra della Groenlandia sta tra il mio amore e me.

NOTE
1) la descrizione del naufragio viene dalle versioni scozzesi della storia
2) per il lutto
3) la descrizione è un topico del genere e compare in  molte canzoni sulla caccia alle balene vedi

FONTI https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thecoldcoastofgreenland.html

Greenland Whale Fishery

” Greenland (Sperm) whale fishery” è una canzone del mare che risale forse al 1700, eppure ancora oggi, la più popolare canzone sulla caccia alla balena:  una baleniera in rotta verso la Groenlandia incrocia una balena, ammaina le lance per la caccia, ma uno degli equipaggi viene scagliato in mare  e il capitano  si rammarica per la perdita dei suoi uomini (e ancor più rimpiange il mancato guadagno!)

Ovviamente oggi facciamo il tifo per la balena, ma all’epoca la caccia in alto mare era una lotta quasi ad armi pari tra uomini e il gigantesco mammifero!
La canzone ha avuto un discreto successo durante il folk revival degli anni 60 (The Weavers, Burl Ives) eseguita con una melodia lenta, (essendo sostanzialmente un lament) ma anche con un arrangiamento più spavaldo ed energico.

ASCOLTA The Dubliners 1969

ASCOLTA Peter, Paul and Mary

ASCOLTA The Pougues, la versione che va per la maggiore tra i gruppi folk-rock.

ASCOLTA Van Dyke Parks in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006 (strofe I, II, IV, V) – testo qui

Versione The Dubliners
I
Oh in eighteen-hundred and-forty-four(1)/Of March the eighteenth day
We hoisted our colours to the top of the mast
And for Greenland bore away, brave boys/And for Greenland bore away
II
The lookout on the mainmast(1) he stood/His spyglass in his hand
“There’s a whale, there’s a whale, there’s a whale fish” he cried
“And she blows at every span, brave boys/And she blows at every span”
III
The captain stood on the quarter deck
The ice was in his eye
“Overhaul, overhaul, let your jib sheets fall
And go put your boats to sea, brave boys/ And go put your boats to sea”
IV
The boats were lowered and the men aboard
The whale was full at view
Resolved, resolved was each whalerman bold/For to steer where the whalefish blew, brave boys
For to steer where the whalefish blew
V
The harpoon struck and the line paid out/With a single flourish of his tail
He capsized our boat and we lost five men(3)
And we did not catch that whale, brave boys/And we did not catch that whale
VI
The losin’ of those five jolly men
It grieved out captain sore
But the losin’ of that sperm whale fish
Now it grieved him ten times more, brave boys
Now it grieved him ten times more
VII
“Up anchor now” our captain he cried
“For the winter stars do appear
And it’s time that we left this cold country/And for the England we will steer, brave boys
And for the England we will steer”
VIII
Well, Greenland is a barren land
A land that bears no green
Where there’s ice and snow and the whalefishes blow
And the daylight’s seldom seen, brave boys/And the daylight’s seldom seen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Nel 1844
il 18 marzo
issammo la bandiera sulla cima dell’albero maestro
e per la Groenlandia partimmo, miei bravi e per la Groenlandia partimmo
II
La vedetta stava sulla crocetta
con il cannocchiale in mano
“C’è una balena, c’è una balena, c’è una balena gridò
“E soffia a ogni gettito, mie bravi
soffia a ogni gettito”
III
Il capitano era in piedi sul ponte
con il ghiaccio negli occhi
“Ammainate le vele, ammainate le vele
di fiocco
e mettete le lance in mare, miei bravi, 
mettete le lance in mare
IV
Le lance furono calate con gli uomini a bordo,
la balena era in piena vista
risoluto, risoluto era ogni baleniere e spavaldo,
per portarsi dove soffiava la balena, miei bravi, per portarsi dove soffiava la balena
V
L’arpione colpì e la lenza mollata,
con un solo colpo della coda
rovesciò la lancia e perdemmo cinque uomini
e non catturammo quella balena miei bravi, non catturammo quella balena
VI
La perdita di quei cinque bravi ragazzi
addolorò il nostro capitano,
ma la perdita di quel capodoglio
ora lo addolorava dieci volte tanto, miei bravi
lo addolorava dieci volte tanto
VII
“Alzate l’ancora- gridò il capitano-
perchè sorgono le stelle d’inverno
ed è tempo di lasciare queste fredde terre
e per l’Inghilterra faremo rotta, miei bravi
per l’Inghilterra faremo rotta
VIII
Beh la Groenlandia è una terra sterile
una terra che non fiorisce,
dove c’è ghiaccio e neve e le balene soffiano
e la luce del sole è vista raramente, miei bravi,  la luce del sole è vista raramente

NOTE
1) Già nel 1576 l’Inghilterra aveva ottenuto il monopolio per la cattura delle balene nel Mare del Nord e nel Mar Bianco, e nel 1786 con una flotta di 162 navi avviò la caccia alla balena franca e alla balena di Groenlandia nello stretto di Davis:  è probabile che il testo sia stato rimaneggiato nei vari secoli, perlomeno fino al 1830 quando i mari della Groenlandia erano diventati poco proficui e la caccia si spostò verso la Baia di Baffin. A seconda delle versioni vengono citate date diverse e anche il nome di diverse navi, come pure cambia il nome del capitano
2) in the crosstrees
3) l’equipaggio di ogni barca era composto da sei uomini, il capitano o un ufficiale, l’arpionista e 4 rematori

ASCOLTA A. L. Lloyd, dal disco LP registrato insieme ad Ewan MacColl negli anni ’50 “Thar She Blows!” un classico canto ricreativo dei balenieri. Scrive nelle note: This is the oldest—and many think the best—of surviving songs of the whaling trade. It had already appeared on a broadside around 1725, very shortly after the South Sea Company decided to resuscitate the then moribund whaling industry, and sent a dozen fine large ships around Spitsbergen and the Greenland Sea. The song went on being sung with small changes all the time to bring it up to date. Our present version mentions the year 1834, the shipLion, its captain Randolph. Other versions give other years, and name other ships and skippers (there was a whaler the Lion, out of Liverpool, but her captain’s name was Hawkins, and she was lost off Greenland in 1817). We may take it that the incident described in the song is not historical but imaginary, a stylisation like those thrilling engravings of whaling scenes that were once so popular. But the song’s pattern of departure, chase, and return home, was imitated in a large number of whaling ballads made subsequently. It is the ace and deuce of whale songs. (tratto da qui)


I
They signed us weary whaling men
For the icy Greenland ground
They said we’d take a shorter way While we was outward bound, brave boys
While we was outward bound
II
Oh, the lookout up in the barrel stood With a spyglass in his hand
There’s a whale, there’s a whale, there’s a whale! He cried
And she blows at every span, brave boys And she blows at every span
III
The captain stood on the quarter-deck And the ice was in his eye
Overhaul, overhaul, let your davit tackles fall
And put your boats to sea, brave boys And put your boats to sea
IV
Well the boats got down and the men aboard
And the whale was full in view Resolved, resolved were these whalermen bold /To steer where the whale fish blew, brave boys/ To steer where the whale fish blew
V
Well, the harpoon struck, the line ran out/ The whale give a flurry with his tail/ And he upset the boat, we lost half a dozen men No more, no more Greenland for you, brave boys No more, no more Greenland for you
VI
Bad news, bad news – The captain said And it grieved his heart full sore
But the losing of that hundred pound whale Oh, it grieved him ten times more, brave boys Oh, it grieved him ten times more
VII
The northern star did now appear It’s time we’ll anchor weigh
To stow below our running gear
And homeward bear away, brave boys And homeward bear away
VIII
Oh Greenland is a dreadful place
A place that’s never green
Where the cold winds blow and the whale fish go
And the daylight’s seldom seen, brave boys And the daylight’s seldom seen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ci arruolarono stanchi balenieri per le terre ghiacciate della Groenlandia
Ci dissero che avremmo preso una strada più breve mentre eravamo in partenza,  miei bravi
mentre eravamo in partenza

II
Oh la vedetta stava sulla crocetta
con il cannocchiale in mano
“C’è una balena, c’è una balena, c’è una balena gridò
“E soffia a ogni gettito, mie bravi
soffia a ogni gettito”
III
Il capitano era in piedi sul ponte
con il ghiaccio negli occhi
“Ammainate, ammainate mollate le cime
e mettete le lance in mare, miei bravi, 
mettete le lance in mare
IV
Le lance furono calate con gli uomini a bordo,
la balena era in piena vista
risoluto, risoluto era ogni baleniere e spavaldo,
per portarsi dove soffiava la balena, miei bravi, per portarsi dove soffiava la balena
V
L’arpione colpì e la lenza mollata,
la balena dieve un colpo della coda
e rovesciò la lancia e perdemmo una mezza dozzina di uomini
niente più Groenlandia per voi, miei bravi, niente più Groenlandia per voi,
VI
Pessime notizie, pessime notizie -gridò il capitano – con il cuore addolorato dalla pena, ma la perdita di quelle 100 sterline di balena, Oh  lo addolorava dieci volte tanto, miei bravi
lo addolorava dieci volte tanto
VII
“Sorge la stella polare è tempo di  alzare l’ancora-
stivare la nostra attrezzatura
e seguire la rotta verso casa, miei bravi
e seguire la rotta verso casa
VIII
La Groenlandia è posto spaventoso
una terra che non fiorisce,
dove i venti freddi soffiano e le balene vanno
e la luce del sole è vista raramente, miei bravi,  la luce del sole è vista raramente

NOTE
1) la data è quantomai variabile, a seconda delle versioni, c’è da rilevare che la caccia alla balena si spostò nel 1830 dalla Groenlandia alla Baia di Baffin. La caccia in Groenlandia era stata iniziata da Olandesi e Inglesi all’inizio del XVI° secolo
2) in the crosstrees

continua

FONTI
http://www.arcoacrobata.it/flash/pdf/mare1/05.pdf
https://www.grizzlyfolk.com/2017/08/31/greenland-whale-fishery-folk-attic/
http://compvid101.blogspot.it/2011/07/when-whale-gets-strike-greenland-whale.html
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/greenland-whale-fishery/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thegreenlandwhalefishery.html
https://ismaels.wordpress.com/2010/06/01/rogue%E2%80%99s-gallery-the-art-of-the-siren-38/

Nella terra santa ancora una volta

Read the post in English  

Per un marinaio  “la terra promessa” o “terra santa” (in inglese holy ground) non è altro che una zona del porto o una strada piena di locande, pubs o taverne di una cittadina portuale, dove divertirsi con bevute, donne e canzoni!
La versione di Holy ground preferita dai balenieri irlandesi, riprende la melodia e parte del testo di un’altra sea shanty dal titolo “Off to Sea Once More” o “Go to see Once More” (anch’essa dalle origini incerte). In quella il marinaio si rammarica di essere costretto ad andare per mare ancora una volta, perchè ha già speso tutti i soldi appena guadagnati, ubriacandosi e facendosi derubare da una puttana, in questa trovandosi invece già imbarcato su una baleniera è finito nel Mare Artico e si rammarica di non essere sulla Terra Santa!
Una dura vita quella dei pescatori di balene che stavano mesi in mare aperto in balia dei capricci del tempo, una vita dura e solitaria inframmezzata da colossali bevute una volta a terra.

The Wolfe Tones in Rifles of the IRA 1969


I
As I rolled(1) into Frisco, boys,
I went upon the street
I drank and gambled all night long,
as drunk as I could be
I drank and gambled all night long,
till I could drink no more
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like
to be back in the Holy Ground once more

CHORUS
Once more, boys, once more,
the Holy Ground once more
II
I shipped on the Angeline, me boys, down for the Arctic Sea
Where cold winds blow
amid frost and snow,
was as cold as it could be
Where cold winds blow
amid frost and snow,
but the good old ship she did roll
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like
to be back in the Holy Ground once more

III
We weren’t long in the Arctic Sea when we had spied a whale
With harpoon in my icy hands,
to hit I dare not fail
With harpoon in my icy hand,
I shot but I struck before
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like to be back in the Holy Ground once more
IV
When you’re aboard a whaling ship with storms  and gales afore
Your mind is in some public house that lies upon the shore
Your mind is in some public house that lies upon the shore
‘Twas then that I thought that I’d like to be back in the Holy Ground once more
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo per Frisco, ragazzi, in giro per la strada,
ho bevuto e scommesso tutta la notte ubriaco fradicio,
ho bevuto e scommesso tutta la notte fino a fare il pieno,
fu allora che pensai che avrei voluto ritornare di nuovo nella Terra Santa 
CORO
Ancora una volta, ragazzi ancora
nella Terra Santa, ancora una volta

II
Mi sono imbarcato sull’Angeline, ragazzi, verso il Mare Artico
dove i freddi venti soffiano
tra gelo e neve,
che più freddo non si può,
dove i freddi venti soffiano
tra gelo e neve
ma la cara vecchia nave rollava,
fu allora che pensai che avrei voluto ritornare di nuovo nella Terra Santa 
III
Eravamo nei pressi del Mar Artico quando abbiamo visto una balena,
con l’arpione nelle mani ghiacciate
il colpo non volevo rischiare di fallire,
con l’arpione nelle mani ghiacciate
ho sparato e colpito,
fu allora che pensai che avrei voluto ritornare di nuovo nella Terra Santa 
IV
Quando sei a bordo di una baleniera davanti a tempeste e bufere
il pensiero va a una taverna che si trova a terra,
il pensiero va a una taverna che si trova a terra,
fu allora che pensai che avrei voluto ritornare di nuovo nella Terra Santa 

NOTE
1) nelle sea shanty viene usato il termine rolling per indicare la camminata un po’ oscillante tipica del marinaio dovuta ai lunghi periodi passati sulle navi che beccheggiano

APPROFONDIMENTO
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/holy-ground/
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/go-to-sea-once-more/

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15375

HILO IN THE SEA SHANTIES

shanty_balladUna serie di canzoni marinaresche (sea shanty) hanno come soggetto il termine Hilo una parola diventata altro nel gergo marinaresco e condivisa da tutti gli shantymen.

Stan Hugill scrive: “…we will now run through those worksongs woven around the word ‘Hilo’. Hilo is a port in the Hawaiian group, and, although occasionally shellbacks may have been referring to this locality, usually it was a port in South America of which they were singing–the Peruvian nitrate port of Ilo. But in some of these Hilo shanties it was not a port, either in Hawaii or Peru, to which they were referring. Sometimes the word was a substitute for a ‘do’, a ‘jamboree’, or even a ‘dance’. And in some cases the word was used as a verb–to ‘hilo’ somebody or something. In this sense its origin and derivation is a mystery. Furthermore, since shanties were not composed in the normal manner, by putting them down, it is on paper quite possible many of these ‘hilos’ are nothing more than ‘high-low’, as Miss Colcord has it in her version of We’ll Ranzo Ray. Take your pick!” (tratto da qui)

HILO SOMEBODY

Come dice A.L Lloyd Hilo a volte vuol dire semplicemente “Hullo” oppure “Haul-o”
ASCOLTA Alan Mills su Spotify
ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl su Spotify

La strofa è ripetuta due volte seguita dai due ritornelli del coro


The blackbird sang unto our crew.
Hilo boys, Hilo(1).
The blackbird sang unto our crew.
Oh Hilo somebody, Hilo.
The blackbird sang so sweet to me.
We sailed away to Mobile Bay(2).
And now we’re bound to London Town.
I thought I heard the old man say:
“Just one more pull, and then belay.”
Hooray my boys, we’re homeward bound
We’ll soon be home in London town
And then we rolled on the street(3)
We’ll spend our money fast and free
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il merlo cantò alla nostra ciurma salve(tirate) ragazzi, salve(tirate),
Il merlo cantò alla nostra ciurma
salve a tutti (tirate tutti)
il merlo cantò dolcemente per me. Siamo salpati da Mobile Bay
e adesso siamo diretti alla città di Londra.
Credo di aver sentito dire dal capitano
“Ancora un tiro e poi è finito”.
Evviva ragazzi siamo diretti a casa, saremo preso a casa nella città di Londra
e poi andremo in giro(3)
a spendere il nostro denaro in fretta e senza freni

NOTE
1) heave-o, haul: vira e ala. Alare è un termine nautico che si dice per tirare con forza una cima o un cavo orizzontalmente o verticalmente
2) Mobile, città portuale dell’Alabama nel Golfo del Messico, già capitale della Louisiana francese. Mobile passò sotto il controllo britannico (Florida) e finì sotto il dominio spagnolo (dal 1780 al 1812) per poi diventare territorio degli Stati Uniti. “Tra il 1819 ed il 1822, con la creazione delle piantagioni, la popolazione aumentò a dismisura, inoltre, a favorire lo sviluppo cittadino vi era la sua posizione geografica, al centro delle tratte commerciali tra l’Alabama ed il Mississippi. Si sviluppò particolarmente il settore legato alla vendita ed al commercio del cotone, tanto che nel 1840, Mobile era seconda solo a New Orleans per esportazione del prezioso materiale.” (Wikipedia).
3) una delle tante Paradise street dei porti dedicate ai marinai con pubs, locande e donnine

TOM’S (JOHNNY) GONE TO HILO

Una canzone nostalgica e malinconica forse un po’ troppo lenta per il tipo di lavoro a cui era dedicata (halliard shanty) così commenta A.L Lloyd ” The slow tempo of Tom’s Gone suited the crew when the pull was heavy, but it was no favourite with the officers, who liked to hear the shanties going brisker.” Le versioni testuali sono moltissime, ma la melodia è sempre la stessa seppur con alcune variazioni. L’ispirazione della melodia è probabilmente afro-americana, anche se non si esclude una matrice irlandese. Probabilmente ogni nave aveva la sua versione preferita, tra le tante ne ho scelte due, una dal punto di vista del marinaio, l’altra della sua fidanzatina che è rimasta a casa.

ASCOLTA Bob Davenport in Farewell Nancy: Sea Songs and Shanties, 1964


Tommy’s gone on a whaling ship,
Away to Hilo!
Oh, Tommy’s gone on a damn long trip,
Tom’s gone to Hilo!
He never kissed his girl goodbye,
He left her and he told her why
She’d robbed him blind (4) and left him broke,
He’d had enough, gave her the poke(5)
His half-pay went, it went like chaff,
She hung around for the other half
She drank and boozed his pay away,
With her weather-eye on his next pay day
Oh Tommy’s gone and left her flat,
Oh Tommy’s gone and he won’t come back
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tommy è partito su una baleniera
diretto a Ylo,
Tommy è partito per un viaggio maledettamente lungo,
Tom è andato a Ylo
Non diede mai il bacio d’addio alla ragazza che aveva lasciato, e le disse anche il perchè: lo aveva derubato di tutto (4) e lasciato a pezzi,
lui ne aveva avuto abbastanza e le aveva dato il benservito (5),
metà della sua paga era volata via come pula
e lei gli gironzolava intorno per l’altra metà,
bevendo e tracannandosi la sua paga
con lo sguardo vigile sul prossimo giorno di paga.
Tommy se n’è andato e ha lasciato il suo appartamento
Tommy se n’è andato e non ritornerà!

NOTE
4) to steal=stealing all or most of what someone has
5) prosegue con il doppio senso

In queste versioni  è la ragazza abbandonata dal marinaio (stufo per le sue troppe pretese) a lamentarsi!

ASCOLTA  Gavin Friday & Shannon McNally in  Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 su Spotify


Tommy’s gone what shall I do?
ehi ho to Hilo!
Oh, Tommy’s gone and I’ll go too
Tom’s gone to Hilo!
Hilo Tom he loves me.
He thinks of me when out to sea
Tommy’s gone to Callao
Tommy’s gone to Callao
Tommy’s gone to Vallipo
He’ll dance with spanish girls, I know
Tommy’s gone to Rye-o Grand
Tommy’s gone for the yellar sand.
Tommy’s gone to Singapore
I’ll never see Tommy no more,
Tommy’s gone what shall I do?
Oh, Tommy’s gone and I’ll go too
Tommy’s gone for evermore,
I’ll never see my Tom no more.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa fare?
ehi ho a Ylo
Tommy se n’è andato e ci andrò anch’io
Tom è andato a Ylo
Ylo Tom mi ama
e mi pensa quando è per mare
Tommy è andato a Callao
Tommy è andato a Callao
Tommy è andato a Vallipo
e ballerà con le ragazze spagnole, lo so
Tommy è andato a Rio Grande
Tommy è andato per la sabbia gialla
Tommy è andato a Singapore
non vedrò Tommy mai più
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa fare?
Tommy se n’è andato e ci andrò anch’io
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre
e non vedrò il mio Tom mai più

ASCOLTA Ian Giles su Spotify
 ASCOLTA Paul Clayton


My Johnny’s gone, what shall I do?
My Johnny’s gone to Hilo.
And if he says so I’ll go too,
My Johnny’s gone to Hilo.
Hilo-a Hilo,
My Johnny’s gone and I’ll go too,
My Johnny’s gone to Hilo.
My Johnny’s sailed away to sea,
A mermaid’s lover he’ll surely be
My Johnny’s sailed from off of these shores,
I’ll never see my Johnny no more
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il mio Johnny se n’è andato, cosa fare?
Il mio Johnny è andato a Ylo
e se dice così ci andrò anch’io
Il mio Johnny è andato a Ylo
Ylo, Ylo
il mio Johnny è andato e ci andrò anch’io
Il mio Johnny è andato a Ylo

Il mio Johnny ha preso il mare
e di sicuro diventerà l’amante di una sirena (1),
il mio Johnny ha preso il largo da questi lidi
e non rivedrò il mio Johnny mai più!

NOTE
1) nel senso che affogherà

HILO JOHNNY BROWN

ASCOLTA Brasy

Sally is the girl that I love dearly,
‘Way-hey, Sally-o!
Oh, Sally is the girl that I love dearly,
Hilo, Johnny Brown, stand to your ground!

Poor Old Man (Johnny Come Down to Hilo)

ASCOLTA Keith Kendrick in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


I
Oh a poor old man come a-riding by (1)
Says I “Old man your horse will die”
Johnny come to Hilo,
Poor old man!
Chorus:
Oh! wake her, Oh! shake her,
Oh! shake that girl with the blue dress on!
Johnny come to Hilo,
Poor old man.
[And after a years I saw an happy news
with salting gun with sailors use]
Johnny come to Hilo..
[We hoisted up to the main yard high
and I wish all along the bay]
Johnny come to Hilo..
II
Round Cape Horn with frost and snow
Round Cape Horn we all must go
Johnny come to Hilo..
When we go up to Hilo town
we met that flash girl dance round
Johnny come to Hilo..
Oh poor old man come riding by
Says “Old man your horse would die”
Johnny come to Hilo..

[] non riesco a capire la pronuncia delle parole

traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il povero Vecchio viene a cavallo
dico io “Vecchio il tuo cavallo morirà”
Johnny vieni a Hilo
povero capitano
coro
Oh svegliala, squotila
Oh squoti quella ragazza con il vestito blu, Johnny vieni a Hilo
povero capitano
[..
…]
Johnny vieni a Hilo
[..
..]
II
A doppiare Capo Horn con il gelo e la neve, a doppiare l’Horn dobbiamo andare Johnny vieni a Hilo
Quando andiamo nella cittò di Hilo,
incontriamo quella ragazzina che ci gira intorno Johnny vieni a Hilo
Il povero Vecchio viene a cavallo
dico io “Vecchio il tuo cavallo morirà”
Johnny vieni a Hilo


NOTE
1) dalla sea shanty Dead horse

continua le versioni di John Short

FONTI

http://www.kbapps.com/lyrics/sailor-shanties/JohnnycomedowntoHilo.php
http://ingeb.org/songs/ineverse.html
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2007/apr/21/featuresreviews.guardianreview17
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2666
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15683
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/tomsgonetohilo.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/hilojohnnybrown.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#Toms_gone_to_Hilo
http://ingeb.org/songs/otomysgo.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/514.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/tomhilo
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/TomsGoneToHilo/index.html

Blood Red Roses, a whale shanty

Read the post in English

Ho Molly, come down
Come down with your pretty posy
Come down with your cheeks so rosy
Ho Molly, come down”
(in Gordon Grant “SAIL HO!: Windjammer Sketches Alow and Aloft”,  New York 1930)

Per introdurre due nuovi sea shanties nell’archivio del blog Terre Celtiche parto dal film Moby Dick girato da John Huston nel 1956 che mostra l’equipaggio della “Pequod” impegnato in due manovre per uscire dal porto di New Bedford, (nel libro il porto è invece quello di Nantucket) grande centro baleniero sull’Atlantico: Starbuck l’ufficiale in seconda saluta la moglie e il figlio (e la camera stacca spesso sulle mogli e le fidanzate andate a salutare i marinai che non vedranno più per molto tempo: in genere le baleniere stavano per mare sei-sette mesi o anche dai tre ai quattro anni). La nave dopo aver doppiato il Capo di Buona Speranza si dirigerà verso l’Oceano Indiano.
E’ stato AL Lloyd ad adattare lo shanty “Bunch of roses” proprio per il film, modificandolo con il titolo “Blood Red Roses”. C’è da osservare che all’epoca di Melville molti shanty erano ancora da venire

Albert Lancaster Lloyd, Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger

It’s round Cape Horn we all must go
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
For that is where them whalefish blow
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
It’s frosty snow and winter snow
under’s many ships they ‘round Cape Horn
It’s your boots to see again
let you them for whaler men

oswald-brierly
Oswald Brierly, “Whalers off Twofold Bay” da Wikimedia Commons. Il dipinto è datato 1867 ma mostra la caccia alla balena e la Baia com’era negli anni del 1840

Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage)


Me bonnie bunch of Roses o!
Come down, you blood red roses, come down (1)
Tis time for us to roll and go
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
We’re bound away around Cape Horn (2), Were ye wish to hell you aint never been born
Me boots and clothes are all in pawn (3)/Aye it’s bleedin drafty round Cape Horn
Tis growl ye may but go ye must
If ye growl to hard your head ill bust
Them Spanish Girls are pure and strong
And down me boys it wont take long
Just one more pull and that’ll do
We’ll the bullie sport  to kick her through
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Mio bel mazzo di Rose o!
venite qui, voi rose rosso sangue, venite qui
è tempo per noi di partire
venite qui, voi rose rosso sangue,
venite qui,
o voi rose e viole del pensiero
venite qui, voi rose rosso sangue, venite qui.
Siamo diretti a doppiare l’Horn
e vorresti non essere mai nato all’inferno
stivali e i vestiti sono ancora da pagare,
ed è pieno di spifferi intorno a Capo Horn
Puoi brontolare, ma devi andare,
se brontoli troppo ti scoppierà la testa
Quelle ragazze Spagnole sono sincere e forti
e sotto ragazzi, non ci vorrà molto
Ci vuole solo un altro tiro e sarà fatto
siamo i maschioni che la fanno ripartire 

NOTE
1) con buona pace di tutte le speculazioni avanzate sull’origine dell’insolito verso molto probabilmente esso è stato creato dallo stesso A.L. Lloyd per il film di Mody Dick, rimaneggiando il verso tradizionale “come down, you bunch of roses“, e trasformandolo in un  vezzeggiativo riferito alle ragazze (un pensiero fisso dei marinai, ovviamente appena dopo il drinking). Non credo proprio che in questo contesto ci siano riferimenti ai soldati inglesi (in epoca napoleonica ci si riferiva alla Gran Bretagna come il ‘Bonny bunch of roses’, i francesi anche si riferivano ai soldati inglesi come i “bunch of roses” per via delle loro divise rosso acceso) né tanto meno alle balene, anche se secondo alcuni vecchi marinai you blood red roses è un riferimento alla morte delle balene, anche se l’immagine è di forte impatto emotivo: “una balena arpionata da una barca a remi, a meno che non fosse colpita in un organo vitale poteva nuotare per miglia a volte attaccando le barche. Quando moriva era un lavoro difficile rimorchiarla fino alla nave. Se la balena era stata colpita nei polmoni, avrebbe soffiato un getto a forma di rosa rossa dal suo sfiatatoio. I balenieri si riferivano a questi come a “Bloody Red Roses”, quando il getto si trasformava in bollicine schiumose intorno alla balena e il respiro si fermava sembravano come “pinks and posies”  nelle aiuole” (tratto da mudcat qui)
2) un tempo passaggio obbligato delle baleniere che dall’atlantico si dirigevano verso il pacifico a volte è scritto “Cape Stiff” che è un modo marinaresco per indicare Capo Horn
3) come ci insegna Italo Ottonello ” All’atto della firma del contratto d’arruolamento per i viaggi di lungo corso, i marinai ricevevano un anticipo pari a tre mesi di paga che, a garanzia del rispetto del contratto, era erogato in forma di pagherò, esigibile tre giorni dopo che la nave aveva lasciato il porto, “sempre che detto marinaio sia salpato con detta nave”. Tutti, invariabilmente, correvano a cercare qualche ‘squalo’ compiacente che comprasse il loro pagherò ad un valore scontato, di solito del quaranta per cento, con molta parte dell’importo fornito in natura. Gli acquirenti, procuratori d’imbarco e procacciatori vari, – gli ‘arruolatori’, com’erano soprannominati – erano indotti a ‘sequestrare’ i marinai e portarli a bordo, ubriachi o drogati, con poco o niente vestiario oltre quello che avevano indosso, e sperperare o rubare loro tutto l’anticipo. In questo senso, fino a quando non avevano restituito l’anticipo ricevuto, essi avevano tutto “impegnato” (all in the pawn).

Sting in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys” ANTI 2006. 
La versione testuale riprende quella di Louis Killen e l’interpretazione musicale è decisamente caraibica, cadenzata e ipnotica..


Our boots and clothes are all in pawn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

It’s flamin’ drafty (1) ‘round Cape Horn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

Oh, you pinks and posies Go down,
you blood red roses, Go down

My dear old mother she said to me,
“My dearest son, come home from sea”.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn we all must go
‘Round Cape Horn in the frost and snow.
You’ve got your advance, and to sea you’ll go
To chase them whales through the frost and snow.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn you’ve got to go,
For that is where them whalefish blow(2).
It’s growl you may, but go you must,
If you growl too much your head they’ll bust.
Just one more pull and that will do
For we’re the boys to kick her through
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I nostri stivali e i vestiti sono ancora da pagare, andate giù, voi rose rosso sangue,
andate giù
i venti ruggiscono nei pressi di Capo Horn andate giù, voi rose rosso sangue, andate giù
o voi rose e viole del pensiero andate giù,
Oh voi rose rosso sangue, andate giù.
La mia cara vecchia mamma mi disse
“Caro figlio, fai ritorno a casa dal mare”.
A doppiare Capo Horn tutti dobbiamo andare,
a doppiare Capo Horn con il gelo e la neve.
Hai preso il tuo anticipo e per mare devi andare
a inseguire le balene tra gelo e neve.
A doppiare Capo Horn devi andare
perchè è dove vanno le balene.
Puoi brontolare, ma devi andare,
se brontoli troppo ti spaccheranno la testa.
Ci vuole solo un altro tiro e sarà fatto
perchè noi siamo quelli che la fanno ripartire 

NOTE
1) Tutta la canzone in questa versione è tinta di rosso con “flaming draughty” al posto di “mighty draughty”. E tuttavia anche se flaming ha come primo significato “Burning in flame” significa anche  “Bright; red. Also, violent; vehement; as a flaming harangue” Così Italo Ottonello cita il (WEBSTER DICT. 1828) per tradurre più propriamente  come “i venti ruggiscono”
2) blow= “soffiare”, ma tradotto più liberamente

Jon Contino

“Go Down, You Blood Red Roses” è un gioco per bambino diffuso ai Caraibi e documentato da Alan Lomax nel 1962

(prosegue seconda parte)

FONTI

http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/debunking-myth-that-go-down-you-blood.html
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/coming-down-with-bunch-of-roses-lyrics.html

http://songbat.com/archive/songs/english-americas/blood-red-roses
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/bloodredroses.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34080 http://www.well.com/~cwj/dogwatch/chanteys/Blood%20Red%20Roses.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/blood.htm http://will.wright.is/post/1367066738/jon-contino

ROLLING DOWN TO OLD MAUI (MOHEE): THE LOST PARADISE

Una whaling sea song che esprime la felicità della ciurma, provata dal clima polare, ansiosa di lasciare il mare artico per far ritorno a Maui (isole Hawaii). Si tratta di una “forebitter” song per le ore di riposo e svago dei marinai che appare trascritta in varie versioni testuali verso la metà del 1800. La varietà di versioni testuali giunte fino a noi ci testimoniano la popolarità della canzone sulle baleniere.

Le isole Hawaii incorporate negli U.S.A. solo alle soglie del 1960 sono state “scoperte” da James Cook nel 1778 e battezzate isole Sandwich dal nome di uno dei principali suoi finanziatori (John Montagu Lord di Sandwich, si proprio quello del tramezzino!)
A mezza via tra Asia e America diventarono presto un passaggio obbligato per le navi mercantili e le baleniere. Sebbene più in generale le isole della Polinesia non diventino “colonie” di fatto sono state ridotte a pedine al servizio delle potenze colonialistiche del tempo. Un reportage sull’isola ci viene da Herman Melville nel suo primo romanzo Typee (in italiano Taipi) 1846 dove in appendice mostra tutta l’illusorietà del paradiso hawaiano. (continua)

All’epoca della canzone il lavoro di baleniere era molto pericoloso e praticato da uomini duri e incuranti del pericolo, che dovevano spingersi nel Mare Artico dove il ghiaccio ricopre terra e oceano, perchè le balene erano diventate sempre più rare negli altri mari; uomini che stavano fuori per almeno quattro o cinque mesi prima di rientrare a casa e che finirono per considerare “casa” i caldi e “accoglienti” litorali delle isolette polinesiane.

La versione che conosciamo è quella riportata da Stan Hugill negli anni 70 che dice di aver imparato da Paddy Griffith intorno al 1920 e tuttavia si trovano diverse versioni testuali collezionate in varie raccolte del XX secolo. La melodia risale al XVIII secolo ed è conosciuta anche con il nome di “The Miller of Dee” (anche usata per “Lowlands, Lowlands, Low.”). Ma nelle collezioni date in stampa la canzone è stata abbinata anche ad altre melodie (Frederick P. Harlow, Gale Huntington). Gale Huntington nel suo libro “Songs the Whalemen Sang” (1970) ci dice che il testo arriva dalla trascrizione sul diario di bordo del vascello Atkins Adams (1858), mentre la melodia viene dalla raccolta “Chanteying Aboard American Ships” (1962) di Frederick P. Harlow. Harlow il quale ha trascritto la melodia dalla voce di R. W. Nye capitano del C. Goss (1947). La differente grafia con cui è scritta la parola Maui deriva dalla trascrizione così come viene pronunciata “Mo-hee”.

Secondo Hugill “…(it) is probably the work of some Bowhead whaleman who had experienced the rigors of the Kamchatka Sea and warmth of the Ship Girls’ welcome. .. This song I would place at an earlier date than the booklet (A. L. Lloyd’s LEVIATHAN recording) gives (1850). Maui was the Hawaiian island where Lahaina, the greatest ‘homeport’ of the Bowhead whalers was situated and whalemen were rolling down from the Arctic to this excellent sheltered haven as early as 1820.”

Whaling-hawaii

Louis Killen in Steady as She Goes 1977 Nelle note scrive: “Stan Hugill of Liverpool says that as early as 1820 Maui, one of the Hawaiian Islands (then the Sandwich Islands), was considered “home” by the Yankee sailors who hunted the northern grounds of the Behring Straits for right and bowhead whales. This is an off-watch song, as distinct from a working song, of whalermen longing for the women and weather of better latitudes.”

E tuttavia è stato il musicista canadese Stan Roger a rendere popolare la canzone e a farne una sorta di standard interpretativo
ASCOLTA Stan Roger in Between the Breaks… Live! 1979

ASCOLTA The Dreadnoughts in Uncle Touchy Goes To College 2011

ASCOLTA Ernesto Villarreal & TJ Hull bella la voce, notevole l’arrangiamento del violino

Una versione decisamente danzerina in stile “california” dei Gaelic Storm

ASCOLTA Todd Rundgren in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013

su Spotify


I
It’s a damn tough life,
full of toil and strife,
we whalermen undergo,
And we won’t give a damn
when the gales are done
how hard the winds did blow,
For we’re homeward bound
from the Arctic grounds
with a good ship taut and free,
And we won’t give a damn
when we drink our rum
with the girls from old Maui.
CHORUS:
Rolling down to old Maui(1),
me boys,
rolling down to old Maui,
We’re homeward bound
from the Arctic grounds,

rolling down to old Maui.
II
Once more we sail
with the northerly gales
through the ice and wind and rain,
Them coconut fronds,
them tropical shores,
we soon shall see again;
Six hellish months we’ve passed away
on the cold Kamchatka sea(2),
But now we’re bound
from the Arctic grounds,
rolling down to old Maui.
III
Once more we sail
with the Northerly gales,
towards our island home(3),
Our whaling done,
our mainmast sprung,
and we ain’t got far to roam;
Our stuns’l’s bones(4) is carried away,
what care we for that sound,
A living gale is after us,
thank God we’re homeward bound.
IV
How soft the breeze
through the island trees,
now the ice is far astern,
Them native maids,
them tropical glades,
is awaiting our return;
Even now their big brown
eyes look out,
hoping some fine day to see,
Our baggy sails, running ‘fore the gales,
rolling down to old Maui.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
E ‘una fottuta vita,
piena di fatiche e lotte,
che noi cacciatori di balene subiamo
e non ci frega niente delle tempeste
e di come i venti soffino forte,
perchè siamo di ritorno
dalla terra artica
con una buona nave disciplinata e indipendente
e non ci frega di niente
quando beviamo il rum
con le ragazze della vecchia Maui.
CORO
Ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui,
ragazzi,

ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui,
siamo di ritorno dalla terra artica,
ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui
II
Ancora una volta si naviga
con il vento fortissimo da nord
attraverso ghiaccio e vento e pioggia,
e quelle fronde di cocco,
quelle terre tropicali,
presto vedremo di nuovo;
Sei mesi infernali abbiamo passato lontano sul freddo mare Kamchatka,(2)
ma ora siamo di ritorno
dalla terra artica,
ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui
III
Ancora una volta si naviga
con il vento fortissimo da nord,
in direzione della nostra isola(3),
finita la caccia alle balene
alzato il nostro albero maestro,
e non c’è da andare ancora lontano;
le vele addizionali(4) sono spazzate via,
non ci preoccupiamo per quel suono,
una tempesta infernale ci viene dietro,
ma grazie a Dio siamo di ritorno a casa!
IV
Come dolce è la brezza
tra gli alberi dell’isola,
ora il ghiaccio è lontana dalla poppa
quelle fanciulle native,
quelle radure tropicali,
attendono il nostro ritorno;
anche ora i loro grandi
occhi castani scrutano,
sperando di vedere un bel giorno,
le nostre ampie vele,
arrivare prima della tempesta,
muovendosi verso la vecchia Maui

hawaii-maidenNOTE
1) I primi sbarchi dei balenieri nelle isole Hawaii risalgono al 1819 proprio a Lahaina l’allora capitale delle Hawaii. “According to Starbuck’s History of the American Whale Fishery (1877 [1989]), whalers began working the northwest coast of N. America 1835, got up around Kamchatka to begin the bowhead fishery in 1843, and in 1848, Captain Royce of the bark Superior, out of Sag Harbor, N.Y., was the first to work a season North of the Bering Straits. Royce wrote that since they were the first to whales on those grounds, the whales were comparatively tame and easy to strike” stralciato da Mudcat (qui) Il porto di Lahaina non era l’unico nelle isole Hawaii (c’erano Hilo e Honolulu) ma era indubbiamente molto frequentato dalle baleniere americane e dal punto di vista urbanistico venne via via assumendo l’aspetto di una cittadina del New England.

Balenieri e missionari arrivarono a Lahaina all’inizio degli anni ’20 del XIX secolo, ma presto entrarono in conflitto. Poco dopo essere giunto nell’isola, dove era sbarcato nel 1823, William Richards, primo missionario protestante di Lahaina, convertì al cristianesimo il governatore di Maui, Hoapili. Grazie all’influenza di Richards, Hoapili promulgò delle leggi che punivano l’ubriachezza e i facili costumi, per cui i balenieri dovettero rivolgersi altrove per trovare alcolici e donne dopo aver trascorso mesi in mare e non gradirono affatto l’ingerenza puritana dei missionari. Nel 1826 il capitano inglese William Buckle fece scalo a Maui e scoprì che a Lahaina era stato introdotto un nuovo ‘tabù dei missionari’ contro gli uomini che correvano dietro alle gonnelle. L’equipaggio, infuriato, scese a terra per vendicarsi di Richards, a fianco del quale però si schierò un gruppo di hawaiani cristianizzati che costrinsero i balenieri ad andarsene. Nel 1827 il governatore Hoapili fece arrestare il capitano della nave John Palmer per aver fatto salire a bordo delle donne, e come rappresaglia l’equipaggio prese a cannonate la casa di Richards. Il capitano fu rilasciato, ma le leggi – e le tensioni – rimasero. Dopo la morte del governatore Hoapili le leggi contro gli alcolici e la prostituzione furono fatte rispettare con minore severità e i balenieri tornarono a frequentare Lahaina. Verso la metà del XIX secolo i due terzi dei balenieri che arrivavano alle Hawaii sbarcavano a Lahaina, che prese il posto di Honolulu come porto più importante dell’arcipelago. La caccia alle balene cominciò a dare segni di crisi intorno al 1860, in conseguenza dell’impoverimento delle ultime riserve dell’Artico, e ricevette infine il colpo di grazia dall’emergere dell’industria petrolifera. Con la scomparsa dei balenieri, Lahaina divenne una sorta di città fantasma. (tratto da qui)
2) alcuni propendono stia per indicare il mare di Bering (che nelle mappe ottocentesche era più genericamente indicato come Artic Sea) scritto su alcune mappe sempre ottocentesche come Kamchatka sea , che delimitano più strettamente la zona polare
3) l’isola è oramai diventata casa loro
4) Stuns’l  = studding sail o studsail si prunincia stuns’l, sono le vele addizionali poste lateralmente rispetto alle vele quadre che in italiano si dicono (partendo dall’alto) coltellaccino, coltellaccio e scopamare con le relative aste di sostegno (booms). Bones o è termine gergale marinaresco o è un refuso e sta per boom. Le vele addizionali sono dispiegate con il bel tempo e il vento favorevole per prendere la massima velocità. E tuttavia con il cattivo tempo vengono ammainate perchè c’è il rischio che siano strappate via. La frase vuole dire i marinai preferiscono far garrire tutte le vele anche con il rischio di danneggiarle pur di arrivare prima a Maui!

strofa aggiuntiva V (in Stan Hugill)
And now we’re anchored in the bay
with the Kanaka’s(5) all around
With chants and soft aloha ois(oes),
they greet us homeward bound;
And now ashore we’ll have some fun,
we’ll paint them beaches red(6);
Awaken in the arms of an island maid
with a big fat aching head(7).

(Traduzione italiano):
adesso siamo all’ancora alla baia
con le hawaiane(5) tutt’intorno,
con canti e dolci “aloha”
che salutano il nostro ritorno a casa;
e ora a terra ci divertiremo
tingeremo le loro spiagge di rosso(6), risvegliandoci fra le braccia di una fanciulla nativa
con un grande fottuto mal di testa(7)

5) “kanakas” — kanaka is the Hawaiian word for man, or person, or human being. Another word for man is “kane”, which is specifically male, as opposed to “wahine”, woman più in generale indica gli “Hawaiian.”
6) si riferisce al sangue delle balene, oggi l’isola di Maui è il punto di partenza da dicembre a maggio per il “whale waching” quando le megattere migrano verso le acque calde hawaiane per accoppiarsi e partorire. ” Be Aware Whale ” è il motto del Pacific Whale Foundation che ogni anno organizza la giornata mondiale delle balene per festeggiare il ritorno delle balene nell’isola. Se proprio non potete fare a meno di visitare l’isola un ottimo vademecum di Mattia Pedrani qui
7) noto effetto postumo di una colossale sbornia

APPROFONDIMENTO
Jack Tar nelle sea shanty
The Bonny Ship The Diamond

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/rollingdowntooldmaui.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/maui.htm http://www.jsward.com/shanty/old_maui.html http://www.8notes.com/scores/5512.asp
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=33324
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94585