Bear Away Yankee, Bear Away Boy

The shanty “Bear Away Yankee” (Deep The Water, Shallow The Shore) comes from the singing of West Indies sailors, collected by Alan Lomax and Roger D. Abrahams in the smaller Caribbean islands and published in “Deep The Water, Shallow The Shore “(1974). From the field recordings made in 1962 it was released Caribbean Voyage: Nevis And St. Kitts” album
The chantey-singing fishermen, under the leadership of Walter Roberts or Reginald Syder performed songs used for boat hauling or while sailing, many reflecting past rather than contemporary practice. Notwithstanding, versions of several of the songs are also featured in Abrahams’ book about the tradition: Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore: Three Essays on Shantying in the West Indies, (Austin, University of Texas Press, 1974). (from here)
La shanty “Bear Away Yankee” (Deep The Water, Shallow The Shore) viene dai canti di lavoro nelle Indie Occidentali, collezionata da Alan Lomax e da Roger D. Abrahams nelle isole minori dei Caraibi e pubblicata nella raccolta “Deep The Water, Shallow The Shore” (1974).
Dalle registrazioni sul campo effettuate nel 1962 è stato realizzato l’album “Caribbean Voyage: Nevis And St. Kitts
I pescatori cantavano, sotto la guida di Walter Roberts o Reginald Syder, le canzoni usate per il trasporto di imbarcazioni o durante la navigazione, molte delle quali riflettevano il passato piuttosto che la pratica contemporanea. Nonostante ciò, le versioni di molte delle canzoni sono anche presenti nel libro di Abrahams sulla tradizione: Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore: tre saggi su Shantying nelle Indie occidentali, (Austin, University of Texas Press, 1974). (tradotto da qui)

A rowing chanty presumably dates back to 1831 when on a river trip in Guyana, a White British captain observed the enslaved Africans rowing his boat to sing “their favourite song: Velly well, yankee, velly well oh!
Una rowing chanty che si presume risalga al 1831 quando,durante un viaggio fluviale in Guyana, un capitano britannico bianco osservò degli schiavi africani che remavano nella sua barca cantare “la loro canzone preferita: Velly well, yankee, velly well oh!!

Roy Gumbs live Newcaste, isle of Nevis, 1962

Hulton Clint writes “The first is a recording that Alan Lomax made of Roy Gumbs and party of Newcastle, Nevis in July 1962. The second (starting 1:40) is a rendition presented by Roger Abrahams in _Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore_, from his fieldwork with fishermen in Nevis 1963-66. The textual themes are the same, but the melody noted by Abrahams is different than these men’s colleagues had sung a year or so earlier for Lomax.
La prima parte è la registrazione che Alan Lomax fece di Roy Gumbs e compagni di Newcastle, Nevis, nel luglio 1962. La seconda (a partire da 1:40) è la versione presentata da Roger Abrahams in “Deep Water, Shallow the Shore”, dal suo lavoro sul campo con pescatori a Nevis 1963-66. I temi testuali sono gli stessi, ma la melodia annotata da Abrahams è diversa da quella che i loro colleghi avevano cantato un anno prima per Lomax

Hulton Clint Saint Vincent variant 
This rendition was documented by Roger Abrahams in 1966, and the Vincentian group, The Barrouallie Whalers
He notes: Like many of these men’s songs, the lyrics have an element of taunting. Essentially, it critiques those who would not participate in the work of fishing but who would nevertheless expect to share in the spoils of that work.”
Questa interpretazione è stata documentata da Roger Abrahams nel 1966, e il gruppo vincenziano, The Barrouallie Whalers, Hulton Clint osserva: “Come molte di queste canzoni virili, i testi hanno un elemento di scherno. In sostanza, si critica coloro che pur non partecipando al lavoro di pesca, si aspettavano comunque di condividere il bottino di quel lavoro “.

Kenny Wollesen & The Himalayas Marching Band in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


Bear away (1) Yankee, bear away boy (repeat twice)
Oh what we tell John Gould (2) today?
Bear away Yankee, bear away boy
Oh, deep the water an’ shallow the shore
Bear away Yankee, bear away boy
Bear away Yankee, bear away boy
Bear away Yankee, bear away boy

Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Vento in poppa americano, vento in poppa ragazzo (ripete due volte)
Che diciamo a John Gould oggi?
Vento in poppa..
profondo il mare e fondale basso a riva
Vento in poppa..
Vento in poppa..
Vento in poppa..

NOTE
Like many shanties, the lyrics vary from singer to singer, especially with these fairly simple examples. [Come molti chantey, i testi variano da cantante a cantante]
Pull away all through the day
Bear away to Noble Bay
1) Bear away è un termine nautico per poggiare (o puggiare)
2) John Gould is supposed to have been a shipowner who lost his cargo [John Gould potrebbe essere un armatore che ha perso il suo carico]

LINK
http://research.culturalequity.org/rc-b2/get-audio-ix.do?ix=recording&id=5936&idType=performerId&sortBy=abc
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/nevis.htm
http://neurosis02.gz01.bdysite.com/index.php/2019/01/13/caribbean-voyage-nevis-and-st-kitts/
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=5180
http://www.tomlewis.net/lyrics/bear_away.htm
https://www.bethsnotesplus.com/2013/12/bear-away-yankee-bear-away-boy.html

The importance of being.. Reily

Leggi in italiano

TITLES: A Fair Young Maid all in her Garden, There Was A Maid In Her Father’s Garden, Pretty, Fair Maid in the Garden, John Riley, Johnny Riley, The Broken Token, The Young and Single Sailor

Joan Baez popularised this ballad with John Reily title in the 60s:  it is a classic love story of probable seventeenth-century origins, in which the woman remains faithful to her lover or promised spouse who has gone to war or embarked on a vessel. The song is classified as reily ballad because it is structured as a dialogue between the protagonist  (in disguise) usually called John or George, Willie or Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) and the woman, example of loyalty ( first part)

SECOND MELODY

The text of this version reminds me of the Oscar Wild comedy, “The Importance of Being Earnest” Wilde’s contradictory to Shakespeare in the famous Juliet declaration on the name of Romeo:
“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

This is the melody in the American tradition as collected in the field (Providence, Kentucky) in the 30s by Alan Lomax. Joe Hickerson penned “There are two ballads titled “John (George)  Riley” in G. Malcolm Laws’s American Balladry  from British Broadsides (1957). In number N36, the returned man claims that  Riley was killed so as to test his lover’s steadfastness. In number N37,  which is our ballad, there is no such claim. Rather, he suggests they sail  away to Pennsylvania; when she refuses, he reveals his identity. In the many  versions found, the man’s last name is spelled in various ways, and in some  cases he is “Young Riley.” Several scholars cite a possible origin  in “The Constant Damsel,” published in a 1791 Dublin songbook.
Peggy’s learned the song in childhood from a field  recording in the Library of Congress Folk Archive: AFS 1504B1 as sung by Mrs.  Lucy Garrison and recorded by Alan and Elizabeth Lomax in Providence,  Kentucky, in 1937. This was transcribed by Ruth Crawford Seeger and included  in John and Alan Lomax’s Our Singing Country (1941), p. 168. Previously, the  first verse and melody as collected from Mrs. Garrison at Little Goose Creek,  Manchester, Clay Co., Kentucky, in 1917 appeared in Cecil Sharp’s English  Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians (1932), vol. 2, p. 22. Peggy’s  singing is listed as the source for the ballad on pp. 161-162 of Alan Lomax’s  The Folk Songs of North America in the English Language (1960), with  “melodies and guitar chords transcribed by Peggy Seeger.” In 1964  it appeared on p. 39 of Peggy’s Folk Songs of Peggy Seeger (Oak Publications.  edited by Ethel Raim). Peggy recorded it on  Folk-Lyric FL114, American Folk Songs for Banjo and her brother Pete included  this version on his first Folkways LP, FP 3 (FA 2003), Darling Corey (1950).” (from here)

The dialogue between them seems more like a skirmish between lovers in which she proves to be chilly and offended, while he, returned after leaving her alone for three years, jokingly pretends not to know her and asks her to marry him because he is fascinated by his graces! So in the end she yields and paraphrasing Shakespeare says “If you be he,  and your name is Riley..

Peggy  Seeger in “Heading for home”  2003


Pete Seeger in “Darling Corey/Goofing-Off Suite” 1993

Peggy  Seeger version
I
As I walked out  one morning early
To take the  sweet and pleasant air
Who should I  spy but a fair young lady
Her cheeks  being like a lily fair.
II
I stepped up to  her, right boldly asking
Would she be a  sailor’s wife?
O no, kind sir, I’d rather tarry
And remain single for all my life.
III
Tell me, kind  miss, and what makes you differ
From all the rest of womankind?
I see you’re  fair, you are young, you’re handsome
And for to  marry might be inclined.
IV
The truth, kind  sir, I will plainly tell you
I might have  married three years ago
To one John  Riley who left this country
He is the cause of all my woe.
V
Come along with  me, don’t you think on Riley,
Come along with  me to some distant shore;
We will set sail for Pennsylvanie
Adieu, sweet  England, forevermore.
VI
I’ll not go  with you to Pennsylvanie
I’ll not go  with you that distant shore;
My heart’s with  Riley, I will ne’er forget him
Although I may  never see him no more.
VII
And when he  seen she truly loved him
He give her  kisses, one two and three,
Says, I am  Riley, your own true lover
That’s been the  cause of your misery.
VIII
If you be he,  and your name is Riley,
I’ll go with  you to that distant shore.
We will set  sail to Pennsylvanie,
Adieu, kind friends, forevermore.

THIRD MELODY

In this version the identification is based on the ring that probably the two sweethearts had exchanged as a token of love before departure. A beautiful Celtic Bluegrass style version!

Tim  O’Brien in Fiddler’s Green 2005

I
Pretty fair  maid was in her garden
When a stranger came a-riding by
He came up to the gate and called her
Said pretty  fair maid would you be my bride
She said I’ve a true love who’s in the army
And he’s been gone for seven long years
And if he’s  gone for seven years longer
I’ll still be waiting for him here
II
Perhaps he’s on some watercourse drowning
Perhaps he’s on some battlefield slain
Perhaps he’s to a fair girl married
And you may never see him again
Well if he’s  drown, I hope he’s happy
Or if he’s on some battlefield slain
And if he’s to some fair girl married
I’ll love the girl that married him
III
He took his hand out of his pocket
And on his finger he wore a golden ring (1)
And when she saw that band a-shining
A brand new song her heart did sing
And then he  threw his arms all around her
Kisses gave her one, two, three
Said I’m your true and loving soldier
That’s come  back home to marry thee
NOTE
1)  the ring that they exchanged on the day of departure

SOURCES
http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/title/The%20constant%20maids%20resolution:%20or%20The%20damsels%20loyal%20love%20to%20a%20seaman
http://die-augenweide.de/byrds/songjk/john_riley.htm
http://peggyseeger.bandcamp.com/track/john-riley
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN37.html
http://www.folklorist.org/song/John_(George)_Riley_(I)
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_38.htm

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

Mhurchaidh Bhig Nan Gormshuil Greannmhor versus Witchery fate song

From the Hebrides, a mysterious waulking song.
The ballad was recorded by Alan Lomax under the title “Mhurchaidh Bhig Nan Gormshuil Greannmhor” (“Little Murdoch of Beguiling Eyes”) (in Gaelic Songs of Scotland: Women at Work in the Western Isles: a preview here). The song is also known as “Cha Teaid Mi do Chille Mhoire”
This waulking song is addressed to Murdo with the beautiful dark blue eyes. The composer says she will not go to Kilmore (Mull) and will not meet Murdo, whom she describes as a deceitful young man who would come night visiting (from Tobar an Dualchais )

[Dalle Isole Ebridi una waulking song misteriosa.
La ballata è stata registrata da Alan Lomax con il titolo “Mhurchaidh Bhig Nan Gormshuil Greannmhor” (“Little Murdoch of beguiling eyes”)  (in Gaelic Songs of Scotland: Women at Work in the Western Isles, 2006 una preview qui). La canzone è anche conosciuta come “Cha Tèid Mi do Chille Mhoire”.
“Questa waulking è rivolta a Murdo dagli splendidi occhi blu. Chi canta dice che non andrà a Kilmore (isola di Mull) per incontrare Murdo, descritto come un corteggiatore ingannevole.”
Così dall’archivio Tobar an Dualchais apprendiamo che colei che canta vuole tenere lontano da sè Murdo il giovane dai begli occhi blu che vive a Kilmore (isola di Mull), perchè l’ha ingannata (sedotta) durante una “night visiting”.]
In the genre classified as “night visiting songs” the suitors sneak into the house of the beloved trying to snatch their virginity: sometimes they are adventurous travelers, street vendors, soldiers, sailors or seasonal workers, who under the pretext of the cold night and rain they seek shelter between the girl’s sheets; obviously every marriage promise is immediately forgotten once the goal is reached.
[Nel genere classificato come “night visiting songs” i corteggiatori entrano di soppiatto nella casa dell’amata cercando di carpirne la verginità: a volte sono avventurieri di passaggio, ambulanti, soldati, marinai o lavoratori stagionali, che con il pretesto della notte fredda e della pioggia cercano riparo tra le lenzuola della fanciulla; ovviamente ogni promessa di matrimonio è subito dimenticata una volta raggiunto lo scopo.]

Mhurchaidh Bhig Nan Gormshuil Greannmhor 

Nan Bryan (Mary Anne) Buchanan 

(al momento senza trascrizione del testo)

WITCHERY FATE SONG: THE HAWK OMEN

A different interpretation comes instead from the collection “Songs of the Hebrides” by Marjory Kennedy-Fraser  and who writes the score, the Gaelic text and the English translation of the ballad titled “Witchery Fate Song”. The song becomes the prophecy of the Great Gormula of Moy (Gormshùil Mhòr na Maighe) and / or of Corrag from Elsewhere (Corrag Nighean Iain Bhain).
So writes Marjory Kennedy-Fraser in the notes accompanying the song’s score (“Songs of the Hebrides” vol III, # 166)
“Two of the “Big Seven” (famous witches) Gormshuil (Gorumhool) from Moy and Corrag Nighean Iain Bhain (Korrack nee-an Eean Vahn) or as she somethimes called herself, “Corrag from Nowhere”, were talking old ploys on a sea-rock in Knoyart when a hawk which had been circling above them, suddendly droped down with its back to the ground

[Tutt’altra interpretazione viene invece dalla raccolta “Songs of the Hebrides” di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser che riporta spartito, testo in gaelico e trasposizione in inglese della ballata dandole il titolo di “Witchery fate song“. La canzone diventa la profezia della Grande Gormula di Moy  ( Gormshùil Mhòr na Maighe) e/o di Corrag da Altrove (Corrag Nighean Iain Bhain).
Così scrive Marjory Kennedy-Fraser nelle note che accompagnano lo spartito della canzone (“Songs of the Hebrides” volume III, #166): “Due delle” Big Seven” ( famose streghe) Gormshuil (Gorumhool) di Moy e Corrag Nighean Iain Bhain o come lei stessa si autodefiniva,” Corrag from Nowhere (Corrag da Altrove)”, stavano parlando di vecchi trucchi sugli scogli di Knoyart quando un falco che stava girando sopra di loro, precipitosamente cadde con il dorso riverso “

The peninsula of Knoydart is the wildest part of the Lochaber, a Scottish region that can be reached practically only by boat, being surrounded on three sides by the sea and isolated by kilometers of mountains and by Loch Nevis (Lake of Paradise) and Loch Hourn (Lake of Hell). There are no roads, the few people live practically all in the village of Inverie and nature dominates uncontested.
[La penisola di Knoydart è la parte più selvaggia del Lochaber, una regione della Scozia che si può raggiungere praticamente solo in barca, essendo circondata su tre lati dal mare e isolata da chilometri di montagne e dai rami del Loch Nevis (lago del Paradiso) e del Loch Hourn (lago dell’Inferno) . Non ci sono strade, le poche persone vivono praticamente tutte nel villaggio di Inverie e la natura domina incontrastata.]

Also Shakespeare in Macbeth focuses the tragedy, set in medieval Scotland, on the prophecy of three witches.
[Anche Shakespeare nel Macbeth incentra la tragedia ambientata nella Scozia medievale sulla profezia di tre streghe.]


Jean-Luc Lenoir in “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads”

  • I
    Chunna mi’n t-seabhag ‘s a cùl rilàr,
    Chunna mi’n t-seabh ag ‘s a cùl rilàr,
    ‘S bidh Corrag Iain(1) Bhain
    ‘S bidh Gormshuilna Maigh (2)
    A fagail am mairech siaban nan tonn
    ‘S righ gur a tromair an ògshean e
    Ari a, ari
    Chunna mi’n t-seabhag ‘s a cùl rilàr
    II
    Chunna mi’n t-seabhag ‘s a cùl rilàr
    Chunna mi’n t-seabhag ‘s a cùl rilàr
    ‘S bidh Corrag Iain Bhain
    ‘S bidh Gormshuilna Maigh
    A fagail gu brath gach cladach is fonn
    Gach lagan is tom air am b’eolach iad
    (An diugh na’m b’e’n de, chuirinn gair e ri gair
    Is gu debhiodh ‘san dan dubh cha’n fheor aich inn)
    Ari a, ari
    Chunna mi’n t-seabhag ‘s a cùl rilàr
    NOTE
    1)  Corrag Nighean Iain Bhain is the witch Corrag [è la strega Corrag]
    2) Gormshuilna Maigh is the Great Gormula of Moy, another famous witch mentioned in many legends of the Lochaber [è la Grande Gormula di Moy, altra famosa strega citata in molte leggende del Lochaber]

    English Translation*
    I have seen the falcon lying on the earth
    I have seen the falcon lying on the earth
    John with blond hairs
    and the young girl with blue eyes
    They will have to leave
    the foam of the waves tomorrow
    What a grief for this already aged youth
    Ari a, ari
    I have seen the falcon lying on the earth
    II
    I have seen the falcon lying on the earth
    I have seen the falcon lying on the earth
    John with blond hairs
    and the young girl with blue eyes
    will leave these beaches and theses shores forever,
    these glens, these hills that they knew so well.
    Ari a, ari
    I have seen the falcon lying on the earth
    Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
    Ho visto il falco cadere a terra
    ho visto il falco cadere a terra
    John dai biondi capelli
    e la giovane ragazza dagli occhi azzurri
    dovranno lasciare
    la schiuma del mare domani,
    che pena per questa gioventù già invecchiata
    Ari a, ari, ho visto il falco cadere a terra
    II
    Ho visto il falco cadere a terra
    ho visto il falco cadere a terra
    John dai biondi capelli
    e la giovane ragazza dagli occhi azzurri
    dovranno lasciare queste spiagge e questi lidi per sempre,
    queste valli e queste colline che conoscono così bene
    Ari a, ari
    Ho visto il falco cadere a terra

    NOTE
    * from https://lyricstranslate.com/en/witchery-fate-song-witchery-fate-song.html

THE HAWK OMEN

The English adaptation of the Gaelic lyrics was written by Reverend Kenneth Macleod: the ballad is connected to the Norns and to the thread of destiny that is traced to the birth of every human creature.
[L’adattamento in inglese dell’originale gaelico è stato scritto dal reverendo Kenneth Macleod: la ballata viene collegata alle Norne e al filo del destino che viene tracciato alla nascita di ogni creatura umana.]

Dannsair in Mists of Ennistymon 2008

Siobhan Doherty in “Marrying the Sea” 2010

 English version Kenneth Macleod
I
See yonder the hawk
and her back to the ground,
See yonder the hawk
and her back to the ground,
And Corrac from Noway
And Gormhool from Moyway
Tomorrow must leave
the play o’ the waves.
Ah me, it is sore
on the old still young,
Aree a, aree.
Down comes the hawk
and she flies no more.
II
Down comes the hawk
and she flies no more,
Down comes the hawk
and she flies nevermore,
And Corrac from Noway
And Gormhool from Moyway
Will leave evermore
the lea and the shore,
The glens and the hills
where they loved to rove,
Aree a, aree.
Down comes the hawk
and she flies no more
traduzione italiano
I
Vedo il falco in lontananza
che si distende a terra
Vedo un falco in lontananza
che si distende a terra
e Corrac da Altrove (1)
e Gormhool da Moyway  (2)
domani dovranno lasciare
la schiuma delle onde
che dolore
per questa giovinezza già vecchia
Aree a, aree.
giù viene il falco
e più non vola
II
Giù viene il falco
e più non vola
giù viene il falco
e mai più vola
e Corrac da Altrove
e Gormhool da Moyway
lasceranno per sempre
i campi e la spiaggia,
le valli e le colline
dove amavano vagabondare
Aree a, aree
giù viene il falco
e più non vola

NOTE
1) noway, nowhere in italiano” luogo inesistente”, “il nulla”, ma anche “Altromondo”, si tratta quindi di una creatura fatata
2 Gormla Occhio Azzurro era una strega  protettrice del clan Cameron

Chant magique de Sorcière ( in “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads”)
I
J’ai vu le faucon gisant à terre, gisant à terre
Jean aux cheveux blonds
et la jeune fille aux yeux bleus
Doivent demain quitter l’écume des vagues
Quel chagrin pour cette jeunesse déjà vieille !
Ari a, ari
J’ai vu le faucon gisant à terre
II
J’ai vu le faucon gisant à terre, gisant à terre !
Jean aux cheveux blonds
et la jeune fille aux yeux bleus
quitteront pour toujours ces plages et ces rivages
Ces vallons, ces collines qu’ils ont si bien connus
Ari a, ari
J’ai vu le faucon gisant à terre

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/terra-di-scozia-nelle-sue-canzoni/marjorie-kennedy-fraser/
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/14388/9
http://oxfordindex.oup.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095900954
http://www.clan-cameron.org.uk/oldsite/Research/gormshuil.html
https://calumimaclean.blogspot.com/2017/03/the-most-powerful-witch-of-all-great.html
https://humanisticpaganism.com/2011/10/09/symbols-in-the-sky/
http://www.mondobimbiblog.com/2011/02/le-streghe-di-mull/
http://www.mondobimbiblog.com/2011/02/le-streghe-di-mull-parte-seconda/
http://www.mondobimbiblog.com/2011/02/le-streghe-di-mull-parte-terza/
Un giro in macchina per la Scozia. Avvistamenti dall’altro lato della strada.

L’albero in mezzo al prato

Read the post in English

Come il gioco della campana conosciuto dai bambini di tutti i continenti, anche la “canzone del ciclo eterno” è una goccia di antica sapienza sopravvissuta ai nostri giorni: oltre che gioco mnemonico è anche scioglilingua che diventa sempre più difficile articolare all’aumentare della velocità.

Alcuni dicono sia irlandese, altri che sia una melodia irlandese su di un testo scozzese, (o viceversa), altri ancora dicono che sia del Sud dell’Inghilterra o del Galles, o di origini bretoni, ma la canzoncina è talmente popolare che a nessuno importa discutere sulla paternità delle origini. Più probabilmente è una filastrocca collettiva e archetipa di quelle che si ritrovano nei vari paesi europei, proveniente da una antichissima preghiera-canto, di quelle che si praticavano nelle celebrazioni rituali primaverili, ovvero quanto è sopravvissuto dell’insegnamento antico, per metafore, del ciclo vita-morte-vita.

albero celtaL’ALBERO COSMICO

Non si può non pensare all’albero cosmico come simbolo universale, ossia il punto di inizio assoluto della vita. Nel linguaggio simbolico, questo punto è l’ombelico del mondo, inizio e fine di tutte le cose, ma viene spesso immaginato come un asse verticale che, situato al centro dell’universo, attraversa il cielo, la terra e il mondo sotterraneo.

Come sintetizza con chiarezza Greta Fogliani nel suo “Alle radici dell’Albero cosmico” “Di per sé, l’albero non è propriamente un motivo cosmologico, perché è innanzi tutto un elemento naturale che, per i suoi attributi, ha assunto una funzione simbolica. L’albero, in quanto tale, si rigenera sempre con il passare delle stagioni: perde le foglie, secca, sembra morire, ma poi ogni volta rinasce e recupera il suo splendore.
Per queste sue caratteristiche, esso diventa non solo un elemento sacro, ma addirittura un microcosmo, perché nel suo processo di evoluzione rappresenta e ripete la creazione dell’universo. Inoltre, proprio per la sua estensione sia verso il basso sia verso l’alto, questo elemento ha finito inevitabilmente per assumere una valenza cosmologica, andando a costituire il perno dell’universo che attraversa cielo, terra e oltretomba e che funge da collegamento tra le zone cosmiche.”

Gustav Klimt: L’albero della vita, 1905

Dalle molteplici declinazioni pur mantenendo la stessa struttura, le melodie variano a seconda della provenienza, una polka in Irlanda, una strathspey in Scozia e una morris dance in Inghilterra.. Gli irlandesi non potevano non trasformarla in una drinking song come gioco-pretesto per abbondanti bevute (chi sbaglia beve).
Insomma paese che vai verso che trovi, ognuno ci ha aggiunto del suo.

RATTLIN’ BOG

MELODIA “STANDARD”: è quella irlandese che è una polka più o meno veloce

The Corries (molto comunicativi con il pubblico)

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula sempre più demenziale


CHORUS
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Buona palude,
la palude giù nella valle
speciale palude, la bella palude,
la palude giù nella valle
I
Nella palude c’è un buco
un buco speciale, un bel buco
il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
II
Nel buco c’è un albero
un albero speciale, un bell’albero,
l’albero nel buco, e il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
III
sull’albero c’è un ramo
sul ramo un rametto
sul rametto c’è un nido
nel nido c’è un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
sulla piuma un verme
sul verme un capello
sul capello un pidocchio
sul pidocchio una zecca
sulla zecca un eczema

NOTE
1) rattling si traduce genericamente come “fine” cioè “molto buono/bello”
2)  gli Irish Descendants dicono “limb” con lo stesso significato d i ramo
3) nella versione che circola a Dublino (anche se non unica, ad esempio si trova anche in Cornovaglia) diventa a flea (una pulce)

PREN AR Y BRYN

La versione gallese ha due percorsi associativi che hanno come centro l’albero, viene da pensare all’albero cosmico, l’albero della vita: l’albero che sta sulla collina che è nella valle accanto al mare. Così dice il refrain, mentre la seconda catena parte dall’albero e va al ramo, al nido, all’uovo, all’uccello alle piume, e al letto. E qui si ferma a volte aggiungendo una pulce per poi ritornare indietro all’albero.

Le versioni meno fanciullesche della canzone una volta arrivate al letto proseguono con considerazioni molto più carnali (la donna e l’uomo e poi il bambino che cresce e diventa adulto e dal braccio alla sua mano pianta il seme, dal quale cresce l’albero). Ancora viene in mente un modo divertente per insegnare le parole delle cose ai bambini, sempre però trasmettendo il messaggio che tutto è interconnesso e noi facciamo parte del tutto.

I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc, o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth, o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy, o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw, o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu, o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely, o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
Traduzione inglese
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea
The flea from the bed,
The bed from the feathers,
the feathers on the bird,
The bird from the egg,
The egg from the nest,
The nest on the bough,
The bough on the tree,
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
And the valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Che grande vecchio albero,
oh un bell’albero
l’albero sulla collina,
la collina nella valle,
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva
II
Dall’alvero venne un ramo
Oh bel ramo!
III
Dall’albero venne un nido,
Oh bel nido!
IV
Dal nido venneun uovo,
Oh bell’uovo!
V
Dall’uovo venne un uccello
Oh bell’uccello
VI
Dall’uovo vennero le piume;
oh belle piume
VII
dalle piume venne il letto
oh bel letto
VIII
Dal letto venne una pulce
una pulce dal letto
il letto dalle piume
le piume sull’uccello
l’uccello dall’uovo
l’uovo dal nido
il nido dal ramo
il ramo sull’albero
l’albero sulla collina
la collina nella valle
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni dal film Wicker Man


In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Nei boschi cresceva un albero
un bel bell’albero c’era
sull’abero c’era un ramo
e sul ramo c’era un rametto
sul rametto c’era un nido
nel nido c’era un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
e dalla piuma un
letto
sul letto c’era una ragazza
sulla ragazza c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo c’era un seme
e da quel seme c’era un ragazzo
e dal ragazzo c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo la tomba
dalla tomba cresceva
un albero
a Summerisle
Summerisle, Summerisle il bosco di Summerisle,
il bosco di Summerisle

NOTE
1) Summerisle è l’isola immaginaria dove si svolge il film

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

E’ la versione regionale italiana collezionata anche da Alan Lomax nel suo giro per l’Italia nel 1954. Di origine italiane Lomax era il nome dei Lomazzi emigrati in America nell’Ottocento.
Nel luglio del 1954 Alan arriva in Italia con l’intento di fissare su nastro magnetico la straordinaria varietà delle musiche della tradizione popolare italiana. Un viaggio di scoperta, dal nord al sud della penisola, a fianco del grande collega italiano Diego Carpitella che ha prodotto oltre duemila registrazioni in circa sei mesi di lavoro sul campo..

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn questa versione dall’albero si passa dai rami al nido e all’uovo e quindi all’uccellino. Il contesto è fresco, molto primaverile e pasquale.. per spiegare l’origine della vita e rispondere alle prime curiosità dei bambini sul sesso..
La canzoncina è finita nel repertorio degli scouts e nelle canzoni da oratorio e raduni giovani cattolici, ma anche tra le canzoncine dei centri-estivi e scuole dell’infanzia.

Un video trovato in rete proveniente dalla tradizione lombardo-emiliana.


In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in   mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
in mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
cʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in mezzo al prato, il prato intorno allʼalbero
e l
ʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera, allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano i brocchi, (1)i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e l’albero piantato in mezzo al prato
Attaccato ai brocchi indovina cosa c’era, cʼerano i rami, i rami attaccati ai  brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato ai rami indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano le foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
cʼera il nido, il nido in mezzo alle  foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro al nido indovina cosa cʼera,
cʼerano gli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro al nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano gli uccellini, gli uccellini dentro agli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro a nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami,
i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato

NOTE
1) è l’equivalente italiano del branch inglese: anche se in disuso il termine italiano “brocco” indica un ramo irto di spine e quindi per estensione un troncone di ramo, insomma i grossi rami che si dipartono dal tronco centrale dell’albero!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

Ovvero “The tree in the wood”, c’è un che di grembo, di riposo tombale in quel “e l’erba verde cresce tutt’intorno” ..

Luis Jordan

una versione per bambini


There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
C’era un albero
nei boschi
l’albero più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sull’albero
c’era un ramo
il ramo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sul ramo
c’era un nido
il nido più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nel nido
c’era un uvoo
l’uovo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nell’uovo
c’era un uccello
l’uccello più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
e sull’uccello
c’ara un ala
l’ala più graziosa
che si sia mai vista
e l’ala sull’uccello
l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.

FONTI
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

L’importanza di chiamarsi .. Reily

Read the post in English

TITOLI: A Fair Young Maid all in her Garden, There Was A Maid In Her Father’s Garden, Pretty, Fair Maid in the Garden, John Riley, Johnny Riley, The Broken Token, The Young and Single Sailor

La ballata è stata resa popolare con il titolo di John Reily  da Joan Baez  negli anni 60: è una classica storia d’amore  di probabili origini seicentesche, in cui la donna resta fedele al suo amante  o promesso sposo partito per la guerra o imbarcato su un vascello. La canzone  viene classificata come reily ballad  perchè è strutturata in forma di dialogo tra il protagonista (sotto mentite spoglie) in genere chiamato John o George, Willie o Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) e la donna, specchiato esempio di fedeltà. (prima parte continua)

SECONDA MELODIA

Il testo di questa versione mi ricorda la commedia di Oscar Wild, “L’importanza  di chiamarsi Onesto” (in inglese The Importance  of Being Earnest) il contraddittorio di Wilde a Shakespeare nella  famosa dichiarazione di Giulietta sul nome di Romeo:
Che cos’è un nome? La rosa avrebbe lo  stesso profumo anche se la chiamassimo in un altro modo.
Dunque cambia il  nome, Romeo, e amiamoci tranquillamente.
“.

E’ questa la melodia riportata  dalla tradizione americana come collezionata sul campo (Providence, Kentucky)  negli anni 30 da Alan Lomax. Così scrive Joe Hickerson nelle note della versione di Peggy Seeger
Ci sono due ballate intitolate “John (George) Riley” in American Balladry di G. Malcolm Laws dal British Broadsides (1957). Nel numero N36, l’uomo ritornato afferma che Riley è stato ucciso, in modo da mettere alla prova la costanza della sua fidanzata. Nel numero N37, che è la nostra ballata, non esiste tale rivendicazione. Piuttosto, lui suggerisce di salpare per la Pennsylvania; quando lei rifiuta, rivela la sua identità. Nelle molte versioni trovate, il cognome dell’uomo è scritto in vari modi, e in alcuni casi è “Young Riley”. Diversi studiosi citano una possibile origine nel “The Constant Damsel”, pubblicato in un libro di canzoni del 1791 a Dublino.
Peggy ha imparato la canzone durante l’infanzia da una registrazione sul campo dell’Archivio Folk della Biblioteca del Congresso: AFS 1504B1 come cantata dalla signora Lucy Garrison e registrata da Alan ed Elizabeth Lomax a Providence, nel Kentucky, nel 1937. Questa versione è stata trascritta da Ruth Crawford Seeger e inclusa in Our Our Countrying (1941) di John e Alan Lomax, p. 168. In precedenza, il primo versetto e la melodia raccolti dalla signora Garrison a Little Goose Creek, Manchester, Clay Co., Kentucky, nel 1917, apparivano in “English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians” (1932) di Cecil Sharp, vol. 2, p. 22. Il canto di Peggy è elencato come la fonte della ballata in pp. 161-162 de “The Folk Songs of North America” (1960) di Alan Lomax, con “melodie e accordi di chitarra trascritti da Peggy Seeger”. Nel 1964 è apparsa a p. 39 di Folk Songs di Peggy Seeger (Oak Publications, a cura di Ethel Raim). Peggy ha registrato su Folk-Lyric FL114, American Folk Songs per Banjo e suo fratello Pete ha incluso questa versione sul suo primo LP Folkways, FP 3 (FA 2003), Darling Corey (1950).”

Il dialogo tra i due sembra qui più una schermaglia tra  innamorati in cui lei si dimostra freddina e offesa,  mentre lui, ritornato dopo averla lasciata da sola per tre anni, scherzosamente  finge di non conoscerla e le chiede di sposarlo perchè  affascinato dalle sue grazie! Così alla fine lei cede e parafrasando Shakespeare dice “If you be he,  and your name is Riley..

Peggy  Seeger in “Heading for home”  2003


Pete Seeger in “Darling Corey/Goofing-Off Suite” 1993


I
As I walked out  one morning early
To take the  sweet and pleasant air
Who should I  spy but a fair young lady
Her cheeks  being like a lily fair.
II
I stepped up to  her, right boldly asking
Would she be a  sailor’s wife?
O no, kind sir, I’d rather tarry
And remain single for all my life.
III
Tell me, kind  miss, and what makes you differ
From all the rest of womankind?
I see you’re  fair, you are young, you’re handsome
And for to  marry might be inclined.
IV
The truth, kind  sir, I will plainly tell you
I might have  married three years ago
To one John  Riley who left this country
He is the cause of all my woe.
V
Come along with  me, don’t you think on Riley, Come along with  me to some distant shore;
We will set sail for Pennsylvanie
Adieu, sweet  England, forevermore.
VI
I’ll not go  with you to Pennsylvanie
I’ll not go  with you that distant shore;
My heart’s with  Riley, I will ne’er forget him
Although I may  never see him no more.
VII
And when he  seen she truly loved him
He give her  kisses, one two and three,
Says, I am  Riley, your own true lover
That’s been the  cause of your misery.
VIII
If you be he,  and your name is Riley,
I’ll go with  you to that distant shore.
We will set  sail to Pennsylvanie,
Adieu, kind friends, forevermore.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo di mattina presto
per prendere una boccata d’aria fresca
ho visto una  bella giovinetta
dalle guance del pallor di giglio.
II
Mi sono fermato facendomi coraggio per chiederle
Volete essere la sposa di un marinaio?
O no,  signore, piuttosto
resto sola per tutta la mia vita!
III
Ditemi,  gentile signorina, che cosa vi differisce
dal resto del genere femminile? 
Eppure voi siete bella e giovane e cara
e siete di certo incline al matrimonio
IV
In verità, gentile signore, vi parlerò chiaro:
avrei potuto sposarmi  tre anni fa
con John Riley che lasciò questo paese 
causandomi un grande dolore
V
Venite con me, e non pensate a Riley,
venite  con me in qualche lido lontano, 
salperemo per la Pensilvania 
e addio alla dolce Inghilterra per sempre
VI
Io non andrò con voi in Pensilvania
e non  verrò con voi in qualche lido lontano,
il mio cuore è di Riley e non lo scorderò mai,
anche se non potrò mai più rivederlo
VII
E quando vide  che lei era sinceramente innamorata di lui le diede uno, due e tre baci
Io sono Riley, il tuo vero amore
che è stato causa del  tuo dolore
VIII
Se siete lui e il vostro nome è Riley 
verrò con voi per qualche lido lontano,
salperò per la Pensilvania. 
Addio cari amici, per sempre!

TERZA MELODIA

In questa versione testuale l’identificazione  dell’uomo viene avvallata dall’anello che probabilmente i due fidanzatini si erano scambiati  come pegno d’amore prima della partenza. Una bella versione in stile Celtic Bluegrass!

Tim  O’Brien in Fiddler’s Green 2005


I
Pretty fair  maid was in her garden
When a stranger came a-riding by
He came up to the gate and called her
Said pretty  fair maid would you be my bride
She said I’ve a true love who’s in the army
And he’s been gone for seven long years
And if he’s  gone for seven years longer
I’ll still be waiting for him here
II
Perhaps he’s on some watercourse drowning
Perhaps he’s on some battlefield slain
Perhaps he’s to a fair girl married
And you may never see him again
Well if he’s  drown, I hope he’s happy
Or if he’s on some battlefield slain
And if he’s to some fair girl married
I’ll love the girl that married him
III
He took his hand out of his pocket
And on his finger he wore a golden ring
And when she saw that band a-shining
A brand new song her heart did sing
And then he  threw his arms all around her
Kisses gave her one, two, three
Said I’m your true and loving soldier
That’s come  back home to marry thee
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Una bella giovane  fanciulla era nel giardino quando un forestiero a cavallo
venne al cancello e  la chiamò
Disse “Bella fanciulla vuoi sposarmi?”
e lei rispose ”  Ho un amore che è militare,
ed è via da sette anni,
e anche se starà via  altri sette anni
lo aspetterò ancora qui”
II
“Forse è  annegato in qualche fiume
o deceduto su qualche campo di battaglia
o magari  ha sposato una bella ragazza
e tu potresti non vederlo più”
«Se lui è annegato  spero sia felice,
o se è caduto in qualche campo di battaglia;
e se ha  sposato un’altra bella ragazza,
io amerò la ragazza che lo ha sposato ”
III
Lui si tolse la mano  dalla tasca
e al dito portava un anello d’oro (1)
e quando lei vide quella verga  brillare
una nuova canzone il suo cuore cantò
e allora lui l’abbracciò
e le  diede uno, due e tre baci
“Io sono il tuo amato soldato
che è ritornato  per sposarti”

NOTE
1) è il segno di riconoscimento, l’anello che si sono scambiati il giorno della partenza

FONTI
http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/title/The%20constant%20maids%20resolution:%20or%20The%20damsels%20loyal%20love%20to%20a%20seaman
http://die-augenweide.de/byrds/songjk/john_riley.htm
http://peggyseeger.bandcamp.com/track/john-riley
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN37.html
http://www.folklorist.org/song/John_(George)_Riley_(I)
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_38.htm

Whiskey in the jar

work in progress

“Whiskey in the jar” (Kilgary Mountain), one of the most popular Irish pub songs, is the story of a outlaw who, after robbing an English landowner, is betrayed by his woman. Its weaknesses: barley juice and beautiful women!
“Whiskey in the jar” (Kilgary Mountain), tra le più cantate irish pub song,  è la storia di un bandito, che dopo aver derubato un possidente  inglese è tradito dalla propria donna. Le sue debolezze: il succo d’orzo e le belle donne!

fuorilegge-diligenzaLa vicenda risale probabilmente al 17° secolo e riecheggia la figura di Redmond O’Hanlon (c. 1620 – 1681) conosciuto come il Robin Hood dell’Ulster (Irlanda del Nord) perché oltre a derubare gli inglesi (o a fargli pagare una “tassa” di protezione perché nessuno li rapinasse), restituiva gli affitti pagati dai contadini irlandesi, rubandoli ai ricchi proprietari terrieri inglesi ai quali erano stati appena versati. Della ballata esistono varie versioni con diverse strofe, ma la storia mantiene sempre la stessa struttura e il finale è sempre la prigione.

beggar-opera

Alan Lomax, storico della musica folk, nel suo libro The Folk Songs of North America, ritiene che questa canzone abbia influenzato “The Beggar’s Opera” commedia scritta da John Gray nel 1728.
“Gli strati popolari delle isole britanniche nel diciassettesimo  secolo ammiravano i briganti locali; e in Irlanda (o Scozia) quando i  gentiluomini della strada rapinavano i possidenti inglesi erano considerati  patrioti. Questi sentimenti ispirarono questa allegra ballata.”

 

Il protagonista della canzone è probabilmente Richard Power, che lascia la contea di Kerry per unirsi ai fuorilegge capeggiati da O’Hanlon e deruba un soldato inglese (tra i bersagli preferiti), ma è catturato perché ingannato dalla bella Jenny (amante o fidanzata): durante la notte, mentre Richard smaltiva la sbornia, lei gli nasconde la spada e mette la polvere da sparo nell’acqua. Circondato dai soldati e impossibilitato a difendersi, Richard si arrende. L’unica sua speranza per evitare l’impiccagione è un fratello arruolato nell’esercito, che potrebbe riuscire a farlo fuggire!

LA VERSIONE FOLK (STANDARD)

Numerosissimi gli interpreti, a partire dagli storici The Dubliners e The Clancy Brothers..

Da seguire con il video animato da Francesco Guiotto

Tra le tante (ma proprio tante) versioni folk la mia preferita è quella dei The High Kings


I
As I was going  over the far famed Kerry mountains
I met with captain Farrell and his money he was counting.
I first produced my pistol, and then produced my rapier(1).
Said “stand and deliver, for I am a bold deceiver”
musha ring dumma do damma  da
whack for the daddy ‘o (2)
whack for the daddy ‘o
there’s whiskey in the jar (3)
II
I counted out  his money, and it made a pretty penny.
I put it in my pocket and I took it home to Jenny.
She said and she swore, that she never would deceive me,
but the devil take the women, for they never can be easy
III
I went into my  chamber, all for to take a slumber,
I dreamt of gold and jewels and for sure it was no wonder.
But Jenny took my charges and she filled them up with water,
Then sent for captain Farrel to be ready for the slaughter.
IV
It was early in  the morning, as I rose up for travel,
The guards were all around me and likewise captain Farrel (4).
I first produced my pistol, for she stole away my rapier,
But I couldn’t shoot the water (5) so a prisoner I was taken.
V
If anyone can aid  me, it’s my brother in the army,
If I can find his station down in Cork or in Killarney.
And if he’ll come and save me, we’ll go roving near Kilkenny,
And I swear he’ll treat me better than me darling sportling (6) Jenny
VI
Now some men  take delight in the drinking and the roving (7),
But others take delight in the gambling and the smoking (8).
But I take delight in the juice of the barley,
And courting pretty fair maids in the morning bright and early (9)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre stavo attraversando le famose montagne di Kerry
incontrai il capitano Farrell che contava il  suo gruzzolo.
Prima tirai fuori la pistola e poi lo spadino,
dissi “Fermo o sparo, perché io sono un bandito.”
Mush-a ring dum-a do dum-a da
Whack for my daddy-o
Whack for my daddy-o
C’è del whiskey nel boccale
II
Contai i soldi e facevano un buon penny,
me  li sono messi in tasca per portarli a casa da Jenny.
Sospirava e giurava che non mi avrebbe mai ingannato,
ma  il diavolo si prenda le donne, perché sono delle traditrici.
III
Andai nella mia camera, per farmi un pisolino,
sognai di oro e gioielli, c’era da spettarselo
Ma Jenny prese le cartucce e le bagnò nell’acqua,
poi invitò il Capitano Farrel a tenersi pronto per l’agguato.
IV
Era mattino presto, quando mi alzai per mettermi in viaggio.
ero circondato dalle guardie
Capitano Farrel compreso,
prima presentai la pistola, perché lei mi aveva rubato lo spadino.
ma ha fatto cilecca, così mi hanno fatto prigioniero.
V
Se c’è qualcuno in grado di aiutarmi, è mio fratello  nell’esercito,
se trovo dov’è di stanza, a Cork o in Killarney.
e se lui venisse salvarmi, andremo a zonzo per Kilkenny,
e sono certo che mi tratterà meglio della mia cara avversaria Jenny.
VI
Ad alcuni piace
bere e vagabondare,
ad altri piace il gioco d’azzardo e il fumo.
ma io traggo diletto nel succo d’orzo e nel corteggiare ragazze graziose la mattina di buon’ora

NOTE
1) rapier ovvero lo “spadino” vedi qui
2) alcuni vogliono trovare un senso nella frase e la traducono come “Lascio una parte (dei soldi) a mio papà”
3) In Gran Bretagna, “Jar” è  un barattolo dal collo largo, adatto per conservare marmellate e sottaceti,  ma anche un vaso rastremato a collo di bottiglia. Anticamente era utilizzato per lo stoccaggio di liquidi, e doveva essere consuetudine berci direttamente, e tuttavia il termine si usa più spesso per indicare un bicchiere: “I’ll have a jar” si traduce infatti con ” berrò una pinta di birra “. (anche se c’è più di un modo per misurare la pinta! vedi)
Gli Irlandesi si attribuiscono l’invenzione del whiskey partendo nientemeno che da San Patrizio che nel V sec, avrebbe portato dal pellegrinaggio in Terra Santa, l’alambicco, all’epoca utilizzato per distillare solo i profumi, e convertito dai monaci irlandesi in divina macchina per produrre l’Uisce Beathe (in gaelico acqua di vita).
Whiskey con una e aggiuntiva che lo differenzia dal cugino scozzese, sia per la sua lavorazione che per le sue caratteristiche organolettiche. continua
4) i Dubliners cantano invece “Up comes a band of footmen and likewise captain Farrell” (ero circondato un gruppo di soldati Capitano Farrel compreso)
5) letteralmente dice “ma non potevo sparare con l’acqua”
6) scritto anche come “ole a-sporting Jenny” nel senso della sporca traditice, letteralmente “vecchia rivale”
7) i Dubliners cantano invece “There’s some take delight in the carriages a rolling (c’è chi si diverte ad andare in giro in carrozza)
8) i Dubliners cantano invece “and others take delight in the hurling and the bowling”  (e chi si diverte a giocare a hurling o a bowling
9) è un modo di dire Bright and early (di buon ora)

LA VERSIONE FOLK-ROCK

Anche i gruppi rock si sono impadroniti di questa canzone e cito The Grateful Dead (ASCOLTA che peraltro hanno realizzato una godibilissima versione acustica un po’ bluegrass) e i Metallica (ASCOLTA una versione decisamente metal, ma ricordo che il riff della chitarra e l’arrangiamento è dei Thin Lizzy )

ASCOLTA The Thin Lizzy – 1972/73 (gruppo hard rock irlandese nato a Dublino nel 1969 e attivo fino agli anni 80)

In questa versione la bella si chiama Molly e la storia si ferma alla sparatoria con il quale il bandito cerca di sottrarsi alla cattura. La morale però è sempre la stessa: il succo d’orzo e le belle donne rendono l’uomo debole! Questa versione riveduta dai Thin Lizzy più che una”rebel song” sembra una storia di corna!

VERSIONE THE THIN LIZZY
I
As I was goin’ over the Cork and Kerry mountains
I saw Captain Farrell and his money he was countin’
I first produced my pistol and then produced my rapier
I said stand and deliver or the devil he may take ya
Chorus
Musha ring dum a doo dum a da Whack for my daddy-o
Whack for my daddy-o There’s whiskey in the jar-o
II
I took all of his money and it was a pretty penny
I took all of his money yeah I brought it home to Molly
She swore that she’d love me, never would she leave me
But the devil take that woman for you know she trick me easy
III
Being drunk and weary I went to Molly’s chamber
Takin’ my money with me and I never knew the danger
For about six or maybe seven in walked Captain Farrell
I jumped up, fired off my pistols and I shot him with both barrels
IV
Now some men like the fishin’ and some men like the fowlin’
And some men like ta hear, ta hear cannon ball a roarin’
Me I like sleepin’ specially in my Molly’s chamber
But here I am in prison, here I am with a ball and chain yeah
Traduzione italiano (da qui)
I
Stavo andando sulle montagne Cork e Ferry,
ho visto il Capitano Farrel e il suoi soldi che stava contando.
Prima ho mostrato la mia pistola e poi il mio spadino.
Ho detto fermati e consegnameli o il diavolo potrebbe prenderti.
Ritornello:
Musha ring dum a doo dum a da
Lascio una parte (dei soldi) a mio papà- o, Lascio una parte (dei soldi) a mio papà- o C’è del whiskey nella brocca- o
II
Ho preso tutti i suoi soldi ed era un bella sommetta.
Ho preso tutti i suoi soldi sì, li ho portati a casa da Molly.
Giurò che mi amava, non mi avrebbe mai voluto lasciare.
Ma il diavolo prese questa donna, sappiate che mi imbrogliò con facilità.
III
Sbronzo e stanco sono andato in camera da Molly.
Ho preso i miei soldi con me e non ho mai saputo il pericolo.
Verso le sei o sette circa entrò il Capitano Farrel.
Son saltato su, ho sparato con le mie pistole e l’ho ucciso con entrambe le canne.
IV
Ora ad alcuni uomini piace pescare ed ad altri andare a caccia di uccelli.
Ed ad alcuni uomini piace sentire, sentire il cannone sparare con fragore. Io amo dormire, specialmente nella camera della mia Molly.
Ma qui sono in prigione, sono qui son con una palla (al piede) e una catena che mi lega sì

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3116
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=36987&lang=it