Peigín agus Peadar

Vladan Nikolic

Our Goodman, The Goodman, The Gudeman, The Traveler

American version
Four (Three) Nights Drunk, Four (Five) Drunken Nights,
Old Cuckold, Cabbage Head 
Drunkard’s Special

Seven Drunken nights (irish version)
Peigín agus Peadar (irish gaelic version)

Le repliche di Marion (italian version)

This is the Irish Gaelic version of the comic ballad “Our Goodman” released in Ireland as “Seven Drunken Nights
It is Joe Heaney who reconnects the ballad to an Irish story in which a laborer, returning home after spending twenty years working at a rich farm, finds his wife in bed with a bearded guy (whom his wife claims to be their little son who became an adult!).
E’ la versione in gaelico irlandese della ballata comica “Our Goodman” diffusa in Irlanda con il titolo “Seven Drunken Nights”
E’ Joe Heaney a ricollegare la ballata ad una storiella irlandese in cui un bracciante, ritornato a casa dopo vent’anni passati a lavorare presso una ricca fattoria, trova la moglie a letto con un tizio con tanto di barba (che la moglie sostiene essere il loro figlioletto diventato adulto!).

Colm Keane  sings “A Pheigí na gCarad (Our Goodman)” AFC 2004/004 recorded by Alan Lomax 

Dervish – Peigín mo Chroí live, Playing with Fire 1996

A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Ce he an fear fada ud timpeall an ti
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

A Pheadar mo chara is a Pheadar mo chroi
Sin e do mhaicin nach bhfaca tu riamh
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheadar mo chroi

Shuil mise thoir agus shuil mise thiar
Is feasog ar leanbh ni fhaca me riamh
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

A Pheadar mo chara is a Pheadar mo chroi
Eirigh do sheasamh ‘gus reitigh greim bia
O ho a Pheadar mo chroi
A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Nil ins an teach ach aon greim mine bui
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

A Pheadar mo chara is a Pheadar mo chroi
In iochtar mo mhala ta caca mine bui
O ho a Pheadar mo chroi
A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Ta an caca seo ro fada nil in aon chaoi bui
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

‘S a Pheadar mo chara, suifimis sios
Na fagfas an baile chomh ‘s mhairfeas me riamh
O ho a Pheadar mo chroi
A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Ce he an fear fada timpeall an ti

O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a ghra geal mo chroi


I
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Who is that tall strange man?
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Peggy, my heart
II
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
That is your baby (1) whom you never saw 
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Peter, my heart

III
I walked east and I walked west
But a beard on a baby
I have never before seen
IV
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
Rise up now and prepare some food
O ho Peter, my heart
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
I have not a grain of yellow meal in the house
V
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
In the bottom of my bag
there is a yellow meal cake (2)
O ho Peter, my heart
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
This cake you have is full of golden guineas (3)
VI
Peter, my friend we will sit down
I’ll never leave home again for as long as I live
O ho Peter, my heart
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Who is that tall strange man?
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
chi è quell’uomo barbuto alto e sconosciuto?
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Rita, cuore mio
II
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
è tuo figlio che non hai mai visto
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Piero cuore mio
III
Sono stato a Est e a Ovest
ma una barba su un bambino
non l’ho mai vista prima
IV
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
alzati ora e prepara del cibo
oh Piero cuore mio
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
non c’è un granello di farina nella casa
V
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
nel fondo della mia sacca
c’è una torta di meliga
oh Piero cuore mio
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
questa torta che hai è piena di sovrane d’oro
VI
Piero amore mio, ci sistemeremo
non  partirò mai più finchè avrò vita
oh Piero cuore mio
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
chi è quell’uomo barbuto alto e sconosciuto?

NOTE
1) the story has a background (cf): Peter left twenty years earlier to go to work as a farm laborer and by seven years in seven years has always renewed his employment contract until one day he decides to return home. The owners of the farm then ask him if he prefers to receive compensation for his work or if he prefers to receive three valuable tips. He chooses the advices (which will save his life on the return journey). When he left twenty years before his wife was already waiting for a child who obviously is now a man
la storia ha un antefatto (vedi): Piero è partito vent’anni prima per andare a lavorare come bracciante in una fattoria e di sette anni in sette anni ha sempre rinnovato il contratto di lavoro finchè un bel giorno decide di ritornare a casa. I proprietari della fattoria allora gli chiedono se preferisce ricevere il compenso per il lavoro svolto o se in alternativa preferisce ricevere tre preziosi consigli. L’uomo sceglie i consigli (che gli salveranno la vita nel viaggio di ritorno). Quando è partito vent’anni prima la moglie era già in attesa di un bambino che ovviamente vent’anni dopo è diventato un uomo
2) The farmer’s wife had prepared two sweets for Peter, one to take home to his wife and the other to eat during the trip
La moglie del fattore aveva preparato a Piero due dolci, uno da portare a casa alla moglie e l’altro da mangiare durante il viaggio
3) In the second cake there was all the compensation for the 21 years of work done by Peter
Nella seconda torta c’era tutto il compenso per i 21 anni di lavoro svolto da Piero

Teada in Téada 2003

A Pheigín na gcarad ‘s a Pheigín mo chroí
Cé hé an fear fada údan sínte leat síos?
Curfá: Ó a hó, ó a hó Ó a hó, a stóirín mo chroí

A Pheadair na gcarad ‘s a Pheadair mo chroí
Sin é do leanbh nach bhfaca tú riamh
Ó shiúil mise thoir agus shiúil mise thiar
Ach féasóg ar leanbh ní fhaca mé riamh

A Pheigín na gcarad ‘s a Pheigín mo chroí
Éirigh i do sheasamh ‘gus réitigh greim bídh
A Pheadair na gcarad ‘s a Pheadair mo chroí
Níl ins an teach agam greim mine buí

A Pheigín na gcarad ‘s a Pheigín mo chroí
In íochtar mo mhála tá cáca mine buí

‘S a Pheigín ‘s a mhaicín suífidh muid síos
Ní fhágfad an baile chúns mhairfeas mé arís


I
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Who is that tall man stretched alongside you?
Chorus : Oh a ho, oh a ho Oh a ho,
my love, oh love of my heart
II
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
That is your baby (1) whom you never saw 
I walked east and I walked west
But a beard on a baby
I have never before seen
III
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Rise up now and prepare some food
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
I have not a grain of yellow meal in the house
IV
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
In the bottom of my bag
there is a yellow meal cake (2)
V
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
I’ll never leave home again for as long as I live
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
chi è quell’uomo alto disteso accanto a te?
Coro Oh a ho, oh a ho Oh a ho,
amore mio, oh amore del mio cuore
II
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
è tuo figlio che non hai mai visto
Sono stato a Est e a Ovest
ma una barba su un bambino
non l’ho mai vista prima
III
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
alzati ora e prepara del cibo
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
non c’è un granello di farina nella casa
IV
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
nel fondo della mia sacca
c’è una torta di meliga
V
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
non  partirò mai più finchè avrò vita

LINK
https://songsinirish.com/peigins-peadar-teada-lyrics/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/teada/peigins.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/dervish/peigin.htm
https://www.joeheaney.org/en/peigin-agus-peadar/

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18132
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/seven-drunken-nights/

Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold

Leggi in italiano

TITLES: Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold, Groline and Her Young Sailor Bold, The Young Sailor Bold, The Nobleman ‘s Daughter, Caroline and Her Young Sailor Boy, A Rich Nobleman’s Daughter’, Young Caroline and The Sailor
sailor-pic
A love story between a young girl who denies her noble and wealthy family and her wealthy life for the love of a young and handsome sailor. For fear he forgets her, she embarks on the ship disguised as a sailor. When their ship returns to the port of London, the girl goes to her parents to request consent to their marriage.
The theme was very popular among the nineteenth-century broadside and the ballad was popularized by the popular tradition of England, Ireland, Scotland and North America. The melody combined with the text is not unique, here are reported only two: fromJoe Heaney (Rosin The Beau) and from Sara Makem (recorded by Bill Leader at the home of Sara, Keady, County of Armagh in 1967).

The cross-dressing ballads decline the theme of the disguise often combined with the sailor’s (sometimes soldier) farewell with the woman who begs him to take her with him, willing to dress up as a man to stand beside him; the image of a woman-warrior and strong, supported by the power of love and therefore willing to go against her family and social conventions is more a story from a novel than an actual chronicle, the women in those times were subdued to the father first and to the husband later, and very few could win the economic independence (there were then the poor ones who did not care about anyone and who ended up badly in the middle of a street, making all kind of work to barely manage to feed the children). These were the times of marriages combined by families and were based on appropriate alliances and young women were not allowed to fall in love with a handsome black-eyed sailor!

Sarah Makem from Sea Song and Shanties 1994

Andrea Corr from Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

Joe Heaney 1964 (here)

I
There lived a rich Nobleman’s daughter/
Caroline is her name we are told/
One day from her drawing room window
She admired a young sailor bold
II
She cried – “I’m a Nobleman’s daughter
My income’s five thousand in gold
I forsake both my father and mother
And I’ll marry young sailor bold”
III
Says William- “Fair lady remember
Your parents you are bound to mind
In sailors there is no dependence
For they leave their true lovers behind”
IV
And she says – “There’s no one could prevent me/
One moment to alter my mind/
In the ships I’ll be off with my true love/
He never will leave me behind”
 
V
Three years and a half on the ocean
And she always proved loyal and true
Her duty she did like a sailor
Dressed up in her jacket of blue
VI
When at last they arrived back in England
Straightway to her father she went
“Oh father dear father forgive me
Deprive me forever of gold
Just grant me one favor I ask you
To marry a young sailor bold”
VII
Her father looked upon young William
And love and in sweet unity
“If I be spared till Tomorrow
It’s married this couple shall be”.

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/carolineandheryoungsailorbold.html
http://www.thecopperfamily.com/songs/collected/caroline.html
http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=742
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/caroline_young_sailor_bold_pegmcmahon.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/15/caroline.htm
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN17.html
http://www.johnmorrish.com/folkhandbook/sailors.html

CAILLEACH AN AIRGID

Una sean-nós song in gaelico irlandese proveniente dal Connemara dal titolo “Cailleach An Airgid” (in inglese “the hag with the money”-in italiano la strega con i soldi) diffusa anche con il titolo di “Sí Do Mhaimeó Í” (in inglese “She’s your granny!”)

E’ una canzone umoristica che dice alle arzille vecchiette di fare attenzione ai bei giovanotti interessati al matrimonio più per i loro soldi che per il sentimento. Nella canzone ci si riferisce a un personaggio reale Máire Ní Chathasaigh (Mary Casey) che fece fortuna in America e ritornò in Irlanda per avviare un traffico di autobus lungo le strade di Connemara.

cailleachmarriage
by Cartoon Saloon

Una vasta playlist qui tra cui segnalo in particolare:

ASCOLTA Niamh Ní Charra in Súgach Sámh / Happy Out”, 2010.

ASCOLTA Altan in Harvest Storm 1992
ASCOLTA Celtic woman voce Meav Ni Mhaolchatha

ASCOLTA Anuna

Nell’esilarante VIDEO Sónta & Cartoon Saloon si aggiungono ulteriori tre strofe, credo provengano dalla versione di Dara Bán Mac Donnchadha e che riguardano la pesca, ma al momento non ho ancora trovato il testo


Curfá
‘Sí do mhaimeo í, ‘sí do mhaimeo í
‘Sí do mhaimeo í, ‘sí cailleach an airgid
‘Sí do mhaimeo í, ó Bhaile Iorrais Mhóir í
‘S chuirfeadh sí cóistí
Ar bhóithre Cois Fharraige
I
Dá bhfeicfeá’ an “steam”
‘Ghabhail siar Tóin Uí Loin’
‘S na rothaí ‘ghabhail timpeall siar ó na ceathrúnaí
Chaithfeadh sí ‘n stiúir naoi n-uair’ ar a cúl
‘S ní choinneodh sí siúl
Le cailleach an airgid
II
Measann tú, ‘bpósfa’, measann tú ‘bpósfa’
Measann tú, ‘bpósfa’, cailleach an airgid?
Tá’s a’m nach ‘bpósfa’, tá’s a’m nach ‘bpósfa’
Mar tá sé ró-óg ‘gus d’ólfadh sé’n t-airgead
III
‘S gairid go ‘bpósfaidh, ‘s gairid go ‘bpósfaidh
‘S gairid go ‘bpósfaidh, beirt ar a’ mbaile seo
‘S gairid go ‘bpósfaidh, ‘s gairid go ‘bpósfaidh
Séan Shéamais Mhóir is Máire Ní Chathasaigh


Chorus
She is your granny(x3)
the hag with the money
She’s your granny, from Iorras Mhór(1) she’d ride in coaches on the roads of Cois Fharraige (2)
I
If you saw the steam going west to Flynn’s Point
And the wheels churning around her hindquarters,
You could turn the steering wheel nine times at her stern
And she wouldn’t keep up(3) with the hag with the money
II
Do you think you’ll marry?  (x3)
the hag with the money?
I know you won’t marry (x2)
‘Cause he’s too young and he’ll squander the money
III
We’ll soon have a wedding (x3)
by two in the village
We’ll soon have a wedding (x2)
Between Sean Seamais Mhoir and Maire Ni Chathasaigh
tradotto da Cattia Salto
CORO
E’ tua nonna,
la strega con il grano
è tua nonna da Errismore (1)
che corre in autobus
per le strade di Cois Fharraige(2)
I
Se vedevi il fumo (del battello) andare verso Ovest a Flynn’s Point
e le ruote che sbattevano sul suo deretano
potresti girare il timone nove volte a poppa
e non avrebbe tenuto il passo(3)
alla strega con i soldi
II
Credi che ti sposerai
la strega con i soldi?
Credo che non si sposerà
perché è troppo giovane e sperpererà il danaro
III
Presto ci sarà un matrimonio
con due del villaggio
presto ci sarà un matrimonio
tra Sean Seamais Mhoir e Maire Ni Chathasaigh

NOTE
1) Iorruis Mhóir (Errismore)
2) Cois Fharraige= “beside the sea”. è quella parte ragionevolmente dritto della costa del Connemara “is that reasonably straight part of the Connemara coastline that stretches from Salthill on the east to Ros a’ Mhíl on the west. Beyond Ros a’Mhíl it’s nothing but inlets and islands and huge rocks.”
3) la frase è un po’ contorta ma si descrive una gara di abilità tra un battello a vapore (in inglese è di genere femminile) e la “nonnina” la quale secondo Joe Heaney “she was reputed to be so strong, that even at that time – that’s when the first boats came out with the…steamboats – they reckoned that if she went into a rowing-boat and started rowing against the steamboat she’d have beaten the steamboat, she was that strong” (tratto da qui).

IL CONNEMARA

Non una contea ma un’area peninsulare geograficamente delimitata nella contea di Galway (Irlanda Ovest)
Il Connemara rappresenta per l’ Irlanda un po’ quello che la Toscana e’ per l’Italia o la Valle della Loira o la Borgogna sono per la Francia: la regione che in un certo senso ne riassume lo spirito, dove si trovano concentrati gli aspetti del paesaggio e della cultura che piu’ di frequente vengono associati all’ intera nazione: qui si trova una delle piu’ vaste aree dove ancora sopravvive la lingua celtica, qui si possono ammirare le verdissime vallate e le colline spazzate dal vento rese famose da film come The Quiet Man di John Ford, e piu’ di recente, The Field, entrambi girati da queste parti.” (tratto da qui)

FONTI
http://www.verdeirlanda.info/index.php/i-luoghi/97-il-connemara
http://www.guide-europe.info/connemara-guida-turistica/
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/SiDoMhamoI.html
http://ronanbrowne.com/dally-and-stray-sleeve-notes/20-2/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/cliar/cailleach.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/altan/sido.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/sido.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/meav/sido.htm
http://songsinirish.com/p/cailleach-an-airgid-lyrics.html
http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=734
http://saturdaychorale.com/2011/07/16/saturday-chorale-the-hag-with-the-money-anuna/
https://thesession.org/tunes/351

Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold

Read the post in English

TITOLI: Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold, Groline and Her Young Sailor Bold, The Young Sailor Bold, The Nobleman ‘s Daughter, Caroline and Her Young Sailor Boy, A Rich Nobleman’s Daughter’, Young Caroline and The Sailor
sailor-pic
La storia è una storia d’amore tra una giovane fanciulla che rinnega la sua nobile e ricca famiglia e la sua vita agiata per amore di un giovane e bel marinaio. Per paura che lui la dimentichi, lei si imbarca sulla nave travestendosi da marinaio. Quando la loro nave ritorna nel porto di Londra la fanciulla si reca dai genitori per chiedere il consenso al matrimonio.
Il tema era molto popolare tra i broadside ottocenteschi e la ballata venne diffusa dalla tradizione popolare di Inghilterra, Irlanda, Scozia e Nord America. La melodia abbinata al testo non è univoca, qui ne sono riportate solo due quella di Joe Heaney (Rosin The Beau) e quella di Sara Makem registrata da Bill Leader a casa di Sara, Keady, Contea di Armagh nel 1967.

Le cross-dressing ballads declinano il tema del travestimento spesso abbinate al farewell del marinaio (a volte soldato) con la donna che lo supplica di prenderla con sé disposta a travestirsi da uomo pur di stargli al fianco; l’immagine di una donna-guerriera e forte, sostenuta dalla forza dell’amore e perciò disposta ad andare contro alla sua famiglia e alle convenzioni sociali è più un racconto da romanzo d’appendice che di cronaca vera, le donna in quei tempi sottostavano al padre prima e al marito dopo, e ben poche potevano conquistare l’indipendenza economica (c’erano poi quelle povere di cui non importava niente a nessuno e che finivano malamente in mezzo ad una strada o si ammazzavano di lavoro per riuscire a malapena a dare da mangiare ai figli). Erano i tempi dei matrimoni combinati dalle famiglie e si basavano su opportune alleanze e convenienti unioni e alle giovani donne non era consentito di innamorarsi di un bel marinaio dagli occhi neri!

Sarah Makem in Sea Song and Shanties 1994

Andrea Corr in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

Joe Heaney 1964 (here)


I
There lived a rich Nobleman’s daughter/
Caroline is her name we are told/
One day from her drawing room window
She admired a young sailor bold
II
She cried – “I’m a Nobleman’s daughter
My income’s five thousand in gold
I forsake both my father and mother
And I’ll marry young sailor bold”
III
Says William- “Fair lady remember
Your parents you are bound to mind
In sailors there is no dependence
For they leave their true lovers behind”
IV
And she says – “There’s no one could prevent me/
One moment to alter my mind/
In the ships I’ll be off with my true love/
He never will leave me behind”
V
Three years and a half on the ocean
And she always proved loyal and true
Her duty she did like a sailor
Dressed up in her jacket of blue
VI
When at last they arrived back in England
Straightway to her father she went
“Oh father dear father forgive me
Deprive me forever of gold
Just grant me one favor I ask you
To marry a young sailor bold”
VII
Her father looked upon young William
And love and in sweet unity
“If I be spared till Tomorrow(1)
It’s married this couple shall be”.
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Laggiù viveva la figlia di un ricco nobiluomo,
dicono si chiamasse Carolina ;
un giorno dalla finestra della sua camera si mise ad ammirare un giovane audace marinaio
II
Si lamentò “Sono figlia di un nobiluomo,
le mie entrate sono di 5 mila pezzi d’oro, lascerò mio padre e mia madre
e sposerò il giovane audace marinaio
.”
III
Dice William ” Bella madama, ricorda quello che i tuoi genitori ti hanno raccomandato, di non fare affidamento sui marinai perchè si lasciano le loro innamorate alle spalle
IV
Dice lei “Non c’è nessuno che riuscirà a ostacolarmi,
o a  farmi cambiare idea per un istante.
Sulla nave me ne andrò con il mio innamorato
così non mi lascerà mai indietro”

V
Tre anni e mezzo sull’oceano
e sempre lei si mostrò leale e fidata, faceva il suo dovere come un marinaio vestita con la giacchetta blu.
VI
Quando alla fine ritornarono in Inghilterra
ditta da suo padre lei andò
O padre caro padre perdonami, diseredami pure,
ma piuttosto concedimi il favore che ti chiedo, di sposare un giovane audace marinaio

VII
Il padre prese in considerazione il giovane William e l’amore e la (loro) dolce unione
Se arriverò a domani(1)
questa coppia si dovrà sposare

NOTE
1) equivalente in italiano all’espressione idiomatica “Se non mi viene un colpo oggi”

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/carolineandheryoungsailorbold.html
http://www.thecopperfamily.com/songs/collected/caroline.html
http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=742
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/caroline_young_sailor_bold_pegmcmahon.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/15/caroline.htm
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN17.html
http://www.johnmorrish.com/folkhandbook/sailors.html

THE ROCKS OF BAWN FROM CONNACH OR ULSTER?

imagesM1A0JIDC“The Rocks of Bawn” è un brano tradizionale irlandese che parla delle precarie condizioni di vita degli Irlandesi, nella persona del signor Sweeney, il quale lavora come bracciante agricolo, una terra rocciosa e improduttiva. Ma tra le righe si leggono i segni dell’incitazione alla lotta politica.
La melodia è infatti malinconica e sognante come un’aisling song!
Della canzone esistono perlomeno due versioni una di Sam Hanry con il giovane Sweeney nei panni di un bracciante agricolo, la seconda di Patrick Kelly più orientata nel filone delle “irish rebel song”.
Prima di tutto cerchiamo di stabilirne le origini (vedi); la questione sempre aperta quando si tratta di tradizione orale è che tendenzialmente si vuole attribuire una patina di “antichità” alle canzoni popolari, per farle risalire al 1700 o dal 1600, e tuttavia molte di esse sono state composte nel 1800 o anche nei primi decenni del 1900.

CONNACHT o ULSTER?

Un aiuto per la comprensione della ballata ci può venire dall’individuazione storica del personaggio citato, il signor Sweeney, forse l’autore del testo.
Come spesso accade le vecchie ballate prendono nuova vita alla luce di eventi più attuali come può essere accaduto per “The Rocks of Bawn” così Sweeney  potrebbe essere stato Peter (Peadar) Sweeney (1873 – 1922), Loughrea, contea di Galway.Peter was very good friends with Arthur Griffith, and was one of the original founders of the Sinn Fein Movement.  He spent the early part of the 19th century extremely active in the Loughrea area, in his cause for Home Rule.  He had transformed his home into a meeting place, as well as, a distribution place for movement literature.  Consequently, he was often harassed and repeatedly jailed.  He was one of the first men in the Loughrea area to be arrested after the Easter Rising in 1916, and was sent to Reading Gaol with many others, not to be released until Christmas Eve that year.  He later became director of propaganda for South Galway Executive in the campaign for the Republican candidate, Captain Fahy.” (Mary Hamley tratto da qui)

Dominic Behan riteneva invece che l’autore fosse tale Martin Swiney di Cavan (nel suo “Ireland Sings” 1997).
Su Mudcat Cafè si avanza un’altra ipotesi in merito a John Sweeney di Mullahoran (Contea di Cavan) vissuto alla metà dell’Ottocento (vedi) in quest’ottica la canzone è semplicemente il lamento di un povero e molto giovane bracciante agricolo vessato dal suo padrone, (forse un contadino con più terra e più probabilmente in affitto che non un grosso proprietario terriero) che dopo un violento litigio con lui si ritrova di nuovo in mezzo alla strada nell’incertezza del futuro, al punto che preferirebbe la paga dell’esercito e la morte in guerra piuttosto che quella per fame.
A visitor described county Cavan in the 1600s, as “consisting altogether of hills, very steep and high, valleys between them being most commonly loughs and bogs”. Many of the lakes and bogs were later drained and are now dry land; but central Cavan remains a land of little hills and lakes. The western part of County Cavan is especially harsh with high elevation and poor land for farming. For that reason, much of the population lived in the more fertile central and eastern part of the county.(tratto da qui)
Le condizioni dell’agricoltura nella contea di Cavan erano così arretrate che l’aratro in ferro vi fece la sua comparsa sono nel 1810!

Dalle note di Joe Heaney [1919-1984] in “Come All Ye Gallant Irishmen” (Philo 2004, 1963) leggiamo “Joe learned this plaintive ballad from his father “40 or 50 years ago”. The “rocks of bawn” may refer to the white rocks of western Ireland [bawn=ban (Gaelic for white)] where Catholic landowners and farmers, dispossessed of their fertile farm lands in Meath by Oliver Cromwell in the seventeenth century, were forced to settle and where they have since managed, at best, a bleak existence from the rocks and the sea of the scraggy west coastal lands. To the hard-pressed, tired and bitter hired farm servant of the ballad, the British army presents itself as a reasonable escape from the near impossibility to “plough the rocks of bawn.” Si rende necessaria però una precisazione: il trasferimento forzoso degli irlandesi ribelli dopo la confisca delle loro terre riguardava essenzialmente la gentry, alla quale venne assegnata un terra “improduttiva” nel Connacht dopo la “colonizzazione” di Cromwell (ovviamente accompagnata dai loro “domestici” e dai fittavoli che avessero voluto seguirli). La grande massa degli Irlandesi rimase semplicemente dove  stava, ma sotto un nuovo padrone.

LA VERSIONE DI SAM HENRY

E’ la versione più diffusa, quella pubblicata da Sam Henry nel suo “Song of the People” (1923-1939), che colloca Bawn nella contea di Cavan.
Sebbene non ci siano grosse varianti testuali è la sequenza delle strofe a variare a secondo degli interpreti; il tema riprende il filone tardo seicentesco già iniziato con “The Spailpin Fanach” (in Inglese “The Rambling Laborer” o “The Roving Worker“) che ugualmente vira di significato nelle sue molte versioni andando dal lamento per una misera vita fatta di fatica e stenti, alla canzone comica condita con caustico irish-humour. Così anche in questa canzone c’è di che riflettere sul significato metaforico di poter arare “the rocks of bawn

ASCOLTA Arcady (strofe I, III, IV, V)

ASCOLTA John Jones in ‘Rising Road’ (strofe I, IV, II, III, V)

ASCOLTA Paul Brady & Liam O’Flynn (strofe I, II, III, V)

ASCOLTA Ryan’s Fancy 1974 (strofe I, IV, III, II, V) che propongono una melodia allegra, cogliendo più il lato di canzone comica condita con caustico irish-humour

“Songs of the People” 1923-39
I(1)
Come all ye loyal heroes wherever that you be,
Don’t hire with any master till y’ know what your work will be;
For you must rise up early from the clear daylight till the dawn(2),
And you never will be able to plough the rocks of bawn(3).
II
Rise up, rise up, young Sweeney, and give your horse its hay,
And give him as a feed of oats before you start away;
Don’t feed him on soft turnips and go on to your green lawn,
And then ye might be able to plough the rocks of bawn.
III
My curse upon you, Sweeney, you nearly have me robbed(4),
You’re sitting by the fireside with your feet upon the hob;
You’re sitting by the fireside from the clear daylight till the dawn,
And you never will be able to plough the rocks of bawn.
IV(5)
My shoes they are well worn now, my stockings they are thin,
My heart is always trembling a-feared that I’d give in;
My heart is nearly broken from the clear daylight till dawn,
And I never will be able to plough the rocks of bawn.
V
I wish the queen of England(6) would write to me in time(7),
And place me in some regiment all in my youth and prime;
I’d fight for Ireland’s glory from clear daylight till the dawn,
And I never would return again to plough the rocks of bawn(8)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite voi tutti compagni leali ovunque voi siate, non fatevi assumere da un  padrone fino a quando non saprete il tipo di lavoro che vi verrà assegnato; perchè vi toccherà alzarvi presto, tra le prime luci del giorno e il sorgere del sole (2) e non riuscirete mai a dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn (3).
II
“Alzati giovane Sweeney e dai il fieno al tuo cavallo
e dagli anche da mangiare l’avena prima di iniziare (il lavoro);
non dargli le rape molli e l’erba del prato
e allora sarai in grado di arare le terre rocciose di Bawn”.
III
“La mia maledizione su di te Sweeney, che mi hai quasi derubato,
te ne stai seduto accanto al focolare con i piedi al caldo,
stai seduto al focolare tra le prime luci del giorno e il sorgere del sole e non riuscirai mai a dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn”
IV
Ho calzato bene le scarpe oggi e le calze sono sottili,
il cuore mi trema per quello che sarà il futuro,
il cuore è vicino alla rottura, tra le prime luci del giorno e il sorgere del sole e non riuscirò mai dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn.
V
Vorrei che la regina d’Inghilterra mi mandasse la cartolina(7) e mi assegnasse a qualche reggimento nel pieno della mia giovinezza, lotterei per la gloria d’Irlanda  tra le prime luci del giorno e il sorgere del sole, e non ritornerei mai più dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn.

NOTE
1) strofa alternativa in Christy Moore
Come all you loyal heroes wherever you may be
Don’t hire with any master till you know what your work may be
Don’t hire with any master from the clear daylight till the dawn
For he’ll want you rising early to plough the rocks of Bawn
2) dawn è l’alba e anche se il primo chiarore del giorno e l’alba sembrano essere due momenti coincidenti passano in realtà circa due ore
3) Bawn è in Irlanda un nome di località presente un po’ ovunque nella toponomastica. Bawn is a townland in Mullahoran parish, which lies just south of Scrabby parish. Farming conditions in Scrabby would have been the same as in Mullahoran. The name “Bawn” refers to a square shaped fort, constructed in the 1620’s – a fortified farmstead of wealthy protestant settlers during the plantation of Ulster (1610). (tratto da qui)
Il termine ‘Bán’ visto genericamente ha però significati diversi e anche contrastanti: a parte il significato di “bianco” può voler dire “a grass field” nel senso di ‘untilled’, “wild” ma anche di “waste land”, quindi una terra buona per il pascolo non necessariamente rocciosa ma di certo brulla e desolata
4) Tra le maldicenze che descrivevano i braccianti come degli “sfaticati” o “perdigiorno” c’era anche l’accusa di ruberie perciò la strofa potrebbe essere un botta e risposta tra il bracciante e il datore di lavoro, Sweeney accusa il padrone per cui lavora di essere un tipo pigro, mentre il padrone accusa il bracciante di averlo derubato; più semplicemente è il padrone che accusa Sweeney di derubarlo perchè resta a sonnecchiare o a fumarsi la pipa accanto al fuoco, quando invece dovrebbe andare nei campi ad arare. Altri commentatori ritengono che la frase sia un’allusione al fatto che “Sweeney” sia un proprietario terriero ovviamente protestante inglese o scozzese, entrato in possesso delle terre della gentry irlandese (la prassi era consolidata dopo ogni ribellione alla Corona, ma anche per ogni violazione delle leggi inglesi) e perciò “maledetto” dal giovane bracciante . Ma la seconda strofa ci dice invece chiaramente che il giovane “Sweeney” è un cavallante.
5) questa strofa è spesso omessa o collocata al secondo posto nella sequenza delle strofe superstiti cantate oggigiorno. Eppure è in questa strofa che si evince la condizione precaria e malandata del giovane ragazzo, uno spalpeen costretto a vagabondare per la strada, sempre in cerca di un lavoro e angosciato dell’incertezza di non trovarlo. Quando la strofa si trova in IV posizione è chiaramente un riferimento al fatto che il ragazzo è  stato appena licenziato dal padrone dopo il litigio. La strofa alternativa in Christy Moore dice:
My shoes (boots) they are well worn and my stockings they are thin
My auld coat sure it’s threadbare now and I’m leaking to the skin
But I’ll rise us in the morning from the clear daylight till dawn
Then I will be able to plough up the rocks of Bawn
6) la regina diventa il “Sergeant-Major” oppure “Patrick Sarsfield” secondo la versione più antica: “Sarsfied (Earl of Lucan) was the Jacobite soldier who led the second flight of the Wild Geese. After the Treaty of Limerick (October 1691) he joined the army of Louis XIV in the Spanish Netherlands and was killed fighting the English at Neerwinden, near Landen, on 19 August, 1693.” (tratto da qui)
7) la tentazione di tradurre la frase secondo le consuetudini moderne è troppo forte, anche se oramai in Italia il servizio di leva è solo un lontano ricordo
8) una strofa aggiuntiva (qui) dice:
And if I’m not enlisted I’ll sail across the sea
To the broad fields of Americay or some far country
Where I’ll learn to rise up early from the clear daylight of the dawn
And I never would return again to plough the Rocks of Bawn
Tom Lenihan canta invece un’ulteriore strofa:
It is true that I must ramble, it is true that I must go.
It is true that I must ramble from my dear old Irish home.
My poor ould heart is breaking for the clear daylight of dawn,
For I know I won’t return no more to plough the rocks of Bawn.

SECONDA VERSIONE

La versione raccolta (o scritta) da Patrick Kelly di Cashel-in-Connemara (in “Ballads” 1922) è piuttosto una canzone d’amore, ma anche una canzone di protesta da leggersi in codice.


I
“Oh, rise up, gallant Sweeney”
The woman’s voice was sweet;
The piper took his pipes and stick
And follow’d thro’ the street.
As he was first so he was last
From clear daylight till dawn
He said: “We won’t be able
To plough the Rocks o’ Bawn.”
II
All weary walk’d young Sweeney:
The woman went before.
At high-noon sun he stopp’d to play
Before her father’s door.
Her father came the youth to curse
And drive him from his lawn.
She said: “I go with Sweeney
To plough the Rocks o’ Bawn.”
III
“Now rest you, loyal comrade,
Beside this clear spring well;
And look you there and what you see
To me I bid you tell.”
Young Sweeney look’d thro’ Life and Death
And saw a golden dawn
He said: “I know we’re able
To plough the Rocks o’ Bawn.”
IV
“Why sit you, Piper Sweeney,
So idle thro’ the day,
And where is she you follow’d far
As cuckoo follows May?”
Young Sweeney said: “She weeps alone
Beside her father’s lawn,
And so I sit me idle
All on the Rocks o’ Bawn.”
V
“Oh, rouse you, handsome Sweeney
And rouse the woman too;
Why sigh you here, why weeps she there
While work is still to do?”
But Sweeney said: “Tho’ we may toil
From clear daylight till dawn,
I fear we won’t be able
To plough the Rocks o’ Bawn.”
VI
“Where go you now, Boy Sweeney,
Or roving in the May?”
“I go to her I’d follow still
Thro’ dark and stormy day.
I look’d into the well she knew,
A Queen she walk’d her lawn–
And so I know we’re able
To plough the Rocks o’ Bawn.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Oh alzati prode Sweeney”
la voce della donna era dolce;
il pipaiolo prese la sua piva e il bastone
e s’incammino.
Era il primo e solo
tra le prime luci del giorno e il sorgere del sole, disse “Non riusciremo a dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn”
II
Tutto stanco camminavi giovane Sweeney: la donna è andata avanti. Al sole di mezzogioni si fermò a suonare davanti alla porta del padre.
Il padre uscì a maledire il giovane e ad allontanarlo dal prato.
Lei disse ” Vado con Sweeney
a dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn”
III
“Adesso riposati, leale compagno
davanti a questo pozzo di acqua sorgiva, e guardati intorno e cosa vedi, ti prego di raccontarmi”
Il giovane  Sweeney guardò tra la vita e la morte
e vide un’alba dorata (1)
disse “Sono certo che riusciremo
a dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn”
IV
“Perchè ti siedi Sweeney; così standotene in ozio tutto il giorno,
e dov’è lei che seguisti da lungi, come il cuculo segue il Maggio?”
Il giovane Sweeney disse ” Piange solitaria davanti al prato del padre,
e così mi siedo in ozio
sulle terre rocciose di Bawn”
V
” Oh svegliati, bel Sweeney
e sveglia anche la donna;
perchè piangi qui e lei si lamenta qui
mentre il lavoro è ancora da fare?”
Ma  Sweeney disse “Per quanto possiamo faticare tra le prime luci del giorno e il sorgere del sole temo che non saremo capaci di dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn”
VI
“Dove andrai adesso, Sweeney ragazzo
o vagabonderai a Maggio?”
“Vado da lei, ancora la seguirò
nel giorno oscuro e tempestoso.
Ho guardato nel pozzo che lei conosce,
una Regina che cammina sul prato –
e così so che siamo capaci di dissodare le terre rocciose di Bawn”

NOTE
1) la donna è la personificazione dell’Irlanda e l’alba dorata il radioso futuro dell’indipendenza irlandese

continua

FONTI
http://www.rocksofbawn.com/
http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=1690542 http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/11/bawn.htm http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/31/bawn.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6479 http://dowdfamilysite.com/dowd_html4.htm http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=1013 http://www.veteran.co.uk/VT149CD%20words.htm http://members.iinet.net.au/~dwomen/files/nlSept1407.html#anchor1183426

Red is the Rose

In the most sentimental Celtic songs there ia s plenty of red roses!
“Red is the Rose” is the Irish variant of the Scottish ballad Loch Lomond.
It is not unusual for the beautiful melodies to resemble each other beyond and to the other side of the North Channel (opening the controversy about which is the original and who copied it from whom), so the origin of this song is not well known, Tommy Makem along with the Clancy Brothers  introduced it to the public in the 1960s: Tommy, fondly remembered as Bard of Armagh had learned the song from his mother Sarah, singer and great collector of Armagh, Northern Ireland. Always among the songs of Sarah Makem and to remain in floral theme, I refer you to “I wish my love was a red, red rose“.
Di rose rosse sono piene le canzoni celtiche più sentimentali e molte sono già state inserite in questo database.
Red is the Rose” è la variante irlandese della ballata scozzese Loch Lomond. Non è insolito che le belle melodie si somiglino al di là e al di qua del North Channel (e tra gli appassionati fiocca la querelle su quale sia l’originale e chi ha copiato da chi), di questa non si conosce bene la provenienza, è stato Tommy Makem insieme ai Clancy Brothers a farla conoscere al grande pubblico a partire dagli anni ’60: Tommy, ricordato affettuosamente con il nome di Bardo di Armagh (vedi) aveva imparato la canzone dalla madre Sarah, cantante e grande collezionista di Armagh, Irlanda del Nord. Sempre tra le canzoni di Sarah Makem e per restare in tema floreale, vi rimando a “I wish my love was a red, red rose” .

IRISH VERSION

The first recording dates back to 1934 with the title of “My Bonnie Irish Lass“; only more recently has it come back into vogue after the version of The High Kings ..
La prima registrazione della canzone tuttavia  risale al 1934 con il titolo di My Bonnie Irish Lass; solo più recentemente è ritornata in auge dopo la versione dei The High Kings ..

Josephine Beirne & George Sweetman 1934

Tommy Makem & Liam Clancy live

The Ennis Sisters (Terranova) & The Chieftains in “Fire in the kitchen” 1997

Nanci Griffin & The Chieftains in An Irish Evening, 1992

The High Kings in Memory Lane 2010

I versi sono molto semplici: due innamorati si dichiarano amore eterno, e si scambiano le promesse di matrimonio, ma la canzone è permeata dall’amarezza dell’abbandono, lui partirà (probabilmente per l’America) in cerca di lavoro.


I
Come over the hills,
my bonny Irish lass(1)
Comer over the hills to your darling;
You choose the rose, love,
and I’ll make the vow(2)
And I’ll be your true love forever.
Refrain:
Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows,
And fair is the lily of the valley(3);
Clear is the water that flows from the Boyne(4)
But my love is fairer than any.
II
Down by Killarney’s green woods (5)
that we strayed
And the moon and the stars they were shining;
The moon shone its rays
on her locks of golden hair
And she swore she’d be my love forever.
III
It’s not for the parting that my sister pains
It’s not for the grief of my mother,
“Tis all for the loss of my bonny Irish lass
That my heart is breaking forever (6).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Vieni sulle colline,
mia bella irlandese
vieni sulle colline dal tuo amore;
sceglierai la rosa, amore,
e io farò le promesse
e sarò il tuo amore per sempre.
Ritornello:
Rossa è la rosa che cresce nel giardino,
e bello è il mughetto;
chiara è l’acqua che scorre dal Boyne
ma il mio amore è il più bello di tutti.
II
Per i boschi di Killarney
vagavamo
e la luna e le stelle brillavano;
la luna irraggiava luminosa
sulle ciocche dei suoi capelli d’oro,
e lei mi giurò eterno amore
III
Non soffro per la separazione da mia sorella
non è per la perdita di mia madre,
è per la perdita della mia bella irlandese
che il mio cuore è spezzato per sempre

NOTE
1) oppure a secondo di chi canta “my handsome Irish lad”
2) a leggere tra le righe il protagonista sta chiedendo una notte d’amore alla sua fidanzata e vuole convincerla a cedere la sua virtù (la rosa) con una promessa di matrimonio. Secondo la l’antica tradizione se due persone, anche senza testimoni, si fossero scambiate le promesse e avessero dormito insieme erano socialmente sposati. In genere il matrimonio veniva celebrato nei boschi con il rito dell’handfasting continua
3) il mughetto è un fiore delicato e profumatissimo che fiorisce in tutto maggio-giugno; nelle notti di luna piena il suo profumo diventa particolarmente intenso e inebriante
4) il fiume Boyne che scorre nel Leinster (Irlanda Orientale) è spesso richiamato nella mitologia irlandese: Brú na Bóinne (in italiano “la dimora del Boyne”) è uno dei più importanti siti archeologici del mondo con i grandi tumuli di Newgrange, Knowth e Dowth. La citazione allude a una specie di cuore dell’Irlanda, il santuario degli Antenati dell’Irlanda tribale.
5) Killarney si trova nel Kerry, all’estremità sud dell’isola e mi piace pensare che il bosco della canzone sia stato preservato nel Parco Nazionale (Killarney National Park) ricco di odorosi alberi secolari. In questa strofa veniamo a sapere che l’incontro d’amore notturno c’è effettivamente stato!!
6) nella versione americana diventa “That is leaving old Ireland forever” in cui si rende più esplicito l’abbandono degli affetti a causa dell’emigrazione. Come possibile “trait d’union” con le versioni scozzesi la somiglianza con la ballata Flora’s Lament For Her Charlie 1841 (qui)
It’s not for the hardships that I must endure,
Nor the leaving of Benlomond;
But it’s for the leaving of my comrades all,
And the bonny lad that I love so dearly.

AMERICAN VERSION

51IzeFlH0lL__SL500_AA500_Questa versione iniziò a circolare negli anni 70 e Joe Heaney ci dice di averla imparata dal nonno. Originario di Carna (Connemara, Irlanda) egli fu un moderno bardo, un cantore del popolo custode dei canti tradizionali (la maggior parte in gaelico); negli anni 50 e 60 è in viaggio tra Dublino e Londra per concerti, registrazioni e competizioni canore.
The folk music revival proved both a blessing and a curse to Joe.  He began to be féted by the ‘stars’ of this revival.  Some, like MacColl and Seeger, Lloyd and Hamish Henderson were earnestly trying to gain a knowledge and appreciation of his art.  And at a more popular level, groups like the Clancy Brothers and the Dubliners were genuinely attracted to him and respected him for what he stood for.  However, well-meant attempts by such groups to introduce him to popular audiences often came to grief.  It has to be remembered that such audiences were there only because the current fad was ‘the ballads’.  Their comprehension of sean-nós, or any other form of traditional singing, was zilch“.(tratto da qui)
Poco dopo Joe decide di trasferirsi definitivamente in America dove accanto al lavoro “per vivere” partecipò a festival diede concerti nei folk club e così via, fino a diventare insegnante (nel dipartimento di Etnomucologia) in alcune università..

Joe Heaney 1996 nel sean nós di Connamara 

The version is almost identical to the Irish one, without more precise geographical connotations, but here the stanza is missing in which the man asks his sweetheart to spend a night of love in the woods; some therefore sing a “syncretic” version adding strophes I and II of the Irish version as final stanzas to this one.
La versione è pressochè identica a quella irlandese privata però da più precise connotazioni geografiche, qui però manca la strofa in cui l’uomo chiede alla propria innamorata di trascorrere una notte d’amore nel bosco (l’ultima prima della partenza); alcuni perciò cantano una versione “sincretica” aggiungendo le strofe I e II della versione irlandese come strofe finali a questa. 


CHORUS
Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows,
Fair is the lily of the valley ;
Clear are the waters
that flow in yonder stream ,
But my love is fairer than any
I
Over the mountains and down in the glen,
To a little thatched cot (1) in the valley;
Where the thrush and the linnet
sing their ditty and their song,
And my love’s leaning over the half-door (2).
II
Down by the seashore
on a cool summer’s eve 
With the moon rising over the heather;
The moon it shown fair
on her head of golden hair,
And she vowed she’d be my love forever.
III
It is not for the loss of my own sister Kate,
It is not for the loss of my mother;
It is all for the loss of my bonnie blue-eyed lass,
That I’m leaving my homeland forever (3).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Ritornello:
Rossa è la rosa che cresce nel giardino,
e bello è il mughetto;
chiara è l’acqua
che scorre
in quel ruscello
ma il mio amore è la più bella di tutto.
I
Su per le montagne e giù per la valletta
alla casina rustica nella valle,
dove il merlo e tordo
cantano le loro canzoncine /e il mio amore è appoggiata alla porta d’ingresso.
II
In riva al mare
in una fresca  sera d’estate (vagavamo)
con la luna che spuntava dall’edera;
la luna irraggiava chiara
sulle ciocche dei suoi capelli d’oro,
e lei mi giurò eterno amore
III
Non è per la perdita di mia sorella Kate
non è per la perdita di mia madre,
è per la perdita della mia bella ragazza occhi-azzurri, che lascio la mia terra per sempre

NOTE
1) the “thatched cottage” is the typical “country cottage” of fairy tales in white plastered stone and with a sloping roof in straw il “thatched cottage” è la tipica “casetta di campagna” delle fiabe in pietra intonacata di bianco e con il tetto spiovente in paglia
2) the cottage had a single access door to the south a characteristic “half-door” that is divided into two panels, which opened independently: the upper one could also be made of glass and it was almost always left open to let in light and air; the lower one was in wood and always remained closed, so that children and animals could not enter (or leave!). To the “half-door” it was resting to gossip with the neighbors or to smoke some tobacco! [il cottage aveva un’unica porta d’accesso a sud una caratteristica “mezza-porta” divisa cioè in due pannelli, che si aprivano in modo indipendente: quello superiore poteva essere anche a vetro e veniva lasciato quasi sempre aperto per fare entrare la luce e far circolare l’aria; quello inferiore era in un unico battente di legno che rimaneva sempre chiuso, in modo che bambini e animali non potessero entrare (o uscire!). Al mezzo battente della porta si stava appoggiati restando in casa per spettegolare con i vicini o per fumare un po’ di tabacco!]
3) the stanza suggests that the protagonist has emigrated due to the death of his love / disappointment of love (she may have married another) [la chiusura lascia intendere che il protagonista sia emigrato a causa della morte dell’innamorata/delusione d’amore (lei forse si è sposata con un altro)]

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/matrimonio-celtico-storia.html
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/red-is-the-rose
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/06/rose.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/20/red.htm http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=1009
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7171 http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/j_heaney.htm
http://www.irlandando.it/cosa-vedere/sud/contea-di-kerry/killarney-national-park/ http://cottageology.com/information/irishcottagehistory/

THE KERRY RECRUIT

Un giovane e sempliciotto ragazzo del Kerry (Irlanda sud-occidentale) che non aveva visto altro che il suo campo, decide di partire per l’avventura e si arruola nell’esercito britannico: siamo nella metà dell’Ottocento e il giovanotto è subito spedito, come carne da cannone, nella guerra di Crimea, all’epoca chiamata Guerra d’Oriente, la guerra russo-turca del 1853-1856.

La canzone si inserisce nel filone dei canti di protesta (anti-war songs) della tradizione popolare irlandese, che più spesso sono cantati dalle madri e dalle mogli, le quali si vedono ritornare a casa i loro uomini, straziati nel fisico e nello spirito dagli orrori della guerra. In questa canzone invece è il ragazzo che si descrive, tra il serio e il faceto, in prima persona, rilasciandoci l’immagine di “idiota patentato“, un soldato “da barzelletta”, un Paddy tronfio di irlandesità: eppure nel suo fervore di servitore “armato” (anche se non ha nemmeno ben chiaro come si faccia a sparare) denuncia l’inadeguatezza del “sistema britannico” di arruolamento e addestramento dei suoi soldati!

Ovviamente il ragazzo (poco più che ventenne) ritorna a casa cieco da un occhio e senza una gamba, eppure è contento di avere una “fine elegant leg made of wood“, la medaglia e un piccolo sussidio d’invalidità che gli permette di sistemarsi con Sheila, evidentemente più soldi di quanto riuscisse a ricavare dal suo lavoro nei campi!

assedio-sebastopoli

La versione attuale deriva da una serie di stampe in Inghilterra alla fine del 1700, inizi 1800 dal titolo The Frolicsome (or Frolicksome) Irishman, The Irish Recruit e The Kerry Recruit, per diffondersi anche in Irlanda in epoca più tarda e in riferimento alla guerra in Crimea (Roly Brown in “Glimpses into the 19th Century Broadside Ballad Trade No. 5: The Kerry Recruit” qui)
“So that we have two distinct outline forms of text at hand – The Frolic(k)some Irishman and The Irish Recruit – and the distribution of printings looks to be particularly circumscribed. ..  From this collection of dates it would appear that texts of The Irish Recruit came later than The Frolic(k)some Irishman.  It is worth noting that, despite such close connections amongst printers, so many small changes in layout and expression occurred – they surely parallel the changes made as oral versions were disseminated and indicate that print, therefore, did not necessarily confer an unchallengeable format. Nor, so far, has the title The Kerry Recruit surfaced and it is only when we encounter Irish broadside printings that it does emerge … It is hardly possible to be absolute in terms of printing dates but the internal evidence as discussed below suggests that Irish printings emerged after The Froli(ck)some Irishman and The Irish Recruit. ”

ASCOLTA The Dubliners
I
One morning in March I was digging the land(1),
with me brogues(2) on me feet and me spade in me hand
And says I to myself, such a pity to see,
such a fine strappin’ lad footin’ turf round Tralee
CHORUS (nonsense)
Wid me too ra na nya and me too ra na nya,
wid me too ra na noo ra na noo ra na nya
II
So I buttered(3) me brogues, shook hands with me spade,
then went off to the fair like a dashing young blade(4)
When up comes a sergeant he asks me to list,
‘Arra, sergeant a gra(5), stick a bob(6) in me fist
III
Well the first thing they gave me it was a red coat(7),
with a wide strap of leather to tie round me throat(8)
They gave me a quare thing, I asked what was that,
and they told me it was a cockade for me hat
IV
The next thing they gave me they called it a gun,
with powder and shot and a place for me thumb
Well first she spat fire and then she spat smoke,
she gave a great leap and me shoulder near broke
V
Well the first place they sent me was down by the quay,
on board of a warship bound for the Crimea
Three sticks in the middle all rowled round with sheets,
faith, she walked on the water without any feet
VI
When at Balaclava(9) we landed quite soon,
both cold, wet and hungry we lay on the ground.
Next morning for action the bugle did call,
and we had a hot breakfast of powder and ball
VII
Well we fought at the Alma, likewise Inkermann,
and the Russians they whaled us at the Redan(10)
In scalin’ the walls there meself lost an eye,
and a big Russian bullet ran away with me thigh
VIII(11)
‘Twas there we lay bleeding stretched on the cold ground,
both heads, legs and arms were all scattered around
I thought of me mam and me cleaveens were nigh,
sure they’d bury me decent and raise a loud cry
IX
Well a doctor was called and he soon staunched me blood,
and he gave me a fine elegant leg made of wood
They gave me a medal and ten pence a day,
contented with Sheelagh(12), I’ll live on half pay.

NOTE
1) Richard Dyer-Bennett dice: “At the age of nineteen, I was ploughin’ the land”
2) brogues: un tipo di scarpe robuste e grossolane un tempo usate in Irlanda ed nelle Highlands scozzesi.
3) letteralmente “imburrai”
4) letteralmente “lama” ma blade= man
5) in gaelico irlandese Gra’ mo chroi’ = love (of) my heart
6) il famigerato “schellino del Re
12th_Foot_uniform7) le giubbe rosse sono i soldati dell’esercito britannico dal XVII al XX secolo per via della giacca rossa delle divise
8) letteralmente: to tie= legare: sono una o due fasce di cuoio bianche da incrociare sul petto che fungono da cinturoni, in effetti la divisa all’epoca era diventata anacronistica con quel rosso sgargiante perfetto per il tiro a segno
9) la battaglia a Balaklava si svolse nel 1854
10) guerra di trincea quella dell’assedio a Sebastopoli, punto nevralgico per il controllo marittimo del Mar Nero, dove i Russi si erano asserragliati in grande numero e intenti non solo a cannonare gli avversari, ma anche a costruire e ricostruire una serie poderosa di fortificazioni, terrapieni difensivi, bastioni e torri. Lo scontro decisivo venne mosso alla Torre Malakov nel pressi del fiume Redan nei primi di settembre del 1855. Le perdite nello scontro furono pesanti per entrambi gli schieramenti, ma alla fine i Russi furono costretti ad abbandonare Sebastopoli. La parola “whale” è riferita alle balene e come verbo rende bene l’idea di una mattanza.
 11) la strofa cantata invece da Joe Heaney dice:
And it’s often I thought of me mother at home,
And while I was with her I was maith go leor;
When the bullets did fly, lads, I did let them pass
I lay down in the ditch, awful feared to be shot.
12) Altre versioni riportano Chela o Shela. Sembrerebbero nomi di donna (Sheelagh = Sheila)
Richard Dyer-Bennett ha aggiunto una strofa finale nella sua registrazione del 1957:
Now that was the story my grandfather told,
As he sat by the fire all withered and old.
“Remember,” said he,”that the Irish fight well,
But the Russian artillery’s hotter than Hell.”

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO (riveduta da qui)
I
Una mattina di marzo ero a scavare la terra
con le mie scarpacce(2) ai piedi e la mia vanga in mano
e mi dissi: “che peccato vedere
un bel ragazzo robusto, calpestare le zolle nei dintorni di Tralee
II
Così ingrassai (3) le scarpe, salutai la mia vanga
e mentre me ne andavo alla fiera sentendomi un giovanotto(4) affascinante
ti salta fuori un sergente che mi chiede di arruolarmi,
“Urra’, sergente bello mio(5), sbatti uno scellino(6) nel mio pugno”
III
Bene, la prima cosa che mi dettero fu una giubba rossa(7)
con un largo cinturone di cuoio da incrociare intorno alla gola(8);
mi dettero una cosa strana che chiesi cos’era
e mi dissero che era una coccarda per il mio cappello
IV
La cosa successiva che mi dettero la chiamarono un fucile
con polvere e pallottole e un posto per il mio pollice
Bene, prima sputò fuoco, poi sputò fumo,
dette un gran rinculo e la mia spalla quasi si ruppe
V
Bene, il primo posto dove mi mandarono fu per il molo,
a bordo di una nave da guerra diretta in Crimea
Tre pali nel mezzo tutti coperti di lenzuola
incredibile! Camminava sull’acqua senza (bisogno) dei piedi!
VI
Quando arrivammo a Balaklava(9) sbarcammo piuttosto alla svelta
freddi, zuppi e affamati ci buttammo per terra.
Il mattino dopo la tromba ci chiamò in azione
ed avemmo una calda colazione con polvere e proiettili
VII
Beh, combattemmo all’Alma, e così a Inkerman
e i russi ce ne diedero di brutto sul Redan(10).
Là mentre scalavo le mura persi un occhio,
e una grossa palla russa si portò via la mia coscia
VIII(11)
Eravamo là sanguinanti nelle barelle sulla fredda terra
teste, gambe e braccia erano sparpagliate tutte intorno;
pensai che se la mia mamma e i miei parenti erano vicini
sicuramente mi avrebbero dato una sepoltura decente e avrebbero pianto forte.
IX
Beh fu chiamato un dottore che presto arrestò il sangue,
e mi dette una gamba bella ed elegante fatta di legno;
mi dettero una medaglia e 10 pence al giorno
sistemato con Sheelagh(12), vivrò con la mezza paga.

FONTI
http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=918 http://www.folkways.si.edu/richard-dyer-bennet/the-kerry-recruit/american-folk-celtic/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=673&lang=it http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/kerry-recruit http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/kerry-recruit.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44753
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_05.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=86979

Hunting the wren: the King

wrenSopravvissuta in Irlanda fino ai nostri giorni la caccia dello scricciolo è un rituale pan-celtico che si svolge il 26 dicembre: secondo la tradizione celtica lo scricciolo era il simbolo di Lugh, Figlio della Luce trionfante e il suo sacrificio, un tributo in sangue agli spiriti della Terra nel Solstizio d’Inverno, era una supplica per ottenere favori e fortuna, ma anche un sacrificio solare (la luce che riprende vigore dopo il solstizio riceve energia dal sangue del suo simulacro). L’uccisione dello scricciolo e la distribuzione delle sue piume avrebbe portato salute e fortuna agli abitanti del villaggio.(prima parte continua)
Surviving in Ireland to this day the wren hunting is a pan-Celtic ritual that takes place on December 26: according to Celtic tradition the wren was the symbol of Lugh, the triumphant Son of Light and his sacrifice, a tribute to blood to the spirits of the Earth in the Winter Solstice, it was a plea to obtain favors and fortune, but also a solar sacrifice (the light that regains strength after the solstice receives energy from the blood of its simulacrum). The killing of the wren and the distribution of its feathers would bring health and fortune to the villagers. (see First part)

Proseguiamo il viaggio per la campagna britannica per andare in Galles.
Let’s go the journey through the British countryside to go to Wales.

Flag_of_WalesGALLES : Pembrokeshire

IL SACRIFICIO RITUALE DEL RE – MARTIRIO DI SANTO STEFANO
(THE RITUAL SACRIFICE OF THE KING – Saint Stephen martyr)

Ancora controversa la questione se i Druidi praticassero sacrifici umani rituali; il dibattito in verità è più orientato sulla questione temporale (i reperti archeologici hanno dimostrato la diffusa presenza di roghi votivi celtici risalenti all’età del bronzo-ferro) ovvero se la prassi fosse ancora praticata dai Galli ai tempi di Giulio Cesare oppure dai druidi irlandesi alle soglie del Medioevo. Un eccezionale reperto archeologico risalente al I-II secolo a. C. è la mummia chiamata l’uomo di Lindow (detto Pete Marsh da qualche giornalista burlone – gioco di parole derivato da “peat marsh”, in italiano “torbiera”) trovato nella torbiera di Lindow Moss, Wilmslow, Contea di Cheshire (Inghilterra).
The question still arises whether the Druids practiced ritual human sacrifices; the debate in truth is more oriented on the temporal question (archaeological finds have shown the widespread presence of Celtic votive bonfires dating back to the Bronze-Iron Age) or if the ritual was still practiced by the Gauls at the time of Julius Caesar or by the Irish druids on the threshold of the Middle Ages. An exceptional archaeological find dating back to the I-II century a. C. is the mummy called the man of Lindow (called Pete Marsh by some joker journalist – word game derived from “peat marsh”) found in the bog of Lindow Moss, Wilmslow, Cheshire County,England).

In occasione delle due principali festività rituali dell’anno (Samahin o Beltane) i Druidi sacrificavano una vittima umana agli dei. La vittima era nutrita con una focaccia d’orzo, denudata e dipinta di rosso, gli veniva legata una striscia di pelo di volpe sul braccio sinistro. Quindi al sorgere del sole gli veniva data la triplice morte, una per la terra, una per l’aria e una per il cielo. La morte era però “pietosa” perchè la vittima veniva tramortita prima con un colpo di mazza, poi era garrotata e quindi gli si squarciava la gola con un coltello ricurvo. Il sangue era raccolto in una coppa d’argento e infine veniva sparso sui campi per garantire un raccolto migliore.
On the occasion of the two main ritual festivals of the year (Samahin or Beltane) the Druids sacrificed a human victim to the gods. The victim was nourished with a barley focaccia, stripped and painted red, tied a strip of fox fur on his left arm. So at sunrise it was given the triple death, one for the earth, one for the air and one for the sky. The death was however “pitiful” because the victim was first stunned with a blow of mace, then it was garrotata and then the slashed his throat with a curved knife. The blood was collected in a silver cup and was then spread on the fields to ensure a better harvest.

Anticamente era il re ad essere sacrificato, per ottenere i favori degli dei offesi da qualche “scortesia” (ovvero un venir meno nella sua funzione regale): le annate di carestia che si susseguivano, erano un pessimo segnale!
E’ inevitabile il collegamento tra sacrificio dello scricciolo e il martirio del santo, essendo Santo Stefano il primo martire del cristianesimo (protomartire) ucciso per aver testimoniato la sua fede in Cristo. Secondo il folklore irlandese il Santo si era nascosto in un cespuglio di agrifoglio per nascondersi dalla folla che voleva lapidarlo e il suo nascondiglio venne rivelato dallo strepito di uno scricciolo che aveva deciso di svernare proprio lì!
In ancient times it was the king who was sacrificed, to obtain the favors of the gods offended by some “rudeness” (that is, a lacking in his royal function): the years of famine that followed each other, were a bad sign!
The link between the sacrifice of the wren and the martyrdom of the saint is inevitable, being Saint Stephen the first martyr of Christianity (protomartyr) killed for having witnessed his faith in Christ. According to Irish folklore, the Saint was hiding in a holly bush to hide from the crowd who wanted to stone him and his hiding place was revealed by the noise of a wren who had decided to winter there!

PLEASE TO SEE THE KING

Anche intitolato semplicemente “The King” il brano proviene da Pembrokeshire in Galles, ed è tradizionalmente cantato nel giorno di Santo Stefano.
Also titled simply “The King” the song comes from Pembrokeshire in Wales, and is traditionally sung on St Stephen’s Day.

A.L. Lloyd commenta nelle note dell’album dei Watersons in “Sound, Sound Your Instruments of Joy”1977: “Un canto dello scricciolo, cantato da gruppi di ragazzi e giovani, mascherati e travestiti, che il giorno di Santo Stefano (26 dicembre) andavano di porta in porta portando un cespuglio di agrifoglio su cui era messo uno scricciolo morto, “il re degli uccelli “, o qualcosa per rappresentarlo. Questa canzone rara è arrivata ai Waterson da Andy Nisbet, che l’ha presa da “due vecchie signore nel Pembrokeshire“.
AL Lloyd comments in the notes of the Watersons album in “Sound, Sound Your Instruments of Joy” 1977: “A wren-boys carol, sung by groups of boys and young men, masked and disguised, who on St Stephen’s Day (December 26) went from door to door carrying a holly bush on which was a dead wren, “the king of the birds”, or something to represent it. This rare song came to the Watersons from Andy Nisbet, who got it from “two old ladies in Pembrokeshire.”

Steeleye Span in ‘Please to see the King‘ – 1971

Loreena McKennitt & Cedric Smith in “Drive Cold Winter Away” 1987

Nadia Birkenstock 


I
Health, love and peace
Be all here in this place
By your leave we will sing
Concerning our king(1).
II
Our king is well dressed
In silks of the best
In ribbons so rare
No king can compare.(2)
III
We have traveled many miles
Over hedges and stiles
In search of our king
Unto you [him] we bring.
IV
We have powder and shot
To conquer the lot
We have cannon and ball
To conquer them all.(3)
V
Old Christmas is past
Twelfth tide (4) is the last
And we bid you adieu
Great joy to the new.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Salute, amore e pace
siano su questa casa,
e con il vostro permesso
canteremo del nostro Re.
II
Il nostro Re è ben vestito
con la migliore seta,
con preziosi nastri
nessun re gli si paragona.
III
Abbiamo viaggiato per molte miglia
per siepi e passaggi
alla ricerca del nostro Re
e a voi lo portiamo.
IV
Abbiamo polvere e proiettili
per prenderne molti
abbiamo cannoni e palle
per prenderli tutti.
V
Il vecchio Natale è passato
e la dodicesima notte è l’ultima
e noi vi diamo l’addio,
grande gioia per l’anno nuovo!

NOTE
1) Una fiaba celtica per bambini racconta la sfida tra l’aquila e lo scricciolo per contendersi l’appellativo di re degli uccelli: avrebbe vinto chi fosse riuscito a volare più in alto! Lo scricciolo partì per primo e quando la possente aquila lo superò si sistemò sul suo dorso e si fece trasportare ancora più in alto, fino a spiccare di nuovo il volo e quindi vincere la gara. (raccontata da Joe Heaney qui)
Joe Heaney: And you know how it got the name King of the Birds? The wren — how it came to be called the King of Birds? Well, long ago, there was a big race between all the birds, to see who would fly the highest. And of course the eagle was odds-on favourite to win. And the wren being a little bird, he jumped on the eagle’s back, and of course the eagle never felt him on his back. And the eagle went as high as he could, and he said, “I’m king of the birds!” And the little wren went off his back, up another bit, “No”, he says, “you’re not — I’m king of the birds!” And then the eagle followed him.
wren-ireland2) manca una strofa allusiva alla gabbietta in cui viene portato lo scricciolo dai wren-boys per mostrarlo alla gente del villaggio: ” Nella sua carrozza è scarrozzato con grande orgoglio, da quattro valletti che vegliano su di lui.”
missing stanza”In his coach he does not ride with a great deal of pride, and with four footmen to wait upon him
3) la strofa ha un che di rivoluzionario e senza dubbio è stata cantata anche come canzone di protesta, ma tutto sommato è un po’ una spacconata per dire che il gruppo di wren boys aveva fatto incetta di tutti gli scriccioli del bosco!
the verse has something revolutionary and no doubt has also been sung as a protest song, but all in all it is exaggerated to say that the group of wren boys had catched all the wrens of the forest!
4) un tempo i giorni del Natale erano solo 12 e si cominciava a contare dal 21 dicembre di modo che il primo dell’anno era anche l’ultimo delle festività.
Once the days of Christmas were 12 with the count beginning from 21 December so that the first of the year was also the last of the holidays. 

THE CUTTY WREN

LINK
http://piereligion.org/wrenkingsongs.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/thewren.ht

https://www.joeheaney.org/en/lore-about-the-wren/

HUNTING THE WREN: WREN IN THE FURZE

wrenSopravvissuta in Irlanda fino ai nostri giorni la caccia dello scricciolo è un rituale pan-celtico che si svolge il 26 dicembre: l’uccisione dello scricciolo e la distribuzione delle sue piume avrebbe portato salute e fortuna agli abitanti del villaggio.
(prima parte continua)

Seguitemi quindi in questo viaggio per la campagna irlandese!

irish_flagIRLANDA

La tradizione è ancora diffusa nelle contee di Sligo, Leitrim, Clare, Kerry (in particolare Dingle), Tipperary, Kildare..

VIDEO The West Clare Wrenboys

SECONDA MELODIA IRLANDESE:WREN IN THE FURZE

La versione proviene dalla trasmissione orale e si annovera nella tradizione delle questue rituali dell’a-souling (vedi) e del wassailing (vedi).  Nella canzone si descrive molto chiaramente il clima festoso della questua con condivisione di libagioni, raccolta di soldi “per il funerale dello scricciolo”, danze tradizionali e colossali bevute.

The Chieftains in The Bells of Dublin 1991


I
Oh the wren, oh the wren
is the king of all birds(1)
On St. Stephen’s Day he got caught in the furze
It’s up with the kettle and down with the pan
Won’t you give us a penny (2) for to bury the wren?
II
Oh, it’s Christmas time; that’s why we’re here.
Please be good enough to give us an ear.
For we’ll sing and we’ll dance if you give us a chance,
And we won’t be comin’ back for another whole year.
III
We’ll play Kerry polkas; they’re real hot stuff.
We’ll play The Mason’s Apron and The Pinch of Snuff,
Jon Maroney’s Jig and The Donegal Reel,/Music made to put a spring in your heel(3).
IV
If there’s a drink in the house, may it make itself known,
Before I sing a song called The Banks of the Lowne,
And I’ll drink with you with occasion in it,
For my poor dry throat and I’ll sing like a linnet.
V
Oh, please give us something for the little bird’s wake,
A big lump of pudding or some Christmas cake(4),
A fist full o’ goose and a hot cup o’ tay(5)
And then we’ll soon be going on our way.
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Lo scricciolo, lo scricciolo
è il re di tutti gli uccelli (1)
nel giorno di Santo Stefano si cattura tra i cespugli,
mettete su il bollitore e sotto con la padella!
Ci date un penny (2) per seppellire lo scricciolo?
II
E’ Natale, per questo
siamo qui.
Vi preghiamo di essere benevoli e porgerci un orecchio
perchè canteremo e danzeremo se ce ne darete la possibilità
e non ritorneremo che tra un altro anno.
III
Suoneremo polche del Kerry, è roba veramente forte.
Suoneremo “The Mason’s Apron” e “The Pinch of Snuff”,
“Jon Maroney’s Jig” e “The Donegal Reel” tutta musica che vi farà saltare (3).
IV
Se c’è da bere in casa
che si presenti
prima di cantare una canzone dal titolo ” The Banks of the Lowne”
e berrò con voi per l’occasione,
per la mia povera gola secca
e canterò come un fringuello.
V
Prego dateci qualcosa per il funerale del piccolo uccello,
una bella fetta di budino o un dolce di Natale (4)
un bel pezzo di oca e una tazza di tè caldo (5)
e poi ce ne andremo subito per la nostra strada

NOTE
1) Una fiaba celtica per bambini racconta la sfida tra l’aquila e lo scricciolo per contendersi l’appellativo di re degli uccelli: avrebbe vinto chi fosse riuscito a volare più in alto! Lo scricciolo partì per primo e quando la possente aquila lo superò si sistemò sul suo dorso e si fece trasportare ancora più in alto, fino a spiccare di nuovo il volo e quindi vincere la gara. (raccontata da Joe Heaney qui)
2) scopo della questua era quello di raccogliere un po’ di soldi per la veglia funebre allo scricciolo (notoriamente passata nel pub a bere alla salute del defunto, a cantare e a danzare)
3) “to put a spring in your heel” letteralmente “mettere una molla ai vostri piedi”
4) il barm brack cake un dolce tradizionale all’uvetta e canditi associato con Halloween e che si abbina anche al Natale, una specie di panettone irlandese più speziato e asciutto rispetto a quello italiano!
5) tay =tea

Ed ecco le musiche citate nella canzone che erano eseguite tradizionalmente dai questuanti
ASCOLTA Medley ‘The Wren! The Wren!’: The Dingle Set
ASCOLTA The Mason’s Apron
ASCOLTA The Pinch of Snuff
ASCOLTA The Donegal Reel

ASCOLTA Heather Dale in The Green Knight 2006 intitola il brano “Hunting the Wren” essendo il primo verso tradizionale e gli altri scritti e arrangiati da Heather M. Dale & Ben Deschamp da ascoltare nella compilation di Top Celtic Christmas Music di Marc Gun al 4:21 minuto

I
Oh the wren, oh the wren is the king of all birds(1)
On St. Stephen’s Day he got caught in the furze
It’s up with the kettle and down with the pan
Give us a penny for to bury the wren
II
Oh the wren, oh the wren is a terrible rake
Won’t you give us a penny for the little bird’s wake?
It’s up with the bottle and it’s down with the can
Give us a penny for to bury the wren
III
Oh the wren, oh the wren has the tiniest quill
Won’t you give us a penny for the little bird’s will?
It’s up with the paper and it’s down with the pen
Give us a penny for to bury the wren
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Lo scricciolo è il re di tutti gli uccelli(1) nel giorno di Santo Stefano si cattura tra i cespugli,
mettete su il bollitore e sotto con la padella!
Dateci un penny per seppellire lo scricciolo.
II
Lo scricciolo è un terribile setacciatore,
non volte darci un penny per la veglia dell’uccellino?
Su la bottiglia e giù il bicchiere, dateci un penny per seppellire lo scricciolo.
III
Lo scricciolo ha le più piccole piume, non volte darci un penny per il testamento dell’uccellino?
Mettete su il foglio e giù la penna, dateci un penny per seppellire lo scricciolo.

FONTI
http://piereligion.org/wrenkingsongs.html http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Wren.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3289
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15132

continua

THE WREN SONG AND WREN HUNTING

518px-Book_Illustration_of_a_Robin_and_WrenLa canzone dello scricciolo rievoca un rito dalle oscure origini che affondano nella tradizione celtica. Il più piccolo dei passeri, lo scricciolo, (termine che si usa anche per vezzeggiare un bambino molto piccolo) era chiamato in latino reguluspiccolo re” e con questo appellativo era conosciuto in tutta Europa (re di macchie, re di siepi, re di tutti gli uccelli o anche piccolo zar). Un uccello tanto piccolo ma dal canto potente, il più squillante e armonioso. Il nome gaelico “Druidh dhubh” si traduce come “druido degli uccelli” detto anche “passero di Bran” (il dio della profezia). Animale sacro la cui uccisione era considerata tabù e portatrice di sventura, ma non durante il tempo di Yule.

D’altraparte non tutti gli studiosi concordano con il far risalile la parola gaelica “Dreoilín” a “druido”, piuttosto “dryw” e “drev” vogliono dire “felice”. Così Christian Souchon scrive ” I nomi di questo uccello in lingue celtiche ruotano intorno all’idea di allegria:
– Bretone: “laouenan (ig)” di “laouenn” = felice
– Gallese: “dryw” è certamente la stessa parola bretone “drev” (pronunciato “dreo”) che significa felice

A propos du roitelet, (scricciolo), ne faudrait-il pas parler du nom latin de cet oiseau « regulus », petit roi, qui se retrouve en français, en espagnol (reyezuelo), en allemand (sous forme de traduction « Zaunkönig », roi des clôtures) et sans doute dans d’autres langues ?
A l’origine il y a la fable latine du concours de vol en hauteur pour choisir le roi des oiseaux. Le vainqueur est l’aigle, mais un roitelet s’était perché sur sa tête, à son insu, méritant ainsi le nom de « petit roi » qui lui est resté.
On peut se demander si les « wren king songs » sont, de ce fait, d’origine uniquement celtique. Les noms de cet oiseau dans les langues celtes tournent autour de l’idée de gaité :
– Breton : « laouenan (ig) » de « laouenn »= joyeux
– Gallois : « dryw » est certainement le même mot que le breton « drev » (prononcé « dreo ») qui veut dire aussi joyeux (Christian Souchon )

Nel suo libro “La dea bianca”, Robert Graves spiega che nella tradizione celtica, la lotta tra le due parti dell’anno, è rappresentata dalla lotta tra il re-agrifoglio (o vischio), che rappresenta l’anno nascente e il re-quercia, che rappresenta l’anno morente. Al solstizio d’inverno il re-agrifoglio vince sul re-quercia, e viceversa per il solstizio d’estate. (continua) Nella tradizione orale, una variante di questa lotta è rappresentata dal pettirosso e lo scricciolo, nascosti tra le foglie dei due rispettivi alberi. Lo scricciolo rappresenta l’anno calante, il pettirosso l’anno nuovo e la morte dello scricciolo è un passaggio di morte-rinascita.

LA VERA MORTE DI COCK ROBIN

Nei secoli si sono mescolate molte varianti di questa lotta-litigio diventate anche oggetto di racconti per bambini e nursery rhymes, in quella più conosciuta Cock Robin (il pettirosso) si innamora di Jenny Wren (lo scricciolo). Viene celebrato il loro matrimonio (ampia descrizione del banchetto). Tutti sono felici, bevono e mangiano cose deliziose, ma a rovinare la festa entra in scena il cuculo, che vuole portarsi via Jenny Wren, ma nel tafferuglio viene ucciso Cock Robin. In altre varianti una lite tra i due uccellini innamorati precede il matrimonio continua
jennywren-waltercrane

Nell’Inghilterra vittoriana è il pettirosso a rispuntare nelle cartoline degli auguri a simboleggiare la morte-resurrezione di Gesù (e l’uccelino viene raffigurato tra le mani di Gesù bambino tra le braccia di Maria).
Nella fiaba/filastrocca per bambini è lo scricciolo Jenny Wren ad essere la parte femminile della coppia  ed è il Frazer nel suo “Il ramo d’oro” a dirci che gli scozzesi lo chiamano anche “gallina della regina del cielo”. La regina del cielo è evidentemente il sole che nell’antichità era femmina.

LA CACCIA DELLO SCRICCIOLO IN IRLANDA

In Irlanda il giorno di S. Stefano, conosciuto anche con il nome gaelico La An Droilin, il giorno dello scricciolo, i giovani del villaggio con i visi sporchi di fuliggine e armati di bastoni, andavano nei boschi alle prime luci dell’alba per cercare tra i cespugli la tana dello scricciolo: il primo di loro che riusciva a colpirlo diventava il re per un giorno. Il corpicino dello scricciolo legato ad un ramo di agrifoglio veniva portato in processione di casa in casa e cantando una filastrocca i ragazzi dello scricciolo ricevevano piccoli doni lasciando in cambio una piuma strappata dal petto del piccolo uccellino. Compiuto il giro presso tutte le case del villaggio i ragazzi intonavano una nenia funebre e andavano a seppellire lo scricciolo nel cimitero. Scrive James Frazer nel “Ramo d’oro” “Uno scrittore del secolo XVIII dice che in Irlanda lo scricciolo “viene ancora acchiappato e ucciso dai contadini il giorno di Natale e quello successivo (il giorno di Santo Stefano); e viene portato in processione attaccato ad una zampetta… e in ogni villaggio si fa una processione di uomini, donne e bambini che cantano una ballata irlandese in cui si dice che questo è il re di tutti gli uccelli”. Fino ai nostri giorno (l’inizio del secolo XX) la caccia dello scricciolo si fa ancor in alcune parte del Leinster e del Connaught” In effetti la caccia dello scricciolo era un rituale pan-celtico sopravvissuto nell’Irlanda sud-occidentale: secondo la tradizione celtica lo scricciolo era il simbolo di Lugh, Figlio della Luce trionfante e il suo sacrificio, un tributo in sangue agli spiriti della Terra nel Solstizio d’Inverno, era una supplica per ottenere favori e fortuna, ma anche un sacrificio solare (la luce che riprende vigore dopo il solstizio riceve energia dal sangue del suo simulacro). L’uccisione dello scricciolo e la distribuzione delle sue piume avrebbe portato salute e fortuna agli abitanti del villaggio.

wren-boys
Parade of Wren Bush & Boys, 1850: i ragazzi dello scricciolo erano danzatori, cantanti e musicisti in costume, sebbene i personaggi variassero c’era sempre in Irlanda un uomo vestito da “megera” (la cailleach) e una Giumenta bianca (Lair Bhan)

Ancora oggi gli Wren Boys indossano vestiti stracciati e si coprono o dipingono i visi e vanno di casa in casa cantando la Canzone dello Scricciolo accompagnandosi con vari strumenti tradizionali, oggi non si permette più l’uccisione dell’uccellino, e appeso al ramo di agrifoglio c’è un simulacro che tutti i bambini del villaggio devono colpire con bastoni o sassi, fino a farlo cadere. Una volta “ucciso” lo scricciolo, i bambini dovranno bussare alle porte del paese con un rametto di agrifoglio in mano, chiedendo soldi per seppellirlo. Ancora alla fine della seconda guerra mondiale c’era l’usanza di catturare (nottetempo) lo scricciolo per tenerlo prigioniero per tutto il giorno del 26 dicembre in una gabbietta e mostrarlo di casa in casa chiedendo dei soldi per il suo funerale. I giovani del paese la sera sarebbero poi andati al pub a fare una bella veglia funebre all’irlandese (bevendo, cantando e ballando!!) (testimonianza di Joe Heaney qui)
A Dingle (contea di Kerry, Irlanda) il Giorno dello Scricciolo è celebrato con una festa: il fantoccio dell’uccellino è legato su un alto palo (decorato con nastri e rami di agrifoglio e edera) e portato in parata per le strade con tanto di musicisti: il danaro ricavato dalla questua è donato in beneficenza o dedicato alla danza serale che si svolge attorno al palo decorato. Le persone offrono birra e dolci (ma anche qualche monetina) e i più giovani di ogni casa visitata si uniscono alla combriccola finché non si da vita a un gruppo numeroso di ragazzini. Alcuni Wren boys indossano abiti di paglia e buffi copri capi sempre in paglia che nei secoli XVIII e XIX erano i travestimenti dei Whiteboys, i sovversivi al tempo delle guerre contadine. pommer-wrenboys L’usanza oltre che in alcune parti d’Irlanda è diffusa nell’Isola di Man e in alcune parti del Galles, nel Suffolk, ma anche in Canada presso le comunità irlandesi e in Bretagna.

THE WREN SONG

Le strofe cantate nella questua variano a seconda delle località e non si può non rilevare una certa somiglianza con le questue dell’a-souling (vedi). Nel raccolta “Song of Uladh” (1904) di Herbert Hughes si riporta una strofa e la testimonianza di Gerald Griffin (1803-1840) “The Wran! the Wran! the king of all birds,St Stephen’s day was caught in the furze; Although he’s little, his family’s great. Get up, fair ladies! and give us a trate! And if your trate be of the best, In heaven we hope your soul will rest!”’ ‘The Wren-boys of Sean-ghualann [Griffin has Shanagolden] … were all assembled pursuant to custom on the green before the chapel-door on a fine frosty morning, being the twenty-sixth of December, or Saint Stephen’s Day – a festival yet held in much reverence in Mumha [Griffin has Munster], although the Catholic Church has for many years ceased to look upon it as a holiday of “obligation”. ‘Seven or eight handsome young fellows, tricked out in ribbons of the gayest colours, white waistcoats and stockings, and furnished with musical instruments of various kinds – a fife, a piccolo, an old drum, a cracked fidil [Griffin has fiddle], and a set of bagpipes – assumed their place in the rear [Griffin has rere] of the procession, and startled the yet slumbering inhabitants of the neighbouring houses by a fearfully discordant prelude. ‘Behind those came the Wren-boy par excellence – a lad who bore in his hands a holly-bush, the leaves of which were interwoven with long streamers of red, yellow, blue and white ribbon; all which finery, nevertheless, in no way contributed to reconcile the little mottled tenant of the bower (a wren which was tied by the leg to one of the boughs) to his state of durance. After the Wren-boy came a promiscuous crowd of youngsters, of all ages under fifteen, composing just such a little ragged rabble as one observes attending the band of a marching regiment on its entrance into a country town, shouting, hallooing, laughing, and joining in apt chorus with the droning, shrilling, squeaking, and rattling of the musicians of the morn.’ Di solito le canzoni dello scricciolo si compongono di tre, quattro strofe abbastanza simili da regione a regione (è ovvio che se si doveva girare di casa in casa per tutto il paese la canzone era piuttosto breve!!)


I
The Wren, the Wren the king of all birds(1),
St. Stephenses day, he was caught in the furze.
Although he is little, his honor(2) is great,
Rise up, kind sir, and give us a trate(3).
II
We followed this Wren ten miles or more
Through hedges and ditches and heaps of snow,
We up with our wattles and gave him a fall
And brought him here to show you all.
III
For we are the boys that came your way
To bury the Wren on Saint Stephenses Day,
So up with the kettle(4) and down with the pan!
Give us some help for to bury the Wren!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Lo scricciolo, il re di tutti
gli uccelli(1)
nel giorno di S. Stefano è catturato tra i cespugli
sebbene sia piccolo, il suo spirito(2) è grande,
alzatevi, gentile signore, e dateci un dolcetto(3).
II
Abbiamo inseguito questo scricciolo per 10 e più miglia
tra siepi e fossati e cumuli
di neve,
abbiamo fatto rumore con i nostri bastoni e lo abbiamo intrappolato
e lo portiamo qui per mostrarlo a tutti.
III
Perchè noi siamo i ragazzi che vengono sulla vostra strada
a portare lo Scricciolo nel giorno di S. Stefano,
su la lattina(4) e giù la monetina
Dateci un aiuto per seppellire lo Scricciolo.

NOTE
1) Una fiaba celtica per bambini racconta la sfida tra l’aquila e lo scricciolo per contendersi l’appellativo di re degli uccelli: avrebbe vinto chi fosse riuscito a volare più in alto! Lo scricciolo partì per primo e quando la possente aquila lo superò, si sistemò sul suo dorso e si fece trasportare ancora più in alto, fino a spiccare di nuovo il volo all’ultimo momento e quindi vincere la gara. (raccontata da Joe Heaney qui )
2) letteralmente onore, ma qui è da intendersi più in termini “mistici”
3) in altre versioni è espressamente richiesto un penny, ma più spesso ai questuanti si dava un dolce (barm brack un dolce tradizionale all’uvetta e canditi associato con Halloween e anche con il Natale, una specie di panettone irlandese più speziato e asciutto rispetto a quello italiano!) vedi
4) la parola si traduce come bollitore, teiera ma nel contesto credo voglia dire lattina. La traduzione letterale è: mettete su il bollitore e sotto con la padella!

Seguitemi allora in questo viaggio per la campagna britannica e per l’Irlanda!

LE WREN SONGS suddivise per territorio continua
Musiche e danze per il giorno dello scricciolo qui

APPROFONDIMENTO
SOLSTIZIO D’INVERNO qui
COCK ROBIN, DEATH AND BURIAL OF COCK ROBIN vedi

FONTI
http://piereligion.org/wrenkingsongs.html http://paulbommer.blogspot.it/2010/12/advent-calendar-23rd-dec-wren-boys.html http://www.gippeswic.demon.co.uk/wren.html