Archivi tag: irish drinking song

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

MALONEY WANTS A DRINK

songbook_2ndMaloney wants a drink è una drinking song da manuale scritta da Dominic Behan, in cui il nostro Paddy se fosse vissuto nel tempo biblico, avrebbe sedotto Eva, per poi abbandonarla … e andare in cerca di un altro “drink”. Anche la seducente Salomè con la sua danza del ventre non riesce ad abbindolare Maloney che, da navigato uomo di mare, lascia una donna in ogni porto..

Dominic Behan ha scritto parecchie canzoni, alcune diventate molto popolari, questa è stata registrata dai Dubliners nel loro album uscito subito dopo il famosissimo “Seven Drunken Nights”  (vedi) intitolato “A drop of the Hard Stuff” (in italiano “Un goccio di roba forte”): il titolo è significativo perchè oltre a canzoni da pub, ce n’erano alcune filo IRA in chiave umoristica ma anche “Anti-British stuff”! L’album raggiunse il 5° posto nella hit parade britannica seguito da More of the Hard Stuff che rimase nella Top Ten per circa sei mesi.

Scrive Philip Kay definendo i Dubliners dei “freeborn men” nel suo blog (qui – articolo che vi consiglio di leggere tutto) “It’s probably easy to dismiss it all now as “Irish drinking songs”, but the mixture was a carefully calculated one, of bawdy drinking songs, some of the best songs by important contemporary songwriters like Behan and MacColl, many of which had social commentary as intransigent as anything Bob Dylan ever wrote, several pro-Irish and anti-British songs, and the whole sweetened by some of the most stirring yet melodious dance music heard from any Irish group.

ASCOLTA The Dubliners in More of the Hard Stuff 1967


I
When Eve was in the garden,
Adam climbed an apple tree,
He went aloft up to the top,
to see what he could see.
He gazed in awe of what he saw,
fair made the poor man grieve.
For Patrick John Maloney stood there, whispering to Eve…
`Ah kiss me, love, and miss me, love
And dry your bitter tears.
My loving you`ll remember now
For many, many years.
Be happy love, be satisfied,
I left you in the pink(1).

There`s many a man that wants a bride.
Maloney wants a drink.`
II
Salome danced for Paddy,
taking off her seven veils.
Salome said “Maloney that’s a trick that never fails.”(2)
Malone put Salome`s own
clothing in a sack.(3)
`I`ll run along now to the pawn(4),
and bring your bottle(5) back.`
III
From London to Nebraska,
and from Glasgow to Hong Kong,
From Cardiff to Alaska,
from Peking to Saigon,
Wherever girls are lonely,
I know that in his role,
It`s there you`ll find Maloney,
a-waiting to console…
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Quando Eva era nel giardino dell’Eden, Adamo salì su un melo,
si arrampicò fino alla cima,
per vedere cosa gli riuscisse di vedere, ma ciò che vide lo impressionò,
il pover uomo era proprio afflitto, perchè Patrick John Maloney se ne stava lì, sussurrando a Eva
“Ah baciami, amore, ti mancherò, amore, asciuga le tue lacrime tristi.
Il mio amore tu ricorderai
per molti, molti anni.
Sii lieta amore, e contenta,
ti ho lasciato in rosa,
c’è più di un uomo che desidera una sposa, ma Maloney vuole un drink”.

II
Salomè danzò per Paddy,
togliendosi i suoi sette veli.
Salomè disse “Maloney questo è un trucco che non fallisce mai.”
Maloney mise il vestito di Salomè
in una sacca
“Farò la mia mossa
e ti riporterò la bottiglia.”
III
Da Londra al Nebraska
e da Glasgow a Hong Kong,
da Cardiff all’Alaska,
da Pechino a Saigon,
ovunque ci siano ragazze sole,
stanne certo,
lì troverai Maloney,
in attesa di consolarle..

NOTE
1) in the pink: il significato di “essere in rosa” è quello di stare bene, in salute, ma anche “su di giri” nel senso euforico di chi ha bevuto qualche drink
2) la frase in altre versioni è detta da Paddy, ma a mio avviso ha più senso se detta da Salomè
3) significa che Paddy fa i bagagli per andarsene; il termine “own” è scritto in vari modi
4) letteralmente ” Seguirò ora il pedone
5) scritto a volte come “bundle

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=47622
https://phillipkay.wordpress.com/2011/07/09/freeborn-men/
http://itsthedubliners.com/ref_song_1967_sb.htm

LOOK AT THE COFFIN: AN IRISH WAKE

irish-wakePossiamo considerare tutte le celebrazioni funebri una sorta di rituale per accertarsi che il morto non ritorni più a disturbare i vivi. Un tempo del resto non erano insoliti i casi di morte apparente e la veglia al cadavere era il modo migliore per essere certi dell’avvenuto trapasso.

C’era l’usanza comune in molte tradizioni di lasciare aperta la finestra o la porta della stanza per permettere all’anima di uscire (così le aperture dovevano essere richiuse dopo un paio d’ore in modo da impedirne il ritorno). Per agevolare il transito dell’anima si scioglievano tutti i nodi e si coprivano gli specchi (che potevano intrappolare l’anima nel proprio riflesso). Il cadavere doveva soprattutto essere vegliato: in Irlanda era sistemato su di una tavola in bella vista (nel soggiorno o comunque nella stanza migliore della casa) facendo in modo che un gruppo di visitatori fosse sempre pronto a circondare il cadavere per impedire agli spiriti maligni di avvicinarsi al corpo e prendere l’anima (lasciando però un passaggio libero nella direzione della finestra o della porta precedentemente lasciata aperta).
Il corpo dopo essere stato lavato e vestito con il vestito più bello (spesso coperto da un candido lino) era circondato dalle candele; si adottavano anche particolari accorgimenti: ad esempio mettere un pizzico di sale (antidoto verso il male) sul petto, legare gli alluci dei piedi tra loro (senza fare un nodo ovviamente) per evitare che potesse ritornare come fantasma. Venivano pagate delle prefiche per il lamento funebre (in irlandese “keenning“) che doveva iniziare solo dopo la preparazione della salma per evitare di invocare gli spiriti maligni.
Poteva così avere inizio la veglia vera e propria con cibo (dolci, panini rigorosamente tagliati a forma triangolare), bevute (particolarmente gradito il poteen e l’irish whiskey), fumatine con la pipa, musica e canti, danze e giochi. (vedi)

936-1366859006563
Al momento di andare al cimitero (o alla chiesa per il rito religioso) il cadavere era messo nella cassa da morto con gli oggetti che il defunto aveva con sé al momento della morte o con gli oggetti che aveva più cari per evitare che il suo spirito tornasse per cercarli. Al ritorno dal cimitero si finiva in un pub per trascorrere il resto del giorno per brindare molte e molte volte alla salute del morto!!!

A TRADITIONAL IRISH WAKE

(tratto da qui)
The most anxious thoughts of the Irish peasant through life revert to his death; and he will endure the extreme of poverty in order that he may scrape together the means of obtaining “a fine wake” and a “decent funeral.” He will, indeed, hoard for this purpose, though he will economise for no other; and it is by no means rare to find among a family clothed with rags, and living in entire wretchedness, a few untouched garments laid aside for the day of burial. It is not for himself only that he cares; his continual and engrossing desire is, that his friends may enjoy “full and plenty” at his wake; and however miserable his circumstances, “the neighbors” are sure to have a merry meeting and an abundant treat after he is dead. His first care is, as his end approaches, to obtain the consolations of his religion; his next, to arrange the order of the coming feast. To “die without the priest” is regarded as an awful calamity. We have more than once heard a dying man exclaim in piteous accents, mingled with moans – “Oh, for the Lord’s sake, keep the life in me till the priest comes!” In every serious case of illness the priest is called in without delay, and it is a duty which he never omits; the most urgent business, the most seductive pleasure, the severest weather, the most painful illness, will fail in tempting him to neglect the most solemn and imperative of all his obligations-the preparing a member of his flock to meet his Creator. When the Roman Catholic sacrament of extreme unction has been administered, death has lost its terrors- the sufferer usually dies with calmness, and even cheerfulness. He has still, however, some ef the anxieties of earth; and, unhappily, they are less given to the future destinies of his family, than to the ceremonies and preparations for his approaching wake.
The formalities commence almost immediately after life has ceased;. The corpse is at once laid out, and the wake begins: the priest having been first summoned to say mass for the repose of the departed soul, whicn he generally does in the apartment in which the body reposes! It is regarded by the friends of the deceased as a sacred duty to watch by the corpse until laid in the grave; and only less sacred is the duty of attending it thither.
The ceremonies differ somewhat in various districts, but only in a few minor and unimportant particulars. The body, decently laid out on a table or bed, is covered with white linen, and, not unfrequently, adorned with black ribbons, if an adult; white if the party be unmarried; and flower, if a child. Close by it, or upon it, are plates of tobacco and snuff; aiound it are lighted candles. Usually a quantity of salt is laid upon it also. The women of the household arrange themselves at either side, and the keen (caoinej) at once commences. They rise with one accord, and moving their bodies with a slow motion to and fro, their arms apart, they continue to keep up a heart-rending cry. This cry is interrupted for a while to give the ban cuointhc (the leading keener,) an opportunity of commencing. At the close of every stanza of the dirge, the cry is repeated, to fill up as it were, the pause, and then dropped; the woman then again proceeds with the dirge, and so on to the close. The only interruption which this manner of conducting a wake suffers, is from the entrance of some relative of the deceased, who, living remote, or from some other cause, may not have been in at the commencement. In this case, the ban caointhe ceases, all the women rise and begin the cry, which is continued until the new-cemsr has cried enough. During the pauses of the women’s wailing, the men, seated in groups by the fire, or in the corners of the room, are indulging in jokes, exchanging repartees, and bantering each other, some about their sweethearts, and some about their wives, or talking over the affairs of the day – prices and politics, priests and parsons, the all-engrossing subjects of Irish conversation.
A very accurate idea of an Irish wake may be gathered from a verse of a rude song, It is needless to observe that the merriment is in ill keeping with the solemnity of the death chamber, and that very disgraceful scenes are or rather were, of frequent occurrence; the whiskey being always abundant, and the men and women nothing loath to partake of it to intoxication.

The keener is usually paid for her services-the charge varying from a crown to a pound, according to the circumstances of the employer. The funerals are invariably attended by a numerous concourse; some from affection to the deceased: others, as a tribute of respect to a neighbor; and a large proportion, because time is of small value, and a day unemployed is not looked upon in the light of money lost. No invitations are ever issued. Among the upper classes, females seldom accompany the mourners to the grave; but among the peasantry the women always assemble largely.
The procession, unless the churchyard is very near, (which is seldom the case) consists mostly of equestrians-the women being mounted behind the men on pillions; but there are also a number of cars, of every variety. The wail rises and dies away, at intervals, like the fitful breeze.- On coming to a crossroad it is customary, in some places, for the followers to stop and offer up a prayer for the departed soul; and in passing through a town or village, they always make a circuit round the site of an ancient cross. In former times the scene at a wake was re-enacted with infinitely less decorum in the church-yard; and country funerals were often disgraced by riot and confusion. Itinerant venders of whiskey always mingled among the crowd, and found ready markets for their inflammatory merchandise. Party fights were consequently very common; persons were frequently set to guard the ground where it was expected an obnoxious individual was about to be interred; and it often happened that, after such conflicts, the vanquished party have returned to the grave, disinterred the body, and left it exposed on the highway. The horror against suicide is so great in Ireland, that it is by no means rare to find the body of a wretched man, who has been guilty of the crime, remaining for weeks without interment-parties having been set to watch every neighboring church yard to prevent its being deposited in that which they consider belongs peculiarly to them.
It is well known that if two funerals meet at the same churchyard, a contest immediately takes place to know which will enter first; and happily if, descrying each other at a distance, it is only a contest of speed; for it is often a eontest of strength, terminating in bloodshed and sometimes in Death.

Notes:
Salt has been considered by all nations as an emblem of friendship; and it was anciently offered to guests at an entertainment, as a pledge of welcome. The Irish words ” Caoin” and ” Cointhe” cannot easily be pronounced according to any mode of writing them in English. The best idea that can be given of the pronunciation, is to say that the word has a sound between that ol the English words ” Keen” and Queen.”
The wake lasted two to four days.

May17_12d

AIN’T IT GRAND TO BE BLOOMING WELL DEAD

E’ una canzone del music-hall inglese, cavallo di battaglia di Leslie Sarony grande performer tra il 1880 e il 1930. La canzone si sviluppa in due parti (parole e melodia di Leslie Sarony). Si ironizza dicendo che un bel funerale è una gioia per il morto

ASCOLTA Leslie Sarony 1932

Parte prima
I
Lately there’s nothing but trouble, grief and strife
There’s not much attraction about this bloomin’ life
Last night I dreamt I was bloomin’ well dead
As I went to the funeral, I bloomin’ well said:
Look at the flowers, bloomin’ great orchids
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
And look at the corfin, bloomin’ great ‘andles
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead
II
I was so ‘appy to think that I’d popped off
I said to a bloke with a nasty, ‘acking cough
Look at the black ‘earse, bloomin’ great ‘orses
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the bearers, all in their frock coats
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
And look at their top ‘ats, polished with Guiness
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
III
Some people there were praying for me soul
I said, ‘It’s the first time I’ve been off the dole’
Look at the mourners, bloomin’ well sozzled(1)
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!Look at the children, bloomin’ excited
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the neighbours, bloomin’ delighted
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
IV
‘Spend the insurance’, I murmered, ‘for alack
‘You know I shan’t be with you going back.’
Look at the Missus, bloomin’ well laughing
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!Look at me Sister, bloomin new ‘at on
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
And look at me Brother, bloomin’ cigar on
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
V
We come from clay and we all go back they say
Don’t ‘eave a brick it may be your Aunty May(2)
Look at me Grandma, bloomin’ great haybag(3)
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
Parte Seconda
OTHER VOICES: Where oh where has our Leslie gone?
Oh where oh where can he be?
He promised to be on the other side.
Ha-ha, ho-ho, hee-hee!LESLIE: I’ve got me eye on ya! You’re the blokes that told me to learn to play the bloomin’ ‘arp.
I ‘aven’t played a bloomin’ note since I’ve been ‘ere.
Look at the florists countin’ their profits.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the lawyers readin’ the will out.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!Taxes an’ rent I’ll ‘ave no need to pay.
I’ve dodged ‘em by bloomin’ well snuffin’ it. Hooray!
Look at the landlord, bloomin’ ol’ shylock!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the bulldog (arf!) bloomin’ well barkin’.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the tomcat (meow!) bloomin’ well flirtin’.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
People said ‘e was so good to the poor.
I said as I thought what they called me before:
Look at the sexton. Bloomin’ great shovel!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!

Look at me schoolmates bloomin’ well gigglin’!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the earthworms bloomin’ well wrigglin’!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
All my old Chinas(4) I saw them standin’ round.
I said as they slowly lowered me in the ground:
Look at the tombstones, granite with knobs on.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!

Now it’s all over. Look at them scarpering.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the weather bloomin’ well raining.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Then I awoke with a really shocking start.
I found me in bed with the missus of me ‘eart.
I got the milk in. Baby was screaming.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!

NOTE
1)”sozzled” — intoxicated, pickled, plastered, soused, canned, loaded, etc.
2) anche scritto ” Don’t aim a brick” mi sfugge il senso della frase
3) “hay-bag” — a mess, noisy or riotous
4) Chinas = China plates = mates

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
parte prima Ultimamente non ci sono che disordini, dolore e lotta e non c’è niente di interessante in questa fottuta vita, la notte scorsa ho sognato che ero belle morto e mentre andavo al funerale dicevo “guarda i fiori, fottute grosse orchidee, non è forte essere morti stecchiti! Guardate la bara, belle maniglie, non è forte essere morti stecchiti! Ero così felice di essere spuntato fuori che dissi a un tizio con una brutta tosse secca: guarda il carro funebre, che bei cavalli; guarda ai portatori tutti nella loro redingote, guarda i loro cilindri puliti con la Guiness. Alcuni stavano pregando per la mia anima dissi “E’ la prima volta che sono senza il sussidio di disoccupazione” Guarda alle prefiche tutte esaltate, guarda i bambini tutti eccitati, guarda i vicini così felici. “Spendi l’assicurazione – mormorai ahimè lo sai che non potrò ritornare indietro” Guardate la moglie come se la ride, guardami sorella che bel nuovo cappellino guardami fratello che bel sigaro. Veniamo dalla terra e ci ritorneremo tutti dicono, non puntare al mattone potrebbe essere la zia May(2), guardami nonna che gran confusione, non è forte essere morti stecchiti!
parte seconda “Dov’è andato il nostro Leslie? oh dove potrebbe essere? Ha promesso di essere dall’alta parte!” Vi vedo, siete i tizi che mi dicevate di imparare a suonare la fottuta arpa. Non ho suonato una sola nota da quando sono stato qui! Guarda i fiorai che contano i loro guadagni, e gli avvocati che leggono le ultime volontà. Tasse e affitto non devo pagare, li ho schivati morendo, evviva! Guarda il padrone di casa, vecchio ciarpame. Guarda il bulldog che bell’abbaio, guarda il gatto che bel trastullo.  La gente diceva era così buono con i poveri, io dicevo mentre pensavo a come mi chiamavano prima: Guarda che sagrestano che grande pala. Guarda i miei compagni di scuola come ridacchiano bene, guarda i lombrichi come si divincolano bene; tutti i miei vecchi compagni li vidi starmi intorno: guarda le lapidi granito coni pomelli. Ora è tutto finito guardali come se la svignano, guarda il tempo che bella pioggia. Poi mi svegliai di soprassalto e mi trovai nel letto con la moglie sul cuore. Ho preso il latte il bambino urlava, non è forte essere morti stecchiti!

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: LOOK AT THE COFFIN

E’ l’adattamento irlandese della canzone resa popolare da Leslie Sarony al tempo del music hall
ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem
ASCOLTA Troy Bennett

Look at the coffin, with golden handles
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

CHORUS
Let’s not have a sniffle, let’s have a bloody-good cry
And always remember: The longer you live
The sooner you’ll bloody-well die

Look at the flowers, all bloody withered
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

Look at the mourners, bloody-great hypocrites
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

Look at the preacher, a bloody-nice fellow
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

Look at the widow, bloody-great female
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Guardate la bara, con le maniglie dorate, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? CORO: Cerchiamo di non prendere il raffreddore, cacciamo un bell’urlo e sempre ricordate: più a lungo si vive, più presto si morirà Guardate i fiori, tutti appassiti, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? Guardate alle prefiche, grandi ipocrite, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? Guardate il prete, un collega grazioso, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? Guardate la vedova, un bel pezzo di femmina, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti?

FONTI
https://mysendoff.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/irish_wake_infographic.png http://www.maggieblanck.com/Mayopages/Customs.html http://www.johnderbyshire.com/Readings/aintitgrand.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62586

WHERE THE BLARNEY ROSES GROW

b-384553-antique_roses_posters (2)“Le rose di Blarney” è una canzone tradizionale irlandese che parla di una bella ragazza che ha sedotto il protagonista lasciandolo con il cuore infranto e senza soldi!
La canzone è tipica del music hall ed è stata attribuita a A. Melville su un’aria tradizionale (Folksongs & Ballads Popular in Ireland, Volume 4″) forse tale Alexander Melville di Glasgow emigrato in America e morto nel 1929; egli scrisse molte canzoni con e per lo scozzese Henry “Harry” Lauder (1870-1950), famoso cantante e attore che calcò le scene del vaudeville americano e del music hall inglese.
La prima registrazione risale al 1926 ed è interpretata dal tenore irlandese George O’Brien. Nella “Dahr” Discography of American Historical Recordings troviamo accreditati Alex Melville (lyricist) e D. Frame Flint (arranger) così la canzone di certo era tipica dei repertori dei musical halls ed è diventata ben presto per il suo tema semi-serio e la sua aria scanzonata, una canzone tradizionale irlandese da cantare nei pubs.

ASCOLTA The Willoughby Brothers in ‘The Promise’ 2011 (i sei fratelli della contea Wicklow in un video molto patinato pieno di testosterone oserei dire sciccoso!)

ASCOLTA Noel McLoughin in “Noel Mcloughlin: Ireland” 2008

ASCOLTA Fine Crowd in “Newfoundland drinking songs” 2005


CHORUS
Can anybody tell me where the blarney roses(1) grow?
Some say down in Limerick Town and more say in Mayo;
Somewhere in the Emerald Isle of this I’d like to know,
Can anybody tell me where the blarney roses grow?
I
‘Twas over in old Ireland near the town of Cushendall(2),
One morn I met a damsel there, the fairest of them all;
‘Twas by me own affections and me money she did go,
She told me she belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
II
Her cheeks were like the roses and her hair a raven hue,
Before that she had done with me, she had me raving, too;
She left me sorely stranded, not a coin she left, you know,
And she told me she belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
III
They’ve roses in Killarney and the same in County Clare,
But ‘pon my word those roses, boys, you can’t see anywhere;
She blarney’d(3) me and, by the powers, she left me broke, you know,
Did this damsel that belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
IV
A-cushla gra mo chroi(4), me boys, she wants to leave with I,
If you belong to Ireland then yourself belongs to me;
Her Donegal come-all-ye brogue, it captured me, you know,
Bad luck to her, good luck(5) to where the blarney roses grow.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
CORO
Qualcuno può dirmi dove crescono le rose Blarney(1)?
Alcuni dicono giù nella città di Limerick e altri dicono a Mayo;
da qualche parte nell’Isola di Smeraldo, e questo che vorrei sapere,
qualcuno può dirmi dove crescono le rose Blarney?
I
Fu nella vecchia Irlanda, vicino alla città di Cushendall(2)
che una mattina incontrai una donzella, la più bella del reame;
si è presa il mio affetto e i miei soldi,
e mi ha detto che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
II
Le sue guance erano come le rose e i capelli erano corvini,
prima che avesse finito con me, mi aveva mandato fuori di testa;
e dolorosamente mi ha piantato in asso, non una moneta mi ha lasciato, sai, e mi ha detto che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
III
Ci sono rose a Killarney e anche nella Contea di Clare,
ma in fede mia quelle rose, ragazzi, non si trovano da tutte le parti;
mi ha intontito con le chiacchiere(3) e per Dio, lei mi ha lasciato al verde, sai
(così) ha fatto questa fanciulla che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
IV
A-chusla gra mo Chroi(4), ragazzi, lei vuole lasciarmi,
se fai parte dell’Irlanda, allora tu mi appartieni;
il suo accento del Donegal mi ha catturato, sai,
sfortuna per lei, buona sorte(5) al luogo in cui le rose Blarney crescono

NOTE
1) Non esiste una varietà botanica di rose detta Blarney, la frase richiama un’altrettanto famosa canzone del circo “The garden where the praties grow” (vedi)
2) Cushendall è un villaggio nella contea di Antrim (Irlanda del Nord) in una baia ai piedi delle Glens of Antrim: sulla Antrim Coast Road il tratto che va da Cushendun a Torr Head è uno dei più suggestivi panorami della costa irlandese (muretti a secco, ginestre, greggi di pecore e ovviamente scogliere) nelle giornate limpide si riesce a vedere la costa scozzeze che dista solo 20 km. Le valli sono ben nove e Cushendall si trova tra Glenballyemon (rinomata per le sue cascate), Glenaan (dove si trova la tomba di Ossian un sito megalitico leggendario) e Glencorp (il nome significa valle dei morti ma i suoi paesaggi sono meravigliosi, in genere si consiglia di seguire la Ballybrack che passa lungo le montagne di Trostan e Lurig poi sulla collina delle fate di Tieverah e infine scendendo ripidamente a Cushendall). Ma ciascuna delle nove valli ha un fascino particolare e vanta le sue tradizioni e leggende.
3) Blarney è una cittadina irlandese nella contea di Cork, famosa per il suo castello o meglio per una magica pietra nelle mura del castello che la leggenda vuole doni l’eloquenza a chi la baci, così il verbo blarney indica una parlantina sciolta, ma anche ingannevole
4) la frase  significa”My darling, love of my heart” è tipica della canzone del music hall infarcire le strofe con almeno una citazione in gaelico
5) in altre versioni l’espressione è più cruda!

IN VIAGGIO
Cushendall è situata in una baia sabbiosa ai piedi di tre delle nove Glens of Antrim, ovvero Glenballyemon, Glenaan e Glencorp, e per questo motivo è conosciuta come “The Capital of the Glens”. Si tratta di un grazioso villaggio formato da una serie di casette colorate raggruppate su una splendida spiaggia continua

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/blarney.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5387
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13513
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic97551.html
http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/800011039/BVE-36792-The_blarney_roses
http://www.irlandando.it/cosa-vedere/nord/contea-di-antrim/glens-of-antrim/
http://www.minube.it/posto-preferito/glenariff-forest-park-a117111

THE IRISH ROVER: A COMIC DRINKING SONG

aa8fa4c8ef9c450aa42f1559cf008760“The Irish Rovers” è il titolo di una comica narrazione di un disastro in mare: un magnifico quanto improbabile vascello in viaggio da Cork (Irlanda) alle Americhe è distrutto da una serie di sfortunati accidenti che riducono l’equipaggio a un solo superstite (in verità gli  ultimi rimasti erano due: il marinaio che racconta la storia e il cane del capitano che resiste tenacemente a tutte le sventure, per poi perire in ultimo, alla vista della costa, in un naufragio). Il marinaio essendo rimasto l’unico testimone ne spara delle grosse visto che nessuno lo può smentire: a cominciare dalle gigantesche dimensioni della nave con la bellezza di 27 alberi! Il carico poi è del tutto assurdo e la quantità di animali caricati ancora più folle! L’unica descrizione realistica probabilmente è quella dell’equipaggio.

Il testo è stato attribuito a Joseph Crofts (JM Crofts) un compositore / arrangiatore americano, tuttavia il brano è considerato un tradizionale ottocentesco: ha il sapore di una music hall song (vedi) presumibilmente un tradizionale di genere marinaresco che è stato rielaborato in canzone comica.
Dalle prime registrazioni degli anni 60 di Dominic Behan, Clancy Brothers (i quali hanno rivendicato il copyright) e i Dubliners la canzone è famosa in Irlanda e America immancabile drinking song negli irish pubs: del brano esistono diverse verioni testuali
ASCOLTA The Irish Rovers
alcune anche con il ritornello
So fare thee well, my own true love,
I’m going far from you,
And I will swear by the stars above
Forever I’ll be true to you,
Tho’ as I part, it breaks my heart,
Yet when the trip is over
I’ll come back again in true Irish style
Aboard the Irish Rover.
(The Irish Rover A Selection of Irish Songs and Ballads
Dublino: Walton’s Musical Instrument Galleries, 1966)

ASCOLTAThe Dubliners

ASCOLTA The High Kings (strofe I, IV, II, V)


I
On the fourth of July
eighteen hundred and six(1)
We set sail from
the sweet cove of Cork(2)
We were sailing away
with a cargo of bricks
For the grand city hall in New York
‘Twas a wonderful craft(3),
she was rigged fore-and-aft
And oh, how the wild winds drove her.
She’d got several blasts,
she’d twenty-seven masts (4)
And we called her the Irish Rover.
II (5)
We had one million bales
of the best Sligo rags
We had two million barrels of stones
We had three million sides of old blind horses hides (6),
We had four million barrels of bones.
We had five million hogs,
we had six million dogs,
Seven million barrels of porter,
We had eight million
bails of old nanny goats’ tails,
In the hold of the Irish Rover.
III
There was awl Mickey Coote
who played hard on his flute
When the ladies lined up for his set
He was tootin’ with skill for each sparkling quadrille
Though the dancers were fluther’d (6) and bet (7)
With his sparse witty talk
he was cock of the walk
As he rolled the dames under and over
They all knew at a glance
when he took up his stance
And he sailed in the Irish Rover
IV
There was Barney McGee
from the banks of the Lee,
There was Hogan from County Tyrone
There was Jimmy McGurk
who was scar(r)ed stiff of work
And a man(8) from Westmeath
called Malone
There was Slugger O’Toole who was drunk as a rule
And fighting Bill Tracey from Dover
And your man Mick McCann
from the banks of the Bann
Was the skipper of the Irish Rover
V
We had sailed seven years
when the measles(9) broke out
And the ship lost it’s way in a fog.
And that whole of the crew
was reduced down to two,
Just meself and the captain’s old dog.
Then the ship struck a rock,
oh Lord what a shock
The bulkhead (10)
was turned right over
Turned nine times around, and the poor dog was drowned
I’m the last of the Irish Rover
VI (11)
For a sailor it’s always a bother in life
It’s so lonesome by night and day
That he longs for the shore
And a charming young whore
Who will melt all his troubles away
Oh, the noise and the rout (12)
Swillin’ poitin (13) and stout (14)
For him soon the torment’s over
Of the love of a maid
He is never afraid
An old salt from the Irish Rover
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto*
I
Il quattro luglio
del 1806
salpammo dalla
bella baia di Cork
facendo rotta
con un carico di mattoni
per il grande municipio di New York.
Era una bellissima nave
equipaggiata a prua e a poppa
e oh come prendeva il vento!
Aveva resistito a diverse tempeste
aveva 27 alberi
e si chiamava Irish Rover
II
Caricammo un milione di balle
dei migliori stracci di Sligo
e due milioni di barili di pietre,
tre milioni di vecchi paraocchi da cavallo
e quattro milioni di barili di ossa,
cinque milioni di porci,
sei milioni di cani
e sette milioni di barili di porter,
avevamo otto milioni
di balle di code di capra
nella stiva della Irish Rover
III
C’era il vecchio Mickey Coote
che suonava il flauto alla grande
quando le dame si mettevano in fila per la danza, suonava con bravura
ogni vivace quadriglia,
sebbene i danzatori fossero tutti follemente accoppiati
con la sua parlantina spiritosa
era il gallo del pollaio
e si rigirava le signore come voleva.
Tutte sapevano alla prima occhiata,
quando cominciava a darsi delle arie,
che aveva navigato sulla Irish Rover
IV
C’era Barney McGee
dalle rive del Lee
c’era Hogan dalla contea di Tyrone
c’era Jimmy McGurk,
paralizzato dal terrore di lavorare,
ed un uomo da Westmeath chiamato Malone,
c’era Slugger O’Toole che di norma era ubriaco
e si menava con Bill Tracy di Dover,
ed il vostro uomo, Mick McCann,
dalle rive del Bann,
era il comandante della Irish Rover
V
Navigammo sette anni
quando scoppiò il morbillo
e la nave perse la rotta nella nebbia,
e tutto quell’equipaggio
fu ridotto a due , soltanto
io e il vecchio cane del capitano.
poi la nave urtò uno scoglio,
oddio! che paura!
La fiancata si ribaltò,
girò nove volte in tondo
e il povero cane affogò
io sono l’ultimo della Irish Rover
VI
La vita del marinaio e’ una bella seccatura
sempre così solo giorno e notte,
che uno ha nostalgia della terra
e di una bella puttana giovane
per  dissolvere tutte le preoccupazioni.
Ah, il rumore e il frastuono,
ubriaco di distillato e birra scura,
ma presto il tormento dovra’ finire;
dell’amore di una donna
non ha mai paura
il vecchio lupo di mare della Irish Rover

NOTE
* dalla traduzione di Marco Zampetti qui
1) Tommy Makem “In the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred and six
2) High Kins dicono “coal quay of Cork
3) High Kins dicono “We had an elegant craft
4) High Kins invertono l’orgine delle frasi
5) High Kins le sparano ancora più grosse
“We had five million bags of the best Sligo rags
We had six million barrels of stones
We had seven million bales of old nanny goats tails
We had eight million barrels of bones
We had nine million hogs
ten million dogs
eleven million barrels of porter
We had twelve million sides of old blind horses hides’
In the hold of the Irish Rover”
6) fluthered è un termine irlandese che definisce uno stato di ubriachezza
7) bet il significato si evince dal contesto: le coppie vanno d’amore e daccordo ma Mickey Coote attirava le donne come l’unico gallo del pollaio!
8) High Kins dicono “chap”
9) Il morbillo è in realtà una corruzione di “mizzens” cioè mezzane, che si riferisce al terzo e più piccolo albero sulle navi a vela. Entrambe le parole morbillo e mezzane sono ormai comunemente utilizzati
10) High Kins dicono “The boat she turned right over” letteralmente bulkhead è la paratia dello scafo; in inglese scafo si traduce come hull. Se si separa la parola bulk head diventa una parolaccia
11) una strofa spesso censurata
12) letteralmente rout è la diserzione delle truppe in una sconfitta, una ritirata disordinata e rumorosa
13) poitin è il whisky illegale continua
14) stout è la birra scura che in Irlanda è sinonimo di Guinness. Per molti la Guinness non è una birra, è Dublino (anche se ormai la proprietà della fabbrica è in mano alla Diageo il colosso britannico nella produzione di liquori, birra e vino). Si parla di Stout per indicare le birre dal colore quasi nero e dal sapore tipicamente amaro (la tipica colorazione scura viene dall’orzo bruciacchiato, ovvero molto tostato). La parola significa anche “robusto” continua

LA DANZA: IRISH ROVER

La melodia è una scottish country dance molto popolare
VIDEO

FONTI
http://thesession.org/discussions/11798
http://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/video/irish-rover.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14865

THE IRISH GIRL: I WISH MY LOVE WAS A RED RED ROSE

 “I Wish My Love Was a Red Red Rose” detta anche The Irish Girl o Let the Wind Blow High or Low, registrata da Sarah Makem (1900-1983) nel 1968 è inclusa nell’antologia “As  I Roved Out”. Popolare in Irlanda e in particolare nell’Irlanda del Nordsi (ma anche in Inghilterra e Scozia) presenta in un’infinità di varianti testuali, sebbene la versione  più moderna rimanga quella interpretata da Sarah Makem. Di fatto chi la canta aggiunge a piacere versi presi un po’ qui e là dai canti tradizionali, così non possiamo affermare che ci sia una versione definitiva di “The Irish Girl”.

Il testo non si  deve confondere con la scozzese “A red, Red Rose” ovvero “My love is a Red red rose” si tratta piuttosto di una variante di “O were my love yon lilac fair” (sembre rielaborata da Robert Burns): in “Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rosa rossa”  l’uomo dichiara la sua passione e il desiderio ardente verso la sua innamorata, che però rifiuta i suoi approcci sessuali. Il tono della canzone è mesto, potrebbe essere scambiato per romanticismo in realtà è un canto “consolatorio”!

La prima strofa riprende un tema diffuso nelle ballate  popolare in cui fiori ed erbe sono un linguaggio  magico ben codificato e ricco di significati, che si ricollega a mio  avviso alla ballata “The Gardener” (Child #219) (vedi); viene da pensare che questa sia il punto di  vista maschile di quella, in cui l’uomo respinto esprime il suo rammarico.  Così collegandole veniamo a conoscere sempre più un pezzo della storia, come  se fossero i capitoli di un romanzo..

E l’uomo prosegue nella sua fantasia erotica: essere una farfalla  per suggere il nettare di quella rosa rossa o un uccello per farla  addormentare dolcemente e poi risvegliarla al sorgere dell’alba. Nella terza  strofa il sogno si fa meno bucolico e fuor di metafora, così i piaceri di un onesto irlandese: avere il bicchiere sempre pieno di liquore, le tasche piene  di soldi e la ragazza tra le braccia con cui rotolarsi nell’erba.

ASCOLTA Tim O’Brien&Jan Fabricius

ASCOLTA Bothy Band live

Pur essendo un canto maschile viene eseguito anche da voci femminili per il tono malinconico della melodia.
ASCOLTA Maev Ni Mhaolchatha

ASCOLTA Altan live


I
I wish my love was a red red rose(1)
Growing in yon garden fair
And I (me) to be the gardener
Of her I would take care
There’s not a month throughout the year, That my love I’d renew
I’d garnish her with flowers fine
Sweet William(2), Thyme(3), and Rue(4)
II
I wish I was a butterfly
I’d light on my love’s breast
And if I was a blue cuckoo(5)
I’d sing my love to rest
And if I was a nightingale
I’d sing the daylight clear
I’d sit and sing with (for) you Molly
For once I loved you dear
III
I wish I was in Dublin(6) town
And seated on the grass
In my right hand a jug of punch
And on my knee a lass
I’d call for liquor freely (7)
And I’d pay before I’d go
I’d roll my Molly in my arms
Let the wind blow high or low (8)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rosa rossa, che cresce in quel bel giardino
e io essere il giardiniere
per prendermi cura di lei.
Non c’è  mese in tutto l’anno,
che io non rinnovi il mio amore
la adorno con freschi fiori,
garofanini dei poeti, timo
e ruta.
II
Se fossi una farfalla
mi poserei sul seno del mio amore
o un cuculo malinconico
canterei al mio amore mentre riposa; se fossi un usignolo,
annuncerei il chiarore del mattino,
e starei seduto a cantare con te Molly, perchè un tempo ti ho amato mia cara
III
Vorrei essere a Dublino
seduto sul prato
con alla destra una brocca di punch
e sulle ginocchia una ragazza,
ordinerei liquore (di marca) a volontà
e pagherei prima di andarmene,
abbraccerei la mia Molly
e che il vento soffi forte o piano.

NOTE
1) la Rosa rossa equivale sia all’amore romantico, che alla lussuria o  “passione sfrenata”, Nelle ballate popolari la rosa non è solo “una rosa” ma è il simbolo della passione amorosa; l’allusione al fiore più intimo e segreto della donna. Sebbene un tempo le fanciulle fossero educate a preservarsi caste e pure fino al matrimonio, la loro stessa ingenuità le poteva far cadere facile preda dei mascalzoni, che con false promesse matrimoniali, le inducevano a concedere il loro “pegno d’amore”; così le rose nelle canzoni celtiche sono associate alla sfortuna
2) Sweet William è il dianthus barbatus il garofano dei poeti che simboleggia la galanteria maschile
3) il timo è il simbolo della purezza, intesa come rettitudine  coerenza
4) la ruta è simbolo del rimpianto. La bella Molly ha  preferito mantenere la sua verginità: così contrapponendo il garofano dei  poeti che sta per la mascolinità al timo che è la purezza femminile resta il  rimpianto (la ruta) per il mancato appagamento.
5) il canto del cuculo è particolarmente armonioso
6) il nome della città varia a secondo dei luoghi in cui è cantata la canzone
7) il call drink non è un semplice ordine di liquore, ma un ordine in cui il cliente specifica la marca che vuole bere e si differenzia dai liquori a basso costo che sono in serviti dai barman nelle richieste generiche. La sfumatura si perde nella traduzione in italiano, a meno di aggiungere un aggettivazione a liquore.
8) ancora un’allusione sessuale

ASCOLTA Tim Dennehy (con delle strofe aggiuntive di suo pugno)


I
I wish my love was a red, red rose,
Growing in yon garden fair
And me to be the gardener
‘Tis of her I would take care.
There is not a month throughout the year/But my love I would renew.
I’d garnish her with flowers fine
Sweet William, thyme and rue.
II
I wish I was a butterfly
I’d light on my love’s breast
Or if I was a blue cuckoo
I’d sing my love to rest.
If I but was a nightingale
I’d sing ‘til the daylight clear.
I’d sit and watch with you my love
For once I loved you dear.
III
The first time that I met my love
Was in the market square.
The look that passed between us then
My heart it did ensnare
But fate displayed its cruel hand
And we were forced to part.
Farewell my own dear Mary
You’re my joy my own sweetheart.
IV
For love it is a sharpened sword
That sears and tears apart.
It brings great rhapsodies of joy
But still can break your heart.
Oh painful joy oh joyous pain
From dawn ‘til night does fall.
It was better to have loved and lost
Than never loved at all.
V
And Mary I’m so lonely now
Without you all the while.
I miss your lovely wish and cheer
I miss your gentle smile.
Before I go to sleep at night
Before my eyes I close.
I pray that God may guide you right
You’re my lovely Irish rose.
VI
And I wish you were beside me now
And seated on the ground.
A warm embrace, your smiling face
Your fragrance all around.
I’d call your name so gently then
As I did oft times before
And I’d roll you in my arms my love
Let the wind blow high or low.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rosa rossa, che cresce in quel bel giardino
e io essere il giardiniere
per prendermi cura di lei.
Non c’è  mese in tutto l’anno
che io non rinnovi il mio amore
la adorno con freschi fiori,
garofanini dei poeti, timo e ruta.
II
Se fossi una farfalla
mi poserei sul seno del mio amore
o un cuculo malinconico
canterei al mio amore mentre riposa; se fossi un usignolo,
annuncerei il chiarore del mattino,
e starei sedutoa guardarti amore mio, perchè un tempo ti ho amato mia cara
III
La prima volta che vidi il mio amore
era nella piazza del mercato
Lo sguardo che ci scambiammo tra di noi, mi conquistò il cuore
ma il destino posò la sua crudele mano
e fummo costretti a separarci.
Addio, Mary mia cara
tu sei la mia gioia, il mio tesoro
IV
Perchè amore è una spada affilata
che riserva dispiaceri e lacrime
porta grandi rapimenti di gioia
e tuttavia ti può spezzare il cuore.
Oh le pene d’amore
dall’alba al tramonto!
Era meglio aver amato e perso
che non aver amato mai!
V
Mary sono tutto solo oggi
senza di te tutto il tempo.
Mi mancano i tuoi saluti della buonanotte, mi manca il tuo dolce sorriso, prima di andare a dormire
prima di chiudere gli occhi.
Prego che Dio ti aiuti,
sei la mia amata rafazza irlandese.
VI
Vorrei che tu fossi qui ora
seduta a terra.
Un caldo abbraccio, la faccia sorridente, il tuo profumo tutt’intorno, chiamerei il tuo nome così dolcemente, poi come facevo spesso prima,
ti abbraccerei, amore mio
e che il vento soffi forte o piano.

Dall'”Irish Peasant Songs in the English Language” di Patrick Weston Joyce (Londra: Longmans, Green and Co., 1906), pag 2: THE IRISH GIRL:   “This beautiful air, and the  accompanying words, I have known since my childhood; and both are now  published for the first time.* (* More than half a century ago I gave this  air to Dr. Petrie: and now I find—after printing the above—that it is  included in the Stanford-Petrie collection of Irish Music recently published  (No. 657): with my name acknowledged. But the words have never hitherto been  published.)
I have copies of the song on broadsheets,  varying a good deal, and much corrupted. The versions I give here of air and  words are from my own memory, as sung by the old people of Limerick when I was a child; but I have thought it  necessary to make some few restorations.”

Patrick Weston Joyce paragona i versi di Robert Burns (contenuti nella sua poesia “O were my love yon lilac fair” del 1793)  con quelli dell’Irish girl, versioni entrambe molto “spinte” a livello  erotico.

IRISH GIRL
“Oh, gin my love were yon red rose
That grows upon the castle wa’;
And I mysel a drap o’ dew
Into her bonnie breast to fa’!
Oh, there beyond expression blest,
I’d feast on beauty a’ the night,
Seal’d on her silk-saft faulds to rest,
Till fley’d awa by Phoebus’ light.”

ROBERT BURNS
I wish my love was yon red, red rose
That grows on the garden wall,
And I to be a drop of dew,
Among its leaves I’d fall—
‘Tis in her sacred bosom
All night I’d sport and play,
And pass away the summer night
Until the break of day

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Se il mio amore fosse quella rosa rossa
che cresce tra le mura del castello,
ed io una goccia di rugiada
che cade tra il suo bel seno!
Oh lì con somma benedizione onorerei la bellezza tutta la notte, sigillato nelle sue pieghe di soffice seta per riposare e volare via alla luce di Febo
O were my love yon lilac fair
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse quella rossa rosa rossa, che cresce tra le mura del giardino, e io essere una goccia di rugiada,  tra i suoi petali cadrei fino al suo sacro seno,
tutta la notte ci giocherei e mi divertirei, e ci trascorrerei la notte estiva fino al sorgere del giorno

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/flower-blossoms-joy/
http://www.sceilig.com/i_wish_my_love_was_a_red_red_rose.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.CFM?threadID=29537
http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/theirishgirl.html
http://www.folksongsyouneversang.com/essays/170-2/

L’albero in mezzo al prato

Read the post in English

Come il gioco della campana conosciuto dai bambini di tutti i continenti, anche la “canzone del ciclo eterno” è una goccia di antica sapienza sopravvissuta ai nostri giorni: oltre che gioco mnemonico è anche scioglilingua che diventa sempre più difficile articolare all’aumentare della velocità.

Alcuni dicono sia irlandese, altri che sia una melodia irlandese su di un testo scozzese, (o viceversa), altri ancora dicono che sia del Sud dell’Inghilterra o del Galles, o di origini bretoni, ma la canzoncina è talmente popolare che a nessuno importa discutere sulla paternità delle origini. Più probabilmente è una filastrocca collettiva e archetipa di quelle che si ritrovano nei vari paesi europei, proveniente da una antichissima preghiera-canto, di quelle che si praticavano nelle celebrazioni rituali primaverili, ovvero quanto è sopravvissuto dell’insegnamento antico, per metafore, del ciclo vita-morte-vita.

albero celtaL’ALBERO COSMICO

Non si può non pensare all’albero cosmico come simbolo universale, ossia il punto di inizio assoluto della vita. Nel linguaggio simbolico, questo punto è l’ombelico del mondo, inizio e fine di tutte le cose, ma viene spesso immaginato come un asse verticale che, situato al centro dell’universo, attraversa il cielo, la terra e il mondo sotterraneo.

Come sintetizza con chiarezza Greta Fogliani nel suo “Alle radici dell’Albero cosmico” “Di per sé, l’albero non è propriamente un motivo cosmologico, perché è innanzi tutto un elemento naturale che, per i suoi attributi, ha assunto una funzione simbolica. L’albero, in quanto tale, si rigenera sempre con il passare delle stagioni: perde le foglie, secca, sembra morire, ma poi ogni volta rinasce e recupera il suo splendore.
Per queste sue caratteristiche, esso diventa non solo un elemento sacro, ma addirittura un microcosmo, perché nel suo processo di evoluzione rappresenta e ripete la creazione dell’universo. Inoltre, proprio per la sua estensione sia verso il basso sia verso l’alto, questo elemento ha finito inevitabilmente per assumere una valenza cosmologica, andando a costituire il perno dell’universo che attraversa cielo, terra e oltretomba e che funge da collegamento tra le zone cosmiche.”

Gustav Klimt: L’albero della vita, 1905

Dalle molteplici declinazioni pur mantenendo la stessa struttura, le melodie variano a seconda della provenienza, una polka in Irlanda, una strathspey in Scozia e una morris dance in Inghilterra.. Gli irlandesi non potevano non trasformarla in una drinking song come gioco-pretesto per abbondanti bevute (chi sbaglia beve).
Insomma paese che vai verso che trovi, ognuno ci ha aggiunto del suo.

RATTLIN’ BOG

MELODIA “STANDARD”: è quella irlandese che è una polka più o meno veloce

The Corries (molto comunicativi con il pubblico)

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula sempre più demenziale


CHORUS
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Buona palude,
la palude giù nella valle
speciale palude, la bella palude,
la palude giù nella valle
I
Nella palude c’è un buco
un buco speciale, un bel buco
il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
II
Nel buco c’è un albero
un albero speciale, un bell’albero,
l’albero nel buco, e il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
III
sull’albero c’è un ramo
sul ramo un rametto
sul rametto c’è un nido
nel nido c’è un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
sulla piuma un verme
sul verme un capello
sul capello un pidocchio
sul pidocchio una zecca
sulla zecca un eczema

NOTE
1) rattling si traduce genericamente come “fine” cioè “molto buono/bello”
2)  gli Irish Descendants dicono “limb” con lo stesso significato d i ramo
3) nella versione che circola a Dublino (anche se non unica, ad esempio si trova anche in Cornovaglia) diventa a flea (una pulce)

PREN AR Y BRYN

La versione gallese ha due percorsi associativi che hanno come centro l’albero, viene da pensare all’albero cosmico, l’albero della vita: l’albero che sta sulla collina che è nella valle accanto al mare. Così dice il refrain, mentre la seconda catena parte dall’albero e va al ramo, al nido, all’uovo, all’uccello alle piume, e al letto. E qui si ferma a volte aggiungendo una pulce per poi ritornare indietro all’albero.

Le versioni meno fanciullesche della canzone una volta arrivate al letto proseguono con considerazioni molto più carnali (la donna e l’uomo e poi il bambino che cresce e diventa adulto e dal braccio alla sua mano pianta il seme, dal quale cresce l’albero). Ancora viene in mente un modo divertente per insegnare le parole delle cose ai bambini, sempre però trasmettendo il messaggio che tutto è interconnesso e noi facciamo parte del tutto.

I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc, o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth, o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy, o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw, o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu, o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely, o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
Traduzione inglese
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea
The flea from the bed,
The bed from the feathers,
the feathers on the bird,
The bird from the egg,
The egg from the nest,
The nest on the bough,
The bough on the tree,
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
And the valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Che grande vecchio albero,
oh un bell’albero
l’albero sulla collina,
la collina nella valle,
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva
II
Dall’alvero venne un ramo
Oh bel ramo!
III
Dall’albero venne un nido,
Oh bel nido!
IV
Dal nido venneun uovo,
Oh bell’uovo!
V
Dall’uovo venne un uccello
Oh bell’uccello
VI
Dall’uovo vennero le piume;
oh belle piume
VII
dalle piume venne il letto
oh bel letto
VIII
Dal letto venne una pulce
una pulce dal letto
il letto dalle piume
le piume sull’uccello
l’uccello dall’uovo
l’uovo dal nido
il nido dal ramo
il ramo sull’albero
l’albero sulla collina
la collina nella valle
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni dal film Wicker Man


In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Nei boschi cresceva un albero
un bel bell’albero c’era
sull’abero c’era un ramo
e sul ramo c’era un rametto
sul rametto c’era un nido
nel nido c’era un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
e dalla piuma un
letto
sul letto c’era una ragazza
sulla ragazza c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo c’era un seme
e da quel seme c’era un ragazzo
e dal ragazzo c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo la tomba
dalla tomba cresceva
un albero
a Summerisle
Summerisle, Summerisle il bosco di Summerisle,
il bosco di Summerisle

NOTE
1) Summerisle è l’isola immaginaria dove si svolge il film

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

E’ la versione regionale italiana collezionata anche da Alan Lomax nel suo giro per l’Italia nel 1954. Di origine italiane Lomax era il nome dei Lomazzi emigrati in America nell’Ottocento.
Nel luglio del 1954 Alan arriva in Italia con l’intento di fissare su nastro magnetico la straordinaria varietà delle musiche della tradizione popolare italiana. Un viaggio di scoperta, dal nord al sud della penisola, a fianco del grande collega italiano Diego Carpitella che ha prodotto oltre duemila registrazioni in circa sei mesi di lavoro sul campo..

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn questa versione dall’albero si passa dai rami al nido e all’uovo e quindi all’uccellino. Il contesto è fresco, molto primaverile e pasquale.. per spiegare l’origine della vita e rispondere alle prime curiosità dei bambini sul sesso..
La canzoncina è finita nel repertorio degli scouts e nelle canzoni da oratorio e raduni giovani cattolici, ma anche tra le canzoncine dei centri-estivi e scuole dell’infanzia.

Un video trovato in rete proveniente dalla tradizione lombardo-emiliana.


In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in   mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
in mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
cʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in mezzo al prato, il prato intorno allʼalbero
e l
ʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera, allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano i brocchi, (1)i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e l’albero piantato in mezzo al prato
Attaccato ai brocchi indovina cosa c’era, cʼerano i rami, i rami attaccati ai  brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato ai rami indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano le foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
cʼera il nido, il nido in mezzo alle  foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro al nido indovina cosa cʼera,
cʼerano gli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro al nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano gli uccellini, gli uccellini dentro agli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro a nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami,
i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato

NOTE
1) è l’equivalente italiano del branch inglese: anche se in disuso il termine italiano “brocco” indica un ramo irto di spine e quindi per estensione un troncone di ramo, insomma i grossi rami che si dipartono dal tronco centrale dell’albero!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

Ovvero “The tree in the wood”, c’è un che di grembo, di riposo tombale in quel “e l’erba verde cresce tutt’intorno” ..

Luis Jordan

una versione per bambini


There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
C’era un albero
nei boschi
l’albero più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sull’albero
c’era un ramo
il ramo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sul ramo
c’era un nido
il nido più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nel nido
c’era un uvoo
l’uovo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nell’uovo
c’era un uccello
l’uccello più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
e sull’uccello
c’ara un ala
l’ala più graziosa
che si sia mai vista
e l’ala sull’uccello
l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.

FONTI
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

O’REILLY’S DAUGHTER

ATTENZIONE IL CONTENUTO POTREBBE RISULTARE OFFENSIVO

Henry_Singleton_The_Ale-House_Door_c__1790“Riley’s Daughter” e “O’Reilly’s Daughter” ma anche ”The One Eyed Reilly” è una canzoncina irlandese oscena (o ricca di doppi sensi) forse di origini settecentesche in cui il protagonista ottiene i favori di una bella fanciulla, la figlia di O’Reilly il guercio, proprietario di una locanda/birreria.
Nella versione pulita il protagonista adocchia la bella locandiera e gli punge vaghezza di farsela, accasandosi con lei in un matrimonio non proprio regolare. La loro unione è da considerarsi piuttosto una “fuitina”  in cui i due si sono scambiati la promessa di matrimonio in forma privata e lo hanno consumato. Questi “matrimoni d’amore” divennero illegali in Inghilterra con il Marriage Act del 1753 che impediva ai giovani minorenni (al tempo di età inferiore ai 21 anni) di sposarsi senza il consenso delle famiglie.

La donna era però disonorata e ben per questo i due si attirano l’ira di O’Reilly.  Molto popolare tra i soldati americani durante la seconda guerra mondiale (nella sua versione oscena) la canzone fu diffusa nella scena folk dai Clancy Brothers. La canzone è spesso presente nel repertorio delle celtic-rock bands ma è anche (per quella benda rossa sull’occhio) una pirate song!

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem La versione è ovviamente quella ripulita quasi una filastrocca per bambini


I
As I was sitting by the fire
Eating spuds and drinking porter(1)
Suddenly a thought came into my mind
I’d like to marry old Reilly’s daughter.
CHORUS:
Giddy eye ay, giddy eye ay,
giddy eye ay for the one eyed Reilly
Giddy eye ay, One, Two Three 
try it on your own bass drum
II
Reilly played on the big bass drum
Reilly had a mind for murder and slaughter
Reilly had a bright red glittering eye
And he kept that eye on his lovely daughter.
III
Her hair was black and her eyes were blue
The colonel and the major and the captain sought her
The sergeant and the private and the drummer boy too
But they never had a chance with Reilly’s daughter.
IV
I got me a ring and a parson too
Got me a scratch in a married quarter
Settled me down to a peaceful life
Happy as a king with Reilly’s daughter.
V
Suddenly a footstep on the stairs(2)
Who should it be but Reilly out for slaughter
With two pistols in his hands
Looking for the man who had married his daughter
VI
I caught old Reilly by the hair
Rammed his head in a pail of water
Fired his pistols into the air
A damned sight quicker than I married his daughter.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Mentre ero seduto accanto al fuoco
a mangiare patate e a bere birra scura
all’improvviso mi venne
il vezzo
di sposare la figlia del vecchio Reilly
CORO:
evviva, evviva
per Reilly da un occhio solo
Evviva, un, due, tre
prova sulla tua grancassa
II
Reilly suonava una grande grancassa
ed era portato per l’omicidio
e la strage
Reilly aveva uno scintillante occhio rosso acceso e lo teneva, quell’occhio, sulla sua cara figliola
III
Lei aveva capelli neri e occhi
blu,
se la contendevano il colonnello, il maggiore e il capitano
e anche il sergente, il soldato semplice e il tamburino,
ma non hanno mai avuto una possibilità con la figlia di Reilly
IV
Presi l’anello e anche un pastore
per razzolare in un appartamento da sposato
sistemato in una vita pacifica,
felice come un re con la figlia
di Reilly.
V
All’improvviso dei passi per le scale
chi poteva essere se non Reilly per fare una strage
con due pistole in mano
in cerca dell’uomo che aveva sposato sua figlia?
VI
Ho preso il vecchio Reilly per i capelli ficcato la sua testa in un secchio d’acqua, sparato le sue pistole in aria,
un dannato spettacolo più rapido del mio matrimonio con la figlia!

NOTE
1) anche come “Talking to old Reilly’s daughter”
2) anche come “Well five big knocks come knockin’ at the door”

ASCOLTA (tra le tante versioni testuali) quella bawdy in cui il protagonista prima ottiene i favori della fanciulla e poi si scazzotta con il di lei padre!


I
As I was sitting by the fire ,
Drinking beer & drinking water(1),
Suddenly a thought came to my head,
Why not shag O’Reilly’s daughter ?
Chorus :
Giddy I aye, giddy I aye,
Giddy I aye for the one eyed Reilly,_
Shove it up, stuff it up, balls and all,
A didle-didle-didle-dit, tray ball (2)
II
When walking through the park one day,
I came across O’Reilly’s daughter,
Nary a word did I have to say,
Don’t you think really we oughter?
III
I that damsel on the bed,
Room light I left gently over.
Nary a word the maiden say,
She act like hell ‘till the fun was over.
IV
Suddenly a footstep on the stairs,
Who should it be but the bloody well father,
With two pistols in his hands,
Looking for the man who shagged his daughter.
V
I grabbed O’Reilly by the hair,
Thrust his head in a pail of water,
Rammed them pistols up his bum,
Damn sight harder than I shagged his daughter.
VI
Now all you lasses and all young maids
Answer now and don’t speak shyly
Would you like to have it straight & through
The way I gave it to the one eyed (3) Reilly
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Mentre ero seduto accanto al fuoco
a bere birra e whisky
all’improvviso mi venne
il vezzo
di scopare la figlia di O’ Reilly
CORO:
evviva, evviva
evviva per Reilly da un occhio solo
prendi e porta a casa palle e il resto
A didle-didle-didle-dit, tray ball.
II
Andavo a spasso per il parco
un giorno
e t’incrociai la figlia di O’ Reilly,
non una parola dovetti dire
credete davvero avremmo  dovuto?
III
Con quella damigella nel letto
spensi piano la luce, non una parola disse la fanciulla e si agitò come un’indemoniata  fino
alla fine
IV
All’improvviso dei passi per le scale
chi poteva essere se non quel tizzone d’inferno del padre
con due pistole in mano
in cerca dell’uomo che aveva scopato sua figlia?
V
Ho preso O’ Reilly per i capelli
ficcato la sua testa in un secchio d’acqua, ficcato le pistole su per il suo culo, un dannato spettacolo più rapido della scopata  con la figlia!
VI
Così tutte voi ragazze e
giovani fanciulle
rispondete ora e parlate senza timore
avreste voluto averlo immediatamente
e completamente
nel modo in cui lo diedi alla pupilla di Reilly?

NOTE
1) più probabilmente “acqua di fuoco”
2) il senso del ritornello è piuttosto volgare qui tradotto più eufemisticamente, l’utlimo verso è un non-sense e suona come “Dig-a dig-a rig tres bon”
3) credo si riferisca alla figlia

BIG STRONG MAN: MY BROTHER SYLVESTE

My Brother Sylveste (o  “Big strong man”) è una canzone perfetta come irish drinking song anche se probabilmente è di origine nordamericana-canadese : si riferisce ad alcuni eventi della storia americana e mondiale che ci permettono di collocare la data d’origine intorno agli anni 20 (l’incontro di box Jeffries-Johnson risale al 1910, la Lusitania è affondata nel 1915, Jack Dempsey è stato campione del mondo dei pesi massimi dal 1919 al 1926): la canzone è diffusa un po’ per il mondo tramite i soldati canadesi durante la seconda guerra mondiale.

primo-carneraLa canzone parla del fratello del protagonista descrivendolo come un uomo gigantesco, capace come l’italico Maciste o Ercole d’imprese straordinarie, anche se paradossali. Il parallelo a Primo Carnera è inevitabile anche se il grande pugile italiano (un vero e proprio colosso) si mise alla ribalta mondiale solo negli anni 30.

ASCOLTA The Wolfe Tones

ASCOLTA The Blaggards con un buffo arrangiamento strumentale tra musica da circo e cartoon!

ASCOLTA Carbon Leaf


I
Have you heard about the big strong man? He lived in a caravan.
Have you heard about the Jeffrey Johnson fight(1)?
Oh, Lord what a hell of a fight(2).
You can take all of the heavyweights you’ve got.
We’ve got a lad that can beat the whole lot.
He used to ring bells in the belfry,
Now he’s gonna fight Jack Demspey(3).
Chorus
That was my brother Sylvest’(4)
(What’s he got?)

A row of forty medals on his chest
(big chest!)

He killed fifty bad men in the west(5);
he knows no rest.

Think of a man, hells’ fire, don’t push, (just shove),
Plenty of room for you and me.
He’s got an arm like a leg
(a ladies’ leg!)

And a punch that would sink a battleship (big ship!)
It takes all of the Army and the Navy to put the wind up (6) Sylvest’.
II
Now, he thought he’d take a trip to Italy.
He thought that he’d go by sea.
He dove off the harbor in New York,
And swam like a great big shark(7).
He saw the Lusitania(8) in distress.
He put the Lusitania on his chest.
He drank all of the water in the sea,
And he walked all the way to Italy.
III
He thought he take a trip to old Japan.
They turned out a big brass band(9).
You can take all of the instruments you’ve got,
We got a lad that can play the whole lot.
And the old church bells will ring (Hells bells!)
The old church choir will sing
(Hells fire!)
They all turned out to say farewell to my big brother Sylvest’
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Hai sentito dell’omaccione?
Vive in un caravan.
Hai saputo dell’incontro Jeffrey – Johnson?
Per dio che dannato scontro!
Potete prendere tutti i pesi massimi che volete,
abbiamo un ragazzo che li può battere tutti,
lui era solito suonare le campane del campanile, ora sta per combattere contro Jack Demspey
Chorus
Quello era mio fratello Silvestro
(che cos’ha?)

una serie di 40 medaglie sul petto
(che grande petto)

Ha ucciso una cinquantina di cattivi uomini dell’Ovest; non conosce riposo.
Pensa all’uomo, fuoco dell’inferno, non spingere (vai al diavolo),
c’è abbastanza spazio per entrambi.
Ha un braccio come una gamba
(la gamba di una donna)

e un pugno che potrebbe affondare una nave da battaglia (grande nave)
Ci vuole tutto l’esercito e la marina per catturare Silvestro
II
Beh, pensava di farsi un viaggetto in Italia
e di andarci per mare.
Si tuffò nel porto di New York
e nuotò come uno squalo bello grosso.
Vide la Lusitania in difficoltà
se la mise sulle spalle.
Bevve tutta l’acqua del mare
e si incamminò per l’Italia.
III
Pensava di farsi un viaggetto nel vecchio Giappone, si è presentata tutta la grande banda di strada.
Puoi suonare tutti gli strumenti che vuoi, noi abbiamo un ragazzo che è capace di suonarli tutti insieme.
E le campane della vecchia chiesa suoneranno ( dannate campane)
Il coro della vecchia chiesa canterà (fuoco dell’inferno)
tutti si volteranno per dare il saluto al mio grande fratello Silvestro

NOTE
1) Jack Johnson ha vinto il titolo di campione mondiale di pesi massimi nel 1910 battendo James Jeffries. La sensazionalità della notizia è che Johnson è stato il primo nero a vincere il titolo surclassando il vecchio campione.
2) La sconfitta della “Great white hope” ha dato origine a una serie di rivolte razziali anche se in realtà si trattava per lo più di celebrazioni entusiastiche dei neri usciti in strada per festeggiare la vittoria, osteggiate da poliziotti e cittadini bianchi infastiditi!
3) William Harrison Dempsey è stato campione del mondo dei pesi massimi dal 1919 al 1926. “Jack” Dempsey ha vinto il titolo dei pesi massimi da Jess Willard, l’uomo che ha sconfitto Johnson nel 1919. Per il suo spirito combattivo era soprannominato “il massacratore” o “il mangiatore di uomini”
4) il nome Silvestro è indubbiamente di origini italiane e proviene dal latino Silvester per indicare “colui che vive nei boschi” (dalla radice selva). In senso lato indica una persona rozza o grezza evocando al contempo un che di forte e primordiale, un vero portento della natura. Nome amato dai Papi è ricordato nella figura di San Silvestro, il papa al tempo di Costantino il primo imperatore romano che si convertì al cristianesimo.
5) tra le prodezze del grande Silvestro non mancano le catture dei fuorilegge del Wild-West americano
6) letteralmente “mettere sottovento” significa far innervosire o arrabbiare qualcuno, in italiano si potrebbe tradurre come “mettere la mosca al naso”: la forma gergale potrebbe risalire alla prima guerra mondiale; qui tradotto con il termine catturare perchè più coerente con il contesto
7) anche scritto come “a man made from Cork
8) La Lusitania era una nave passeggeri, che venne silurata da un sommergibile tedesco al largo dell’Islanda il 7 maggio 1915, la strage scosse l’opinione pubblica mondiale e probabilmente contribuì nella decisione di far entrare nel conflitto bellico anche gli Stati Uniti.
9) in italiano si dice semplicemente “banda” in inglese “brass band” ovvero banda d’ottoni (più comunemente riferita alle bande con strumenti a fiato di New Orleans)

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20727
http://www.word-detective.com/2008/04/put-the-wind-up/

THE BOLD O’DONAGHUE: AN IRISHMAN IN LONDON!

La popolazione irlandese è stata oggetto di vari stereotipi nei testi teatrali e nelle canzoni: è Paddy un campagnolo ubriacone e per lo più inaffidabile o traditore. Lo troviamo già nell’Henry V di Shakespeare ma è tutto sommato una buffa figura caricaturale; nella seconda metà dell’Ottocento invece  dopo l’emigrazione causata dalla Grande Carestia, le rivolte agrarie e il movimento feniano, l’irlandese tipo è considerato alla stregua di una creatura culturalmente inferiore, un  “white Negro”.

PADDY NEL MUSIC-HALL DI LONDRA

oxford_music_hallIl music-hall inglese è il precursore del teatro di varietà trattandosi di un locale in cui la gente del popolino mangiava e beveva seduta al tavolo e assisteva a degli spettacoli che si alternavano sul palco, un misto di numeri comici, circensi e canzoni popolari. Questa forma di intrattenimento ha preso piede tra il 1830 e il 1850 periodo in cui si iniziarono a costruire degli appositi music hall al posto delle “public houses” che già offrivano spettacoli.
Il genere di canzoni era comico e sentimentale, il linguaggio mai scurrile ma piuttosto allusivo e provocatorio, così la figura dell’irlandese tipo era irrisa per la sua “irishness” si esaltava, deridendola, la visione stereotipata dell’irlandese quale donnaiolo impenitente, ubriacone, spaccone e rissoso.

 BOLD O’DONOGHUE

Il nome è molto diffuso in Irlanda e si scrive O’Donoghue ma anche O’Donaghue o Donaghy, Donahow, Doneghoe, derivato dal gaelico O Donnchadha (che significa valoroso guerriero dai capelli scuri). Il nome, originario del sud-ovest d’Irlanda, si è sparso nel Kerry e Cork.
Il protagonista di questa canzone inglese del music-hall si vanta delle sue capacità amatorie, gli irlandesi invece di offendersi, hanno adottato O’Donoghue come personaggio per una tipica irish drinking song, così la canzone è stata ripresa e resa popolare dai Clancy Brothers negli anni 60. Tommy Makem, imparò la canzone da Johnny Vallely di Derrynoose (County Armagh).

ASCOLTA Ryan’s Fancy in “Times To Remember”, 1973

ASCOLTA The Blarney Lads


I
Well now, here I am from Paddy’s land(1), a land of high reknown,
I’ve broken all the hearts of girls for miles from Keady town(2);
And when they hear that I’m awa’ they’ll raise a hullabaloo,
When they hear about that handsome lad then they call O’Donoghue.
CHORUS
For I’m the b’y to please her
and I’m the b’y to tease her,

I’m the b’y to squeeze her
and I’ll tell you what I’ll do:

I’ll court her like an Irishman with me brogue and blarney too is me plan,
With me rollikin swollikin hollikin mollikin(3) bold O’Donoghue.
II
Well I wish me love was a red, red rose on yon garden wall, (4)
And me to be a dew drop and upon her brow I’d fall;
Perhaps then she might think of me as a rather heavy dew(5),
Well I’m certain she’d find the notion in the bold O’Donoghue
III
Well I hear that Queen Victoria has a daughter fine and grand,
Perhaps she’d take it into her head to marry an Irishman;
If I could only get the chance to have a word or two,
Then I’m sure she’d put a notion in the bold O’Donoghue. (6)
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Eccomi qui dalla Terra di Paddy(1),
una terra di chiara fama,
ho spezzato i cuori di tutte le ragazze per chilometri intorno alla città di Keady(2), e quando sapranno che sono andato via, faranno un gran baccano;
quando sentiranno parlare di quel bel ragazzo che si chiama O’Donoghue.
CORO
Perchè sono il ragazzo per divertirla
e sono il ragazzo per stuzzicarla

sono il ragazzo per coccolarla
e ti dirò quello che farò:
ho intenzione di corteggiarla con il mio accento irlandese e la mia parlantina
con il mio spensierato, turgido(3), ardito O’Donoghue

II
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rossa rosa rossa su quel muro del giardino (4)
e io essere una goccia di rugiada che cade sopra la sua fronte, forse poi lei potrebbe pensare a me come a una rugiada piuttosto forte (5 )e sono certo che si farebbe un’idea dell’ardito O’Donoghue.
III
Ho sentito che la Regina Vittoria ha una figlia grande e bella
forse le verrà in mente di sposare un irlandese;
se potessi solo avere l’occasione di scambiare due parole,
allora sono certo che avrebbe voglia dell’ardito O’Donoghue

NOTE
1) Paddy è il nome affettuoso con cui gli irlandesi chiamano San Patrizio, patrono d’Irlanda
2) piccolo paese nella contea di Armagh (Irlanda del Nord) di cui è originario Tommy Makem
3) scritto anche come “huligan, wuligan, ruligan, swuligan” serie di vezzeggiativi storpiati dei quali non riesco a dare una traduzione in italiano
4) La seconda strofa è una parodia di una canzone d’amore irlandese dal titolo “I wish my love was a red red rose
5) allusione al “mountain dew” il distillato illegale di whiskey

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/04/bold.htm
http://www.irelandcalling.ie/irish-names-odonoghue
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59176