Archivi tag: The Lochies

Outlander: Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch

Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber

“Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch” (In the Heather’s My Bed) is a Jacobite song dating back to 1747, attributed to Dougal Roy Cameron. This is the song that Jamie and Laoghaire first danced to after meeting again at Lallybroch at the Hogmanay party (V, chapter 37) 

Clan Cameron of Lochiel, old motto was: Mo Righ ‘s Mo Dhuchaich (For King and Country)

The story linked to the song is extremely compelling: Dougal Roy Cameron (MacGillonie / MacOllonie) (or Dughall Ruadh Camaran) was a soldier in the Donald Cameron regiment of Lochiel, taken prisoner in the battle of Culloden (or in some conflict just before) and then released on July 15th 1747.
Shortly before the capture he learned of the death of his brother, executed by order of a ruthless officer named Grant of Knockando, while he was about to give up with his crew. Some Cameron, who had witnessed the execution closely, assured that the officer was wearing a blue coat and riding a white horse. Upon his release, Dougal went in search of that officer to kill him and found him near the Loch Arkaig, but he killed Munro of Culchairn wearing the same jacket. This is why our outlaw spends the sleepless nights, hidden in some dark and damp ravine in the gorges, regretting not having succeeded in trying to avenge his brother’s blood.
The personal story of the warrior intertwines the disappointment of the bitter defeat of the Jacobite cause (attributed by the changings some of the major clan leaders) and the hope of a triumphal return of Prince Charlie.

The Lochies (full version here)


I
Tha mo leabaidh ‘san fhraoch
Fo shileadh nan craobh,
‘S ged tha mi ‘sa choille
Cha do thoill mi na taoid.
II
Tha mo leab’ air an làr
‘S tha mo bhreacan gun sgàil,
‘S cha d’fhuair mi lochd cadail
O’n a spaid mi Cùl Chàirn.
III
Tha mo dhùil ann an Dia
Ged a dhìobradh Loch Iall,
Fhaicinn fhathast na chòirneal
An Inbhir Lòchaidh seo shìos.
IV
Bha thu dìleas do’n Phrionns’
Is d’a shinnsre o thùs,
‘S ged nach tug thu dha t’fhacal
Bha thu ceart air a chùl.
V
Cha b’ionnan ‘s MacLeòid
A tha ‘n-dràsd’ aig Rìgh Deòrs’,
Na fhògarrach soilleir
Fo choibhreadh ‘n dà chleòc.
VI
Cha b’ionnan ‘s an laoch
O Cheapaich nan craobh
Chaidh e sìos le chuid ghaisgeach,
‘S nach robh tais air an raon.
VII
Ach nuair a thig am Prionns’ òg
Is na Frangaich ‘ga chòir,
Théid sgapadh gun taing
Ann an campa Rìgh Deòrs’.
VIII
‘S ged tha mis’ ann am fròig
Tha am botal ‘nam dhorn,
‘S gun òl mi ‘s chan àicheadh
Deoch-slàint a’ Phrionns’ òg.
English version*
I
In the heather ‘s my bed
‘Neath the dew-laden trees,
And though I’m in the green-wood
I deserved not the ropes.
II
My bed’s on the ground
And uncovered’s my plaid (1),
Sleep has not come upon me
Since I murdered Culchairn (2).
III
My hope rests in God,
Though Lochiel (3) has gone,
I’ll yet see him a colonel
In Inverlochy (4) down here.
IV
Thou wast true to the Prince
And his race, from the first,
Though thou hadst never promised
Thou didst give him true aid.
V
Not so did MacLeod (5),
Who is now for King George,
A manifest outcast
‘Neath the shade of two cloaks (6).
VI
Not so the warrior brave
From Keppoch of the trees (7),
Who charged down with his heroes,
Unafraid on the field.
VII
But when comes the young Prince (8)
With the Frenchmen to aid,
Unthanked will be scattered
The camp of King George.
VIII
And though I’m in a den (9),
There’s a glass in my hand,
And I’ll drink, and refuse not,
A health to Prince Charles.

NOTES
* John Lorne Campbell in “Highland Songs of the ’45” (1932)
1) the highlander kilt (in Gaelic philabeg) was a long blanket (plaid)
2) Captain Murno of Culcairn
3) Donald Cameron of Lochiel (c.1700 – October 1748) or “Gentle Lochiel” for his acts of magnanimity towards prisoners was among the most influential chieftains traditionally loyal to the Stuart House.
4) Fort William was built to control the Highland clans
5) McLeod of McLeod promised his support to the Prince, his defection weighed heavily on the failure of the uprising.
6) In the Middle Ages the feudal service  was symbolically given “under his cloak”, and bride was wearing the mantle of her future husband during the celebration of the Marriage, as a sign of submission
7) Alexander McDonald of Keppoch died at the head of his clan in Culloden while the rest of the McDonalds folded
8) Bonny Charlie will never return to Scotland see
9) After Culloden many warriors took refuge in caves and dens to escape the raids of British troops: the Highlands were militarized and kept under strict English control.

see more

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/war-songs-anti-war-songs/you-jacobites-by-name/
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Cameron
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hamoleab.htm

Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch

Stemma del clan Cameron di Lochiel, il motto originario era: Mo Righ ‘s Mo Dhuchaich (For King and Country)

Read the post in English

“Tha Mo Leabaidh ‘san Fhraoch” (In the Heather’s My Bed) è un canto giacobita risalente al 1747 attribuito ad un guerriero highlander sostenitore della causa giacobita tale Dougal Roy Cameron.
La storia legata alla canzone è oltremodo avvincente: Dougal Roy Cameron (MacGillonie/MacOllonie) (oppure Dughall Ruadh Camaran) era un soldato nel reggimento di Donald Cameron di Lochiel, preso prigioniero nella battaglia di Culloden (o in qualche conflitto appena precedente) e poi liberato il 15 luglio 1747.
Poco prima della cattura aveva appreso della morte del fratello, giustiziato per ordine di uno spietato ufficiale di nome Grant di Knockando, mentre era in procinto di arrendersi insieme ai suoi comagni. Alcuni Cameron, che avevano assistito da vicino all’esecuzione, assicurarono che il capo plotone era un ufficiale che indossava una redingote blu e cavalcava un cavallo bianco. Al suo rilascio Dougal andò alla ricerca di quell’ufficiale per ucciderlo e lo trovò nei pressi del Loch Arkaig, ma ci fu uno scambio di persona  e uccise Munro di Culchairn che indossava la stessa giubba. Ecco perchè il nostro fuorilegge trascorre le notti insonni, nascosto in qualche buio e umido anfratto tra le forre, pentendosi di non essere riuscito nell’intento di vendicare il sangue del fratello .
Alla storia personale del guerriero s’intreccia la delusione per l’amara sconfitta della causa giacobita (attribuita come da copione al volta faccia di alcuni tra i maggiori capi clan) e la speranza di un ritorno trionfale del Bel Carletto.

ASCOLTA The Lochies riassumono il testo in otto strofe, per la versione integrale qui

I
Tha mo leabaidh ‘san fhraoch
Fo shileadh nan craobh,
‘S ged tha mi ‘sa choille
Cha do thoill mi na taoid.
II
Tha mo leab’ air an làr
‘S tha mo bhreacan gun sgàil,
‘S cha d’fhuair mi lochd cadail
O’n a spaid mi Cùl Chàirn.
III
Tha mo dhùil ann an Dia
Ged a dhìobradh Loch Iall,
Fhaicinn fhathast na chòirneal
An Inbhir Lòchaidh seo shìos.
IV
Bha thu dìleas do’n Phrionns’
Is d’a shinnsre o thùs,
‘S ged nach tug thu dha t’fhacal
Bha thu ceart air a chùl.
V
Cha b’ionnan ‘s MacLeòid
A tha ‘n-dràsd’ aig Rìgh Deòrs’,
Na fhògarrach soilleir
Fo choibhreadh ‘n dà chleòc.
VI
Cha b’ionnan ‘s an laoch
O Cheapaich nan craobh
Chaidh e sìos le chuid ghaisgeach,
‘S nach robh tais air an raon.
VII
Ach nuair a thig am Prionns’ òg
Is na Frangaich ‘ga chòir,
Théid sgapadh gun taing
Ann an campa Rìgh Deòrs’.
VIII
‘S ged tha mis’ ann am fròig
Tha am botal ‘nam dhorn,
‘S gun òl mi ‘s chan àicheadh
Deoch-slàint a’ Phrionns’ òg.
Traduzione inglese*
I
In the heather ‘s my bed
‘Neath the dew-laden trees,
And though I’m in the green-wood
I deserved not the ropes.
II
My bed’s on the ground
And uncovered’s my plaid,
Sleep has not come upon me
Since I murdered Culchairn.
III
My hope rests in God,
Though Lochiel has gone,
I’ll yet see him a colonel
In Inverlochy down here.
IV
Thou wast true to the Prince
And his race, from the first,
Though thou hadst never promised
Thou didst give him true aid.
V
Not so did MacLeod,
Who is now for King George,
A manifest outcast
‘Neath the shade of two cloaks.
VI
Not so the warrior brave
From Keppoch of the trees,
Who charged down with his heroes,
Unafraid on the field.
VII
But when comes the young Prince
With the Frenchmen to aid,
Unthanked will be scattered
The camp of King George.
VIII
And though I’m in a den,
There’s a glass in my hand,
And I’ll drink, and refuse not,
A health to Prince Charles.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
L’edera è il mio giaciglio
sotto gli alberi carichi di rugiada
e sono (nascosto) nel folto del bosco
perchè non meritavo l’impiccagione
II
Il mio giaciglio è la terra
e mi corpo con il mantello (1)
ma il sonno non viene
da quando ho ucciso Culchairn (2)
III
La mia speranza affido a Dio
anche se Lochiel (3) è partito
lo vedrò ancora colonnello
laggiù a Fort William (4).
IV
Tu eri un seguace del Principe
e alla sua causa, dal principio
e senza aver prestato giuramento,
gli desti il tuo aiuto sincero
V
Non così fece MacLeod (5),
che ora parteggia per Re Giorgio
un palese reietto
colui che serve due padroni (6)
VI
Non così il guerriero coraggioso
da Keppoch degli alberi (7)
che andò all’assalto con i suoi eroi
senza paura sul campo di battaglia
VII
Ma quando ritornerà il giovane Principe
aiutato dai Francesi (8)
in un amen sarà disperso
l’esercito (9) di Re Giorgio
VII
Anche in questo nascondiglio (10)
alzo il bicchiere
e non mi rifiuterò di bere
alla salute del Principe Carlo

NOTE
* John Lorne Campbell in “Highland Songs of the ’45” (1932)
1) è il pratico kilt del montanaro scozzese: Il vero kilt (in gaelico philabeg) è in effetti una lunga coperta (plaid) cioè un unico, lunghissimo, pezzo di stoffa (il tartan) delle dimensioni di 65-75 cm di altezza per una lunghezza di 5 metri circa, pieghettato e drappeggiato intorno ai fianchi e poi riportato sulle spalle come un mantello (che funzionava bene anche come grande tasca dove infilare gli oggetti da trasportare o le armi).  Era indubbiamente un capo pratico, senza troppe pretese di eleganza che teneva al caldo e al riparo, e perciò prevalentemente un abito “rustico”abbinato per lo più allo stivale ad altezza ginocchio (cuaron) ma più spesso portato a piede nudo (e dovevano avere dei fisici ben temprati questi scozzesi che se ne stavano al vento, pioggia e neve così conciati!) Ai rudi scozzesi di montagna  serviva come coperta per coprirsi durante il giorno e come giaciglio in cui dormire durante le notti passate nella brughiera. (continua)
2) il capitano Murno di Culcairn che aveva preso in prestito il mantello (o la giubba) di Grant
3) Donald Cameron di Lochiel (c.1700 – Ottobre 1748) soprannonimato semplicemente “Gentle Lochiel” per i suoi atti di magnanimità nei confronti  dei prigioneri,  fu tra i più influenti capoclan tradizionalmente fedele alla Casa Stuart. Si unì al Principe Carlo nel 1745 e dopo Culloden fuggì in Francia dove morì in esilio. La sua famiglia fu riabilitata e reintegrata nel titolo con l’amnistia del 1748.
4) Fort William a Inverlochy: uno dei forti che faceva parte della catena di fortificazioni (insieme a Fort Augustus e Fort George) utilizzata per tenere sotto controllo le possibili rivolte giacobite. E’ rimasto come presidio militare fino al 1855. Fort William è il centro più importante della Scozia, snodo ferroviario e stradale (qui si dipartono la West Highland Way e la Great Glen Way).
5) McLeod di McLeod ha promesso il suo sostegno al Principe per rimangiarsi la parola quando l’ha visto arrivare senza soldi e senza uomini. La sua defezione ha pesato pesantemente nel fallimento della rivolta.
6) Nel Medioevo il servizio feudale al proprio sire era tributato simbolicamente mettendosi “sotto al suo mantello”, così anche alla sposa durante la celebrazione del Matrimonio veniva appoggiato il mantello del futuro marito sulle spalle, in segno di sottomissione
7) Alexander McDonald di Keppoch morì alla testa del suo clan a Culloden mentre il resto dei McDonalds ripiegava
8) il Bel Carletto non ritornerà più in Scozia vedi
9) letterlamente l’accampamento
10) dopo Culloden molti guerrieri cercarono rifugio in grotte e anfratti per sfuggire ai rastrellamenti delle truppe inglesi:  nei mesi e anni successivi a Culloden fu caccia all’uomo per coloro che erano riusciti a fuggire dal campo della battaglia e per i loro sostenitori, anche le famiglie e i simpatizzanti vennero incarcerati e coloro che offrivano ospitalità ai fuggiaschi erano espropriati e processati per alto tradimento. Le Highlands furono militarizzate e tenute sotto stretto controllo inglese, senza parlare delle leggi volte a spezzare “l’highlander pride”

continua

APPROFONDIMENTO
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/war-songs-anti-war-songs/you-jacobites-by-name/

http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/

FONTI
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Cameron
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hamoleab.htm

MAIRI BHAN VERSUS MHAIRI BHAN OG

Canto nunziale dedicato a Mary McNiven scritto in gaelico scozzese nel 1934 da John Bannerman e successivamente riscritto in inglese da Sir Hugh Roberton (prima parte qui)

La versione in gaelico di John Bannerman non è riferita al matrimonio dal punto di vista degli invitati come nella variante in Inglese, bensì al colpo di fulmine che è piombato sul bel Johnny alla vista della bella Mary, vincitrice della gara canora più ambita del tempo il MOD nazionale: così egli ne ammira la bellezza e la soavità del canto e la vuole sposare.

ASCOLTA The Lochies

ORIGINALE IN GAELICO
I
Gaol mo chrìdh-sa Màiri   Bhàn,
Màiri bhòidheach, sgeul mo dhàin;
‘S i mo ghaol-sa Màiri Bhàn,
‘S tha mi ‘dol ga pòsadh.
II
Thuit mi ann an gaol a-raoir,
Tha mo chrìdh-sa shuas air beinn,
Màiri Bhàn rim’ thaobh a’seinn,
‘S tha mi ‘dol ga pòsadh.
III
Cuailean òir is suilean tlàth,
Mala chaol is gruaidh an àigh,
Beul as binne sheinneas dàn,
‘S tha mi ‘dol ga pòsadh.
IV
‘S ann aig ceilidh aig a’ Mhòd
Fhuair mi eòlas air an òigh —
‘S ise choisinn am bonn òir,
‘S tha mi ‘dol ga pòsadh.
V
Bidh mo ghaol do Màiri Bhàn
Dìleas, dùrachdach gu bràth;
Seinnidh sinn da chèil’ ar gràdh,
‘S tha mi ‘dol ga pòsadh.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
The love of my heart, fair-haired Mairi,
Beautiful Mairi, the story of my song;
She is my true love, fair-haired Mairi,
And I am going to marry her.
II
I fell in love last night,
My very heart is up on a mountain,
Fair-haired Mairi beside me, singing,
And I am going to marry her.
III
Golden locks and gentle eyes,
Narrow eyebrow and merry cheek,
Sweetest mouth to sing a song,
And I am going to marry her.
IV
It was at a ceilidh at the Mod
I became aware of the young woman
It was she that won the gold medal
And I am going to marry her.
V
My love for fair-haired Mairi will be
Faithful, sincere for ever;
Together we will sing our love,
And I am going to marry her.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
L’amore del mio cuore, Mary dai bei capelli
bella Mary, l’ispirazione della mia canzone, lei è il mio amore, Mary dai bei capelli e io la sposerò.
II
Mi sono innamorato la notte scorsa
e ora il mio cuore è in cima alla montagna, Mary dai bei capelli  che mi canta accanto e io la sposerò.
III
Riccioli d’oro e begli occhi sopracciglio fine e guancia sorridente,  la più dolce bocca per cantare e io la sposerò.
IV
Fu alla festa del Mod
che mi accorsi di una giovane donna
è stata lei a vincere la medaglia d’oro e io la sposerò.
V
Il mio amore per Mary dai bei capelli sarà fedele, sincero per sempre(1); insieme canteremo il nostro amore
e io la sposerò

NOTE
1) in realtà la storia non ebbe seguito e Mary convolò a nozze solo sei anni più tardi con il capitano di marina John Campbell di Glendale.

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE

Nel 1959  James B. Cosh di Glasgow ideò una danza sulla melodia di Mairi’s wedding. Benchè composta da poche figure risulta un po’ più complicata per i principianti e non è una danza che s’impara in due minuti.

(per lo schema vedi)

MHAIRI BHAN OG

macintyreNon so perché in alcuni siti Mhairi Bhan Og (Mary Young And Fair) viene considerato come il vecchio brano scozzese riarrangiato da John Bannerman per la versione di Mairi’s Wedding; tale riferimento può essere azzardato forse per la parte testuale, non certo per quella melodica, benchè il testo di Bannerman sia molto più essenziale e contingente al momento dell’incontro.

Si tratta invece di una slow air composta da Duncan Ban MacIntyre (1724-1812) come regalo di nozze per la moglie.

Soprannominato il Bello (Bàn – bhàn) per la sua particolare avvenenza anche in tarda età, fu considerato l’ultimo dei bardi gaelici del 1700. Donnchadh Mac an t-Saoir era la sua denominazione in gaelico scozzese ossia Duncan figlio del Carpentiere, ovvero il clan MacIntyre stanziatosi in Scozia nel XIV secolo.
Duncan era un illetterato e non sapeva scrivere, ma conosceva bene le opere di Alexander MacDonald il grande poeta della generazione precedente. Riuscì a pubblicare (ricorrendo alla dettatura) un libro dal titolo “The Gaelic songs of Duncan MacIntyre” in una prima edizione stampata ad Edimburgo nel 1790

Soprannominato anche “il bardo cacciatore di Glen Orchy” (ovvero la località in cui nacque nell’Argyllshire) ebbe una vita avventurosa e finì in prigione per aver scritto la canzone contro i pantaloni (che gli scozzesi dovevano indossare al posto del gonnellino dopo la sconfitta di Culloden)

La versione modale si trova nella collezione di Patrick MacDonald “A collection of Highland Vocal Airs” pubblicata nel 1783, spartito e testo anche in “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript” (Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 di Elizabeth Jane Ross) vedi pdf

Il brano ha un andamento sognante e dolce, ed è eseguito ai nostri tempi per lo più in versione strumentale, sia per arpa (o chitarra) che per violino, ma anche cornamusa o flauto. Spesso per formazioni in duo o in terzetto.

ASCOLTA James Graham, l’arrangiamento strumentale è essenziale in una venatura più malinconica o nostalgica: Mhairi Bhan Og ovvero Òran d’a Chèile Nuadh-Poste‘ (Song To His Newly Wedded Wife) tratta da “The Gaelic songs of Duncan MacIntyre” di George Calder 1921. La versione integrale è di 136 versi ma ridotta in poche strofe

ASCOLTA  Alyth McCormack (strofe I, II, I)


ORIGINALE IN GAELICO SCOZZESE*  ( vedi testo)
I
A Mhàiri bhàn òg ‘s tu ‘n òigh th’air m’aire,
Ri m’bheò bhith far am bithinn fhéin,
On fhuair mi ort còir cho mór ‘s bu mhath leam
Le pòsadh ceangailt’ o’n chléir,
Le cùmhnanta teann ‘s le banntaibh daingean,
‘S le snaidhm a dh’fhanas, nach tréig:
S e t’fhaotainn air làimh le gràdh gach caraid
Rinn slàinte mhaireann am’ chré.
II
Chaidh mi do’n choill an robh croinn is gallain,
bu bhoisgeil sealladh mu’n cuairt,
‘s bha miann mo shùl do dh’fhiùran barraicht’
an dlùthas nam meanganan suas;
gueg fo bhlàth o barr gu talamh,
a lùb mi farasda nuas;
bu duilich do chàch gu bràth a gearradh
‘s e ‘n dàn domh ‘m faillean a bhuain
III
Dheanaiun duit ceann, is crann, is t-earrach,
an am chur ghearran an éill;
is dheanainn mar chàch air tràigh na mara
chur àird air mealladh an éisg:
mharbhainn duit geòidh is ròin, is eala,
‘s na h-eòin air bharra nan geug;
‘s cha bhi thu ri d’ bheò gun seòl air aran,
‘s mi chòmhnuidh far am bi féidh
IV
Na’m faighinn an dràsd’ do chàradh daingean
an àite falaicht’ o’n eug;
ged thigeadh e ‘d dhàil, is m’ fhàgail falamh
cha b’ àill leam bean eil’ ad dhéidh;
cha toir mi gu bràth dhuit dranndan teallaich,
mu’n àrdaich aileag do chléibh,
ach rogha gach mànrain, gràdh, is furan,
cho blàth ‘s a b’urrainn mo bheul.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
O fair young Mary, you’re the maid that I mean to have in my life wherever I am
since I obtained my right to you, strong and sure, with marriage ties from the clergy,
with firm concracts and secure bonds, and with a knot that will remain and not be forsaken:
obtaining your hand, with your family’s blessing, give me health for life until the grave
II
I went to the wood where trees and saplings
were a radiant sigh all around.
and my eye desired an excellent sapling
enclosed in the branches above:
a bough in blossom from its tip to the ground,
which I bent gently down towards me
It would be hard for another ever to cut it,
when it was destined for me this sapling to pluck
III
Your goodman I’d be, I’d plow, sow for you, sure,
at time to put colts into leash;
and I’d more do for you, like all else on the sea-shore,
set means for deceiving the fish:
I’d kill geese for you, the swan and the seal,
and the birds on the tops of the boughs; while you lives you’ll never be without means for a meal, and me living where red-deer will browes.
IV
If I could now place you a safely in a place hidden from death
if it came near you, leaving me forsaken
I would want to other woman after you:
I will never offer you fireside bickering or heaving and sobbing in your breast,
but the finest of wooing, love and caressing,
as warm as my lips can manage
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
O bella e giovane Mary, tu sei la fanciulla che voglio avere nella mia vita ovunque sia,
perchè ho ottenuto il mio diritto su di te, forte e certo, con il matrimonio consacrato dal prete
con solenni giuramenti e stretti legami, con un nodo che durerà e non sarà sciolto:
ottenere la tua mano, con il consenso dei tuoi genitori
mi darà forza fino alla tomba.
II
Al bosco andai dove gli alberi e arbusti
facevano un bello sfondo
e guardai con brama al germoglio più bello
che cresceva sugli alti rami.
un ramo fiorito da cima
a fondo,
che gentilmente curvai verso di me,
sarebbe stato arduo per un altro tagliarlo
quando era destinato a me  il cogliere tale fuscello.
III
Per il tuo bene arerei, seminerei per te certamente
al momento di mettere i puledri nel recinto, e farei di tutto per te, come chiunque altro sulla spiaggia preparerei gli attrezzi per ingannare i pesci; ucciderei le anatre per te, il cigno e la foca,
e gli uccelli sulla cima dei rami; finchè vivrai
non ti mancheranno mai mezzi di sostentamento
vivendo dove il cervo s’inerpica.
IV
Se potessi metterti al sicuro in un posto protetto dalla morte,
e se si avvicinasse a te, lasciandomi abbandonato,
nessuna altra moglie dopo di te abbraccerò;
non ti offrirò mai gli alterchi del focolare
o ansimi e singhiozzi in petto
ma l’amore romantico e le carezze tanto calde come i baci della mia bocca.

NOTE
* si riportano solo i versi cantati

 

ASCOLTA  versione integrale (tratto da http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk un archivio poderoso raccolto in tutta la Scozia a partire dal 1930)

Ascoltiamo la melodia con l’arpa bardica nell’arrangiamento di Vicente La Camera

FONTI
http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poetry/poets/alasdair-mac-mhaighstir-alasdair
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6412
https://thesession.org/tunes/3878