Archivi tag: Magpie Lane

Jack In The Green: Chimney Sweeps’ Day

Leggi in italiano
Green Jack ” (the Green Man) was a popular mask of the English May, from the Middle Ages and until the Victorian era, fallen into disuse at the end of the nineteenth century, it returned to show itself and spread to starting from the 1970s in May Day parades.

In the nineteenth century the first of May was the feast of the chimney sweeps and so the nursery rhyme “The first of May” says
Chimney Sweeps’ Day, Blackbird is gay,
Here he is singing, you see, in the “May”.
He has feathers as black as a chimney sweep’s coat.
So on Chimney Sweeps’ Day he must pipe a glad note.
Jack-in-the-Green from door to door
capers along with the followers four.
As May Day mummers are seldom seen,
let us all give a copper to Jack-in-the-Green.
(from here)

A chimney sweep maskered himself as “Jack in the Green”  slipping inside a pyramid-shaped wicker structure, covered with ivy and foliage, surmounted by a wreath of flowers. He went out into the streets with his other friends to dance and collect offers in money: they are a King and Queen (or a Lord and Lady), jesters, clowns, chimney sweeps and musicians.

G901506

First recorded in London in the 700, Jack-in-the-Greens were soon appearing across the country. The documentation collected by Keith Chandler is instead related to the publication in newspapers in the years 1820 and up to 1890 (see more)
A series of anecdotes on how the disguise was born (see more)

1835-may

THE GREEN MAN

Some scholars connect this disguise to the Green Man carved in the stones of medieval churches in Europe that is usually depicted only in the face, a human face metamorphosed in foliage.
“In the tenth century they begin to appear as illustrations on the manuscripts, especially in France, such as Bibles, books of Psalms and Ordals, books of hours, even works by famous theologians such as the” Moralia “of St. Gregory the Great, a exegesis of the book of Job, where they often merge with the intertwined motifs typical of Saxon and Celtic art: they are reminiscent of snakes that bite their tails, decorative motifs of evident stylistic practicality, and can be interpreted as pitfalls and obstacles of the earthly life.Afterwards they appear as architectural elements in the churches of Germanic style.They soon spread everywhere in churches, cathedrals and abbeys, but also in other buildings, ecclesiastical and not, both as architectural friezes, both in wooden furniture (like the benches), and also in the funeral art (on the tombs, in short) Their popularity grows between the eleventh and twelfth centuries.
In the simplest form, the faces are generally masculine, from whose orifices, eyes, nose, mouth and ears, foliage appears, often branches or leaves of vines, or which have leaves and bushes instead of beard and hair; these last ones seem almost versions of the Medusa to the masculine, which they resemble in a disturbing way. But there are also more abstract, where vegetation is predominant and the human features are only hinted at, barely distinguishable: heads made of leaves that would have pleased Arcimboldo. In spite of the name, it is not always human faces: often they are demons, masks (or stereotypes), even animals, in preference felines. Sometimes they are provided with teeth and seem to bite the branches. If in some cases their association with the evil one is evident, in others they seem decorative motives without particular meaning, more than anything else a demonstration of the taste for the absurd and the bizarre typical of the Middle Ages. “(translateb from here)

Dunblane Cathedral, Scotland XV secolo

The green men are not a product of Christianity (or they have been clothed with a new theological role) because we have a lot of sculptural decorations, and paintings dating back to the age of Imperial Rome ( Domus Aurea of Nero). Masquerones with plant decorations also recall sylvan gods like Pan, Bacchus, Dionysus, and so on, thus some scholars see in the symbol of the green man of early Christianity the intent to incorporate myths and practices of the most widespread mystery religions in the countryside. (see more)

Other characters connected to the Green Man are also the Wild Man, Puck and Robin Hood, the Green Knight opponent of Sir Galvano, but also the Christian Saint George. In psychology it is said to be an archetypal figure connected to the arboreal myths, or an example of the divinization of nature. (see first part)

Brian Froud: Green Man

JACK IN THE GREEN

Magpie Lane from “Jack in the Green”  1998: Jack in the green (composeb by Martin Graebe in 1972 ) and Jack’s Alive a traditional and popular dancing tune in England and Scotland.

Martin Graebe notes: “”This song was written when Cherri and I were living to the east of Exeter in the area that is marked on the Ordnance Survey map as “Jack in the Green.” We were also drinking fairly often in the pub of the same name and the connection led to the above bit of fantasy based on traditional themes. A number of people have told me at different times that they have heard “Jack in the Green” described as a traditional song. It was the first of my songs to turn up on the Internet, where it was described on the Digital Tradition database as a traditional song. Most recently, someone told me about an American CD of pagan music that includes Jack as an example of a traditional pagan song from the British Isles.”
in the video  “Hastings Jack in the Green Festival”

JACK IN THE GREEN
by Martin Graebe 1972
I
Now winter is over,
I’m happy to say,
And we’re all met again
in our ribbons so gay.
And we’re all met again
on the first day of Spring
To go about dancing
with Jack in the Green(1).
CHORUS
Jack in the Green, Jack in the Green
And we’ll all dance each springtime
with Jack in the Green

II
Now Jack in the Green
is a very strange man,
Tho’ he dies every Autumn,
he is born every Spring.
And each year on our birthday,
we will dance through the street,
And in return Jack
he will ripen our wheat.
 
III(2)
Now all you young maidens
I’d have you beware
Of touching young Jack,
for there’s strange powers there.
For if you but touch him,
there is many will tell
Like the wheat in our fields
so your belly will swell.
IV
With his mantle
he’ll cover the trees that are bare.
Our gardens he’ll trim
with his jacket so fair.
And our fields he will sow
with the hair of his head.
And our grain it will ripen
‘til Old Jack is dead(3)!
V
Now the sun is half up
and betokens the hour
That the children arrive
with their garlands of flowers.
So now let the music
and the dancing begin,
And touch the good heart
of young Jack in the Green!

NOTES
1) Jack is the diminutive of two different names James and John, but more than a name right here is to indicate the Green Man
2) Magpie Lane have skipped this stanza
3) it is the myth of the Spirit of the Wheat: the spirit of the Wheat-Barley never dies because it is reborn the following year with the new harvest, its strength and its ardor are contained in the whiskey that is obtained from the distillation of barley malt!

JACK’S ALIVE

Two dance tunes which I’d been playing for years, before I realised that they are in fact the same tune played in different time signatures. The first, in 6/8, is from Wilson’s Ballroom Companion, via one of Bert Simon’s Kentish Hops pamphlets. I first heard it played by the Oyster Ceilidh Band. Curiously their first LP was called Jack’s Alive, but this tune was not on it; they finally recorded it on their 20 Golden Tie-Slackeners album. I originally knew the 4/4 tune as an unnamed morris tune from Badby in Northamptonshire. Oyster Morris from Canterbury used it for a dance called ‘The Panic’ – originally ‘Pogle’s Panic’ – which had been written in the early 1980s by Pete Collinson. It was some years later that I found the tune in The Yetties’ The Musical Heritage of Thomas Hardy as ‘Jack’s Alive’.” (from here)

Aly Bain & Tom Anderson 
English country dance

Morris Dance

Bibliography
“The Green Man”  Richard Hayman
“Images of Lust: Sexual carvings on medieval churches”  Anthony Weir and James Jerman.

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/jack-in-the-green/
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/jack_gre.htm
https://georgianera.wordpress.com/2017/04/27/may-day-the-tradition-of-the-jack-in-the-green-and-chimney-sweeps/
http://www.greenmanenigma.com/history.html http://www.egreenway.com/meditation/greenman.htm http://www.mariateresalupo.it/simbolimitialchimiafiabe/maggio.html http://freespace.virgin.net/polter.geist/greenman_page0019.htm https://www.adf.org/articles/gods-and-spirits/general/jackingr.html http://www.acam.it/la-tradizione-del-maggio-e-il-culto-arboreo/ http://martingraebe.me.uk/onewebmedia/Jack_in_the_green.htm http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/jack_in_the_green/jack_in_the_green.htm http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/jack_in_the_green/jacks_alive.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3730 http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Jack’s_Alive_(3) https://thesession.org/tunes/3299

Lancashire, Yorkshire & Oxfordshire may day carols

Leggi in italiano

GREATER MANCHESTER – Lancashire

Manchester May Day.
“One tradition was for girls to don mainly white dresses, made from curtains or whatever, and carry around a broomstick representing a maypole. Another tradition was for boys to dress up in women’s clothing and to colour their faces – they were called molly dancers, ‘molly’ being an old expression for an effeminate man. Dr Cass[Dr Eddie Cass, the Folklore Society] says they went round quoting a verse. One such, from the Salford area, was: I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew. Itch Koo Pushing little wagons up a brew I earn thirty bob a week I’ve a wife and kids to keep I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew Dr Cass himself remembers both traditions. The girls would dance round the maypole and sing other songs, such as: Buttercups and daisies Oh what pretty flowers Coming in spring time To tell of sunny hours We come to greet you on the first of May We hope you will not send us away For we dance and sing our merry song On a maypole day (from here)

SWINTON MAY SONG

The version reproduced by Watersons in 1975 is taken from W & R Chamber “Book of Days” – 1869 – with words and music collected by Mr. Job Knight (1861) –  A.L. Lloyd comments
The critical seasons of the year—midwinter, coming of spring, onset of autumn—were times for groups of carollers to go through the villages singing charms for good luck, in hope of a reward of food, drink, money. This one was sung on May Eve or thereabouts in Yorkshire and Lancashire, but it’s much like similar songs from any other county.”

This song is  titled “Drawing Near the Merry Month of May” and the text is also reported in Edwin Waugh’s book “Lancashire Sketches” (1869)
The area of reference is Yorkshire and Lancashire and “Swinton” was a small borough, then Salford city now become a part of Manchester (England)

The Watersons from For Pence and Spicy Ale -1975

Brass Monkey from Flame of Fire – 2005

The two melodies are different, the version of the Brass Monkey recalls the Padstow May Song, another song of springtime still popular ritual in the town of Padstow, Cornwall.
As reported in Chambers’ Book of Day (1869), Swinton’s two songs were the Old May song and the New May song. The Old May Song was a so-called Night song that was sung during the night by groups of mayers accompanied with various musical instruments.

OLD MAY SONG

I
All in this pleasant evening together
come has we
for the summer springs so fresh and green and gay.
We’ll tell you of a blossom and a bud on every tree
Drawing near to the merry month of May
II
Rise up, the master of this house all in your chain of gold
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope you’re not offended with your house we make so bold
Drawing near to the merry month of May
III
Rise up, the mistress of this house with gold all on your breast
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
And if your body is asleep we hope your soul’s at rest
Drawing near to the merry month of May
IV
Rise up, the children of this house, all in your rich attire
For the summer springs so gresh and green and gay.
And every hair all on your head shines like a silver wire
Drawing near to the merry month of May
V
God bless this house and arbor, your riches and your store
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope that the Lord will prosper you both now and evermore
Drawing near to the merry month of May
VI
So now we’re going to leave you in peace and plenty here
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We will not sing you May again until another year
For to drive you these cold winter nights away

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

We heve a direct testimony in the book”Memoirs of Seventy Years of an Eventful Life  from Charles Hulbert (Providence Grove, Near Shrewsbury:1852), pg 107
With feelings of indescribable pleasure, I still call to my remembrance various customs and scenes familiar to my early years. Still present is the delight with which I hailed the approach of May-day morning, when a select company of the musical Rustics of Worsley, Swinton and Eccles, would assemble at midnight to commence the grateful task of saluting their neighbours with the sound of the Clarionet, Hautboy, German Flute, Violin, and the melody of twenty voices. On this occasion the leader of the band would commence his song under the window or before the outer door of the family “he delighted to honour” with
O rise up Master of this House, all in your chain of gold,
For the summer springs so fresh, green and gay;
I hope you’ll not be angry at us for being so bold,
Drawing near to the merry month of May.
In this strain, including some encomiums or happy allusion to the various qualifications of all the other branches of the family the whole were saluted: after which a purse of silver or a few mugs of good ale were distributed among the company; thus they proceeded from house to house, tilling the air with their music and happy voices, till six o’clock in the morning.
Among the drinks with which the singers were refreshing their throat in addition to the inevitable beer there was also the Syllabub prepared with milk cream. see more

OXFORDSHIRE

THE SWALCLIFFE MAY DAY CAROL

CMB-009Here is the transcription of a 19th-century May song sung by Swalcliffe’s children, clearly a Day Song
Swalcliffe (pronounced sway-cliff) is a village near Banbury in North Oxfordshire. The words of this carol were noted by Miss Annie Norris around 1840 from the singing of a group of children in the village. The words were passed onto the collector – and Adderbury resident – Janet Blunt in 1908, and she finally collected a tune for the song from Mrs Woolgrove of Swalcliffe, and Mrs Lynes of Sibford, at Sibford fete, July 1921.” (from here)

Magpie Lane from The Oxford Ramble 1993

I
Awake! awake! lift up your eyes
And pray to God for grace
Repent! repent! of your former sins
While ye have time and space
II
I have been wandering all this night
And part of the last day
So now I’ve come for to sing you a song
And to show you a branch of May
III
A branch of may I have brought you
And at your door it stands
It does spread out, and it spreads all about
By the work of our Lord’s hands
IV
Man is but a man, his life’s but a span
He is much like a flower
He’s here today and he’s gone tomorrow
So he’s all gone down in an hour
V
So now I have sung you my little short song
I can no longer stay
God bless you all both great and small
And I wish you a happy May

LINK

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=129987 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30126 http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/april/24.htm http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/ making_history/makhist10_prog5d.shtml https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/ swintonmaysong.html http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/ oxford_ramble/may_day_carol.htm https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2013/04/29/ week-88-swalcliffe-may-day-carol/

PADSTOW May Day Songs

Leggi in italiano

 

On May 1, in Padstow, a characteristic event called “Obby Oss Festival” is celebrated, centered on the Hobby Horse dance; Padstow is a small fishing port of North Cornwall on the mouth of the river Camel, now a tourist destination. (first part)

In this second part I’m going to bring back a couple of songs incorporated in the Padstow Oss tradition but that have been written more recently in the 20th century!

HAIL! HAIL! THE FIRST OF MAY

Dave Webber, founder with his wife Anni Fentiman of the Beggar’s Velvet group, wrote a May Song inspired by the oss tradition for their debut album “Lady of Autumn” released in 1990. The song was so convincing that it was adopted among the celebrations for the Padstow May, also known as the “Drink To The Old ‘Oss” (see more)
Magpie Lane from Jack in the Green 1998

HAIL! HAIL! THE FIRST OF MAY
by Dave Webber 1990
I
Winter time has gone and past-o,
Summer time has come at last-o.
We shall sing and dance the day
And follow the ‘obby ‘orse that brings the May.
Chorus:
So, Hail! Hail! The First of May-o!
For it is the first summer’s day-o!
Cast you cares and fears away,
Drink to the old horse on the First of May!
II
Blue bells(1) they have started to ring-o,
And true love, it is the thing-o.
Love on any other day
Is never quite the same as on the First of May!
III
Never let it come to pass-o
We should fail to raise a glass-o!
Unto those now gone away
And left us the ‘obby ‘orse that brings the May!

NOTES
1) The Hyacinthoides of Spanish origin is sometimes called Spanish Bluebells to distinguish it also in the vulgar name from the Hyacinthoides non-scripta, known as English Bluebells.

QUEEN OF THE MAY

In 1982 Larry McLaughlin dedicated this song to his wife Maureen on their silver wedding! Here is a tasty anecdote about it told by Larry McLaughlin’s son: “Dad and I were playing in Padstow one night and, inevitably, we did ‘Queen of the May.’ Afterwards, a woman of middle years and a rich Cornish accent came up to us and said to Dad, ‘’Ere boy, you got the words wrong.’ ‘Oh really,’ Dad replied, ‘But I wrote it.’ ‘So you’re the bugger,’ she replied. “But her husband shouted across, ‘’E didn’t write that, I remember my father singing it.’ To which some else joined in with, ‘You don’t even know who your [bleep]ing father was.’ And such was a typical evening in Padstow. “And in many ways the song has been absorbed into the traditions of Padstow. But we should never forget that it is Mum’s song; its original title is ‘Maureen’s Song.’ A treasured gift from Dad to celebrate their Silver Wedding Anniversary, as he says—without having to spend any money!”

QUEEN OF THE MAY
by Larry McLaughlin 1982
I
Winter is over and summer has come
And the Obby Oss waits in his stable for dawn
Rise up my love early and deck yourself gay
And I’ll take you to Padstow today
Chorus: And put your arms round me. I’ll dance you away
For you are my Queen of the May
II
Skip out o’er the fields and the woods and the dells
Pick primroses, daises, cowslips and bluebells
And from the green woods cut a sycamore spray
And I’ll take you to Padstow today
III
We’ll breakfast on ale and an old chorus song
Musicians will come with accordion and drum
We’ll meet the old Oss and we’ll welcome the May
When I take you to Padstow today
IV
When the years have rolled on love and we are both old
And the stories of May day and Padstow are told
And though I’m old and feeble you’ll still hear me say
I’llt take you to Padstow today

LINK
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/padstow.html http://celtic.org/hobby.pdf http://www.padstowlive.com/events/padstow-may-day http://grapewrath.wordpress.com/2010/05/01/chris-wood-andy-cutting-following-the-old-oss/ https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/hailhailthefirstofmay.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46931#698474 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60993 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46931
http://www.sffmc.org/archives/may09/QueenOfMay.pdf

Bedfordshire May Day carols

Leggi in italiano

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]
The Lord and the Lady and the Moggers
On 1st May several customs were observed. Children would go garlanding, a garland being, typically, a wooden hoop over which a white cloth was stretched. A looser piece of cloth was fastened at the top which was used to cover the finished garland. Two dolls were fastened in the middle, one large and one small. Ribbons were sewn around the front edge and the rest of the space was filled with flowers. The dolls were supposed to represent the Virgin Mary and the Christ child. The children would stop at each house and ask for money to view the garland.

Another custom, prevalent throughout the county if not the country, was maying. It was done regularly until the outbreak of the First World War and, sporadically, afterwards. Young men would go around at night with may bushes singing May carols. In the morning a may bush was attached to the school flag pole, another would decorate the inn sign at the Crown and others rested against doors, designed to fall in when they were opened. Those maying included a Lord and a Lady, the latter the smallest of the young men with a veil and bonnet. The party also included Moggers or Moggies, a man and a woman with black faces, ragged clothes and carrying besom brushes. (from here)

VIDEO Here is a very significant testimony of Margery “Mum” Johnstone from  Bedforshide collected by Pete Caslte, with two May songs

Maypole dancers dance during May Day celebrations in the village of Elstow, Bedfordshire, in 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

From the testimony of Mrs Margery Johnstone this May Garland or “This Morning Is The 1st of May” was transcribed by Fred Hamer in his “Gay Garners”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017


MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

The carol is known as “The May Day Carol” or “Bedford May Carol” but also “The Kentucky May Carol” (as preserved in the May tradition in the Appalachian Mountains) and was collected in Bedfordshire.
A first version comes from  Hinwick as collected by Lucy Broadwood  (1858 – 1929) and transcribed into “English Traditional Songs and Carols” (London: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton from “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL
I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady, as in Cambridgshire, the contaminations with the creed of the dominant religion are inevitable
2) this sweet and fresh cream in a glass is a typically Elizabethan vintage-style drink-dessert still popular in the Victorian era, the Syllabub. The Mayers once offered “a syllabub of hot milk directly from the cow, sweet cakes and wine” (The James Frazer Gold Branch). And so I went to browse to find the historical recipe: it is a milk shake, wine (or cider or beer) sweetened and perfumed with lemon juice. The lemon juice served to curdle the milk so that it would form a cream on the surface, over time the recipe has become more solid, ie a cream with the whipped cream flavored with liqueur or sweet wine (see recipes) 

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste: in the background a tray full of syllabus glasses

3) the reference to the dew is not accidental, the tradition of May provides a bath in the dew and in the wild waters full of rain. The night is the magic of April 30 and the dew was collected by the girls and kept as a panacea able to awaken the beauty of women!! (see Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002, same tune of Cambridgeshire May Carol (not completely transcribed)

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY CAROL
I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady..
2) Syllabub (see above)
3) the stanza derives from “The Moon Shine Bright” version published by William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) see

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane from “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 ( I, II, III e IX) with The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
The song is reproposed in the Blog “A Folk song a Week”   edited by Andy Turner himself in which Andy tells us he had learned the song from the collection of Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred collected it from “Chris Marsom and others” – Mr Marsom had by that time emigrated to Canada, but Fred met him on a visit to his native Northill, Bedfordshire. Fred’s notes say “The Day Song is much too long for inclusion here and the Night Song has the same tune. It was used by Vaughan Williams as the tune for No. 638 of the English Hymnal, but he gave it the name of “Southill” because it was sent to him by a Southill man. Chris Marsom who sang this to me had many tales to tell of the reception the Mayers had from some of the ladies who were strangers to the village and became apprehensive at the approach of a body of men to their cottage after midnight on May Eve.”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (track 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy writes in the sleeve notes “May Song came from a Cynthia Gooding record which I lost 16 years ago, words stuck in my head.” (from II to VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) according to the previous religion, water received more power from the Beltane sun. Celts made pilgrimages to the sacred springs and with the spring water they sprinkled the fields to favor the rain.

Kerfuffle from “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

IL GIORNO DI SANTO STEFANO

“Santo Stefano” Luis de Morales, 1575

La figura di Santo Stefano è  venerata sia nel Nord che nell’Est d’Europa dalla Chiesa Cattolica e Ortodossa: si suppone che Stefano provenisse dall’Anatolia ellenica, uno degli ebrei della diaspora benestanti e letterati, di lingua greca, stanziati in città cosmopolite e certamente più colti rispetto ai primi seguaci di Gesù (per lo più i contadini e i diseredati della Galilea).

Gli ellenisti furono coloro che trasformarono la setta ebraica dei seguaci di Gesù in qualcosa di nuovo rispetto al giudaismo e iniziarono a chiamarsi cristiani.
Della vita di Santo Stefano si conosce molto poco, lo troviamo a Gerusalemme come seguace di Cristo e grande predicatore, lapidato nel 36 d.C. per la sua testimonianza di fede, il primo martire della storia cristiana e perciò annoverato tra i Comites Christi, i compagni di Gesù di cui si ricordano la vita a cominciare dal giorno dopo del Natale di Cristo.
L’invenzione della sua sepoltura (cioè il ritrovamento della sua tomba) cade al 3 agosto del 415 e per la Chiesa ortodossa il 3 agosto è ancora la sua festa.

Lapidazione di Saqnto Stefano, Paolo Uccello

Stefano secondo la leggenda medievale diffusa da  Giovanni di Hildesheim  a volte è uno stalliere, a volte un servitore alla mensa di Erode, altre volte un cacciatore. Stefano fu il primo a vedere la stella di Betlemme e lasciò la corte di Erode per seguire Gesù. Un’antica ballata doveva circolare per l’Europa medievale sulla suggestione della leggenda, le cui tracce si conservano nei paesi del Nord. continua

LA TRADIZIONE IN ITALIA

In Italia è festa nazionale solo dal secondo dopoguerra, è il giorno dedicato alla famiglia e al relax con giochi da tavolo e d’intrattenimento per tutti, anche le massaie che si sono dedicate per giorni al pranzo di Natale oggi mettono in tavola gli avanzi.
Un proverbio francese recita “A Santo Stefano le giornate si allungano di uno spillo” e se la giornata è soleggiata sono frequenti le passeggiate in città o le scampagnate.

LA TRADIZIONE IN GRAN BRETAGNA

Il Boxing Day, è una festività natalizia che cade il 26 dicembre, il corrispettivo anglosassone del nostro Santo Stefano: letteralmente “giorno della scatola” (ovvero il giorno delle offerte), è una ricorrenza che risale al Medio Evo, anche se alcuni studiosi ne rintracciano le origini nell’epoca tardoromana.
L’etimologia in realtà non è chiarissima, ma l’idea di fondo della festività, ufficialmente istituita nel Regno Unito nel 1871, è quella di donare qualcosa ai bisognosi o ai propri dipendenti in occasione del Natale, una sorta di bonus: nel pacco natalizio potevano esserci regali e avanzi di cibo e ai lavoratori veniva concesso il giorno libero per stare con la propria famiglia.
La consuetudine si diffuse sistematicamente però solo ai tempi della regina Vittoria e del sentimentalismo di stampo dickensiano. continua

LA TRADIZIONE IN IRLANDA

In Irlanda il giorno di S. Stefano, conosciuto anche con il nome gaelico La An Droilin, il giorno dello scricciolo (wren’s day), i giovani del villaggio con i visi sporchi di fuliggine e armati di bastoni, andavano nei boschi alle prime luci dell’alba per cercare tra i cespugli la tana dello scricciolo: il primo di loro che riusciva a colpirlo diventava il re per un giorno. Il corpicino dello scricciolo legato ad un ramo di agrifoglio veniva portato in processione di casa in casa e cantando una filastrocca i ragazzi dello scricciolo ricevevano piccoli doni lasciando in cambio una piuma strappata dal petto del piccolo uccellino. continua
E’ inevitabile infatti il collegamento tra sacrificio dello scricciolo e il martirio del santo, essendo Santo Stefano il primo martire del cristianesimo (protomartire) ucciso per aver testimoniato la sua fede in Cristo. Secondo il folklore irlandese il Santo si era nascosto in un cespuglio di agrifoglio per nascondersi dalla folla che voleva lapidarlo e il suo nascondiglio venne rivelato dallo strepito di uno scricciolo che aveva deciso di svernare proprio lì! (vedi)

LA TRADIZIONE IN SCANDINAVIA

Nella tradizione scandinava la canzone su Santo Stefano è tipica dei canti per Santa Lucia, e rispecchia maggiormente la tradizione pre-cristiana dei festeggiamenti di Yule. Un tempo era una canzone di questua di fattoria in fattoria cantata dai ragazzi nei giorni prima di Natale per raccogliere dei piccoli doni.
Le versioni della canzone sono innumerevoli tra Svezia, Norvegia e Danimarca con testi più o meno lunghi come una ballata, ma tutti riferiti all’avvistamento della Stella di Betlemme.  continua

Saint Stephen

Magpie Lane in Wassail, 1995


I
Saint Stephen was a holy man
Endued with heavenly might,
And many wonders he did work
Before the people’s sight;
And by the blessed Spirit of God,
Which did his heart inflame,
He spared not, in every place,
To preach God’s holy name.
Chorus 
O man, do never faint nor fear,
When God the truth shall try;
But mark how Stephen, for Christ’s sake,
Was willing for to die.
II
Before the elders he was brought,
His answers for to make,
But they could not the spirit withstand
Whereby this man did speak.
While this was told, the multitude
Beholding him aright,
His comely face began to shine
Most like some angel bright.
III
Then Stephen did put forth his voice,
And he did first unfold
The wond’rous works which God had wrought
Even for their fathers old;
That they thereby might plainly know
Christ Jesus should here be
That from the burden of the law
Should quit us frank and free.
IV
But, oh! quoth he, you wicked men,
Which of the prophets all
Did not your fathers persecute,
And keep in woeful thrall?
But when I heard him so to say,
Upon him they all ran,
And there without the city gates
They stoned this holy man.
V
There he most meekly on his knees
To God did pray at large
Desiring that He would not lay
This sin unto their charge;
Then yielding up his soul to God,
Who had it dearly bought,
He lost his life, and his body then
To the grave was seemly brought.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Santo Stefano era un uomo santo
dotato di potenza celeste
e molti miracoli operò
davanti agli occhi della gente;
e benedetto dallo Spirito Santo
che fece infiammare il suo cuore,
non si risparmiò, in ogni luogo,
per predicare il santo nome di Dio.
Coro
O uomo, non essere mai debole o pauroso, quando Dio metterà alla prova la fede, ma fai come Stefano, che per amore di Dio fu pronto a morire
II
Davanti agli anziani fu portato,
a dare le sue risposte (1),
ma non poterono resistere allo spirito
che attraverso quest’uomo parlava.
Mentre quest’uomo parlava, la moltitudine guardandolo bene,
il suo bel viso iniziò a risplendere
quasi come un angelo radioso.
III
Allora Stefano disse a gran voce (2)
e lo disse per primo
le meravigliose opere che Dio aveva
compiuto
anche per i patriarchi;
che essi dovrebbero chiaramente sapere, Gesù Cristo sarà qui
che dall’onere della legge
dovremo affrancarci e liberarci.
IV
“Ma, oh, – disse -voi uomini malvagi
Quale dei profeti i vostri padri non hanno perseguitato,
e tenuto in schiavitù?”
Ma quando lo sentii dire ciò
su di lui accorsero tutti,
e là fuori dalle porte della città
lapidarono questo sant’uomo
V
Lì si inginocchiò docilmente
a Dio pregò liberamente
desiderando che Egli non ponesse
questo peccato su di loro;
quindi abbandonando la sua anima a Dio, perse la sua vita e il suo corpo allora, alla tomba fu proprio portato

NOTE
* prima stesura, da rivedere
1) L’accusa è di quelle gravi: «Bestemmia contro Dio e contro Mosè».
2) la sua autodifesa è riportata negli Atti degli Apostoli, un lungo discorso in cui Stefano ripercorre le sacre scritture dichiarando che Dio aveva preannunciato l’avvento di Cristo attraverso i profeti e i patriarchi

 

FONTI
http://www.dailyslow.it/santo-stefano/
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2013/12/16/week-121-saint-stephen-rejoice-and-be-merry/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/saintstephen.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/saint_stephen_was_an_holy_man.htm
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/saint_stephen_was_a_holy_man.htm

THE HOLLY BEARS A BERRY

La tradizione medievale del Natale voleva che le case fossero decorate da rami di sempreverde, in particolare agrifoglio ed edera, affinche il princio maschile e quello femminile si unissero; l’Agrifoglio emblema del principio maschile nel suo trionfo invernale è così rivisitato dal Cristianesimo e identificato con la figura salvifica di Gesù Cristo.

THE HOLLY BEARS A BERRY

Illustrazione di Margaret Tarrant (1888-1959)

I fiori candidi dell’agrifoglio sono la purezza di Gesù, le sue bacche rosse sono il sangue versato dal Messia, il margine fogliare acuminato la corona di spine del Re dei Giudei.
L’agrifoglio maschio inizia a fiorire “da grande”, quando ha circa 20 anni e produce dei fiori piccoli e bianco-rosato profumati da maggio a giungo. Le bacche (sull’agrifoglio femmina) sono verdi e d’autunno diventano di un rosso lucido simile a corallo: restano sull’albero per tutto l’inverno costituendo una importante fonte di cibo per gli uccelli. A volte sulle stesso albero compaiono sia i fiori che i pistilli ovarici – come per l’albero del castagno- è la natura che provvede spontaneamente a far riprodurre esemplari isolati oppure è la mano del giardiniere che ha creato un innesto sullo stesso fusto di un ramo femmina e di un ramo maschile (tecnicamente la pianta si definisce dioica..) continua

agrifoglio-inverno

THE HOLLY AND THE IVY

“The Holly and the Ivy” è un inno natalizio che compare in forma scritta in un broadside (in italiano volantino) del 1710, la melodia è fatta risalire (molto genericamente) ad un’antica carol francese; possiamo però affermare, stando ai vari riferimenti contenuti nel testo, che il brano affonda le sue radici quanto meno nel Medioevo. Probabilmente è il canto natalizio sull’agrifoglio più popolare e più registrato nelle Christmas Compilations del quale esistono tantissime versioni e interpretazioni.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

La melodia diventata standard è quella riportata da Cecil Sharp nel suo “English Folk Carols”, 1911 (raccolta nel Gloucestershire a inizio secolo) riportata anche in “Oxford Book of Carols” 1928 .
In epoca vittoriana era un tipico canto dei questuanti per gli auguri di Buon Natale e Felice Anno Nuovo con le strofe moraleggianti sul messaggio salvifico di Gesù, il peccato e il pentimento.


Versione strumentale di Thad Salter  con arrangiamento per chitarra

Manor House String Quartet (arrangiamento per violini, viola e clavicembalo di Vaughan Jones)

ASCOLTA Medieval Baebes in Mistletoe and Wine, 2003

ASCOLTA Heather Dale in “This Endris Night” 2002


I
The holly and the ivy (1),
Now both are full well grown.
Of all the trees that are in the wood,
The holly bears the crown.
Chorus
Oh, the rising of the sun (2),
The running of the deer (3).
The playing of the merry organ (4),
Sweet singing in the quire (5).
II
The holly bears a blossom
As white as lily flower;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To be our sweet Savior.
III
The holly bears a berry
As red as any blood;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To do poor sinners good.
IV
The holly bears a prickle
As sharp as any thorn;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
On Christmas day in the morn.
V
The holly bears a bark
As bitter as any gall;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
For to redeem us all.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’agrifoglio e l’edera
quando sono entrambi adulti
di tutti gli alberi nel bosco
l’agrifoglio porta la corona.
CORO
Il sorgere del sole
il correre del cervo
il suono gaio della ghironda
è amabile cantare intorno al fuoco
II
L’agrifoglio porta un fiore
bianco come il giglio
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
per essere il nostro amato Salvatore.
III
L’agrifoglio porta una bacca
rossa come il sangue
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
per la redenzione dei peccati.
IV
L’agrifoglio porta margine acuminato
appuntito come una spina
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
il Mattino di Natale
V
L’agrifoglio porta una scorza
amara come fiele
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
per la redenzione di noi tutti.

NOTE
1) Nella canto si parla solo dell’agrifoglio, molto probabilmente i versi che riguardavano l’edera (vedi contrasti agrifoglio-edera) sono stati sostituiti da quelli su Maria e Gesù. Così si ribalta il principio maschile ed è Maria, la pianta dell’agrifoglio (al femminile) ad essere incoronata Regina dei Cieli.
2) il verso the rising of the sun è riferito al risorgere del sole dopo il Solstizio d’Inverno, il giorno più corto dell’anno.
hollytapestry3) Franco Cardini riassume in poche frasi tutto il ricco simbolismo riferito alla figura del cervo. “Presso i Celti, il cervo era sacro al “dio cornuto” Cernumn, identificato con l’Apollo ellenico-romano e con la luce diurna, vale a dire con l’eternamente giovane dio Lug. D’altronde, nei miti che riguardano Lug, il cervo gioca un ruolo collegato al ciclo dell’eterno ringiovanimento simboleggiato forse dalle sue corna che cadono e nascono di nuovo, e che è agevole connettere con il solstizio d’inverno e quindi con l’anno nuovo.”
Il “running of the deer” nella strofa del ritornello si riferisce forse alla consuetudine medievale di andare a caccia il giorno dopo il solstizio, trasformatasi in epoca vittoriana in una caccia all’uccellagione con le cui carni si preparava una torta ripiena di Natale.
4) antico strumento dal suono lamentoso simile alla ghironda, trasformato in “organ”, in altre versioni diventa “harp”
5) oppure “sweet singing in the choir”

ALTRE MELODIE

ASCOLTA Magpie Lane in “Wassail! A Country Christmas” 1996
The Young Tradition con Shirley&Dolly Collins in “The Holly Bears the Crown” 1969

Loreena McKennitt in “A Midwinter Night’s Dream” 2008; una versione crepuscolare

Kate Rusby in Sweet Bells 2008

Con un titolo che parrebbe richiamare questa carol Tori Amos canta Holly, Ivy And Rose che tuttavia è tutta un’altra canzone.

Simile a “The Holly and the Ivy” ma nota con il titolo di “Sans day carolo” (The holly bears a berry) è la versione cornica continua

FONTI
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=42010
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15689
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/holly_and_the_ivy.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thehollyandtheivy.html

Jack In The Green: il giorno degli Spazzacamini

Read the post in English
Il verde Jack ” (the Green Man, in italiano l’Uomo Verde) è stata una popolare maschera del Maggio inglese, dal medioevo e fino in epoca vittoriana, caduta in disuso alla fine dell’Ottocento, è ritornata a mostrarsi  e a diffondersi a partire dagli anni 1970 nelle sfilate per le feste del Maggio.

Nell’Ottocento il primo maggio era il giorno degli spazzacamini e così recita la filastrocca per bambini “The first of May” (tratto da qui)


Chimney Sweeps’ Day,
Blackbird is gay,

Here he is singing, you see, in the “May”.
He has feathers
as black as a chimney sweep’s coat.

So on Chimney Sweeps’ Day
he must pipe a glad note.

Jack-in-the-Green from door to door
capers along with the followers four.
As May Day mummers are seldom seen,
let us all give a copper to Jack-in-the-Green.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
il giorno dello spazzacamino
il merlo è allegro,
ecco che canta come vedi nel “Maggio”. Ha le piume nere
come la giacca dello spazzacamino,
così il giorno dello spazzacamino
intona una melodia di ringraziamento.
Il Verde Gianni di porta in porta saltellando a passo di danza con i suoi quattro aiutanti, siccome i mimi sono raramente visti il primo di Maggio, diamo tutti una monetina al Verde Gianni

Così seguendo la tradizione, uno spazzacamino si vestiva da “Jack in the Green” (vedi nota 1) infilandosi in una struttura di vimini a forma piramidale, ricoperta di edera e fogliame, sormontata da una specie di corona di fiori. Se ne andava per le strade con altri suoi compari per ballare e a raccogliere offerte in danaro. L’usanza riportata nel W&R Chamber “Book of Days” – 1869 è quella del Maggio a Londra. Una festa organizzata dagli spazzacamini che vanno per le strade mascherati: due o tre uomini, uno aitante vestito in modo caratteristico con un cappello a tre punte ornato con di piume gialle e rosse e con una mazza affusolata in mano, uno vestito con uno scintillante abito femminile e con in mano un mestolo, l’altro nascosto dentro un “albero” (Jack-in-the-Green). Il corteo si ferma nelle piazze e negli slarghi delle strade per ballare e per ricevere in cambio delle monete. Nell’illustrazione sotto vediamo che si è aggiunto ai personaggi principali anche un clown, la figura del folle.

G901506

L’usaza è documentata a partire dal Settecento nella città di Londra relativamente al giorno della festa degli Spazzacamini e poi si è diffusa in tutto il paese.  la documentazione raccolta da Keith Chandler è invece relativa alle pubblicazione sui giornali negli anni dal 1820 e fino al 1890 (vedi)
Una serie di aneddoti su come sia nato il travestimento (qui)

1835-may

THE GREEN MAN

Alcuni studiosi collegano questo travestimento all’Uomo Verde  scolpito nelle pietre delle chiese medievali d’Europa che di solito è raffigurato solo nel viso, un volto umano metamorfizzato in fogliame.
“Nel decimo secolo essi cominciano ad apparire come illustrazioni sui manoscritti, specialmente in Francia. Si tratta di Bibbie, libri di Salmi e Ordalie, libri d’ore, persino opere di teologi famosi come il “Moralia” di San Gregorio Magno, un’esegesi del libro di Giobbe, dove spesso si fondono con i motivi intrecciati tipici dell’arte sassone e celtica: ricordano in effetti dei serpenti che si mordono la coda, motivi decorativi di evidente praticità stilistica, e possono essere interpretati come le insidie e gli ostacoli della vita terrena. In un secondo momento compaiono come elementi architettonici nelle chiese di stile germanico. Ben presto si diffondono ovunque in chiese, cattedrali ed abbazie, ma anche in altri edifici, ecclesiastici e non, sia come fregi architettonici, sia negli arredi in legno (come le panche), ed anche nell’arte funeraria (sulle tombe, insomma). La loro popolarità si accresce tra l’undicesimo e il dodicesimo secolo.
Nella forma più semplice si tratta di visi, generalmente maschili, dai cui orifizi, occhi, naso, bocca e orecchie, spunta il fogliame, spesso rami o foglie di vite, oppure che hanno foglie e arbusti al posto di barba e capelli; queste ultime sembrano quasi versioni della Medusa al maschile, cui assomigliano in maniera inquietante. Ma ce ne sono anche di più astratti, in cui è la vegetazione a predominare e i lineamenti umani sono solo accennati, appena distinguibili: teste fatte di foglie che sarebbero piaciute ad Arcimboldo. A dispetto del nome, non si tratta sempre di visi umani: spesso sono demoni, maschere (ovvero stereotipi), persino animali, in preferenza felini. Talvolta sono provvisti di denti e sembrano mordere i rami. Se in alcuni casi la loro associazione con il maligno è evidente, in altri sembrano motivi decorativi senza particolare significato, più che altro una dimostrazione del gusto per l’assurdo e il bizzarro tipico del Medioevo.” (tratto da qui)

Dunblane Cathedral, Scotland XV secolo

E tuttavia i green men non sono un prodotto del Cristianesimo (caso mai sono stati rivestiti di un nuovo ruolo teologico) poiché si trovano decorazioni scultoree, musive e pittoriche simili risalenti all’età della Roma imperiale (e si cita in genere la Domus Aurea di Nerone). Mascheroni con decorazioni vegetali inoltre richiamano divinità silvestri come Pan, Bacco, Dioniso, ma anche Cernunno e Viridios o Silvano, così alcuni studiosi vedono nel simbolo dell’uomo verde del primo cristianesimo l’intento di inglobare miti e pratiche delle religioni misteriche ben più diffuse nelle campagne. (continua)
Altri personaggi collegabili all’Uomo verde sono anche l’Uomo Selvatico, Puck e Robin Hood, il Cavaliere Verde avversario di Sir Galvano, ma anche il San Giorgio cristiano. In psicologia si dice sia una figura archetipa connessa ai miti arborei, ovvero un esempio della divinizzazione della natura. (continua)

Brian Froud: Green Man

JACK IN THE GREEN

Magpie Lane in “Jack in the Green” 1998 “Jack in the  green” (brano composto da Martin Graebe nel 1972 ) e “Jack’s Alive” una melodia tradizionale e popolare danza in Inghilterra e Scozia

Martin Graebe commenta: “Ho scritto la canzone quando Cherri and io vivevamo nell’est di Exeter in una zona che era segnata nella mappa dell’Ordnance Survey come “Jack in the Green.” Abbiamo bevuto spesso in un pub dallo stesso nome e ho collegato con un po’ di fantasia i temi tradizionali. Un po’ di persone mi hanno detto in diverse occasioni che avevano già sentito “Jack in the Green” come una canzone tradizionale. E’ stata una delle mie prime canzoni comparsa su internet e descritta nel Digital Tradition database (archivio digitale della musica tradizionale) come una canzone tradizionale. Più recentemente mi hanno riferito di un CD americano di musica pagana che include Jack come un esempio di  canzone tradizionale pagana dalle isole britanniche”

stessa versione in un video con immagini “Jack in the Green Festival” di Hastings


I
Now winter is over,
I’m happy to say,
And we’re all met again
in our ribbons so gay.
And we’re all met again
on the first day of Spring
To go about dancing
with Jack in the Green(1).
CHORUS
Jack in the Green, Jack in the Green
And we’ll all dance each springtime
with Jack in the Green

II
Now Jack in the Green
is a very strange man,
Tho’ he dies every Autumn,
he is born every Spring.
And each year on our birthday,
we will dance through the street,
And in return Jack
he will ripen our wheat.
III(2)
Now all you young maidens
I’d have you beware
Of touching young Jack,
for there’s strange powers there.
For if you but touch him,
there is many will tell
Like the wheat in our fields
so your belly will swell.
IV
With his mantle
he’ll cover the trees that are bare.
Our gardens he’ll trim
with his jacket so fair.
And our fields he will sow
with the hair of his head.
And our grain it will ripen
‘til Old Jack is dead(3)!
V
Now the sun is half up
and betokens the hour
That the children arrive
with their garlands of flowers.
So now let the music
and the dancing begin,
And touch the good heart
of young Jack in the Green!
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
L’inverno è finito
sono lieto di annunciare,
e ci incontreremo tutti di nuovo
con i nostri addobbi così festosi
e ci incontreremo tutti di nuovo
nel primo giorno di Primavera
per andare a danzare
con il Verde Gianni.
CORO
Il Verde Gianni
tutti danzeremo ogni primavera
con il Verde Gianni
II
Il Verde Gianni
è un uomo molto particolare,
sebbene muoia ogni autunno,
nasce ogni primavera,
e ogni anno al suo compleanno danzeremo per le strade
e in cambio Gianni
farà maturare il grano.
III
Ora voi giovanette
vi devo avvisare
di non toccare il giovane Gianni, perchè ha uno strano potere,
se lo toccate,
sono in molti a dirlo,
come il grano nei campi
così anche la vostra pancia si alzerà.
IV
Con il suo mantello
ricoprirà gli alberi che sono nudi
e i giardini decorerà
con la sua bella giacca.
Seminerà i campi
con i capelli che ha in capo
e il grano falcerà affinchè il vecchio Gianni possa morire(3)!
V
Ora il sole è si è alzato
e segna l’ora
dell’arrivo dei bambini
con le loro ghirlande di fiori,
così che la musica
e le danze abbiano inizio
e tocchino il buon cuore
del giovane Verde Gianni

NOTE
1) Jack è il diminutivo di due diversi nomi James (Giacomo) e John (Giovanni, Gianni), ma più che un  nome proprio qui sta a indicare l’Uomo Verde
2) Magpie Lane hanno saltato questa strofa
3) è il mito dello Spirito del Grano: lo spirito del Grano-Orzo non muore mai perchè rinasce l’anno successivo con il nuovo raccolto, la sua forza e il suo ardore sono contenuti nel whisky che si ottiene dalla distillazione del malto d’orzo!

JACK’S ALIVE

Nelle note di Jack’s Alive (qui) “Due melode da danza che suonavo da anni senza rendermi conto che si tratta dello stesso brano. la prima, in 6/8, è da Wilson’s Ballroom Companion, da uno degli opuscoli di Bert Simon (Kentish Hops). L’ho sentita suonare per la prima volta dalla Oyster Ceilidh Band. Guarda caso il loro primo album s’intitola  Jack’s Alive, ma questa melodia non c’è; alla fine l’hanno registrata nel loro album 20 Golden Tie-Slackeners . Conoscevo la melodia in 4/4 come una danza Morris senza titolo da Badby nel Northamptonshire. Oyster Morris da Canterbury la usavano per una danza chiamata ‘The Panic’ – in origine ‘Pogle’s Panic’ – che era stata scritta nei primi anni del 1980 da Pete Collinson. Qualche anno più tardi ho trovato la melodia nel The Yetties’ The Musical Heritage di Thomas Hardy come’Jack’s Alive’.

Aly Bain & Tom Anderson ♪ in versione reel una melodia molto popolare nelle isole Shetland

E con i passi della danza:
english country dance

Morris Dance

Bibliografia
“The Green Man”, Richard Hayman
“Images of Lust: Sexual carvings on medieval churches” Anthony Weir e James Jerman.

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/jack-in-the-green/
https://georgianera.wordpress.com/2017/04/27/may-day-the-tradition-of-the-jack-in-the-green-and-chimney-sweeps/
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/jack_gre.htm
http://www.greenmanenigma.com/history.html http://www.egreenway.com/meditation/greenman.htm http://www.mariateresalupo.it/simbolimitialchimiafiabe/maggio.html
http://freespace.virgin.net/polter.geist/greenman_page0019.htm https://www.adf.org/articles/gods-and-spirits/general/jackingr.html http://www.acam.it/la-tradizione-del-maggio-e-il-culto-arboreo/ http://martingraebe.me.uk/onewebmedia/Jack_in_the_green.htm http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/jack_in_the_green/jack_in_the_green.htm http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/jack_in_the_green/jacks_alive.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3730 http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Jack’s_Alive_(3) https://thesession.org/tunes/3299

Padstow May Day Songs

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow may day  songs
Helston Furry Dance 

Durante le celebrazioni del Maggio si svolge una festa particolare a Padstow, un piccolo porto di pescatori della Cornovaglia settentrionale sulla foce del fiume Camel ora a vocazione turistica: l’Obby Oss Festival. prima parte

CANZONI DEL MAGGIO A PADSTOW

In questa seconda parte vado a riportare un paio di canti inglobati nella tradizione di Padstow ma che sono stati scritti più recentemente nel XX secolo!

HAIL! HAIL! THE FIRST OF MAY

Dave Webber, fondatore con la moglie Anni Fentiman del gruppo Beggar’s Velvet, scrisse una May Song ispirandosi alla tradizione dell’oss per il loro album d’esordio “Lady of Autumn” uscito nel 1990. Il brano fu così convincente che venne adottato tra i canti delle celebrazioni per il Padstow May , noto anche con il titolo di “Drink To The Old ‘Oss” (vedi)
Magpie Lane in Jack in the Green 1998


I
Winter time has gone and past-o,
Summer time has come at last-o.
We shall sing and dance the day
And follow the ‘obby ‘orse that brings the May.
Chorus:
So, Hail! Hail! The First of May-o!
For it is the first summer’s day-o!
Cast you cares and fears away,
Drink to the old horse on the First of May!
II
Blue bells(1) they have started to ring-o,
And true love, it is the thing-o.
Love on any other day
Is never quite the same as on the First of May!
III
Never let it come to pass-o
We should fail to raise a glass-o!
Unto those now gone away
And left us the ‘obby ‘orse that brings the May!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
L’inverno è venuto e andato -o
e infine è arrivata l’estate-o,
danzeremo e canteremo per tutto il giorno e seguiremo il cavallino che porta il Maggio.
CORO
Così Evviva il primo di Maggio-o
Il primo giorno dell’estate-o,
getta via i tuoi affanni e le tue paure,
bevi al vecchio cavallo il primo di Maggio
II
Le campanule hanno iniziato a suonare -o
questa è la questione, il vero amore-o!
Amore in un qualsiasi altro giorno
non è mai la stessa cosa, di quello del Primo di Maggio
III
Non lasciarlo venire e andare-o
senza prima sollevare il bicchiere-o!
Nel mentre se ne va,
ci lascia il cavalluccio che porta il Maggio

NOTE
1) La Hyacinthoides di origine spagnola viene talvolta chiamata Spanish Bluebells per distinguerla anche nel nome volgare dalla Hyacinthoides non-scripta, nota come English Bluebells.

QUEEN OF THE MAY

Anche questo canto è stato scritto recentemente da Larry McLaughlin nel 1982, che l’ha dedicato alla moglie Maureen in occasione delle loro nozze d’argento!

Ecco un gustoso aneddoto in merito raccontato dal figlio di Larry McLaughlin ”Una sera che io e papà eravamo alla festa di Padstow abbiamo cantato ovviamente ‘Queen of the May.’ quando una signora con un deciso accento cornico si avvicna e ci dice “Ehi hai sbagliato le parole” “Oh davvero -rispose mio padre- ma io le ho scritte!” Il marito della signora replicò “Non puoi essere stato tu ad averlo scritto perchè mi ricordo che la cantava mio padre” E qualcuno replicò “Ma se non sai nemmeno chi fosse tuo padre!” Era proprio una tipica serata a Padstow.
La canzone come sia fu assorbita nelle tradizioni di Padstow, ma non si dovrebbe dimenticare che è la canzone della mamma, il suo titolo originario è ‘Maureen’s Song.’ un caro regalo di papà per celebrare le loro nozze d’argento – come dice lui stesso, senza spendere un soldo!”


I
Winter is over and summer has come
And the Obby Oss waits in his stable for dawn
Rise up my love early and deck yourself gay
And I’ll take you to Padstow today
Chorus: And put your arms round me. I’ll dance you away
For you are my Queen of the May
II
Skip out o’er the fields and the woods and the dells
Pick primroses, daises, cowslips and bluebells
And from the green woods cut a sycamore spray
And I’ll take you to Padstow today
III
We’ll breakfast on ale and an old chorus song
Musicians will come with accordion and drum
We’ll meet the old Oss and we’ll welcome the May
When I take you to Padstow today
IV
When the years have rolled on love and we are both old
And the stories of May day and Padstow are told
And though I’m old and feeble you’ll still hear me say
I’llt take you to Padstow today
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
L’inverno è finito e l’estate è arrivata e l’Obby Oss attende nella sua scuderia per l’alba:
alzati mio amore presto, e vestiti in modo vivace
e ti porterò a Padstow oggi.
Coro
Abbracciami e balleremo
poiché tu sei la mia Regina di Maggio
II
Saltella sui campi ei boschi
e le conche,
scegli primule, margherite, primule e campanule
e dal bosco verde taglia un ramo di sicomoro
e io ti porterò a Padstow oggi.
III
Faremo colazione con la birra e una vecchia canzone,
i musicisti ci accompagneranno con fisarmonica e tamburo.
Ci incontreremo con il vecchio Oss e daremo il benvenuto al Maggio quando ti porterò a Padstow oggi.
IV
Quando gli anni saranno scivolati sul nostro amore e saremo vecchi
e saranno raccontare le storie del giorno di Maggio e di Padstow
anche se sarò vecchio e debole, mi sentirai ancora dire
“Ti porto a Padstow oggi”

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/padstow.html http://celtic.org/hobby.pdf http://www.padstowlive.com/events/padstow-may-day http://grapewrath.wordpress.com/2010/05/01/chris-wood-andy-cutting-following-the-old-oss/ https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/hailhailthefirstofmay.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46931#698474 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60993 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46931
http://www.sffmc.org/archives/may09/QueenOfMay.pdf

Carole di Primavera nel Bedforshide

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow may day songs 
Helston Furry Dance

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]Il Primo Maggio si seguivano alcune tradizioni. I bambini portavano la ghirlanda del Maggio ossia un cerchio formato con rami decorati con nastri e fiori, nel centro erano appese due bamboline, una grande che rappresentava la Vergine Maria e una più piccola che rappresentava Cristo bambino, un panno bianco era fissato sulla sommità per coprire tutta la ghirlanda. I bambini si fermavano ad ogni casa e chiedevano dei soldi per mostrare la ghirlanda sollevando il panno.
Un’altra tradizione diffusa in tutta la contea era il Maying, si faceva regolarmente fino allo scoppio della prima guerra mondiale e dopo solo sporadicamente: i giovani andavano in giro la notte con i rami del Maggio e cantavano i canti del Maggio, al mattino un ramo del maggio era attaccato al palo portabandiera della scuola, un altro decorava l’insegna della locanda “at the Crown” e altri erano appoggiati contro le porte in modo che finissero in casa quando si aprivano. Questi maggianti includevano un Signore e una Signora (il più giovane dei ragazzi con un velo sul volto e una cuffietta), tra i mummers anche i Moggers o Moggies un uomo e una donna con le facce annerite vestiti di stracci e con le scope 
(tradotto da qui)

VIDEO Ecco una testimonianza molto significativa di Margery “Mum” Johnstone dal Bedforshide raccolta da Pete Caslte, con due canzoni del Maggio

La danza del Palo durante  la festa del Maggio a Elstow, Bedfordshire, nel 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

Ancora dalla testimonianza della signora Margery Johnstone questa May Garland ovvero “This Morning Is The 1st of May” trascritta da Fred Hamer  nel suo  “Garners Gay”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Stamattina è il Primo di Maggio
il momento più importante dell’anno
e se vivrò e resterò qui
vi visiterò un altro anno
II
I campi e i prati
sono così verdi
come il tenero porro
il nostro Padre del Cielo li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
III
L’uomo tuttavia è solo un uomo, la sua vita è breve, è molto simile a un fiore
è qui oggi e domani non c’è più,
così tutto finisce nel giro di un ora.
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, devo andare
non posso restare più a lungo
vieni e — la mia bambola del Maggio
e guarda il mio ramo del Maggio
V
Ho una borsa in tasca
che è legata con un nastro di seta
e tutto ciò che le manca
è un po’ del tuo denaro
da infilare dentro

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

La carol è conosciuta con il nome più generico di “The May Day Carol” o “Bedford May Carol” ma anche come “The Kentucky May Carol” (come preservata nella tradizione del maggio nei Monti Appalachi) ed è stata raccolta nel Bedfordshire.
Una prima versione ci viene dalla tradizione di Hinwick come collezionata da Lucy Broadwood  (1858 –  1929)  e trascritta in “English Traditional Songs and Carols” ( Londra: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton in “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017


I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ho vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e  ora  ritorno ancora qui
per portarvi il ramo del maggio
II
Lo spino del Maggio mia cara, dico,
è davanti alla tua porta
non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
III
Vai nella dispensa e portami una coppa,
una coppa della tua dolce crema,
e se dovessi restare in città
ritornerò da voi un altro anno.
IV
Le siepi e i campi sono così verdi
e ogni foglia è rifiorita
il Nostro Padre dei Cieli li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
V
E quando sarò morto e nella tomba
e ricoperto dalla fredda terra
l’usignolo si fermerà a cantare
e il tempo trascorrerà via
VI
Prendi la Bibbia in mano
e leggi un capitolo
e quando il giorno del giudizio verrà
il Signore penserà a te
VII
Ho una borsa sul braccio destro
stretta con un nastro di seta
non vuole altro che un po’ d’argento
da infilare dentro
VIII
E ora che la canzone è quasi finita
non posso restare più a lungo
Dio vi benedica, grandi e piccini
e vi auguro un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna, come nella versione del Cambridgshire, inevitabili le contaminazioni con il credo della religione dominante
2) questa crema dolce e fresca in bicchiere è una bevanda-dessert tipicamente inglese d’epoca elisabettiana ancora popolare in epoca vittoriana, il Syllabub. Un tempo ai Mayers si offriva “una syllabub di latte caldo direttamente dalla mucca, torte dolci e vino” (Il ramo d’Oro James Frazer). E così sono andata a curiosare per ritrovare la ricetta storica: si tratta di un  frappè di latte, vino (o sidro o birra) zuccherato e profumato con succo di limone. Il succo di limone serviva a far cagliare il latte in modo che si formasse una crema in superficie,  nel tempo la ricetta è diventata più solida, cioè una crema con la panna montanta aromatizzata con del liquore o vino dolce (vedi ricette)

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste sullo sfondo un vassoio pieno di bicchieri di syllabubs

3) il riferimento alla rugiada non è casuale , la tradizione del maggio prevede il bagno nella rugiada e nelle acque selvatiche ricche di pioggia. La notte è quella magica del 30 aprile e la rugiada veniva raccolta dalle fanciulle e conservata come un toccasana in grado di risvegliare la bellezza femminile! (vedi Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002 la melodia è la stessa della Cambridgeshire May Carol (purtroppo il mio orecchio non riesce a distinguere bene alcune frasi.. lasciate in punteggiatura)


I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Un ramo del Maggio, così bello e allegro, sta davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio, ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
II
Alzati, bella fanciulla e fai entrare il Maggio perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino, potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
III
?
?
IV
Se non una coppa di crema fredda  (dateci) un boccale di birra scura
e se continueremo a  restare in città
ritorneremo da voi un altro anno.
V
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
siamo qui oggi e domani non ci saremo più
saremo tutti morti nel giro di un ora
VI
La luna brilla luminosa, le stelle si accendono
tra poco sarà giorno
così ricordatevi ..
e vi auguriamo un gioioso Maggio

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna.
2) il Syllabub (vedi sopra)
3) la strofa deriva da “The Moon Shine Bright” versione pubblicata da William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) vedi

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane in “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 (strofe I, II, III e IX) e a seguire The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
La canzone viene riproposta nel Blog “A Folk song a Week”   curato dallo stesso Andy Turner  in cui Andy ci dice di aver appreso la canzone dalla raccolta di Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred la collezionò da “Chris Marsom e altri” – Mr Marsom era già emigrato in Canada,ma Fred lo incontrò in visita a Northill, il suo paese natale nel Bedfordshire. Le note di Fred dicono “The Day Song è troppo lunga per essere inclusa qui e la Night Song ha la stessa melodia. E’ stata usata da Vaughan Williams come la melodia No. 638 nell’ English Hymnal, ma con il nome di “Southill” perchè gli era stata mandata da un uomo di Southill. Chris Marsom che me la cantò aveva molte storielle sull’accoglienza delle signore forestiere che vivevano da poco nel villaggio perchè si spaventavano quando i Maggianti si avvicinavano alla loro casa nel cuore della notte alla vigilia del 1° Maggio”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick in “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (traccia 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy scrive nelle note dell’album “May Song viene dalla registrazione di Cynthia Gooding che ho perso circa 16 anni fa, ma le parole mi sono rimaste in testa.” (strofe da II a VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati mia graziosa fanciulla
e prendi il nostro spino del Maggio
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti una allegra ghirlanda (il ramo del maggio)
III
Lo spino del Maggio portiamo in giro (porta l’allegria)
e sta davanti alla tua porta non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato per il lavoro di nostro Signore
IV
Alzati bella fanciulla per far entrare il Maggio, perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
V
Le porte del paradiso sono spalancate
per far fuggire la rugiada
è qui oggi, puntuale
e cade su di me e te
VI
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
non ci sono proroghe oggi c’è
e poi svanisce nel giro di un’ora
VII
E quando sarai morto
e nella tomba
sarai ricoperto dalla fredda terra
i vermi mangeranno la tua carne, buonuomo
e le tue ossa si consumeranno.
VIII
La canzone è finita ed è tempo di andare, non posso restare più a lungo. Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!
IX
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) secondo la precedente religione l’acqua riceveva maggior potere dal sole di Beltane. Si facevano pellegrinaggio alle sorgenti sacre e con l’acqua della sorgente si aspergevano i campi per favorire la pioggia.

Kerfuffle in “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati, dolce fanciulla,
a prendere lo Spino del Maggio,
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce
e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte del giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti il ramo del maggio
III
Un ramo del Maggio ti abbiamo portato, ed è davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio,
ma è ben sbocciato
per mano di Nostro Signore
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

“HEROD AND THE COCK” CAROL

“King Herod and the cock” (in italiano Re Erode e il gallo) è un canto natalizio tradizionale (carol) sulla Natività che narra di un curioso miracolo: Erode il Grande ha ricevuto, nella sala del trono, i Magi, i tre sapienti provenienti dall’Oriente, ma la fantasia popolare li immagina a tavola davanti a un sontuoso banchetto in loro onore. Per farsi una risata un incredulo Erode sfida il Bambino neonato a dare un segno del suo potere: che il gallo arrostito e portato proprio in quell’istante in tavola in “bella vista”, cioè tutto intero e con tutte le sue piume, ritorni in vita. Così il gallo si anima e canta per tre volte.

herod-francken

IL CANTO DEL GALLO

gallo-nosferatuIl Gallo servito a tavola è la prefigurazione della morte di Gesù che risorgerà dalla morte nel terzo giorno. Una variante della storia tira in ballo anche Santo Stefano nelle vesti di presunto servitore alla corte di Erode che esorta il solito gallo arrosto a cantare “Christus natus est”. Si ritiene che la tradizione provenga dalla chiesa ortodossa russa e sia giunta in Europa attraverso i paesi scandinavi. (vedi)
Il canto del gallo annuncia il nuovo giorno, in senso metaforico è il canto della rinascita ovvero di una guarigione fisica ma anche spirituale (il trapasso dell’anima alla vita celeste), il gallo di Asclepio (o Esculapio per i Romani) il dio greco della medicina, era sacrificato per l’ottenuta guarigione: era infatti Asclepio un taumaturgo come Gesù.
Ma il gallo arrosto che ritorna in vita per cantare è un topos dell’immaginario medievale. Già per i Greci il gallo era simbolo solare sacro ad Apollo, e per parte loro i Britanni (chiamati Galli da Cesare) non mangiavano la carne di gallo, animale totemico, simbolo del Sole e lo raffigurarono su monete e emblemi; parimenti  nella mitologia norrena il gallo Vidopnir vive sull’albero cosmico Yggdrasill e con il suo canto annuncerà la fine del mondo così come altri galli sempre luminosi cantano per svegliare i guerrieri del Walhalla o nel regno dei morti.
LA FORZA DEL GUERRIERO
Per la sua combattività, strenuo difensore del pollaio, il gallo è, in molte tradizioni, il simbolo del coraggio guerriero. Dedicato a Ares (il Marte dei Romani) era diffusa la credenza che nel suo petto fosse custodita la pietra alectoriana, prezioso talismano in grado di conferire forza e coraggio, ma anche virilità. Il gallo è infatti instancabile fecondatore del pollaio

IL GALLO NELLA CRISTIANITA’

Per i Cristiani il Gallo è Gesù quale prefigurazione della sua resurrezione futura ma anche del suo ergersi a Giudice che alla fine dei tempi darà il segnale della resurrezione dei morti. Così nel Vangelo di Matteo l’apostolo Pietro disconosce Gesù appena “preso in custodia” dal Sommo Sacerdote Caifa: il tradimento era stato preannunciato dallo stesso Gesù poco prima “in verità ti dico: prima che il gallo canti mi rinnegherai tre volte” Così l’evangelista “rammenta ai fedeli la loro condizione di peccatori esortandoli alla vigilanza e al “risveglio spirituale” (Alfredo Cattabiani, Volario, 2000). Nelle Memorie – o Vangelo (apocrifo)- di Nicodemo, scritto in greco forse all’inizio del II secolo, Giuda tormentato dall’aver tradito Gesù è a casa con la moglie e medita il suicidio. La donna sta arrostendo un gallo per il pranzo e scommette con il marito:  “Nello stesso modo in cui questo gallo arrostito può cantare, così Gesù potrà risorgere”. Ma, proprio mentre stava parlando, quel gallo allargò le ali e cantò tre volte. Giuda, allora, del tutto convinto, con la corda fece un capestro e andò a impiccarsi”. È evidente che il Gallo è la testimonianza dell’imminente resurrezione di Gesù.

KING HEROD AND THE COCK

Il brano è stato raccolto sul campo da Cecil Sharp come cantato dalla signora Ellen Plumb a Armscote, Worcestershire (1911) e lo stesso Sharp ritiene che sia una forma frammentaria di una più lunga ballata dal titolo “The Carnal and the Crane” (vedi)

ASCOLTA  Trond Bengtson & Ernst Stolz (liuto e chitarra)

Del brano esistono molti arrangiamenti per coro, ma poche versioni tradizionali al momento si trovano solo su Spotify
ASCOLTA Mary Rhoads
ASCOLTA Magpie Lane in “Wassail! A Country Christmas” 1995

ASCOLTA Belshazzar’s Feast la melodia è mescolata con Parson’s Farewell una country dance riportata da John Playford nel suo “English Dancing  master” (1651)

(VIDEO Sante Pede dimostrazione danza)


I
There was a star in David’s land,
In David’s land appeared;
And in King Herod’s chamber
So bright it did shine there.
II
The Wise Men they soon spi-ed it,
And told the King a-nigh
That a Princely Babe was born that(this) night,
No King shall e’er destroy.
III
“If this be the truth, -King Herod said,-
That thou hast told to me,
The roasted cock that lies in the disk
Shall crow full senses(1) three.”
IV
O the cock soon thrusted and feathered well,
By the work of God’s own hand,
And he did crow full senses three
In the disk (table) where he did stand.
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
C’era una stella nella terra di David
apparve nella terra di David
e nella camera del re Erode
così brillante che la illuminò
II
Gli uomini saggi la seguirono subito
e dissero al re una sera
che un Principe Bambino era nato quella notte
e nessun re lo potrà mai distruggere.
III
“Se questa è la verità -disse Re Erode-,
quella che mi avete detto
il gallo arrosto che si trova nel piatto
che canti tre volte”
IV
E il gallo arrostito e rivestito di penne
per il lavoro delle mani di Dio
cantò per tre volte
nel piatto in cui era

NOTE
1) probabilmente un refuso da “fences”

FONTI
http://marianoalbrembo.altervista.org/2012/11/il-gallo-simbolo-cristiano/
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/ Hymns_and_Carols/king_herod_and_the_cock.htm http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/herodandthecock.html http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/lod/vol1/daniparson.html
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-HerodCock.html