Our Goodman: Seven Drunken Nights

Our Goodman, The Goodman, The Gudeman, The Traveler

American version
Four (Three) Nights Drunk, Four (Five) Drunken Nights,
Old Cuckold, Cabbage Head 
Drunkard’s Special

Seven Drunken nights (irish version)
Peigín agus Peadar (irish gaelic version)

Le repliche di Marion (italian version)

“Seven Drunken nights” is a comic traditional ballad of the British Isles (and spread throughout Europe and America) made famous in the 60s by the Irish group The Dubliners: the protagonist every evening comes back from the pub very late and notices a series of clues, scattered around the house, that lead him to suspect a betrayal by his wife, but the latter, taking advantage of her husband’s lack of lucidity, always manages to get by.
“Seven Drunken nights” (in italiano “Sette notti da ubriaco”) è una divertentissima ballata tradizionale delle Isole Britanniche (e diffusa un po’ in tutta Europa e in America) resa famosissima negli anni 60 dal gruppo irlandese The Dubliners: il protagonista ogni sera rientra dal pub molto tardi e nota una serie di indizi, sparsi per la casa, che lo inducono a sospettare un tradimento da parte della moglie, ma quest’ultima, approfittando della scarsa lucidità del marito, riesce sempre a cavarsela.

1967_7drunken_mmIt was 1967 when for St. Patrick the single disc called “Seven drunken nights” was released, the Dubliners have limited themselves to singing only the five nights of the week (and nowadays we are smiling), yet in those days the song was banned by official radios, it was radio Caroline, which broadcast from a “pirate” ship anchored off the coast of Ireland, to pass it continuously in its programs. And it was a success.
Era il 1967 quando per San Patrizio uscì il disco singolo intitolato “Seven drunken nights”, i Dubliners si sono limitati a cantare solo le cinque notti della settimana (e al giorno d’oggi ci viene da sorridere), eppure a quei tempi la canzone venne messa al bando dalle radio ufficiali, fu radio Caroline, che trasmetteva da una nave “pirata” ancorata al largo d’Irlanda, a passarla in continuazione nei propri programmi. E fu il successo..

Des Geraghty’s memoir of Luke Kelly (1994): The song which made The Dubliners famous was Seven Drunken Nights, an English version of a light-hearted Irish song that the group had picked up from Seosamh O hEanai [Joe Heaney] long before in O’Donoghue’s pub. It was released as a single on St Patrick’s Day 1967 and promptly banned on RTE as offensive to public decency. Sometime later Seosamh himself gave a straight-faced interview to an evening paper stating that the song was about an Irishman who’d worked away from home for twenty years – a commonplace situation for men from rural Ireland in those years – and returned to find he had a full-grown son. And who are we to differ? In fact, the tongue-in-cheek way in which the song is composed […] is typical of a sly ambiguity in many Irish songs about sex. Intrigue was added to the incident by the fact that the song actually mentions only five nights, and some play was made afterwards of speculation that the ‘missing’ verses might have been too shocking for even The Dubliners. What was true was that the song had been recorded by Seosamh himself in Irish years before and played on RTE without a murmur of protest; while the Irish establishment were conservative and puritanical in English, they were quite often indifferent to how irreverent and unorthodox our culture was in Irish. But […] Radio Caroline gave Seven Drunken Nights saturation airtime. The hypocrisy and the foolishness of RTE’s decision was too much for a generation already chafing under censorship and prudery, and within two days the record had sold 40,000 copies. It didn’t take long to reach the music industry’s Silver Disc status, the award for sales in excess of 250,000. The letters pages of the papers were inundated with letters of indignant protest at censorship; the British papers picked up on Ireland’s banned song, and not long afterwards, Seven Drunken Nights reached Number Five in the British pop charts. (from here)
“La canzone che rese famosi i Dubliners fu Seven Drunken Nights, la versione inglese di una comica canzone irlandese che il gruppo aveva preso da Seosamh O hEanai [Joe Heaney] molto prima al O’Donoghue’s pub. È stata pubblicata come singolo il giorno di San Patrizio del 1967 e prontamente bandita su RTE come offensiva contro la pubblica decenza. Qualche tempo dopo Seosamh stesso rilasciò un’intervista diretta a un giornale serale in cui affermava che la canzone parlava di un irlandese che aveva lavorato lontano da casa per vent’anni – una situazione comune per gli uomini dall’Irlanda rurale in quegli anni – e al ritorno scoprì di avere un figlio adulto. E chi siamo noi per dissentire? In effetti, il modo ironico in cui è composta la canzone […] ha quella tipica ambiguità allusiva di molte canzoni irlandesi sul sesso. L’intrigo è stato aggiunto all’episodio dal fatto che la canzone menziona in realtà solo cinque notti, e in seguito è stato fatto un teatrino di speculazioni sul fatto che i versi “mancanti” avrebbero potuto essere troppo scioccanti anche per i Dubliners. Ciò che era vero era che la canzone era stata registrata dallo stesso Seosamh in Irlanda anni prima e suonata su RTE senza un mormorio di protesta; mentre l’establishment irlandese era conservatore e puritano in inglese, era spesso indifferente a quanto irriverente e non ortodossa la nostra cultura fosse in irlandese. Ma […] Radio Caroline ha trasmesso Seven Drunken Nights in continuazione. L’ipocrisia e la follia della decisione di RTE erano troppo per una generazione già irritata dalla censura e pudicizia, e in due giorni il disco aveva venduto 40.000 copie. Non ci volle molto per raggiungere lo status di Silver Disc dell’industria musicale, il premio per le vendite di oltre 250.000 copie. Le pagine delle lettere dei giornali erano inondate da lettere di protesta indignata verso la censura; i giornali britannici ripresero la canzone bandita dall’Irlanda e, non molto tempo dopo, Seven Drunken Nights raggiunse il numero cinque nelle classifiche pop britanniche.”

Joe Heaney 

Band member Ronnie Drew described his close friendship with Joe in an interview with Joe’s biographer, Liam Mac Con Iomaire: ‘I first met him as Joe Heaney in O’Donoghue’s, because we were going in and out of O’Donoghue’s at the time…. This would be 1961-2. Joe actually stayed with me for a couple of years later on. Joe was no trouble as long as you had strong tea for him…. Joe had a magnificant sean-nós voice. He could do things with his mouth. He could bend notes. I thought he was a great exponent of sean-nós…. Then he gave me a song called “Seven Drunken Nights,” one of these songs that go all over the world. The funny thing about it, Joe had it in Irish as “Peigín is Peadar”, and when he gave it to me he had a kind of a laugh up his sleeve, because Radio Éireann banned it. But Joe had previously sung it on some programme in Irish and got away with it. In fact we thought “Seven Drunken Nights” was just a whimsical song.’ (Liam Mac Con Iomaire, Seosamh Ó hÉanaí: Nár fhágha mé bás choíche, Cló Iar-Chonnachta (2007), 212-13. (from here)
Il membro della band Ronnie Drew ha descritto la sua stretta amicizia con Joe in un’intervista al biografo di Joe, Liam Mac Con Iomaire: ‘L’ho incontrato per la prima volta come Joe Heaney al O’Donoghue, perché all’epoca stavamo entrando e uscendo dal O’Donoghue … . Era il 1961-2 [(quando un paio di amici suonavano per divertirsi e si chiamavano The Ronnie Drew Ballad Group)]. Joe rimase effettivamente con me per un paio d’anni dopo. Joe non aveva mai problemi fintanto che avevi del tè forte per lui … Joe aveva una magnifica voce da sean-nós [vecchio-stile]. Riusciva a fare le cose con la bocca. Poteva tendere le note. Credevo fosse un grande esponente del sean-nós…. Poi mi ha dato una canzone chiamata “Seven Drunken Nights”, una di quelle canzoni che girano il mondo. La cosa divertente a riguardo è che Joe l’aveva in irlandese come “Peigín is Peadar”, e quando me la diede sorrise sotto i baffi, perché Radio Éireann la vietò. Ma Joe l’aveva già cantata in qualche programma in irlandese e se l’era cavata. In realtà pensavamo che “Seven Drunken Nights” fosse solo una canzone stravagante. “

The comicity reaches its climax on Friday when the protagonist sees a head in the bed, next to his wife. However, the woman reproaches her husband for being so drunk that he does not even notice that the one next to her is not a man but a child sent to her by her mother. The strange thing, however, is that the “child” has a mustache!
In the question and answer between the two emerges the phlegm of the man, who although completely drunk, is calm and rational and tries to use logic to explain the obvious inaccuracies that are seen in his house. Instead, the woman verbally assaults him and manipulates the “confused” perception of him due to drunkenness by lying to the last.
So? Never trust a woman, especially if you are drunk!
La comicità raggiunge il culmine di venerdì quando il protagonista vede nel letto, accanto alla moglie, una testa. Tuttavia la donna, rimprovera al marito di essere talmente sbronzo, da non accorgersi neppure che quello accanto a lei non è un uomo, bensì un bambino inviatole dalla madre. La cosa strana però è che il “bambino” ha i baffi!
Nel botta e risposta tra i due emerge la flemma dell’uomo, che pur completamente ubriaco, è calmo e razionale e cerca di usare la logica per spiegare le palesi inesattezze che si vedono nella sua casa. La donna invece lo aggredisce verbalmente e manipola la percezione “confusa” di lui dovuta all’ubriachezza mentendo fino all’ultimo.
E allora? Mai fidarsi di una donna, soprattutto da ubriachi!

The Dubliners with the cartoon of Francesco Guidotto and Ronnie Drew as model
con i disegni di Francesco Guidotto e Ronnie Drew preso come modello


I
As I went home on a Monday night,
as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a horse outside the door
where my ould (1) horse should be,
Well I called my wife and I said to her,
Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns that horse outside the door
where my ould horse should be?
II
Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk
you silly ould fool, and still you cannot see,
That’s a lovely sow
that me mother sent to me,
Well it’s many a day I travelled
a hundred miles or more,
But a saddle on a sow
sure I never saw before.
III
And as I went home on a Tuesday night,
as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a coat behind the door
where my ould coat should be,
Well I called my wife and I said to her,
Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns the coat behind the door
where my ould coat should be?
IV
Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk
you silly ould fool, and still you cannot see,
That’s a woollen blanket that me mother sent to me,
Well it’s many a day I travelled
a hundred miles or more,
But buttons on a blanket sure I never saw before.
V
And as I went home on a Wednesday night,
as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a pipe upon the chair
where my ould pipe should be,
Well I called my wife and said to her,
Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns the pipe upon the chair
where my ould pipe should be?
VI
Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk
you silly ould fool, and still you cannot see,
That’s a lovely tea whistle (2) that me mother sent to me,
Well it’s many a day I travelled
a hundred miles or more,
But tobacco in a tin whistle sure I never saw before.
VII
As I came home on a Thursday night,
as drunk as drunk can be,
I saw two boots beneath the bed
where my ould boots should be,
Well I called my wife and I said to her,
Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns them boots beneath the bed
where my ould boots should be?
VIII
Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk
you silly ould fool, and still you cannot see,
They’re two lovely geranium pots me mother sent to me,
Well it’s many a day I travelled
a hundred miles or more,
But laces in geranium pots I never saw before.
IX
And as I went home on a Friday night,
as drunk as drunk could be,
I saw a head upon the bed
where my ould head should be,
Well I called me wife and I said to her,
Will you kindly tell to me,
Who owns that head with you in the bed, Where my ould head should be?
X
Ah, you’re drunk, you’re drunk
you silly ould fool, and still you cannot see,
That’s a baby boy that me mother sent to me,
Well it’s many a day I travelled
a hundred miles or more,
But a baby boy with his whiskers on sure I never saw before.
XI
As I went home on Saturday night
as drunk as drunk could be
I saw two hands upon her breasts
Where me two hands should be
Well I called my wife and I said to her
Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that hands upon your breasts
Were me two hands should be
XII
Oh you’re drunk you’re drunk
you silly old fool still you cannot see
That’s a lovely night gown that me mother sent to me
Well it’s many a day I travelled
A hundred miles and more
But fingers in a night gown sure I never saw before
XIII
As I went home on Sunday night
As drunk as drunk could be
I saw a thing in her thing
Where me old thing should be
Well I called my wife and I said to her
Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that thing in your thing
Where me old thing should be
XIV
Oh you’re drunk you’re drunk
you silly old fool still you cannot see
That’s that lovely tin whistle (3) that me mother sent to me
Well it’s many a day I travelled
A hundred miles and more
But hair on the tin whistle sure I never saw before!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
E quando tornai a casa un lunedì notte,
ubriaco che più ubriaco non si poteva,
vidi un vecchio cavallo
fuori dalla porta
al posto del mio,
allora chiamai mia moglie e le dissi:
“Vorresti gentilmente dirmi
di chi è quel cavallo fuori dalla porta,
dove dovrebbe esserci il mio vecchio cavallo?”
II
“Ah, sei ubriaco, sei ubriaco
tu, vecchio sciocco e non riesci proprio a vedere,
quella è una graziosa scrofa
che mi ha mandato mia madre”
“Beh, è tanto tempo che viaggio
e ho fatto tanta strada,
ma una sella su un maiale,
certo, non l’avevo mai vista prima”.
La canzone prosegue con una serie di strofe quasi identiche tra loro nelle quali cambiano gli “indizi” del sempre più probabile tradimento della moglie (il motivo? il marito rincasa tutte le sere molto tardi e molto ubriaco!!)
Così il martedì il marito trova un cappotto dietro alla porta, e alla richiesta di spiegazioni la moglie risponde che è solo una coperta che le ha regalato la madre
E l’uomo perplesso, si chiede se sulle coperte ci siano i bottoni!
Il mercoledì trova una pipa sulla sedia, ma la moglie lo convince che si tratta di una teiera fumante, eppure lui non aveva mai visto prima del tabacco nella teiera!
Il giovedì ecco comparire degli stivali accanto al letto, ma la moglie dice che è il vaso di gerani regalatole dalla madre, eppure il marito sempre più perplesso è convinto di non aver mai visto prima dei lacci su di un vaso di gerani!
IX
E quando tornai a casa un venerdì notte,
ubriaco che più ubriaco non si poteva,
vidi una testa dentro al letto al posto della mia, allora chiamai mia moglie e le dissi:
“Vorresti gentilmente dirmi di chi è quella testa nel letto con te dove dovrebbe esserci la mia?”
X
“Ah, sei ubriaco, sei ubriaco
vecchio sciocco e non riesci proprio a vedere,
è un bambino che mi ha mandato mia madre” “Beh, è tanto tempo che viaggio
e ho fatto tanta strada,
ma un bambino con i baffi,
certo, non l’avevo mai vista prima”.

Le ultime due notti diventano esplicite anche perchè la donna è sorpresa in flagranza di reato, la scena si è progressivamente spostata dall’esterno alla varie stanze della casa e fino alla camera da letto finchè sabato notte due mani spuntano sul seno della donna (evidentemente nuda) che prontamente dice trattarsi di una graziosa camicia da notte (e il marito osserva che non ha mai visto una camicia da notte con le dita) e infine domenica il marito vede chiaramente “un coso” nella “cosa” della moglie e lei risponde che è un flauto, eppure il marito è certo di non aver mai visto peli su un flauto di latta!

NOTE
1) ould, forma arcaica e dialettale di old “vecchio”
2) Ronny dice “tea whistle” facendo un po’ fatica a far entrare la parola nella metrica
3) l’ultima notte la storia diventa sempre più esplicita: in altre versioni al posto dello strumento troviamo una candela o una carota, e si equivoca sui testicoli o sulla cappella paragonandoli a vari ortaggi o attrezzi da lavoro..

Celtic Thunder 

The Kilkennys 1998
the singer (Davey Cashin) plays the protagonist as gradually more and more drunk (.. and perplexed !!); even the rhythm of the guitar becomes more uncertain as the nights go by
chi canta (Davey Cashin) interpreta in modo esilarante il protagonista via via sempre più ubriaco (.. e perplesso!!); anche il ritmo della chitarra si fa più incerto man mano che passano le notti

Although the title nights are seven those sung in the “standard” version are only five, from Monday to Friday, the folk collectors are affected by the “modesty” and chose not to report completely what was hearded, but something was leaked ..
Sebbene le sere del titolo siano sette quelle cantate nella versione “standard” sono solo cinque dal lunedì al venerdì, le raccolte sul campo della ballata risentono del “pudore” dei trascrittori i quali sceglievano di non riportare integralmente quanto veniva testimoniato, ma qualcosa è trapelato ..

Nine Fine Irishmen 

LINK
http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=1033 http://itsthedubliners.com/dubs_d03_mm_45.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7291 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=43124 https://www.celticthunder.ie/content/mythology-seven-drunken-nights

(Cattia Salto integrazione febbraio 2013, maggio 2015, revisione agosto 2019)

Lascia un commento

Il tuo indirizzo email non sarà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *

Questo sito usa Akismet per ridurre lo spam. Scopri come i tuoi dati vengono elaborati.