Jack O’Lantern in a dress

Leggi in italiano

The theme of the Devil who tries to take a sinner to hell is a classic of the Celtic tales, made exemplary in the story of Jack O’Lantern: on the night of Halloween the Devil walks the earth to reclaim the souls of men, but Stingy Jack was able to decive him with some tricks; and for two years in a row! At last the Devil, scornfully, gives up Jack’s soul for another ten years. When Jack dies for his too many vices both the doors of Paradise and those of hell are barred for him; forced to wander in the dark, he receives as a gift from the Devil a ember to illuminate his path; since then Jack continues to roam the Limbo in search of a dwelling he will never find, with his pumpkin-shaped lantern (which originally, before the story landed in America, was a turnip (see HOP TU NAA Isle of Manx)

Devil and the Farmer’s wife

In the ballad “Devil and the Farmer’s wife” (also known as the Little Devils-Jean Ritchie) dating back to 1600, the woman deserves the hell for her spiteful and disrespectful behavior; but the devil himself cannot tame her, indeed he risks losing his tranquility. The similarity between the two stories occurs in one of the nineteenth-century versions (Macmath Manuscript 1862 cf) in which the devil says referring to the woman: “O what to do with her I cane weel tell; she’s no fit for heaven, and she’ll no bide in hell! ” just like Jack who found both the Gate of Heaven and Hell to be closed.
The ballad is probably even older, and some scholars link it to Chaucer’s Tales of Canterbury (Waltz and Engle).

LITTLE DEVILS

The ballad has spread widely in England, Ireland, Scotland and America with fairly similar text versions, albeit with melodies declined in a different way.
THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN (english version)
Lilli burlero
THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE (american version)
KILLYBURN BRAE (Irish version)
KELLYBURN BRAES (Scottish version)

THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN

The ballad appears in print in London in 1630 with the title “The Devill and the Scold” to the tune “The Seminary Priest” cf
Of this ballad there are two extant editions, the earlier being in the Roxburghe Collection. The second is in the Rawlinson Collection, No. 169, published by Coles, Vere, and other stationers– a trade edition, of the reign of Charles II. Mr. Payne Collier includes “The Devil and the Scold” in his volume of Eoxburghe Ballads, and says: “This is certainly an early ballad: the allusion, in the second room, to Tom Thumb and Robin Goodfellow (whose ‘Mad Pranks’ had been published before 1588) is highly curious, and one proof of its antiquity ..
The ballad is often printed in broadside throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and collected in two textual variants in “The English And Scottish Popular Ballads” (1882-1898) by Francis James Child  at number 278 with the title “The Farmer’s Curst Wife “.

The song was collected in 1903 by Henry Burstow, Sussex and published in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs by Ralph Vaughan Williams and A.L. Lloyd (1959). Very similar to the text version reported by James Henry Dixon in “Ancient Poems, Ballads and Song” (1846) (Child # 278 version A cf).
Thus writes A.L. Lloyd in 1960 in the liner notes of “A Selection from the Penguin Book of English Folk Songs”, echoing the notes reported by Child himself: The tale of the shrewish wife who terrifies even the demons is ancient and widespread. The Hindus have it in a sixth century fable collection, the Panchatantra. It seems to have traveled westward by Persia, and to have spread to almost every European country. In the early versions, the farmer makes a pact with his wife in return for a pair of plow oxen. Vaughan Williams got the present ballad from the Horsham shoemaker and bell-ringer, Henry Burstow. Mr Burstow whistled the refrains that in our performance are played by the concertina. Whistling was a familiar way of calling up the Devil (hence the sailors who whistling may raise a storm). (from here)

The shrewish wife is taken back to her husband who believed he had succeeded in making fun of the devil! Given the subject is among the most popular ballads in medieval festivals and pirate gatherings !!

from Kellyburn Braes, Sorche Nic Leodhas, illustrated by Evaline Ness, 1968

A.L. Lloyd

Kim Lowings & The Greenwood from This Life, 2012


There was an old farmer in Sussex did dwell/ And he’d a bad wife as many knew well(1)
To me fal-de-ral little law-day.(2)
The Devil he came to the old man at plough,
Saying. ‘One of your family I must have now.
‘Now it isn’t for you nor yet for your son,
But that scolding old wife as you’ve got at home.’
Oh take her, oh take her with all of my heart,/ And I wish she and you may never more part.’
So the devil he took the old wife on his back(3),
And lugged her along like a pedlar’s pack./
He trudged along till he reached his front gate,
Says: ‘Here, take in an old   Sussex chap’s mate.
There was thirteen imps(4) all dancing in chains;
She up with her pattens and beat out their brains.
Two more little devils jumped over the wall,
Saying: ‘Turn her out, father, she’ll murder us all.’
So he bundled her up on his back again,/ And to her old husband he took her again.
I’ve been a tormentor the whole of my life,
But I was never tormented till I met your wife.’
And now to conclude and make an end,/ You see that the women is worse than the men,
If they got sent to Hell, they get kicked back again (5)

NOTE
1) the sentence wants to underline the less than submissive character of the woman!
2) Whistling was a way to summon the devil!
3) the image of women straddling the devil is supported by a vast iconography dating back to the Middle Ages
4) the image of the devils literally massacred by the woman is very funny, unfortunately the domestic reality was very different and in general it was women who suffered mistreatment and violence.
5)  Kim edited the final verse to show the strength of women:
And now to conclude and make an end
you see that us women are strong
even when we get sent to hell,
we come  straight back again

THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE: american version

Here too we find an almost identical textual version declined however with bluegrass melodies. The ending is very hilarious and often without the moral: the old farmer, seeing his wife return, rejected by the devil himself, decides to run and never go home again!

Heather Dale from Perpetual Gift 2012.

Jean Ritchie, British Traditional Ballads in the Southern Mountains, Volume 2


Well there was an old man living up on the hill/ If he ain’t moved on, he’s a livin’ there still
CHORUS Hi diddle ai diddle hi fi, diddle ai diddle ai day
Now the Devil he came to him one day
said “One of your kin I’m gonna take away“/ He said “Oh please don’t take my only son/ There’s work on the farm that’s gotta be done.
Oh but you can have my nagging wife
I swear by God, she’s the curse of my life”
So they marched on down to the gates of hell/ He Said “Kick on the fire boys, we’ll roast her well”
Out came a little devil with a spit and chain
that she upped with her foot and knocked out his brain
Out came a dozen demons then a dozen more
But when she was done they was flat on the floor

So all those little demons went scrambling up the wall
saying “tale her back, daddy, she’ll murder us all
So the Farmer woke up and he looked out the crack/ and he saw that devil bringing her back!
He said:”Here’s your wife both sound and well/ if I kept her any longer she’d’ve tore up the hell
The old man jumped and he bit his tongue
then he ran for the hills in a flat out run
He was heard to yell, as he ran o’er the hill/ “if the devil won’t have her, ‘be damned if I will

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17306

LA LEGGENDA DEL SANTO GRAAL IN UN CANTO DI NATALE?

La tradizione orale sia in Inghilterra (Derbyshire) che in America (Monti Appalachi) ha tramandato una strana carol ricca di simbolismo, riferita alla Natività ma derivata da un antico canto risalente al Medioevo, che commemorava però il Corpus Domini. La solennità del Santissimo Corpo e Sangue di Cristo fu istituita nel 1247 nella diocesi di Liegi per rievocare l’ultima cena ed è diventata di precetto per tutta la Chiesa nel 1264.
dream-burne-jones

CORPUS CHRISTI CAROL

La carol è contenuta nel Commonplace Book di Richiard Hill, un apprendista mercante di Londra che ha raccolto nel suo manoscritto vari testi in inglese, latino e francese dal 1500 e fino al 1536 (Oxford, Balliol Biblioteca MS. 354, 165V folio): il testo è oscuro e si presta a molte interpretazioni, e tuttavia così carico di simbolismo da lasciare affascinati!
Inizia con un grande falco, un falco divino che prende qualcosa o qualcuno e lo porta in un mondo arido, ossia un luogo che dovrebbe essere un frutteto ma è privo di foglie, ci sono solo alberi con i rami rinsecchiti, forse si riferisce all’autunno, ma più probabilmente è l’immagine di un giardino diventato sterile per qualche calamità.

caccia-falcoIL FALCO

Il simbolismo del falco, dal volo rapido e dalla vista acuta, viene da lontano dall’antico Egitto che lo classificò come Horo il dio del cielo e che venne associato a Ra, il dio sole. In Grecia era animale sacro di Apollo, anch’egli divinità solare. Il falco è facilmente addomesticabile e si affeziona al padrone, nel medioevo venne addestrato per la caccia e Federico II scrisse un bellissimo trattato sulla falconeria che dimostrava tutto il suo amore verso questi animali. L’arte della caccia con il falco è nata però nelle steppe dell’Asia e furono i mongoli a diffonderla in Cina ed Europa durante le invasioni.

Anche nelle mitologia nordica il falco è depositario dei segreti celesti, ma simboleggia anche la volontà di elevazione spirituale o di maturazione ad esempio raffigura l’adolescente che supera le prove d’iniziazione per diventare un guerriero. Haukr significa sia “giovane audace” che “falco”.
Presso i Cristiniani Horo-Falco è identificato con Gesù. Nel Rinascimento il falco incappucciato diventa l’emblema del convertito ovvero il simbolo della speranza alimentata da colui che vive nelle tenebre, il falco venne spesso raffigurato con il motto “post tenebras spero luce” (in italiano: dopo le tenebre confido nella luce). E siccome solo ai nobili era riservato il diritto di cacciare con il falco, egli divenne simbolo del viver cortese.

Vediamola così: il falco mandato da dio padre, re del cielo e del sole, ha catturato la preda designata al sacrificio. Chi canta è una donna e definisce la persona trasportata dal falco come “mak” un termine desueto che indica un compagno. Si potrebbe presumere che quell’uomo è un re, il re del sacrificio rituale, vittima designata perchè rappresentante della divinità, sacrificato perchè la terra diventasse fruttifera, carne e sangue sparsi nella terra come concime sacro. Rituale che per lo più si svolgeva nel periodo invernale durante il Solstizio.

Nella seconda scena vediamo una sala, drappeggiata di seta viola con al centro un letto ricoperto da un tessuto damascato in oro e rosso, vi è disteso un cavaliere con delle ferite sanguinanti vegliato da una fanciulla inginocchiata. Il cavaliere nella grande sala è quindi diventato il sostituto del re, è il suo sangue ora che vivifica la terra. Solo alla fine abbiamo un’ulteriore chiave di lettura nella lapide accanto al letto dalla quale si apprende che si tratta del Corpo di Cristo. Così Cristo raffigurato secondo i canoni cortesi è un cavaliere che sanguina come ha sanguinato Gesù sulla croce trafitto dalla lancia del romano Longino, il suo sangue è raccolto in un calice da Giuseppe d’Arimatea. La fanciulla che lo piange è Maria, sua madre inginocchiata ai piedi della croce, ma potrebbe anche essere Maria Maddalena, la compagna di Cristo. La ninna nanna è cantata da Maria che vede Cristo portato prima sul desolato Golgota con le macabre croci come alberi sterili e poi in cielo dalla volontà divina (il dio padre).

IL RE PESCATORE

Eppure se non fosse per quella scritta Corpus Christi il cavaliere ferito potrebbe essere identificato con il leggendario Re Ferito del ciclo arturiano, detto anche Re Pescatore, ultimo discendente dei custodi del Graal: egli è menomato alle gambe da una ferita che non guarisce (o più probabilmente è ferito ai genitali e quindi sterile) e anche il suo regno è malato come lui, si è trasformato in una terra desolata (waste land). I cavalieri che si recano nel suo regno per guarirlo falliscono nell’impresa, solo il più puro tra di loro potrà trovare il Graal. Il re ferito ha molte analogie con l’Artù vecchio e stanco che ha commesso il peccato d’incesto con la sorella e con lei ha generato il figlio che lo ucciderà. Così la ferita del re pescatore è una punizione di un peccato commesso in passato e la ferita gli è stata inferta con la lancia del Destino. Il parallelo con la ferita al costato di Gesù è quindi volutamente adombrato in alcune varianti della leggenda, così Gesù è venuto per portare su di sé il peso del peccato originale e redimere l’umanità.

Holy-GrailIl graal era una coppa o un contenitore non meglio definito dotato del potere di guarire e allungare la vita, ma prima della descrizione medievale di Chrétien de Troyes (Perceval o la storia del Graal ) era il calderone magico di Bran il benedetto della mitologia celtica (leggenda riportata nel gallese Mabinogion). E in effetti Bran potrebbe essere stato il primo dei molti custodi del GraalI guerrieri morti ritornano in vita se gettati nel magico calderone!

ASCOLTA Jeff Buckley, scarna e angelica interpretazione!


I
He bare(1) hym up,
he bare hym down,
He bare hym into an orchard brown.
CHORUS
Lulley, lully, lulley, lully,
The faucon(2) hath born
my mak(3) away.

II
In that orchard ther was an hall,
That was hanged with purpill and pall(4).
And in that hall ther was a bede,
Hit was hangid with gold so rede(5).
III
And yn that bede ther lythe(6) a knyght,
His wowndes bledyng(7) day and nyght.
By that bedes side ther kneleth(8) a may(9),
And she wepeth(10) both nyght and day.
IV
And by that bedes side ther stondith a ston(11),
“Corpus Christi” wretyn(12) theron.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Egli lo portò (1)su,
lo portò giù,
lo portò in un frutteto spoglio
CORO:
Ninna nanna,
il falco (2) ha portato
il mio compagno (3) lontano.
II
In quel frutteto c’era una sala,
addobbata con drappi viola (4).
e in quella sala c’era un letto,
decorato con oro e rosso (5).
III
E in quel letto stava un cavaliere,
dalle ferite sanguinanti giorno e notte.
Da un lato del letto si inginocchia una fanciulla,
e lei piange notte e giorno.
IV
E da quel lato del letto si trova una pietra,
sulla quale è scritto
“Il Corpo di Cristo”.

NOTE
1) bare: bore, carried
2) faucon: falcon.
3) mak: companion, match, mate (dal dialetto del Border inglese)
4) purpill: purple (the royal color) – pall: “a funeral pall, a cloth spread over a coffin” ma anche “fine fabric”
5) rede: red. Il rosso è un colore che richiama la passione di Cristo e il sangue versato.
6) lythe: lieth, lies
7) wowndes bledyng: wounds bleeding
8) kneleth: kneeleth, kneels
9) may: maid, maiden.
10) wepeth: weepeth, weeps
11) stondith ston: standeth, stands stone
12) wretyn: written

LA VERSIONE INGLESE “DOWN IN YON FOREST”

Down in yon valley/forest” anche con il titolo “The bells of Paradise” o “Casteton carol“, è stata raccolta nel 1906-7 da parte di Vaughan Williams dal signor Hill di Castleton, Derbyshire. E’ chiaramente una derivazione della più antica carola del Corpus Christi ma virata in chiave natalizia.
Il vecchio coro molto mistico e da iniziati è sostituito dal più innocuo “ The bells of Paradise I heard them ring,
And I love my Lord Jesus above anything”.

Qui il simbolismo è di più facile decifrazione: a parte la foresta incantata che fa molto Brocelandia, c’è però un contrasto stridente nella descrizione della stessa stanza nel Corpus Christi carol: là è una stanza mistica quasi sontuosa che potrebbe trovarsi in un castello, qui potrebbe essere la grotta in cui Gesù nasce, dalla culla-letto sgorga un fiume di sangue ed acqua, a triste monito del sacrificio che Gesù compierà da adulto, perciò l’antro si trasforma in una stanza sepolcrale.

ASCOLTA Trond Bengtson versione strumentale per liuto: è questa la melodia più conosciuta

ASCOLTA Cantus Lunaris
Altre interessanti esecuzioni sono quelle degli Steeleye Span e di Alfred Deller (ascoltabili su Spotify)


Down in yon forest
there stands a hall
The bells of Paradise
I heard them ring

It’s covered all over
with purple and pall
And I love my Lord Jesus
above anything
.
In that hall there stands a bed:
It’s covered all over
with scarlet so red
At the bed-side there lies a stone
Which the sweet Virgin Mary knelt upon
Under that bed there runs a flood(1)
The one half runs water,
the other runs blood
At the bed’s foot
there grows a thorn(2)
Which ever blows blossom
since he was born
Over that bed
the moon shines bright
Denoting our Saviour
was born this night.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
Laggiù nella foresta lontana
si erge una sala
le campane del paradiso
sento suonare
è tutto coperto
di drappi color porpora
E io amo il Signore Gesù
sopra ogni cosa
In quella sala si trova un letto
ricoperto di rosso
e scarlatto
da un lato del letto si trova una pietra
sulla quale la Vergine Maria s’inginocchiò
Sotto al letto scorre un fiume(1)
una metà pieno di acqua,
l’altra di sangue
ai piedi del letto
cresce un rovo (2)
che non è mai fiorito
da quando è nato
sopra quel letto
la luna splende luminosa
indicando che il nostro Salvatore
è nato questa notte

NOTE
1) dalla ferita di Gesù al costato secondo il vangelo di Giovanni sgorgava sangue misto ad acqua.
2) il rovo che non fiorisce mai è l’albero dal quale sarà ricavata la croce sulla quale sarà crocefisso Gesù. Ma potrebbe anche essere la rappresentazione di Giuseppe, il vecchio marito di Maria il cui bastone secondo i vangeli apocrifi sarebbe improvvisamente e prodigiosamente fiorito nella gara con gli altri pretendenti alla mano di Maria. Così dal ceppo inaridito del Vecchio Testamento rifiorisce la grazia della Redenzione.

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA (Monti Appalachi)

Raccolta da John Jacob Niles nella contea di Cherokee, Carolina del Nord con una melodia diversa rispetto a quella inglese, la carola ha un ritornello differente, che inquadra pur sempre la storia nel periodo natalizio “Sing May, Queen May, sing Mary! Sing all good men for the new-born Baby. Del tutto simile per il resto dalla versione inglese si caratterizza nell’ultima strofa per l’evocazione dell’immagine del Graal: il simbolismo diventa quindi manifesto è il Calice Eucaristico in cui il vino misto ad acqua diventa il sangue di Cristo.

Scrive Bruce Cockburn nelle note di “Christmas” 1990 
“If there were a contest for the title of the spookiest Christmas carol, this ought to win hands down. Collected earlier in this century by John Jacob Niles, it hails from North Carolina. I believe it to be of great age, though, both because of the melodic style and because of the lyrics, which resonate with the Grail myth, and with the ancient custom of every few years draining the blood out of one’s king onto the soil to ensure its continuing fertility.”
ASCOLTA Bruce Cockburn


Down in yon forest be a hall,
Sing May(1), Queen May,
sing Mary!

‘Tis coverlided over
with purple and pall
Sing all good men
for the new-born Baby!
Oh in that hall is a pallet bed,
‘Tis stained with blood like cardinal red
And at that pallet is a stone
On which the Virgin did atone
Under that Hall is a gushing flood
From Christ’s own side ’tis water and blood.
Beside that bed a shrub tree grows,
Since He was born it blooms and blows.
Oh, on that bed a young Squire sleeps,
His wounds are sick, and see, he weeps.
All hail yon Hall (2) were none can sin,
Cause it’s gold outside and silver within
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
Nella foresta lontana c’è una sala
-canta Maggio (1), Regina del Maggio, canta Maria!
E’ tutta ricoperta
di drappi color porpora
-Canta a tutti gli uomini di buona volontà del Bambino appena nato!
In quella sala si trova un letto di paglia macchiato di sangue
rosso scarlatto
e accanto al pagliericcio c’è una pietra sulla quale la Vergine fece penitenza,
sotto quella sala scorre un fiume
dal fianco di Cristo acqua mischiata a sangue.
Accanto al letto cresce un rovo
che da quando Egli è nato sboccia e fiorisce.
Sul letto un giovane cavaliere
dorme,
le sue ferite sono aperte e guarda, lui piange.
Tutti acclamano questa sala (2) dove nessuno può peccare
che è rivestita d’oro fuori e d’argento all’interno

NOTE
1) la parola nell’inglese moderno si traduce con maggio, ma nella sua vecchia forma may = maid che mi sembra il significato più verosimile nel contesto. Maria è definita anche come regina di Maggio, mese delle rose dedicato a Maria
2) il Sacro Graal inteso come il Calice Eucaristico ovvero la coppa in cui Giuseppe d’Arimatea raccolse il sangue di Gesù al Golgota.

FONTI
http://image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=ballion&manuscript=ms354
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/downinyonforest.html
http://historienerrant.wordpress.com/2011/12/23/down-in-yon-forest-a-song-about-christmas-easter-and-probably-the-holy-grail/
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/
down_in_yon_forest-niles.htm

http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/
down_in_yon_forest.htm

http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-CorpusChristi.html
http://historienerrant.wordpress.com/2011/12/23/down-in-yon-forest-a-song-about-christmas-easter-and-probably-the-holy-grail/
http://www.cdbchieri.it/rassegna_stampa_2009/ultima_cena.htm

SHADY GROVE: I’m bound to go away

Una canzone diffusa sui monti Appalachi, terra colonizzata da irlandesi e scozzesi. Dall’Irlanda- Scozia con il nome di Matty Groves la melodia è sbarcata nel Nuovo Mondo ed è diventata Shady Grove: del testo sono pervenute moltissime versioni a testimoniare la popolarità della canzone che narrano anche storie molto diverse tra loro. Letteralmente il titolo si traduce con “Boschetto Ombroso” ma nel contesto si tratta del nome di una donna.

Le varie versioni testuali sono anche diverse interpretazioni della storia: ad esempio in quella riportata da Tim O’ Brien con il gruppo The Chieftains il protagonista è innamorato, perdutamente, ma ha sorpreso la sua bella in un boschetto con un altro e così la lascia.
Il tradimento non è esplicito ma spiega il motivo per cui il protagonista si sente ferito e piange.
Il refrain Shady Grove è quindi come un’ossessione, un flash d’immagine che gli ritorna in mente ogni volta che pensa a lei, ma anche un modo per maledire il posto.

shady_grove_by_anthonypismarov-d5pkz58

©2012-2013 AnthonyPismarov

The Chieftains & Tim O’Brien in “Further Down the Old Plank Road” 2003 (un cd da collezione!) (strofe I, III, IV, VI, VII)

Peter Rowan, Tony Rice, & Tim O’Brien per una strepitosa versione strumentale

ASCOLTA Doc Watson (strofe I, II, V, IV, III) il quale non cantava sempre una versione standard ma aggiungeva o alternava le strofe a piacimento.


Chorus
Shady Grove, my little love
Shady Grove I say
Shady Grove, my little love
I’m bound to go away
I
Cheeks as red as a blooming rose
Eyes the darkest brown
She’s the darling of my heart
Sweetest little thing in town
II
I wish I had a big  fine horse
And corn to feed him on
And Shady Grove to stay at home
And feed him while I’m gone
III
Well I went to see my little Shady Grove
She was standing in the door
Her shoes and socks were in her hand
Her little bare feet on the floor
IV
Now when I was a little bitty boy
I wanted me a Barlow knife
Now I want a little Shady Grove
I want her to be my wife
V
Kiss from pretty little Shady Grove
Is sweet as brandy wine
And there ain’t no girl in this old world
That’s prettier than mine
VI
There’s peaches in the summertime
There’s apples in the fall
If I can’t have the one I love
I won’t have none at all
VII
Well have you  seen the mournful dove
Flyin from pine to pine
She’s mournin for her own true love
Like I mourn for mine.
Traduzione italiano
Ritornello
Shady Grove, mio piccolo amore
Shady Grove (male)dico
Shady Grove, mio piccolo amore
sono pronto a partire
I
Guance rosse come una rosa in boccio
occhi del castano più scuro
lei è l’amore del mio cuore
la più dolce piccola in città
II
Vorrei avere un gran bel cavallo
e biada con cui nutrirlo
e Shady Grove che resta a casa
e gli dà da mangiare quando sono via
III
Andai a incontrare la mia piccola Shady Grove
lei stava in piedi sulla porta
con scarpe e calze in mano
i piccoli piedi nudi sul pavimento.
IV
Allora quando ero un ragazzetto
volevo per me un coltello Barlow
adesso voglio la piccola Shady Grove
voglio che lei sia mia moglie.
V
Un bacio dalla mia piccola Shady Grove, è dolce come il brandy
e non c’è ragazza in questo vecchio mondo che sia più bella della mia
VI
Ci sono le pesche d’estate
e le mele in autunno
se non posso avere colei che amo
non voglio allora niente d’altro.
VII
Beh, hai visto la colomba triste
volare di pino in pino
e lamentarsi per il suo vero amore
come io piango per il mio.

Per ascoltare dell’ottimo BLUEGRASS a go-go!!
ASCOLTA Jerry Garcia & David Grisman

ASCOLTA Jerry Garcia, David Grisman & Tony Rice

VERSIONE TESTO Jerry GARCIA
I
Peaches in the summertime
Apples in the fall
If I can’t get the girl I love
I don’t want none at all
Chorus
Shady Grove, my little love
Shady Grove, I know
Shady Grove, my little love
I’m bound for Shady Grove (1)
II
Wish I had a banjo string
Made of golden twine
Every tune I’d play on it
I wish that girl were mine
III
Wish I had a needle and thread
Fine as I could sew
I’d sew that pretty girl to my side
And down the road I’d go
IV
Some come here to fiddle and dance
Some come here to tarry
Some come here to fiddle and dance
I come here to marry
V
Every night when I go home
My wife, I try to please her
The more I try, the worse she gets
Damned if I don’t leave her
VI
Fly around, my pretty little miss
Fly around, my Daisy
Fly around, my pretty little miss
Nearly drive me crazy
Traduzione italiano
I
Le pesche d’estate
e le mele in autunno
se non posso avere colei che amo
non voglio allora niente d’altro.
CORO
Shady Grove, mio piccolo amore
Shady Grove lo so
Shady Grove, mio piccolo amore
sono pronto (1) per Shady Grove
II
Se avessi le corde del banjo
fatte d’oro
ogni melodia che ci suonerei
vorrei che fosse per la mia ragazza.
III
Se avessi ago e filo
da poter cucire così bene
mi cucirei quella bella ragazza al fianco
e ci andrei per strada.
IV
C’è chi viene qui per suonare e danzare
chi per passare il tempo
c’è chi viene qui per suonare e danzare
io ci vengo per sposarmi.
V
Ogni notte quando ritorno a casa
da mia moglie, cerco di darle piacere,
ma più ci provo, peggio lei diventa
che sia dannato se non la lascerò.
VI
Vai a farti un giro, mia graziosa piccola signorina,
Vai a farti un giro, mia margherita
Vai a farti un giro, graziosa signorina,
mi stai facendo diventare  pazzo

NOTE
1) to bound for in questo contesto ha lo stesso significato del verso biblico “bound for the land of Canaan.” This phrase stems from the 12th-century meaning of bound as “ready” or“prepared.”

Jack O’Lantern in gonnella

Read the post in English

Il tema del Diavolo che cerca di portarsi all’inferno il peccatore è un classico dei racconti popolari di area celtica, reso esemplare nella storia di Jack O’Lantern: la notte di Halloween il Diavolo cammina sulla terra per reclamare le anime degli uomini, ma Stingy Jack riesce ad ingannarlo con dei trucchetti; e per ben due anni di seguito! Così il Diavolo, per non continuare a fare brutte figure, rinuncia all’anima di Jack per altri dieci anni. Quando Jack muore per i troppi vizi sia le porte del Paradiso che quelle dell’inferno sono sbarrate per lui; costretto a vagare nell’oscurità, riceve in dono dal Diavolo un tizzone per illuminare il suo cammino; da allora Jack continua a vagare per il Limbo in cerca di una dimora che non troverà mai, con la sua lanterna a forma di zucca (che in origine, prima che la storia sbarcasse in America, era una rapa vedi HOP TU NAA – Isola di Man).

Devil and the Farmer’s wife

Nella ballata “Devil and the Farmer’s wife” (nota anche con il titolo Little Devils- Jean Ritchie) risalente al 1600 è la donna, per il suo comportamento bisbetico e irrispettoso, a meritarsi l’inferno; ma il diavolo stesso non riesce a domarla, anzi rischia di perdere la sua tranquillità. La similitudine tra le due storie ricorre in una delle versioni ottocentesche (Macmath Manuscript 1862 vedi) in cui il diavolo dice riferendosi alla donna:”O what to do with her I canna weel tell; she’s no fit for heaven, and she’ll no bide in hell!” (in italiano: che fare di lei non so: non è adatta al Paradiso e non sopporta l’Inferno) proprio come Jack che ha trovato chiuse sia la Porta del Paradiso che quella dell’Inferno.
La ballata con tutta probabilità è ancora più antica e alcuni studiosi la ricollegano ai Racconti di Canterbury di Chaucer (Waltz e Engle).

LITTLE DEVILS

La ballata ha avuto una grande diffusione in Inghilterra, Irlanda, Scozia e America con versioni testuali abbastanza simili seppure con melodie declinate in modo diverso.
THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN (english version)
Lilli burlero
THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE (american version)
KILLYBURN BRAE (Irish version)
KELLYBURN BRAES (Scottish version)

VERSIONE INGLESE: THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN

La ballata compare in stampa a Londra nel 1630 con il titolo “The Devill and the Scold” (in italiano “Il Diavolo e la Bisbetica”) abbinata alla melodia “The Seminary Priestvedi
Nelle note in accompagnamento al testo si riporta: Di questa ballata esistono due edizioni, la prima nella collezione Roxburghe. La seconda nella collezione Rawlinson, No. 169, pubblicata da Coles – un’edizione commerciale, del regno di Carlo II. Payne Collier include “The Devil and the Scold” nel suo volume delle Eoxburghe Ballads, e dice: “Questa è certamente una ballata antica: il riferimento nella seconda stanza,a Tom Thumb e a Robin Goodfellow è assai curioso, e una prova della sua vetustà..”

La ballata è spesso stampata in broadside per tutto il settecento e l’ottocento e collezionata in due varianti testuali in “The English And Scottish Popular Ballads” (1882-1898) di Francis James Child al numero 278 con il titolo di “The Farmer’s Curst Wife“.

Il brano è stato raccolto nel 1903 da Henry Burstow, Sussex e pubblicato in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs di Ralph Vaughan Williams e A.L. Lloyd (1959). Molto simile alla versione testuale riportata da James Henry Dixon in “Ancient Poems, Ballads and Song” (1846) (Child #278 versione A vedi).
Così scrive A.L. Lloyd nel 1960 nelle note di copertina di “A Selection from the Penguin Book of English Folk Songs”, riprendendo per altro le note riportate dallo stesso Child: la storia della moglie scaltra che terrorizza anche i demoni è antica e diffusa. Gli indù ce l’hanno in una raccolta di favole del sesto secolo, il Panchatantra. Sembra che abbia viaggiato verso ovest dalla Persia e si sia diffuso in quasi tutti i paesi europei. Nelle prime versioni, il contadino fa un patto con sua moglie in cambio di un paio di buoi. Vaughan Williams ha ottenuto la ballata attuale dal calzolaio e suonatore di campane Horsham, Henry Burstow. Mr Burstow ha fischiettato i ritornelli che nella nostra esibizione sono suonati dalla concertina. Il fischio era un modo familiare di richiamare il diavolo (quindi i marinai che fischiano possono far sollevare una tempesta). (tradotto da qui)
La moglie bisbetica viene riportata indietro al marito che aveva creduto di essere riuscito a prendersi beffe del diavolo! Visto l’argomento è tra le ballate più gettonate nelle feste medievali e nei raduni pirateschi!

Kellyburn Braes
da Kellyburn Braes, di Sorche Nic Leodhas, illustrato da Evaline Ness, 1968

A.L. Lloyd

Kim Lowings & The Greenwood in This Life, 2012 l’album d’esordio.


There was an old farmer in Sussex did dwell/ And he’d a bad wife as many knew well(1)
To me fal-de-ral little law-day.(2)
The Devil he came to the old man at plough,
Saying. ‘One of your family I must have now.
‘Now it isn’t for you nor yet for your son,
But that scolding old wife as you’ve got at home.’
Oh take her, oh take her with all of my heart,/ And I wish she and you may never more part.’
So the devil he took the old wife on his back(3),
And lugged her along like a pedlar’s pack./
He trudged along till he reached his front gate,
Says: ‘Here, take in an old   Sussex chap’s mate.
There was thirteen imps(4) all dancing in chains;
She up with her pattens and beat out their brains.
Two more little devils jumped over the wall,
Saying: ‘Turn her out, father, she’ll murder us all.’
So he bundled her up on his back again,/ And to her old husband he took her again.
I’ve been a tormentor the whole of my life,
But I was never tormented till I met your wife.’
And now to conclude and make an end,/ You see that the women is worse than the men,
If they got sent to Hell, they get kicked back again (5)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’era un vecchio contadino nel Sussex e aveva una pessima moglie, come tutti sanno,
To me fal-de-ral little law-day.
il diavolo venne dal vecchio mentre arava
dicendo ” Adesso mi prendo uno della famiglia!
Non sono qui per te e nemmeno per tuo figlio,
ma per quella vecchia moglie che hai a casa
Oh te la cedo con tutto il cuore
e ti auguro che non possa più separartene
Così il Diavolo prese la vecchia moglie sulla schiena e la trascinò via come un pacco postale.
La trascinò fino alla porta dell’inferno dicendo:
Ecco, prendetevi una vecchia moglie del Sussex
C’erano tredici diavoletti che ballavano in catene
e lei con i suoi zoccoli massacrava i loro crani.
Due diavoletti saltarono il muro dicendo
Riportala indietro padre, o ci ucciderà tutti
Così il Diavolo la riprese sulla sua schiena
e la riportò dal vecchio marito:
Sono stato un tormentatore per tutta la mia vita,
ma non sono mai stato tormentato,
fino a quando ho incontrato tua moglie!!”
E per concludere e arrivare alla fine,
vedete come le donne sono peggio degli uomini,
se le mandate all’inferno, ritornano subito indietro!!

NOTE
1) la frase vuole sottolineare il carattere poco remissivo della donna!
2) Fischiettare era un modo per evocare il diavolo!
3) l’immagine è supportata da una vasta iconografia risalente al medioevo di donne a cavalcioni del diavolo
4) l’immagine dei diavoletti letteralmente massacrati dalla donna è molto buffa, purtroppo la realtà domestica era ben diversa e in genere erano le donne a subire maltrattamenti e violenze.
5) Kim modifica il finale a favore della donna 

And now to conclude and make an end
you see that us women are strong
even when we get sent to hell,
we come  straight back again
E per concludere e arrivare alla fine,
vedete come noi donne siamo forti
anche quando veniamo mandate all’inferno,
ritorniamo subito indietro!!

VERSIONE AMERICANA: THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE

Anche qui ci troviamo in una pressochè identica versione testuale declinata però con melodie bluegrass. Il finale è molto spassoso e spesso senza il predicozzo moralizzante: il vecchio contadino nel vedere ritornare la moglie, respinta nientemeno che dal diavolo stesso, decide di mettersi a correre e non ritornare più a casa!

Heather Dale in Perpetual Gift 2012.

Jean Ritchie, British Traditional Ballads in the Southern Mountains, Volume 2

TRADIZIONALE MONTI APPALACHI (versione semplificata)


Well there was an old man living up on the hill/ If he ain’t moved on, he’s a livin’ there still
CHORUS
Hi diddle ai diddle hi fi, diddle ai diddle ai day

Now the Devil he came to him one day
said “One of your kin I’m gonna take away“/ He said “Oh please don’t take my only son/ There’s work on the farm that’s gotta be done.
Oh but you can have my nagging wife
I swear by God, she’s the curse of my life”
So they marched on down to the gates of hell/ He Said “Kick on the fire boys, we’ll roast her well”
Out came a little devil with a spit and chain
that she upped with her foot and knocked out his brain
Out came a dozen demons then a dozen more
But when she was done they was flat on the floor
So all those little demons went scrambling up the wall
saying “tale her back, daddy, she’ll murder us all
So the Farmer woke up and he looked out the crack (1)/ and he saw that devil bringing her back!
He said:”Here’s your wife both sound and well/ if I kept her any longer she’d’ve tore up the hell
The old man jumped and he bit his tongue
then he ran for the hills in a flat out run
He was heard to yell, as he ran o’er the hill/ “if the devil won’t have her, ‘be damned if I will
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’era un vecchio che viveva sulla collina
e se non si è mosso ci vive ancora.
CORO 
Hi diddle ai diddle hi fi, diddle ai diddle ai day

Il diavolo andò da lui un giorno dicendo ” Adesso mi prendo uno della famiglia! “Oh per favore non prendere il mio unico figlio c’è (parecchio) lavoro nella fattoria che  deve essere fatto,
ma prenditi la mia moglie bisbetica, che giuro su Dio è la mia maledizione!!”
Così marciarono alla porta dell’inferno e il Diavolo disse “Sotto con il fuoco, ragazzi, che faremo un bell’arrosto!
Si è fatto avanti un diavoletto con uno spiedo e la catena
e lei lo ha pestato con i piedi e gli ha massacrato il cranio.
Si sono fatti avanti una dozzina di demoni e poi un’altra dozzina
ma quando lei ebbe finito erano tutti spalmati a terra!
Così i diavoletti si arrampicarono sul muro
dicendo “Riportala indietro padre, o ci ucciderà tutti”.
Così il contadino si svegliò e guardò attraverso  la crepa e vide il diavolo che la riportava indietro
dicendo: “Ecco tua moglie sana e salva, se l’avessi tenuta ancora, mi avrebbe distrutto l’inferno!”
Il vecchio fece un sobbalzo e si morse la lingua,
poi corse verso la collina a tutto gas. L’hanno sentito urlare mentre correva “Se il diavolo non la vuole, che sia dannato se me la prenderò io!”

NOTE
1) ci immaginiamo che si sia spalancata una fenditura nel terreno e che ne sia scaturito il diavolo con la donna

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_278
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/23/wife.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50974
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19182
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151087
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17306
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thedevilandtheploughman.html
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C278.html