Morag and the Kelpie

Leggi in italiano

In the most placid rivers of Ireland and in the dark depths of the Scottish lakes live water demons, fairy creatures, that feed on human flesh: they are “kelpie”, “each uisge” (in English water-horse), “eich- mhara “(in English sea horse); to want to be picky kelpie lives preferably near the rapids of the rivers, fords and waterfalls, while each uisge prefers the lakes and the sea, but kelpie is the most used word for both. Similar creatures are also told in Norse legends (Bäckahästen, the river horse) – and Germanic (nix in the form of fish or frog). (first part)

MORAG AND THE KELPIE

At the summer pastures of the Highlands they are still told of the beautiful Morag (Marion) seduced by a kelpie in human form; she, while noticing the strangeness of her husband, did not understand his true nature, if not after the birth of their child and … she decided to abandoning baby in swaddling clothes and husband shapeshifter!

On the Isle of Skye they still sing a song in Gaelic, ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ or ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) the “Lullaby of the kelpie” a melancholy air with which the kelpie cradled his child without a mother, and at the same time a plea to Morag to return to them, both he and the child needed her.
Of this lament we know several textual versions handed down to today in the Hebrides. The melodies revolve around an old Scottish aria entitled “Crodh Chailein” (in English “Colin’s cattle) evidently considered a melody of the fairies.
Another song, sweet and melancholic at the same time, is entitled Song of the Kelpie or even ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

So translates from Scottish Gaelic Tom Thomson “I got up early, it would have been better not to” (see)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Scottish gaelic
Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
English translation *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
NOTE
English translation also here
1)  the kelpie, suffering from loneliness, leaves the lake early in the morning and takes on human form
2) the shapeshifter promises food and comfort to the girl to convince her to follow him, but he warns her, he is a nocturnal creature and will not wake up with her in the morning!
3) gamhna = cattle between 1 year and 2 years translates Tom Thomson stitks; that is heifer, the cow that has not yet given birth, the verse in addition to qualifying the work of the girl (herdswoman) also wants to be a compliment, in Italian “bella manza” as a busty woman, with abundant and seductive shapes
4) the kelpie remembers the night meeting when they had sex (and obviously nine months later their son was born)
5) after the good memories of the past it comes the present, the woman has discovered the true nature of her companion and she dislikes their child
6) continuing in the comparison the kelpie calls “calf” its baby, that is “small child”
7) A typical “exposition” of fairy children is described. A practice of “birth control” widespread in the countryside of Europe, was the abandonment of newborns in the forest, so that fairies would take care of them; once the practice was widespread both against illegitimate people, and newborns with obvious physical deformations or ill-looking. The custom of “exposing” the baby was connected with the belief that he was “swapped” or kidnapped by the fairies and replaced with a changeling, a shapeshifter who for a while resembles the human child, but ultimately always takes its true appearance.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson translates = speckled band (of withy). I searched the dictionary: it is a crown made by intertwining the branches of willow; it reminds me of the Celtic crowns of flowers and leaves

 

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald recorded it under the title “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” in 2001 (from Colla Mo Rùn) following the collection of Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

english translation *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II and IV
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
scottish gaelic
I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà

NOTE
1) The kelpie sings the lullaby to its child abandoned by the human mother and comforts him by telling him that when he grows up he’ll be a little heartbreaker

With the title of ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan the same story is present in the archives of Tobar an Dualchais, from the voice of three witnesses of the Isle of Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

A similar story is told in the island of Benbecula with the title of Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg see


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 sings another fragment with the title “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (see the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser below)

English translation *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling! Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.

NOTE
1) Mhórag or Mór is the name of the maiden loved by the kelpie
2) it is the incessant cry of the child abandoned by his human mother in the cold and without food
3) mountain between Gesture and Portree on the Isle of Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

With the title “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, the same fragment sung by Caera is also reported in the book of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (page 94)

Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
II
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
III
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVE
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

Sources
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg

TAKE A LOOK AT LOCH QUOICH

Un paio di canti in gaelico scozzese conservati dalla tradizione popolare delle Highlands (dalla costa est ad ovest), Il Laird o il John di cui si parla doveva essere ben conosciuto nei pressi del Loch Quoich (nel distretto di Lochaber): un territorio collocato nel Great Glen, lungo la strada per Kinloc hourn, oggi per la buona parte disabitato adatto per i puri di cuore. Ma tanto per fare un po’ di confusione Glen Quoich è una delle principali valli del Mar Lodge Estate l’antica contea di Mar nell’Aberdeenshire; negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais sono riportare alcune registrazioni di un canto in gaelico dal titolo “O Iain Ghlinne Cuaich” provenienti da Midlothian, o Lothian centrale.

LE ESCURSIONI
Lochaber: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/knoydart/kinlochhourn/
Mar Lodge: http://mountaincoastriver.blogspot.it/2015/06/midsummer-snow-glen-etive-loch-quoich.html
http://www.walkscotland.com/walk21.htm

ORAN FEAR GHLINNE-CUAICH

maclise-harperUn canto bardico o come dovevano essere i canti dei bardi quando i clan erano ancora potenti o meglio quando le Highlands erano il territorio dei clan: tra i compiti del bardo c’era quello di celebrare le imprese degli eroi (e dei capi-clan) e di cantare la loro elegia funebre. Un tempo un guerriero poteva considerare la sua vita non vissuta invano, solo se un bardo narrava della sua storia, perciò preferiva una vita breve ma gloriosa, tale da meritare di essere tramandata (della serie anche i celti  avevano il loro Achille ). Per un guerriero, l’onore rappresentava tutto; un uomo si valutava in base ad esso, e, difatti, uno degli strumenti più pericolosi nella società celtica era la satira, un particolare canto dei poeti che, deridendo un uomo, ne causava l’allontanamento dalla società. Ogni guerriero era tenuto a difendere, a prezzo della vita, il suo onore, insieme a quello del suo clan.

IL GUERRIERO CELTA

Ecco come li descrive il greco-siciliano Diodoro Siculo, vissuto nell’ultimo secolo prima della nascita di Cristo ,  che presumibilmente deve aver incontrati i Celti in uno dei suo viaggi  (ma forse era solo un bibliotecario che si è limitato a riscrivere quanto già scritto in altri libri)
I Galli sono di taglia grande, la loro carne è molle e bianca; i capelli sono biondi non solo di natura, ma si industriano ancora a schiarire la tonalità naturale di questo colore lavandoli continuamente all’acqua di calce. Li rialzano dalla fronte verso la sommità del capo e verso la nuca… con queste operazioni i loro capelli si ispessiscono al punto da somigliare a criniere di cavalli. Alcuni si radono la barba, altri la lasciano crescere con moderazione; i nobili conservano nude le guance ma portano dei baffi lunghi e pendenti al punto che coprono loro la bocca… Si vestono con abiti stravaganti, delle tuniche colorate dove si manifestano tutti i colori e dei pantaloni che chiamano braghe. Vi agganciano sopra dei sai rigati di stoffa, a pelo lungo di inverno, e lisci d’estate, a fitti quadrettino colorati di tutte le gradazioni. (Biblioteca Storica, V, 28-30)

Una buona fonte di informazioni ci viene dai ritrovamenti archeologici delle tombe cosiddette dei Principi (ricchi tumuli funerari dell’età del Ferro disseminati un po’ in tutti i territori abitati dai Celti) e anche da Giulio Cesare al tempo della conquista romana della Gallia. I guerrieri dei Galli (o Celti continentali stanziati nell’attuale Francia) indossavano tunica di cuoio o di stoffa tinta con vari colori, pantaloni (anche questi operati), mantello in tartan (il plaide scozzese) fermato da una fibula (una grossa spilla) e stivali. I cavalieri  al tempo di Cesare potevano fare uso di corazze di cuoio bollito a spessi quadrotti e presumibilmente furono i Celti a realizzare  le prime cotte di maglia (armature formate da anelli di ferro intrecciati), che ebbero così tanta fortuna per tutto il medioevo europeo.

ASCOLTA su Spotify Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald in Colla Mo Rùn 2001

I
Faigh an t-searrag-sa mun cuairt
Lìon an àird gu bàrr a’ chuach
Deoch slàinte fear Ghlinne-Cuaich
‘S gun éireadh buaidh gach latha leis
II
Latha dhomh ‘s mi muigh air chuairt
Thachair orm fear Ghlinne-Cuaich
Làmh a dhiòladh dhòmhs’ an duais
‘S gun d’fhuair sin rud an latha sin
III
Ceist nam ban o thìr nam bó
Far Strath Chluainidh ghorm an fheòir
Far an d’fhuair thu d’àrach òg
‘S gun cùnnte móran aighean dhut
IV
Bu tu ceann-uidhe nam bàrd
Na fìdhlearan ‘s luchd nan dàn
Nuair a shìneadh tu do làmh
Gum b’àilteachadh leam crathadh dhith
V
Nuair a dheidheadh tu bheinn a’ cheo
Dh’iarraidh fàth air damh na cròic
Air do shùil cha laigheadh sgleò
‘S bu sheòlta dol ‘s an amharc thu
VI
‘S tric a leag thu màthair laoigh
‘S a choille ghuirm air a taobh
Eilid bhinneach nan cas caol
Is coileach fraoich ‘s a chamhanaich
VII
Nuair a dheidheadh tu bheinn na stùc
Le do ghunna ‘s le do chù
Nuair a lùbadh tu do ghlùin
Gun ùmhlaicheadh na h-aighean dhut
VIII
‘S truagh nach d’ thachair dhomh bhi ‘m bhàrd
A thogadh do chliù an àird
Dheanainn innse dhuibh nam dhàn
Gur mac a dh’fhàs mar d’athair thu
IX
‘S dé dheanadh do mhàthair chòir
An fhuil uasal dh’fhàs gun phròis
Mura tachradh ort té mhór
Aig am biodh stòr nach caitheadh i
X
‘S faigh an t-searrag-sa mun cuairt
Lìon an àird gu bàrr a’ chuach
Deoch slàinte fear Ghlinne-Cuaich
‘S gun éireadh buaidh gach latha leis

TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
I
Get this bottle ‘round/ And fill the cup up to its brim/A health to the laird of Glen Quoich (1) /And may his be the victory every day
II
One day as I walked out
I met the laird of Glen Quoich
His, the hand to dispense rewards to me(2)
And we got something(3) that day
III
Darling of the women from the land of the cattle/From green Strath Cluaine(4) of the grass
Where you were brought up
And you owned many heifers
IV
To you the bards traveled
And fiddlers and singers
When you stretched out your hand
A shake of it gave me delight
V
When you went to the misty mountain/To try for a shot at the antlered stag/Your eye would not lose its keenness/And you were cunning at watching them
VI
Often you felled a fawn’s mother
In the green wood on her side
The delicate slender-legged hind
As well as the grouse at twilight
V
When you went to the steep mountain
With your gun and your dog
When you bent your knee(5)
The hinds would yield to you
VI
It’s a pity I didn’t happen to be a bard
Who could sing your praises
And I’d tell you all in my song
That you are a son like your father
VII
And what would your mother do
She of the noble blood without conceit/If you didn’t chance on a high-born girl(6)/With unlimited wealth
VIII
Get this bottle ‘round
And fill it to its brim
A health to the laird of Glen Quoich
And may his be the victory every day
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Prendi questa bottiglia e riempi la coppa fino all’orlo alla salute del signore del Glen Quoich (1)
che la vittoria gli arrida ogni giorno.
II
Un giorno ero fuori
e incontrai il Signore del Glen Quoich, il mio mecenate(2), e facemmo una buona caccia (3) quel giorno.
III
Amato dalle donne dalla terra del bestiame
da Strath Cluaine (4)verde d’erba
dove sei cresciuto e possedevi molte giovenche.
IV
I bardi erranti
e i violinisti e cantanti,
pronti al tuo cenno
che delizia!
V
Quando andavi alla montagna delle nebbie
per cacciare il cervo dai palchi
il tuo occhio non perdeva la sua perspicacia e tu eri lesto nel vederli.
VI
Spesso hai abbattuto la madre di un cerbiatto nel bosco più profondo, come pure la cerva dal piè veloce e anche , al crepuscolo, il gallo cedrone
V
Quando andavi sulla ripida montagna
con le armi e i cani, ti mettevi in ginocchio(5)
e le cerve cadevano ai tuoi piedi.
VI
Peccato non aver avuto in sorte di essere bardo per cantare le tue lodi, avrei narrato di te nei canti dicendo che sei il degno figlio di tuo padre.
VII
Cosa farebbe tua madre dal nobile lignaggio,
se non ti sposassi con una fanciulla d’alto lignaggio (6)e dalla ricchezza illimitata?
VIII
Prendi questa bottiglia
e riempi la coppa fino all’orlo
alla salute del signore del Glen Quoich che la vittoria gli arrida ogni giorno.

NOTE
1) ci sono tre alternative per collocare la località
2) letteralmente: “la mano che mi elargiva ricompense”
3) presumo si riferisca alla caccia, letteralmente: “e noi prendemmo qualcosa”
4)Tomdoun is a small hamlet found along a former drove road which branches off the A87 at Loch Garry. Strath Cluanie can be found to the north of Tomdoun.
5) per prendere la mira con l’arco
6) vien da presumere da questa strofa che il bardo stia tessendo le lodi del Laird durante il banchetto nunziale

IAIN GHLINN ‘CUAICH

(tanto per fare un esempio)

In questa versione è una donna a cantare il suo amore per il bellissimo John di Glen Quoich (ovunque Quoich si trovi), ma il canto non è di gioia perchè la donna è stata appena lasciata (il bello ha troncato la relazione senza darle spiegazioni o conforto); eppure la donna è certa di essere lei in torto poiché egli è perfetto sotto ogni punto di vista, così gli augura ogni bene e di trovare presto un’altra donna migliore; immagino ci sia una punta di malizia nell’espressione finale, come se lei lo mandasse a ..  prendersi la donna che si merita (invece che a prendersi la donna che se lo merita)!! (o almeno questa sfumatura è quella più appropriata per le donne di oggi)

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in Sidewaulk 1989 l’interpretazione di Karen Matheson rispecchia in pieno il sentimento della donna abbandonata è soprattutto un sussurro che viene dall’anima


I
O Iain Ghlinn’ Cuaich, fear do choltais cha dual da fas,
Cul bachlach nan dual ‘s e gu camlubach suas gu bharr,
‘S i do phearsa dheas ghrinn a dh’fhag mi cho tinn le gradh,
‘S nach’ eil cron ort ri inns’ o mhullach do chinn gu d’sail.
II
Ach an trian dhe do chliu cha chuir mise, a ruin an ceill,
‘S caoimh’ faiteal dhe d’ghnuis na ur choille fo dhruchd ri grein,
Gum b’ e miann mo dha shuil a bhith sealltainn gu dluth ad dheidh,
‘S math a b’airidh mo run-s’ air ban-oighre a’ chruin fo sgeith.
III
Iain, Iain, a ghaoil, cuim’ a leig thu me faoin air chul,
Gun ghuth cuimhn’ air a’ ghaol a bh’againn araon air tus?
Cha tug mise mo speis do dh’fhear eile fo’n ghrein ach thu,
Is cha toir as do dheidh gus an cairear mo chre ‘san uir.
IV
Ged a chinn thu rium fuar, bheil thu, Iain, gun truas ‘s mi ‘m chas,
‘S a liuthad la agus uair chuir thu ‘n ceill gum bu bhuan do ghradh?
Ach ma chaochail mi buaidh, ‘s gun do choisinn mi t’fhuath na t-fhearg,
Tha mo bheannachd ad dheidh, ‘s feuch an tagh thu dhuit fhein nas fhearr.


TRADUZIONE  INGLESE ( da qui)
I
Oh John of Glencuaich it does not seem right that you should be so beautiful,
Your tresses, in ringlets, are tightly curled to the tips,
Your upright handsome appearance has left me love-sick, /And you are faultless from head to heel.
II
But, my love, I cannot relate one third of your merits
Your presence is more refreshing than the sun-kissed dew-bedecked young trees,
I long to have you always within my sight,
My beloved is well worthy of defending a royal heiress.
III
John, John my love, why did you abandon me so completely,
Without any reminder of the mutual love we once shared,
I have never loved any other man on earth but you,
Nor will I ever love anyone else ‘til my body is interred in the soil.
IV
Although your feelings towards me have turned cold,
Are you, John, without pity for me in my plight,
When you so often declared your undying love for me
But if I have so changed in character that I have earned your hatred and anger.
My blessings still go with you, and if you can, try to choose someone better.

Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Oh John of Glen Quoich non mi sembra giusto che tu possa essere così bello
i tuoi capelli, in boccoli, sono un rigido intreccio(1)
la tua postura bella dritta mi ha lasciato il mal di cuore,
tu sei perfetto dalla testa ai piedi.
II
Ma amore mio non posso che descrivere una misera parte dei tuoi meriti
sei più rinfrescante della rugiada baciata dal sole che ingioiella gli arbusti(2)
voglio averti sempre sotto gli occhi
il mio diletto è ben degno di difendere una principessa
III
John, John amore mio, perchè mi hai  lasciata in tronco
senza alcun ricordo del reciproco amore un tempo condiviso,
non ho mai amato un altro uomo sulla terra, te solo
ne mai amerò un altro finchè il mio corpo sarà sepolto nella terra.
IV
Sebbene i tuoi sentimenti verso di me si siano raffreddati
sei tu, John, senza compassione per me nella mia condizione,
quando così spesso mi dichiaravi il tuo eterno amore,
ma se io non sono così mutata nel carattere da aver meritato il tuo odio e la tua collera,
le mie benedizioni siano ancora su di te, e se ci riesci, cerca di scegliere un’altra migliore.

NOTE
1) la descrizione dei dreads celtici!! I dreadlocks o dreads (Jata in Hindi, o erroneamente chiamati rasta) sono formati aggrovigliando i capelli su se stessi, e si possono ottenere in diversi modi, uno dei quali sta nel non pettinarsi per lungo tempo: in questo modo si formeranno dei locks (nodi) che con il tempo sarà impossibile sciogliere. La parola dreadlock non possiede una traduzione precisa. Sappiamo che dread, in inglese, è un sostantivo che significa “paura”,”timore”, mentre lock significa “bloccare” o, più precisamente, “intrecciare”, poiché i dredlocks sono delle vere e proprie trecce di capelli. Il termine, pertanto, potrebbe voler dire “intrecciare con timore” (sottinteso “di dio”, in quanto nata come pratica religiosa) o, più liberamente, “rigido intreccio”. (grazie wikipedia)
2) sembra di leggere un sonetto di Shakespeare

Ascoltiamola anche in questa dolcissima versione strumentale della Battlefield Band nella sua ultimissima formazione battezzata nel 2011 con il nuovo cd dal titolo “Line-up”: Ewen Henderson accarezza il piano e Alasdair White fa piangere il violino doppiato dal low whistle di Mike Katz ..

FONTI
“I celti” per la Mostra I celti a Palazzo Grassi – Venezia 1991
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/oran.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/iain.htm
http://www.margaretstewart.com/about-margaret.html

Morag e il Kelpie

Read the post in English

Nei fiumi più placidi d’Irlanda e nelle profondità oscure dei laghi scozzesi vivono dei demoni acquatici, creature fatate mutaforma, che si nutrono di carne umana: sono “kelpie“, “each uisge” (in inglese water-horse),  “eich-mhara” (in inglese sea horse), cavalli d’acqua e del mare; a voler essere pignoli il kelpie vive preferibilmente nei pressi delle rapide dei fiumi, dei guadi e delle cascate, mentre l’each uisge preferisce i laghi e il mare, ma kelpie è la parola più usata per entrambi. (prima parte)

MORAG E IL KELPIE

Ai pascoli estivi delle Highlands ancora si narra della bella Morag (Marion) sedotta da un kelpie in forma umana; la fanciulla pur notando delle stranezze del marito non si accorse della sua vera natura, se non dopo la nascita del loro bambino e … se la diede a gambe abbandonando bambino in fasce e marito mutaforma!

Nell’isola di Skye  si canta ancora un canto in gaelico,  ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ oppure ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) la “Ninna nanna del kelpie” una nenia malinconica con cui il kelpie cerca di far addormentare il bambino rimasto senza mamma, e nello stesso tempo una supplica verso Morag perchè ritorni da loro, sia lui che il bambino hanno bisogno di lei.
Di questo lamento si conoscono diverse versioni testuali tramandate fino a oggi nelle Isole Ebridi. Le melodie girano intorno ad una vecchia aria scozzese dal titolo “Crodh Chailein” (in inglese “Colin’s cattle) evidentemente considerata una melodia delle fate (qui)
Un’altra melodia dolce e malinconica nello stesso tempo è intitolata Song of The Kelpie o anche ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

Così traduce Tom Thomson (vedi)”I got up early, it would have been better not to” (mi sono alzato presto ma era meglio se non lo facevo)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Traduzione inglese *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Mi sono alzato presto,
mi sono alzato presto
non l’avrei fatto,
ma fu l’angoscia che mi mandò fuori
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
C’era nebbia sulla collina,
nebbia sulla collina
e piovigginava
e mi sono imbattuto in una graziosa fanciulla
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Ti darò del vino
ti darò del vino
e ogni cosa che vorrai
ma non mi alzerò con te al mattino
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
bella manza
bella manza
ero insieme a te al pascolo
mentre gli altri dormivano
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
la bella moretta malvagia
la bella moretta malvagia
che mi ha dato un figlio
anche se lo ha allevato con freddezza
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
il bimbo della mia canzone
il bimbo della mia canzone
era accanto a una collinetta,
senza fuoco, protezione o riparo
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Morag amore mio
Morag amore mio, ritorna dal tuo piccino
e ti darò una bella ghirlanda variopinta
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.

NOTE
si veda anche la traduzione qui
1)  il kelpie, soffrendo di solitudine, esce dal lago di mattina presto e prende forma umana
2) il mutaforma promette cibo e agiatezze alla fanciulla per convincerlo a seguirlo, però l’avvisa, è una creatura notturna e non si sveglierà con lei al mattino!
3) gamhna= cattle between 1 year and 2 years traduce Tom Thomson stitks; in italiano= giovenca, la mucca che non ha ancora partorito, il verso oltre a qualificare il lavoro della fanciulla (mandriana) vuole essere anche un complimento, per dirla in italiano “bella manza” come donna procace, dalle forme abbondanti e seducenti
4) il kelpie ricorda l’incontro notturno quando i due hanno fatto sesso (e ovviamente nove mesi dopo è nato il loro figlioletto)
5) ecco che dopo i bei ricordi del passato arriva il presente, la donna ha scoperto la vera natura del compagno e ha voluto meno bene al bambino generato con lui
6) proseguendo nel paragone il kelpie chiama “vitellino” il suo bambino, un termine vezzeggiativo per small child
7) Morag nel fuggire ha abbandonato il bambino sotto una balma al freddo e senza protezione. Si descrive una tipica “esposizione” dei bambini delle fate. Una pratica di “controllo delle nascite” diffusa nelle campagne d’Europa, era l’abbandono dei neonati  nel bosco (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi, che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. L’usanza di “esporre” il neonato era connessa con la convinzione che  fosse stato “scambiato” ovvero rapito dalle fate e sostituito con un changeling, un mutaforma il quale per un po’ assomiglia al bambino umano, ma alla fine riprende sempre il suo vero aspetto.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson traduce= speckled band (of withy). Ho cercato sul dizionario: si tratta di una corona fatta intrecciando i rami di salice; in italiano = coroncina di vimini, mi richiama le coroncine celtiche di fiori e foglie

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald la registrano con il titolo di “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” nel 2001(in Colla Mo Rùn) dalla collezione di Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà
III=I
IV=II
Traduzione inglese *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Dormi bambino mio
Dormi bambino mio
Coro
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
piè veloce
come un grande cavallo sei tu
II
Caro figlio mio
mio bel cavallino
sei lontano dalla cittadina
sarai il più rinomato

NOTE
1) Il kelpie canta la ninna-nanna al figlioletto abbandonato dalla madre umana e lo conforta dicendogli che da grande sarà un ruba-cuori

Con il titolo di ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan la stessa storia è presente negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais, dalla voce di tre testimoni dell’isola di Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

Una storia analoga è raccontata nell’isola di Benbecula con il titolo di Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg vedi


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 ne riporta un altro frammento con il titolo di “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (vedasi la versione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser più sotto)

GAELICO SCOZZESE
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh, is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri do bheul beag baoth is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 

Traduzione inglese *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling!
Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara,
ritorna dal tuo piccolo bambino
e avrai una trota maculata dal lago!
Morag mia cara,
questa notte è umida
e piovosa per mio figlio
in una balma della collinetta,
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
Lasciato senza fuoco, senza cibo e rifugio,
ti lamenti senza sosta.
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio sdentato
alla tua sciocca bocca,
e io che canto ninnananne sul Monte Frochkie

NOTE
1) Mhórag o Mór è il nome della fanciulla amata dal kelpie è anche scritto A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh (Mhor mia, amore, mia gioia)
2) è il pianto incessante del bambino che ha freddo e fame, abbandonato dalla mamma umana. Anche se non esplicitato presumo che la madre abbia “esposto” il figlio, cioè l’abbia abbandonato all’aperto (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate o il kelpie; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. vedi
3) montagna tra Gesto e Portree sull’isola di Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

Con il titolo di “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, lo stesso frammento cantato da Caera è riportato anche nel libro di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser e Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (pag 94)

ASCOLTA la versione classica nell’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser

trasposizione inglese Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Amore mio, mia gioia
vieni dal tuo bimbo,
e le trote guizzeranno dal lago in abbondanza
Cuore mio, la notte è buia,
umida e piovosa.
Ecco il tuo bambino nella balma
II
Suvvia, amore mio, mia gioia,
c’è bisogno di fuoco qui,
bisogno di riparo e conforto
il nostro bambino sta piangendo accanto al  lago.
III
Sposa mia, cuore mio!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio
che bacia le tue dolci labbra
e io che canto vecchie canzoni per te
sul Monte Frochkie
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVIO CANTI
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg