Archivi tag: Liverpool

Paddy West sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

A nineteenth-century rogue gallery of the sea inevitably includes also boarding house keeper (boarding masters) who were at the same time owners of pensions for sailors, to whom they provided lodging and boarding.
Most of them “encouraged” the sailor who had just landed with a pocket full of wages,lodging and feeding him in his propensity to drink with a lot of poor whiskey. After a couple of weeks of treatment the victim had run out of money and had to accept as soon as possible to embark again; at the time of signing the sailor received an advance equal to three months of pay in the form of promissory notes and our letch bought them at a discounted price, usually forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind: it was the sailor in fact to have to buy the necessary personal gear for the job and obviously the master of boarding was in league with the supplier and the value of the goods had doubled. The sailor was so double-plucked, upon arrival and departure!
But the most notorious names such as Rapper Brown, Shanghai Brown, Jack Ratcliff or Jackie Brown were scoundrels who hired some thieves or whores to steal from sailors just landed, taking advantage of their drunkenness, after which their gang took sailors back on board unconscious and the boarding master pocketed their advance.
This fraudulent enlistment was called shanghaiing and was mainly practiced in the north-west of the United States. The men who ran this “men’s trade” were called “crimps” and had no qualms to drug the beer of the victim with laudanum.

The authorities on the other hand were willing to turn a blind eye, because the mercantile companies needed to have sailors always available for the hardest work (like the whaling ship) and the most unfavorable routes as those of the Arctic seas.

PADDY WEST

A jesting forebitter / capstan shanty about a famous  boarding master of Liverpool, Stan Hugill says Padyy West (aka Paddy Doyle) was a “real live personage” in Great Howard Street.
Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, which the sailors define as” recruiters “, who provide” indifferently lodging and boarding “. They often welcome sailors “on credit”. On the advance received by boarders at the time of enrollment, they recover for food and accommodation, and with the rest they provide them with poor quality clothing and equipment “. (Italo Ottonello)
Our Paddy to pocket a higher advance, he had invented an imaginative training school for sailors and transformed in a few days the novices in “able seamen”, so “Paddy Wester” is for a incapable sailor.

The British sailor’s uniform, regulated by the British Admiralty, dates back only to 1875, standardizing the uniform blue jacket and white trousers; even the commercial line companies were distinguished by the uniforms worn by the whole crew

Ewan MacColl & A.L. Lloyd from  Blow Boys Blow, 1957
A.L. Lloyd commented in the notes: “Mr West is a redoubtable figure in the folklore of the sea. He was a Liverpool boarding-house keeper in the latter days of sail, who provided ship captains with crews, as a side-line. He would guarantee that every man he supplied had crossed the Line and been round the Horn several times. In order to say so with a clear conscience, he gave greenhorns a curious course in seamanship, described in this jesting ballad. It was a great favourite with “Scouse” (Liverpool) sailors.
The sea literature of the nineteenth century is larded with tales of shanghaied seamen and corrupt boarding-house masters, who sent many a green hand to sea, swearing that they were experienced sailors. The most notorious was Paddy West, a Liverpool Irishman, who hat his fake seamen step across and old rope and walk around a cow’s horn so that he could claim that they had “crossed the line and rounded the horn.”

The tune is Tramps and Hawkers


I
Oh, as I was a-walkin’ down London Road (1),
I come to Paddy West’s house,
He gave me a feed of American hash and he called it Liverpool scouse.
He said, “There’s a ship that’s wantin’ hands,
and on her you quickly sign.
her mate is a bastard, the bosun’s worse, but she will suit you fine.”
Chorus (after each verse):
Take off your dungaree jackets (2)
and give yourselves a rest,

And we’ll think on them cold nor’westers that we had at Paddy West’s.
II
Well, when I’d had a feed, my boys,
the wind began to blow;
He sent me up in the attic,
the main-royal for to stow.
But when I got up in the attic,
no main-royal could I find,
So I turned around to the window
and I furled the window blind (3).
III
Now Paddy he piped all hands on deck, their stations for to man (4).
His wife stood in the doorway
with a bucket in her hand;
And Paddy sings out, “Now let ‘er rip (5)!” and she flung the water our way,
Sayin’, “Clew up (6) your fore t’gan’sl, boys, she’s takin’ in the spray!”
IV
Now seein’ we’re off to the south’ard, boys, to Frisco we was bound,
Old Paddy he called for a length of rope and he laid it on the ground.
And we all stepped over and back again, and he says to me, “That’s fine,
Now when they ask if you’ve been to sea, you can say you’ve crossed the Line (7)”
V
“Now there’s only one thing for you to do, before you sail away,
That’s to step around the table,
where the bullock’s horn do lay.
And when they ask you, ‘Were you ever at sea?’,
you can say, ’Ten times ‘round the Horn (8).’
And Bejesus, you’re a sailor since
the day that you was born.”
Last chorus:
Put on your dungaree jacket,
and walk out lookin’ your best,

And tell ‘em you’re an old sailor man that’s come from Paddy West’s.

NOTES
1) London Road was a busy street full of shops, and an important commercial center in a densely populated neighborhood of Liverpool

London Road, 1908 (da qui)

2) dungaree (dungeon ) jumper, jacket= denim jacket
3) or rather the nineteenth-century equivalent of the blinds
4) man (v.) Old English mannian “to furnish (a fort, ship, etc.) with a company of men,” from man (n.). Meaning “to take up a designated position on a ship” is first recorded 1690s. Meaning “behave like a man, act with courage” is from c. 1400. To man (something) out is from 1660s. Related: Manned; manning. It was obviously the backyard where Paddy had a ship’s wheel rigged up
5) To let it go; to start it up. Often used as an imperative. “Her” is used in the same way that some ships and machines are referred to as female
6)  to furl a sail by gathering its clews up to the yard by means of clew lines

7) the Equator line
8) Cape Horn is the extreme point of Africa feared by sailors because of the strong winds

Dan Miller (featured Louis Killen & Mick Moloney) from Irish Ballads & Songs of the Sea 1998, a similar text version but different melody

Paddy Doyle’s boots
Go to Sea once more
Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddywest.html
http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/paddywest.html
https://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.com/2011/07/17-paddy-west.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=151768

Paddy West

Read the post in English

Una galleria ottocentesca di brutti ceffi del mare comprende inevitabilmente anche i procuratori d’imbarco (detti in inglese boarding master) che erano contemporaneamente proprietari di  pensioni per marinai, ai quali procuravano alloggio e imbarco.
La maggior parte di loro “incoraggiava” il marinaio appena sbarcato e con le tasche gonfie nella sua propensione verso il bere, tenendolo a pensione e foraggiandolo con del whisky scadente. Dopo un paio di settimane di trattamento il malcapitato aveva finito i soldi e doveva accettare al più presto d’imbarcarsi nuovamente, senonchè al momento della firma d’ingaggio il marinaio riceveva un anticipo pari a tre mesi di paga sotto forma di pagherò e il nostro marpione li comprava ad un valore scontato, di solito del quaranta per cento, con molta parte dell’importo fornito in natura:era il marinaio infatti a doversi comprare le attrezzature personali necessarie per il lavoro e ovviamente il maestro d’imbarco era in combutta con il fornitore e il valore della merce era raddoppiato. Il marinaio era così doppiamente spennato, all’arrivo e alla partenza!
Ma i nomi più famigerati come Rapper Brown, Shanghai Brown, Jack Ratcliff o Jackie Brown erano dei farabutti che assoldava dei prezzolati ladruncoli per derubare i marinai approfittando della loro ubriachezza o si mettevano in combutta con qualche puttana per spennare il marinaio incauto appena sbarcato, dopodichè li portavano nuovamente a bordo in stato d’incoscienza e s’intascavano il loro anticipo.
Questo arruolamento fraudolento veniva chiamato shanghaiing ed era praticato soprattutto nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti. Gli uomini che gestivano questo “commercio di uomini” venivano detti “crimps” e non avevano scrupoli a drogare la birra del malcapitato con il laudano.

Le autorità d’altra parte chiudevano volentieri un occhio perchè alle compagnie mercantili faceva comodo avere manovalanza sempre a disposizione anche per i lavori più duri (come sulle baleniere) e le rotte più sfavorevoli come quelle dei mari artici.

PADDY WEST

Una divertente forebitter / capstan shanty su un maestro d’imbarco  di Liverpool, è’ Stan Hugill a riferire che l’irlandese Paddy West (ovvero Paddy Doyle) era un persona reale, che teneva una pensione e una scuola per marinai in Great Howard Street.
Le “boarding houses” sono pensioni per marinai, presenti in ogni grande porto di mare. “Sono tenute da procuratori d’imbarco (boarding masters), di dubbia reputazione, che i marinai definiscono «arruolatori», i quali forniscono «indifferentemente alloggio e imbarco». Spesso accolgono i marinai «a credito». Sull’anticipo ricevuto dai pensionanti all’atto dell’arruolamento, si rifanno del vitto e dell’alloggio, e con il resto forniscono loro abbigliamento e attrezzature di scarsa qualità“. (Italo Ottonello)
Il nostro Paddy per intascarsi una quota più alta dell’anticipo, si era inventato una fantasiosa scuola d’addestramento per marinai e  trasformava in pochi giorni dei novellini in “able seamen”, così “Paddy Wester” è finito tra i modi di dire per descrivere un marinaio incapace.

La divisa del marinaio inglese  regolamentata dall’Ammiragliato britannico risale solo al 1875 standardizzando l’uniforme giacca blu-pantaloni bianchi; anche le compagnie commerciali di linea si contraddistinguevano per le divise indossate da tutto l’equipaggio

Ewan MacColl & A.L. Lloyd in  Blow Boys Blow, 1957
A.L. Lloyd commenta nelle note: “Mr West is a redoubtable figure in the folklore of the sea. He was a Liverpool boarding-house keeper in the latter days of sail, who provided ship captains with crews, as a side-line. He would guarantee that every man he supplied had crossed the Line and been round the Horn several times. In order to say so with a clear conscience, he gave greenhorns a curious course in seamanship, described in this jesting ballad. It was a great favourite with “Scouse” (Liverpool) sailors.
The sea literature of the nineteenth century is larded with tales of shanghaied seamen and corrupt boarding-house masters, who sent many a green hand to sea, swearing that they were experienced sailors. The most notorious was Paddy West, a Liverpool Irishman, who hat his fake seamen step across and old rope and walk around a cow’s horn so that he could claim that they had “crossed the line and rounded the horn.”

La melodia è Tramps and Hawkers


I
Oh, as I was a-walkin’ down London Road (1),
I come to Paddy West’s house,
He gave me a feed of American hash and he called it Liverpool scouse.
He said, “There’s a ship that’s wantin’ hands,
and on her you quickly sign.
her mate is a bastard, the bosun’s worse, but she will suit you fine.”
Chorus (after each verse):
Take off your dungaree jackets (2)
and give yourselves a rest,

And we’ll think on them cold nor’westers that we had at Paddy West’s.
II
Well, when I’d had a feed, my boys,
the wind began to blow;
He sent me up in the attic,
the main-royal for to stow.
But when I got up in the attic,
no main-royal could I find,
So I turned around to the window
and I furled the window blind (3).
III
Now Paddy he piped all hands on deck, their stations for to man (4).
His wife stood in the doorway
with a bucket in her hand;
And Paddy sings out, “Now let ‘er rip (5)!” and she flung the water our way,
Sayin’, “Clew up (6) your fore t’gan’sl, boys, she’s takin’ in the spray!”
IV
Now seein’ we’re off to the south’ard, boys, to Frisco we was bound,
Old Paddy he called for a length of rope and he laid it on the ground.
And we all stepped over and back again, and he says to me, “That’s fine,
Now when they ask if you’ve been to sea, you can say you’ve crossed the Line (7)”
V
“Now there’s only one thing for you to do, before you sail away,
That’s to step around the table,
where the bullock’s horn do lay.
And when they ask you, ‘Were you ever at sea?’,
you can say, ’Ten times ‘round the Horn (8).’
And Bejesus, you’re a sailor since
the day that you was born.”
Last chorus:
Put on your dungaree jacket,
and walk out lookin’ your best,

And tell ‘em you’re an old sailor man that’s come from Paddy West’s.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Oh, mentre passeggiavo lungo London Road,
arrivai alla pensione di Paddy West,
mi ha dato un piatto di pasticcio americano e l’ha chiamato stufato di Liverpool .
Disse: “C’è una nave che vuole una mano, e subito ti arruolerai su di lei;
il suo primo è un bastardo, il nostromo è peggio, ma ti troverai bene. ”
Coro (dopo ogni verso):
Toglietevi le giacche blu
e concedetevi un po’ di riposo
per pensare a quei freddi venti di nordovest che c’erano da Paddy West.
II
Bene, dopo il pasto, ragazzi miei,
il vento ha cominciato a soffiare;
mi ha mandato in soffitta,
a serrare la vela maestra.
Ma quando sono salito in soffitta,
non c’era nessuna vela maestra,
così mi sono voltato verso la finestra
e ho avvolto la tapparella.
III
Ora Paddy richiamò tutti gli uomini sul ponte, nelle loro postazioni.
Sua moglie stava sulla soglia
con un secchio in mano;
e Paddy chiama, “Ora fatela filare!”
e lei gettava l’acqua sulla nostra strada,
dicendo ” Imbrogliate i velacci,
ragazzi, è presa negli spruzzi”
IV
Ora considerando che siamo diretti a sud, ragazzi, diretti a Frisco
il vecchio Paddy chiese un pezzo di corda e la posò a terra.
e la calpestammo tutti avanti e indietro, e lui mi dice: “Va bene, ora quando ti chiedono se sei stato in mare, puoi dire che hai oltrepassato la linea. ”
V
“Ora c’è solo una cosa da fare per te, prima di salpare,
che è di girare intorno al tavolo,
dove è appoggiato il corno di bue.
E quando ti chiedono: ‘Sei mai stato in mare?’,
puoi dire “Dieci volte” intorno al Corno”.
e perdio, sei un marinaio
dal giorno in cui sei nato. ”
Ultimo coro:
Indossa la giacca blu
e  vai a fare il tuo meglio

e dì loro che sei un vecchio marinaio che viene dalla pensione di Paddy West.

NOTE
1) London Road era una trafficata strada ricca di negozi, e importante centro commerciale in un quartiere densamente popolato.

London Road, 1908 (da qui)

2) dungaree (dungeon ) jumper, jacket= denim jacket
3) o meglio l’equivalente ottocentesco delle tapparelle
4) man (v.) Old English mannian “to furnish (a fort, ship, etc.) with a company of men,” from man (n.). Meaning “to take up a designated position on a ship” is first recorded 1690s. Meaning “behave like a man, act with courage” is from c. 1400. To man (something) out is from 1660s. Related: Manned; manning.
Si trattava ovviamente del cortile sul retro dove Paddy aveva montato la ruota del timone
5) espressione idiomatica lasciarla andare a tutta birra/a tutto gas
6)  
Stringere la tela di una vela con gli imbrogli, prima di serrarla
7) dell’equatore
8) Capo Horn la punta estrema dell’Africa temuta dai marinai a causa dei forti venti

Dan Miller (con Louis Killen & Mick Moloney) in Irish Ballads & Songs of the Sea 1998, una versione testuale simile ma diversa melodia

Paddy Doyle’s boots
Go to Sea once more
Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddywest.html
http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/paddywest.html
https://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.com/2011/07/17-paddy-west.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=151768

Row bullies row.. to New York

Leggi in italiano

“Liverpool Judies” (aka”Row, bullies, row”)  is a popular sea shanty  used as reported by Stan Hugill as Capstan shanty (but also as an forebitter) it is grouped into two main versions: one in which our sailor lands in San Francisco, the other in New York.
Both versions, however, always end up with the drunken or drugged boy who wakes up again on a ship where he has been boarded by a small group of crimps
Fraudulent conscription takes the name of “shanghaiinge“, especially in the north-west of the United States.
hanghaiinge

NEW YORK VERSION

Dirty deals in the harbor docks, drunken sailors and complacent “judies”.. but also a warning song to alert the young sailors who get drunk, because they risk ending up kidnapped and forced on board. Song best known as “Row, bullies, row”.
Stan Hugill tells us that the song must be sung with an Irish rhythm. The text is taken from “Shanties and Sailors Songs”, Hugill, Stan, (1969) (see)

Ian Campbell Group from Farewell Nancy, 1964 

The Foo Foo Band from The Foo Foo Band, 2000

I
When I wuz a youngster
I sailed wid de rest,
On a Liverpool packet
bound out to the West.
We anchored one day
in de harbour of Cork,
Then we put out to sea
for the port of New York.
Chorus
And it’s roll, row bullies roll (1),
Them Liverpool Judies (2)
have got us in tow (3).

II
For forty-two days
we wuz hungry an’ sore,
Oh, the winds wuz agin us,
the gales they did roar;
Off Battery Point (4)
we did anchor at last,
Wid our jib boom (5) hove in
an’ the canvas all fast.
III
De boardin’-house masters (6)
wuz off in a trice,
A-shoutin’ an’ promisin’
all that wuz nice;
An’ one fast ol’ crimp
he got cotton’d (7)  to me,
Sez he, “Yer a fool lad (foolish),
ter follow the sea.”
IV
Sez he, “There’s a job
is a waitin’ fer you,
Wid lashin’s o’ liqour
an’ begger-all (nothing) to do.
What d’yer say, lad,
will ye jump ‘er (8), too?”
Sez I, “Ye ol’ bastard,
I’m damned if I do.”
V
But de best ov intentions
dey niver gits far,
After forty-two days
at the door of a bar,
I tossed off me liquor
an’ what d’yer think?
Why the lousy ol’ bastard
‘ad drugs in me drink.
VI
Now, the next I remembers
I woke in de morn,
On a three-skys’l yarder
bound south round Cape Horn;
Wid an’ ol’ suit of oilskins
an’ three (two) pairs o’ sox,
An’ a bloomin’ big head
an’ a dose of the pox.
VII
Now all ye young sailors
take a warnin’ by me,
Keep a watch (an eye) on yer drinks
when the liquor is free,
An’ pay no attintion
to runner (9) or whore,
Or yer head’ll be thick
an’ yer fid (10) ‘ll be sore.

NOTES
1)  in this context roll and row are taken as a synonym
2) The word judy is a dialectal expression of Liverpool to indicate a generic girl (not necessarily a prostitute)
3) the term has become in the seafaring jargon synonymous with favorable winds that drive home (a ship that runs fast).
In this regard Italo Ottonello argues:
the mate stood in the gangway, rubbing his hands, and talking aloud to the ship, “Hurrah, old bucket! the Boston girls have got hold of the tow-rope!” and the like (from: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
At each change of the watch, those coming on deck asked those going below, “How does she go along?” and got, for answer, the rate, and the customary addition, “Aye! and the Boston girls have had hold of the tow-rope all the watch.”(from: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
4) New York, the island of Manhattan
5) Jibboom: it’s a bouncer, that is, an auction (boom) that protrudes from another auction.  Bowsprit or jib-boom extends the bowsprit and is in turn extended by the flying-jibboom
6) a boarding agent who, with more or less legal means, procured sailors to ships
7) “cottoned” =”attached” ,”caught on” (british slang); or says “likin ‘to me” or even “fancying”
8) crimp is offering the boy to help him in his craft and then tells him to leave the engagement on the ship from which he has landed to be part of his team of recruiters and make shangaiing
9)  derogatory term
10) a less cleaned version uses the term “yer knob’ll be sore” which means head of .. (an other head that is a little lower)

ARCHIVE:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
‘Frisco
New York
from Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/liverpooljudies.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/136.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/judies
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=69
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LiverpoolGirls/index.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61483

The Irish Girl of Mr Tapscott

Leggi in italiano

“Mr Tapscott” is a sea shanty/emigration song known as “The Irish Girl”, “The Irish Emigrant”, ” Yellow Meal”. (see firt part)

The Irish Girl of Mr Tapscott

It tells the story of an Irish girl who, from Liverpool embarks on a packet ship of Mr. Tapscott directed to New York. Her arrival point is Brooklyn’s Irishtown not as famous as the Five Points in Manhattan but even more crowded by Irish immigrants. Irishtown was in the Fifth Ward / Vinegar Hill, an Irish stronghold full of illegal whiskey distilleries and detached from Anglo-American culture, in which even the police dared not set foot. Like the famous Irish revolutionary Michael Collins said in the movie, “There is one weapon that the British cannot take away from us: we can ignore them.”  More generally, the masses of poor and desperate Irish settled along the coast of Brooklyn, on the waterfront from Williamsburg to Gowanus.
The waterfront neighborhoods of antebellum Brooklyn was such a place. These neighborhoods of mostly English Protestants and old Dutch aristocracy were quickly overwhelmed by these Catholic “invaders” crippled by diseases, starving and with a legacy of rebelliousness, secrecy, violence and faction fighting within their fiercely communal cooperations. In short, these great numbers of Brooklyn immigrants were in no way interested in assimilating into the incumbent Anglo-Protestant culture. (from qui)

brooklyn-irishtown
A color drawing from 1855 looking west toward Brooklyn’s Navy Yard. Just beyond it in the area that looks shaded was “Irishtown.”

MR TAPSCOTT (John Short)

john-shortText and melody are a variant of “The New York gals” (“Can’t You Dance the Polka?”) This is what the authors of the Short Sharp Shanties project write in the notes: This shanty text is more widely known as The Irish Girl, The Irish Emigrant or Yellow Meal and the texts are fairly consistent – however, this text is one of only two instances where we have deliberately changed any words: we were not prepared to use the ‘N’ word – nor did Sharp, although he noted it, so we have used his text for the ‘Foulton Ferry’ verse. Short’s tune is, of course, more widely known as carrying New York Gals or Can’t You Dance the Polka (which are, arguably, text variants of Jack-All-Alone (a.k.a. Patrick Street/Barrack Street) – which used the tune of the polka Larry Doolan  (a.k.a.The Irish Jaunting Car) –  published 1852). The tune was also used for the American Civil War song The Bonny Blue Flag (1861) and subsequently for The Southern Girl’s Reply. The text has also been recorded, as a shanty, sung to Heave Away, Me Johnny (to which Short sang Banks of the Sweet Dundee (from here)

Sam Lee from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor Vol 1 

I
As I was a-walking down
by the Clarence Dock (1),
I overheard an Irish girl
conversing with Tapscott (2).
Chorus (after each verse):
And away you Santy (3), my dear Annie,
Oh you Santy, I’ll love you for your money
II
“Good morning Mister Tapscott,
good morning, sir,” says she,
“O have you got a ship of fame
to carry me o’er the sea?”
III
“O yes, I have a ship of fame,
tomorrow she sets sail,
She’s lieing in the Waterloo Dock taking in her mail.”
IV
The day was fine when we set sail
but night has scare begun (4)
A dirty nor’west wind came up
and drove us back again.
V
Our captain, being an Irishman,
as you shall understand,
He hoisted out his small boat on the banks of Newfoundland.
VI
‘Twas at the Castle Gardens (5) fair
they landed me on shore,
And if I marry a Yankee boy
I’ll go to sea no more.
VII
I went down to Foulton Ferry (6)
but I could not get across,
I jumped on the back
of a ferryboat man
and rode him like an hoss.
VIII
My father is a butcher,
my mother chops the meat,
My sister keeps a slap-up (7)
shop way down on Water Street (8).

NOTES
1) The port of Liverpool is a port system along the Mersey river estuary. The first basin of Liverpool was built in 1715 and then developed into a system of interconnected docks that allowed the movements of ships uninterruptedly despite the tides. Most of the small quayside of the southern part of the port of Liverpool were closed in 1971, as new basins were opened to accommodate the new cargo ships.
2)This shanty may have had a special appeal to Short: ‘Tapscott’ was William Tapscott from a Minehead (Somerset) family that had lived in the town (a neighbour to Watchet) from at least the mid-1770s.  William was an American packet ship broker, with offices on Regents Road, Liverpool, and Eden Quay, Dublin. He worked in conjunction with his brother James, who looked after the New York end of the business, and specialized in selling pre-paid passages to successful immigrants who now wished to bring their families to America.  They were agents for the Black Ball Line and, at one period, also for the Red Cross Line of American packets.  Together, they fleeced the unsuspecting. The Tapscott brothers were systematic villains, whose frauds began with their advertisements: although Taspcott advertised that his passages were on ships of over 1000 tons, and even as much as 2000 tons, in fact most were barely 600 tons. As their wealth increased the Tapscotts set up their own shipping line.  Cheap emigrant passages was the name of the game – but conditions were atrocious and the food poor (the ‘yellow meal’, i.e. corn grits, of the alternative title).  In 1849 William Tapscott was adjudged bankrupt, and in the same year was charged with fraud, concerning the money of shareholders in the business. He was found guilty and sentenced to three years’ penal servitude (from qui)
3 it recall to another sea shanty and to Santy Anna- Santiana . Santy here is used as a term of endearment in Italian could be Santina
4) Passengers often suffered from seasickness, especially with strong winds from the north wind
5) Castle Clinton or Fort Clinton or Castle Garden was a circular fort located in New York City in Battery Park, in the southern part of the island of Manhattan: from the mid-nineteenth century, it was used as the first sorting center for the european immigration. The station was in operation until 1890, when the federal administration, under pressure of a second and more massive immigration wave coming from all the states of Europe, decided to open a more functional one in Ellis Island.

New York 1850
John Bachmann. The Empire City, Birdseye View of New York and Environs, 1855

6) Fulton Ferry was the ferry that connected Brooklyn with New York and that remained in business until the construction of the famous bridge (1883) see more
7) nowaday we translates slap-up as “excellent” but I imagine a place to eat an economic meal (origins here),the term is however associated with a quality positive as something very good, but it may also mean a trendy place.
8) on the waterfront of Brooklyn

LINK
http://www.castlegarden.org/
http://visualizingnyc.org/essays/john-bachmanns-new-york/
https://artofneed.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/the-brooklyn-irish/
https://artofneed.wordpress.com/2013/03/30/brooklyns-irishtown/
https://artofneed.wordpress.com/2013/10/18/801/
https://www.vwml.org/record/CJS2/10/2877
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/mrtapscott.html
http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/tapscott.shtml

The Irish Girl of Mr Tapscott

Read the post in English 

“Mr Tapscott” è una sea shanty conosciuta con vari nomi “The Irish Girl”, “The Irish Emigrant”, ” Yellow Meal”, una via di mezzo tra una sea shanty e una emigration ballad.
In alcune versioni il testo è stato riscritto per il music-hall, per mettere in ridicolo l’irlandese di turno. (vedi prima parte)

The Irish Girl of Mr Tapscott

Si racconta di una ragazza irlandese che dal molo di Liverpool s’imbarca su una nave della Linea Marittima gestita dal signor Tapscott diretta a New York. Il suo punto d’arrivo è la Irishtown di Brooklyn non altrettanto famosa come i Five Points di Manhattan ma ancor più sovraffollata da immigrati irlandesi. La Irishtown era nel  Fifth Ward/Vinegar Hill, una roccaforte irlandese piena di distillerie di whisky illegale e avulsa dalla cultura anglo-americana, in cui nemmeno la polizia osava mettere piede. Come il famoso rivoluzionario irlandese Michael Collins ha detto nel film omonimo, “C’è un’arma che gli inglesi non possono toglierci: possiamo ignorarli”. Più in generale ingenti masse di poveri e disperati irlandesi si insediarono lungo il litorale di Brooklyn, sul lungomare da Williamsburg a Gowanus.
I quartieri lungomare di Brooklyn antebellum era un posto così. Questi quartieri di protestanti in gran parte inglesi e l’antica aristocrazia olandese furono rapidamente sopraffatti da questi “invasori” cattolici disabilitati dalle malattie, affamati e con un’eredità di ribellione, segretezza, violenza e combattimenti faziosi all’interno delle loro cooperazioni tenacemente comunitarie. In breve, questi grandi numeri di immigrati di Brooklyn non erano in alcun modo interessati ad assimilare la cultura anglo-protestante ufficiale.(tratto da qui)

brooklyn-irishtown
illustrazione del Fifth Ward di Brooklyn del 1855 la parte ombreggiata è la Irishtown, sullo sfondo a destra Manhattan con Battery Park sulla punta

MR TAPSCOTT (John Short)

john-shortTesto e melodia sono una variante di “The New York gals” (“Can’t You Dance the Polka?”) Così scrivono nelle note gli autori del progetto Short Sharp Shanties: “Il testo  è più noto come The Irish Girl, The Irish Emigrant o Yellow Meal con versioni abbastanza coerenti, tuttavia questo testo è uno dei due soli casi in cui abbiamo deliberatamente cambiato alcune parole: non eravamo disposti a usare la parola “N” – e nemmeno Sharp, benché l’abbia annotata, così abbiamo fatto ricorso al suo testo per il versetto di “Foulton Ferry”. Il motivo di Short è, ovviamente, più conosciuto come  New York Gals o Can’t You Dance the Polka (che sono, probabilmente, varianti del testo di Jack-All-Alone (alias Patrick Street / Barrack Street) – che usava la melodia della polka Larry Doolan (The Irish Jaunting Car) – pubblicata nel 1852). La melodia è stata utilizzata anche per la canzone della guerra civile americana The Bonny Blue Flag (1861) e successivamente per The Southern Girl’s Reply. Il testo è stato anche registrato, come una shanty, cantata per Heave Away, Me Johnny (che Short canta su Banks of the Sweet Dundee.   (tratto da qui)

Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor Vol 1 


I
As I was a-walking down
by the Clarence Dock (1),
I overheard an Irish girl
conversing with Tapscott (2).
Chorus (after each verse):
And away you Santy (3), my dear Annie,
Oh you Santy, I’ll love you for your money
II
“Good morning Mister Tapscott,
good morning, sir,” says she,
“O have you got a ship of fame
to carry me o’er the sea?”
III
“O yes, I have a ship of fame,
tomorrow she sets sail,
She’s lieing in the Waterloo Dock taking in her mail.”
IV
The day was fine when we set sail
but night has scare begun (4)
A dirty nor’west wind came up
and drove us back again.
V
Our captain, being an Irishman,
as you shall understand,
He hoisted out his small boat on the banks of Newfoundland.
VI
‘Twas at the Castle Gardens (5) fair
they landed me on shore,
And if I marry a Yankee boy
I’ll go to sea no more.
VII
I went down to Foulton Ferry (6)
but I could not get across,
I jumped on the back
of a ferryboat man
and rode him like an hoss.
VIII
My father is a butcher,
my mother chops the meat,
My sister keeps a slap-up (7)
shop way down on Water Street (8).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo
al  Molo Clarence
ascoltai una ragazza irlandese
conversare con Tapscott.
Coro
E andiamo Santina, mia cara Annie,
tu Santina, ti amerò per i tuoi soldi
II
Buon giorno signor Tapscott,
buon giorno signore -dice lei-
avete una nave di chiara fama
che mi porti oltre mare?”
III
“O si, ho una nave di chiara fama
che partirà domani
è in rada nel Molo Waterloo
a caricare la posta”
IV
Il giorno era bello quando salpammo, ma la notte ci mise in apprensione, un dannato vento di tramontana arrivò e ci ricacciava indietro.
V
Il Capitano, era irlandese,
come capirete,
ammarò la sua barcaccia sulle rive di Terranova.
VI
Fu a Castle Gardens
che mi sbarcarono a riva
e se sposerò un americano
non andrò più per mare
VII
Andai al  Fulton Ferry
ma non riuscii a salire sul traghetto, così saltai sulla schiena di un traghettatore e lo cavalcai come un cavallino
VIII
Mio padre è un macellaio, mia madre trita la carne, mia sorella tiene una bottega alla mano in fondo a Water Street.

NOTE
1) Il porto di Liverpool è un sistema portuale lungo l’estuario del fiume Mersey. Il primo bacino di Liverpool fu costruito nel 1715 sviluppandosi poi in un sistema di docks interconnessi che permettevano i movimenti delle navi ininterrottamente nonostante le maree. La maggior parte delle piccole banchine della parte sud del porto di Liverpool vennero chiuse nel 1971, man mano che s’inauguravano i nuovi bacini adatti ad ospitare le nuovi navi cargo.
2) Questa shanty aveva un fascino particolare per il marinaio Short: “Tapscott” era William Tapscott di una famiglia di Minehead (Somerset) che aveva vissuto in città (vicino a Watchet) almeno dalla metà del 1770. William era un affarista navale americano con sede a Regents Road, a Liverpool, e Eden Quay, a Dublino. Lavorò in collaborazione con suo fratello James, che si occupava della parte finale della tratta di New York e si specializzò nella vendita di passaggi prepagati agli immigrati arricchiti. Erano agenti della Black Ball Line e della Red Cross Line dei postali americani. Insieme, truffavano gli incauti. I fratelli Tapscott erano furfanti sistematici, a cominciare dalle dimensioni del carico venduto come 1000 tonnellate, e persino fino a 2000 tonnellate, mentre la maggior parte delle loro navi non superava le 600 tonnellate. Con l’aumentare della loro ricchezza, i Tapscot hanno creato la loro linea di navigazione. Passaggi economici per l’emigrante erano il nome dell’affare – ma le condizioni erano atroci e il cibo povero (il “pasto giallo”, cioè le pastone di mais del titolo). Nel 1849 William Tapscott fu dichiarato fallito, e nello stesso anno fu accusato di frode. È stato giudicato colpevole e condannato a tre anni di servitù penale  (tratto da qui)
3) richiamo ad un’altra  sea shanty e a Santy Anna- Santiana . Santy qui è usato come vezzeggiativo in italiano potrebbe essere Santina
4) I passeggeri soffrivano spesso il mal di mare specialmente con i forti venti di tramontana
5) Castle Clinton o Fort Clinton o Castle Garden era un forte circolare situato nella Città di New York a Battery Park, nella parte meridionale dell’isola di Manhattan: dalla metà del XIX secolo, fu utilizzato come primo centro di smistamento per l’immigrazione proveniente dall’Europa. La stazione fu in funzione fino al 1890, anno in cui l’amministrazione federale, sotto pressione di una seconda e più imponente ondata immigratoria proveniente da tutti gli stati d’Europa, decise di aprirne una più funzionale su Ellis Island.

New York 1850
John Bachmann. The Empire City, Birdseye View of New York and Environs, 1855, in primo piano Battery Park

6) Fulton Ferry era il traghetto che collegava Brooklyn con New York e che rimase in attività fino alla costruzione del famoso ponte (1883) vedi
7) slap-up oggi si traduce come “eccellente” ma alla luce delle sue origini sull’origine del termine vedere qui, m’immagino un posto dove mangiare un pasto economico antenato del fast-food, il termine è associato tuttavia a una qualità positiva come qualcosa di molto buono, ma può voler anche dire un posto alla moda.
8) sul lungomare del distretto di Brooklyn

FONTI
http://www.castlegarden.org/
http://visualizingnyc.org/essays/john-bachmanns-new-york/
https://artofneed.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/the-brooklyn-irish/
https://artofneed.wordpress.com/2013/03/30/brooklyns-irishtown/
https://artofneed.wordpress.com/2013/10/18/801/
https://www.vwml.org/record/CJS2/10/2877
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/mrtapscott.html
http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/tapscott.shtml

Row bullies row.. to New York

Read the post in English

“Liverpool Judies” (anche”Row, bullies, row”)  è una sea shanty estremamente popolare utilizzata secondo quanto riferito da Stan Hugill come capstan shanty (ma anche come forebitter); si raggruppa in due principali versioni: una in cui il nostro marinaio sbarca a San Francisco, l’altra a New York. Entrambi le versioni finiscono però sempre con il ragazzo ubriaco o drogato che si sveglia di nuovo su una nave su cui è stato portato nottetempo da un gruppetto di “crimps” .
La coscrizione fraudolenta prende il nome di  “shanghaiinge”  diffuso soprattutto nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti.hanghaiinge

VERSIONE NEW YORK

Traffici più o meno loschi nelle banchine portuali, marinai ubriachi e donnine compiacenti .. ma anche una warning song per mettere all’erta i giovani marinai che si ubriacano a terra, perchè rischiano di finire rapiti e imbarcati a forza. Il titolo con la quale è più conosciuta  questa versione è  “Row, bullies, row”.
Stan Hugill ci racconta che la canzone deve essere cantata con una cadenza irlandese .  Il testo è tratto da  “Shanties and Sailors Songs”, Hugill, Stan, (1969) (vedi)

Ian Campbell Group in Farewell Nancy, 1964 

The Foo Foo Band in The Foo Foo Band, 2000


I
When I wuz a youngster
I sailed wid de rest,
On a Liverpool packet
bound out to the West.
We anchored one day
in de harbour of Cork,
Then we put out to sea
for the port of New York.
Chorus
And it’s roll, row bullies roll (1),
Them Liverpool Judies (2)
have got us in tow (3).

II
For forty-two days
we wuz hungry an’ sore,
Oh, the winds wuz agin us,
the gales they did roar;
Off Battery Point (4)
we did anchor at last,
Wid our jib boom (5) hove in
an’ the canvas all fast.
III
De boardin’-house masters (6)
wuz off in a trice,
A-shoutin’ an’ promisin’
all that wuz nice;
An’ one fast ol’ crimp
he got cotton’d (7)  to me,
Sez he, “Yer a fool lad (foolish),
ter follow the sea.”
IV
Sez he, “There’s a job
is a waitin’ fer you,
Wid lashin’s o’ liqour
an’ begger-all (nothing) to do.
What d’yer say, lad,
will ye jump ‘er (8), too?”
Sez I, “Ye ol’ bastard,
I’m damned if I do.”
V
But de best ov intentions
dey niver gits far,
After forty-two days
at the door of a bar,
I tossed off me liquor
an’ what d’yer think?
Why the lousy ol’ bastard
‘ad drugs in me drink.
VI
Now, the next I remembers
I woke in de morn,
On a three-skys’l yarder
bound south round Cape Horn;
Wid an’ ol’ suit of oilskins
an’ three (two) pairs o’ sox,
An’ a bloomin’ big head
an’ a dose of the pox.
VII
Now all ye young sailors
take a warnin’ by me,
Keep a watch (an eye) on yer drinks
when the liquor is free,
An’ pay no attintion
to runner (9) or whore,
Or yer head’ll be thick
an’ yer fid (10) ‘ll be sore.
traduzione italiano di di Italo Ottonello
I
Quando era un giovanotto
ho navigato al meglio
su una nave postale di Liverpool
diretto all’Ovest.
Ci ancorammo per un giorno
nel porto di Cork
e poi prendemmo il mare
per il porto di New York.
CORO:
Vogate, vogate bulletti vogate
quelle ragazze di Liverpool ci hanno passato un [cavo di] rimorchio
II
Per 42 giorni
siamo stati affamati ed afflitti
perchè i venti erano contrari
e le tempeste ruggivano;
di fronte a Battery Point
ci ancorammo infine
con l’asta di fiocco rientrata
e tutte le vele serrate.
III
Gli arruolatori
accorsero in un attimo
strillando e promettendo
un sacco di belle cose;
un vecchio e grasso marpione
mi prese in simpatia
“Sei pazzo, ragazzo,
ad andare per mare-
IV
dice lui – C’è un lavoro
che ti aspetta
con liquore a volontà
e poco o niente da fare.
Cosa ne pensi, ragazzo,
non vuoi sbarcare?”
Dico io “Vecchio bastardo
che io sia dannato se lo farò”
V
Ma le migliori intenzioni
non vanno mai troppo lontano
e dopo 42 giorni
che ero sulla porta del bar
e mi bevevo il liquore,
cosa credete?
Quel vecchio bastardo pidocchioso
mise le droghe nel mio drink.
VI
Ora, il ricordo successivo
è che mi svegliai al mattino
su un grande trealberi
diretto a sud per doppiare Capo Horn;
con una vecchia tenuta cerata
e tre paia di calzini,
una fottuta testa pesante
e una buona dose di febbre.
VII
Quindi voi tutti giovani marinai,
datemi ascolto,
attenzione alle vostre bevande
quando il liquore è gratis!
E non date retta
alle passeggiatrici o alle puttane
o la vostra testa sarà pesante
e la vostra gola infiammata

NOTE
1) in questo contesto roll e row sono presi come sinonimo
2) La parola judy è un’espressione dialettale di Liverpool per indicare una generica ragazza (non necessariamente una prostituta)
3) il termine è diventato nel gergo marinaresco sinonimo di venti favorevoli che spingono verso casa (una nave che fila veloce).
A tal proposito Italo Ottonello argomenta:
Il primo ufficiale stava al barcarizzo, fregandosi le mani e dicendo ad alta voce alla nave, “Evviva, vecchia bagnarola! le ragazze di Boston ti hanno passato il cavo di rimorchio!” e cose del genere. (tratto da: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
(the mate stood in the gangway, rubbing his hands, and talking aloud to the ship, “Hurrah, old bucket! the Boston girls have got hold of the tow-rope!” and the like)
Ad ogni cambio di guardia, quelli che salivano in coperta chiedevano agli smontanti, “Di quanto siamo andati avanti?” e ricevevano, come risposta, la stima accompagnata dall’abituale aggiunta, “Aye! E le ragazze di Boston ci hanno passato il cavo di rimorchio per tutta la guardia!”. Da : idem come sopra
(At each change of the watch, those coming on deck asked those going below, “How does she go along?” and got, for answer, the rate, and the customary addition, “Aye! and the Boston girls have had hold of the tow-rope all the watch.”)
4) New York, l’isola di Manhattan
5) Jibboom: asta di fiocco.  E’ un buttafuori, cioè un’asta (boom) che sporge da un’altra asta. Il buttafuori del bompresso (bowsprit), detto – asta di fiocco (jib-boom) – prolunga il bompresso ed è a sua volta prolungata dall’asta – o bastone – di controfiocco (flying -jibboom); i buttafuori degli altri alberi permettono di armare delle vele supplementari prolungando i rispettivi pennoni.
6) un procacciatore d’imbarco che con mezzi più o meno leciti procurava marinai alle navi
7) “cottoned” =”attached” ,”caught on” (british slang); oppure dice “likin’ to me” o anche “fancying”
8) il marpione (crimp) sta offrendo al ragazzo di aiutarlo nel suo mestiere e quindi gli dice di lasciare l’ingaggio sulla nave da cui è sbarcato per fare parte della sua squadra di reclutatori e fare shangaiing
9) termine spregiativo
10) una versione meno ripulita utilizza il termine “yer knob’ll be sore” che significa testa di .. (tutta un’altra testa che si trova un po’ più in basso)

ARCHIVIO:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
la versione ‘Frisco
la versione New York
la versione dal film Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/liverpooljudies.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/136.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/judies
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=69
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LiverpoolGirls/index.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61483