Il Testamento dell’Avvelenato (The will of the poisoned man)

Leggi in italiano

A folk ballad that inaugurates a narrative genre collected in multiple variations called “The will of the poisoned man“: the story of a dying son, because he has been poisoned, who returns to his mother to die in his bed and make a will; in all likelihood the ballad starts from Italy, passes through Germany to get to Sweden and then spread to the British Isles (Lord Randal) until it lands in America.
This is how Riccardo Venturi teaches us “This ballad may have originated very far from the moors and lochs, and very close to our home [Italy].The poison, in fact, is a very strange weapon in the fierce ballads of Britain, where they kill themselves with sword, it is a subtle, ‘feminine’ means of killing, and it is not by chance that it has always been considered, on a popular level, a really Italian thing.

“The poisoned man”, or “The will of the poisoned man“, is an Italian ballad attested for the first time in a repertoire of popular songs published in 1629 in Verona by a Florentine, Camillo the Bianchino. It was then also reproduced by Alessandro d’Ancona in his essay “La poesia popolare italiana’: the author expresses the opinion that the original text was Tuscan and contains some versions from the Como area and Lucca. Translated in Folk-ballads of Southern Europe edited by Sophie Jewett, Katharine Lee Bates, 1913. (see)
To date there are almost 200 regional versions of this ballad, based on the dialogue between mother (or sometimes the wife) and son who in some regions is called Henry, in other Peppino in others, as in Canton Ticino, Guerino: other characters are the doctor, the confessor and the notary, only in the final we learn that his wife is the guilty (in some versions the sister or more rarely the mother)

EEL OR SNAKE?

The poisoning occurs by means of an eel. The eel was a very popular food in the Middle Ages, and consumed even in areas far from the sea, as it could be kept alive for a long time. But the eel has a serpentine aspect and in fact the capitone (ie the eel with the big head) is often compared, at least in Italy, to the male penis.
At first glance the poisoning could be a revenge by the wife or lover due to a betrayal and it comes a spontaneously parallel with another red thread traced for Europe( ” the Concealed Death“) indeed these ballads could originate from the same ancient mythological source: the hero goes hunting in the woods and is poisoned by a mysterious lady, then returns home and makes his will.
According to the psychoanalytic interpretation of Giordano Dall’Armellina in archetypal key, here we see the teaching-rite of passage that was given in ancient times through the telling. (see the italian text)

IL TESTAMENTO DELL’AVVELENATO

The melodies are very varied and range from lament to dance tunes.

Il canzoniere del Piemonte (in english: The songbook of Piedmont) voice Donata Pinti
In this version the dialogue is between wife and husband; they call the notary to make a will.

Costantino Nigra #26
“Moger l’ái tanto male,
signura moger”
«Coz’ l’as-to mangià a sinha
cavaliero gentil?»
«Mangià d’ün’ anguilëlla
che ‘l mi cör stà mal!”
“L’as-to mangià-la tüta
cavaliero gentil?»
«Oh sül che la testëta:
signora mojer”
«Coz’ l’as-to fáit dla resta
cavaliero gentil?»
«L’ái dà-la alla cagnëta:
signora mojer”
«Duv’ è-lo la cagnëta
cavaliero gentil?»
«L’è morta per la strada
signora mojer”
«Mandè a ciamè ’l nodaro
che ‘l mi cör stà mal!”
«Coz’ vos-to dal nodaro,
cavaliero gentil?»
«Voi fare testamento:
oh signur nodar»
«Coz’ lass-to ai to frateli,
cavaliero gentil?»
«Tante bele cassinhe (1)
oh signor notar”
«Coz’ lass-to ale tue sorele,
cavaliero gentil?»
Tanti bei denari (2)
oh signor notar»
«Coz’ lass-to a la to mare,
cavaliero gentil?»
“La chiave del mio cuore
oh signur nodar»
«Coz’ lass-to a tua mogera,
cavaliero gentil?»
«La forca da impichela:
oh signur nodar»
L’è chila ch’ l’à ‘ntossià-me
oh signur nodar»
english translation Cattia Salto *
“Oh wife, I’m in so much pain
My Lady Wife”
“What did you eat for dinner,
gentle knight?
“I ate a small eel,
and my heart is sick.
Did you eat it all?
gentle knight?”
“Oh only the head
My Lady Wife”
“What did you with the leavings,
gentle knight?”
“I gave them to my good hound
O Lady Wife”
“Where have you left your good hound,
gentle knight?”
“It fell dead in the roadway;
O Lady Wife”
“Go call the notary,
and my heart is sick.
“Wherefore do you need the notary?
o gentle knight?
“I must make my will
master notary”
“What will you leave your brothers
gentle knight?”
“I leave to them all my palaces (1);
master notary”
“What will you leave your sisters,
gentle knight?”
“A lot of money (2)
master notary”
“What will you leave your mother,
gentle knight?”
“The key of my heart
master notary”
“What will you leave your sweetheart,
gentle knight?”
“The gallows-tree to hang her;
master notary
She poisoned me
master notary”
NOTE
1) in italian cascina is a typical agricultural structure of the Po Valley: the lands and houses of the landlord belong to the male brothers
2)the dowry

i Gufi, Lombard area

Testamento dell’avvelenato (Nanni Svampa)
I
Dove sii staa jersira
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Dove sii staa jersira?
II
Son staa da la mia dama
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Son staa da la mia dama.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
III
Cossa v’halla daa de cena
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa v’halla daa de cena?
IV
On’inguilletta arrosto
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
On’inguilletta arrosto.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
V
L’avii mangiada tuta
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
L’avii mangiada tuta?
VI
Non n’ho mangiaa che meza
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Non n’ho mangiaa che meza.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
VII
Cossa avii faa dell’altra mezza
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa avii faa dell’altra mezza?
VIII
L’hoo dada alla cagnola,
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
L’hoo dada alla cagnola.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
IX
Cossa avii faa de la cagnola
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa avii faa de la cagnola?
X
L’è morta ‘dree a la strada,
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
L’è morta ‘dree a la strada.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XI
La v’ha giust daa ‘l veleno
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil,
la v’ha giust daa ‘l veleno?
XII
Mandee a ciamà ‘l dottore
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Mandee a ciamà ‘l dottore.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè.
XIII
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l dottore
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l dottore?
XIV
Per farmi visitare
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Per farmi visitare.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XV
Mandee a ciamà ‘l notaro
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Mandee a ciamà ‘l notaro.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XVI
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l notaro
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l notaro?
XVII
Per fare testamento
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Per fare testamento.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XVIII
Cossa lassee alli vostri fratelli
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alli vostri fratelli?
IX
Carozza coi cavalli
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Carozza coi cavalli.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XX
Cossa lassee alle vostre sorelle
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alle vostre sorelle?
XXI
La dote per maritarle
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
La dote per maritarle.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XXII
Cossa lassee alli vostri servi
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alli vostri servi?
XXIII
La strada d’andà a messa
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
La strada d’andà a messa.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XXIV
Cossa lassee alla vostra dama
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alla vostra dama?
XXV
La forca da impicarla
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
La forca da impicarla.
Ohimèèèè ch’io mooooooro, ohiiiiiiiimè!
english translation *
I
“Where were you yesterevening,
Dear son so fair and noble?
Where were you yesterevening?
II
“I have been with my sweetheart;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
I have been with my sweetheart;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
III
“What supper did she give you,
Dear son so fair and noble?
What supper did she give you?”
IV
“A little a-roasted eel;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
A little eel;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
V
“And did you eat the whole, then,
Dear son so fair and noble?
And did you eat the whole, then?”
VI
“Only the half I’ve eaten;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
Only the half I’ve eaten;
O woe is me! 0 woe is me! I die!”
VII
“What did you with the leavings,
Dear son so fair and noble?
What did you with the leavings?”
VIII
“I gave them to my good hound;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
I gave them to my good hound;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
IX
“Where have you left your good hound,
Dear son so fair and noble?
Where have you left your good hound?”
X
“It fell dead in the roadway;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
It fell dead in the roadway;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
XI
“Oh, she has given you poison,
Dear son so fair and noble!
Oh, she has given you poison!”
XII
“Now call to me the doctor;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
Now call to me the doctor;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
XIII
“Why do you want the doctor,
Dear son so fair and noble?
Why do you want the doctor?”
XIV
“That he may see what ails me;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
That he may see what ails me;
O woe is me! 0 woe is me! I die!
XV
“Now call to me a lawyer[1];
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
Now call to me a lawyer;
O woe is me! 0 woe is me! I die!”
XVI
“Why do you want a lawyer,
Dear son so fair and noble?
Why do you want a lawyer?”
XVII
“My will to draw and witness;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
My will to draw and witness;
O woe is me! 0 woe is me! I die!”
XVIII
“What will you leave your brothers,
Dear son so fair and noble?
What will you leave your brothers?”
XIX
“My carriage and my horses;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
My carriage and my horses;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
XX
“What will you leave your sisters,
Dear son so fair and noble?
What will you leave your sisters?”
XXI
“A dowry for their marriage;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
A dowry for their marriage;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
XXII
“What will you leave your servants,
Dear son so fair and noble?
What will you leave your servants?”
XXIII
“The road to go to mass on;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
The road to go to mass on;
O woe is me! 0 woe is me! I die!”
XXIV
“What will you leave your sweetheart,
Dear son so fair and noble?
What will you leave your sweetheart?”
XXV
“The gallows-tree to hang her;
O Lady Mother, sick at heart am I!
The gallows-tree to hang her;
O woe is me! O woe is me! I die!”
NOTE
1) in italian notaio= notary, solicitor

Monica Bassi & Bandabrian the version from the Veneto (sorrowful interpretation and beautiful black and white images)

La Piva dal Carner (later become BEV, Bonifica Emiliana Veneta), 1995. The Emilia version. Here the protagonist is a gallant knight named Enrico

Musicanta Maggio (Emilia area) in which also a dog dies poisoned for eating a piece of eel.

Angelo Branduardi in Futuro Antico III

Piva del Carner
I
Dov’è che sté ier sira,
fiól mio Irrico?
Dov’è che sté ier sira,
cavaliere gentile?
Sun ste da me surèla,
mama la mia mama
sun ste da me surèla
che il mio core sta male.
II
Che t’à dato da cena,
fiól mio Irrico?
Che t’à dato da cena
cavaliere gentile?
Un’anguillina arosto,
mama la mia mama
un’anguillina arosto
che il mio core sta male.
III
Dove te l’ha condita,
fiól mio Irrico?
Dove te l’ha condita,
cavaliere gentile?
In un piattino d’oro,
mama la mia mama
in un piattino d’oro
che il mio core sta male.
IV
Che parte è stè la tua,
fiól mio Irrico?
Che parte è stè la tua,
cavaliere gentile?
La testa e non la coda,
mama la mia mama
la testa e non la coda
che il mio core sta male.
V
Andè a ciamèr al prete,
mama la mia mama
andè a ciamèr al prete
che il mio core sta male.
Sin vot mai fèr dal prete,
fiól mio Irrico?
sin vot mai fèr dal prete,
cavaliere gentile?
VI
Mi devo confessare,
mama la mia mama
Mi devo confessare,
che il mio core sta male
m’avete avvelenato
mama la mia mama
m’avete avvelenato
e il mio core sta male.
english translation from here
I
Where were you yesterday evening,
my son Enrico?
Where were you,
o gentle knight?
I went to see my sister,
o mother
I went to see my sister
and my heart is sick.
II
What did she give you for dinner,
Enrico my son?
What did she give you for dinner,
o gentle knight?
A small roasted eel,
o mother
A small roasted eel
and my heart is sick.
III
Where did she prepare it,
my son Enrico?
Where did she prepare it,
o gentle knight?
In a gold saucer,
o mother
In a gold saucer,
and my heart is sick.
IV
Which part was yours,
Enrico my son?
Which part was yours,
o gentle knight?
The head and not the tail,
o mother
The head and not the tail
and my heart is sick.
V
Go call the priest,
o mother
Go call the priest
and my heart is sick.
Wherefore do you need the priest,
Enrico my son?
Wherefore do you need the priest,
o gentle knight?
VI
I must be confessed,
o mother
I must be confessed,
and my heart is sick.
You poisoned me,
o mother
You poisoned me
and my heart is sick.

Another version comes from Riolunato sung with the idiom of Fanano (Mo)
Francesco Benozzo in Terracqueo 2013

SOURCES
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio2.htm
https://igiornicantati.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/ballata-narrativa/

Translation 
https://mudcat.org/detail.cfm?messages__Message_ID=3938306
https://mudcat.org/detail.cfm?messages__Message_ID=3938482

Concealed death: french, breton and occitan ballads

Leggi in Italiano

 Concealed death

LORD OLAF AND THE ELVES 
SCANDINAVIAN VARIANTS
BRITISH AND AMERICAN VERSIONS
FRENCH VERSIONS
ITALIAN VERSION

Professor Child collected the summary of a version from Brittany that is likely to be the link between the Scandinavian variants and the south of Europe ones.

BRETON TALE: The Count Nann

The count Nann and his wife were married at the respective ages of thirteen and twelve. The next year a son was born. The young husband asked the countess if she had a fancy for anything. She said that she should like a bit of game, and he took his lance and went to the wood. At the entrance of the wood he met a fairy (a dwarf in other versions). The fairy said that she had long been looking for him. “Now that I have met you, you must marry me.” “Marry you? Not I. I am married already.” “Choose either to die in three days or to lie sick in bed seven (three in other versions) years” and then die. He would rather die in three days, for his wife is very young, and would suffer greatly. On reaching home the young man called to his mother to make his bed; he should never get up again. He recounted his meeting with the fairy, and begged that his wife might not be informed of his death.
The countess asked: “What has happened to my husband that he doesn’t come home to see me?” She was told that he had gone to the wood to get her something. “Why were the men-servants weeping?” The best horse had been drowned in bathing him. She said they were not to weep; others should be brought. “Why were the maids weeping?” Linen had been lost in washing. They must not weep the loss would be supplied. “Why are the priests chanting (or the bells tolling)?” A poor person whom they had lodged had died in the night. “What dress should she wear for her churching – red or blue?” The custom had come in of wearing black.
On arriving at the church she saw that the earth had been disturbed; why was this? “I can no longer conceal it”, said her mother-in-law: “Your husband is dead.” “Take my keys, take care of my son; I will stay with his father.” (from here)

We find the same story in the French medieval ballad Le Roi Renaud which in the Occitan language becomes Comte Arnau (Arnau is Renaud). The rediscovery of the ballad of medieval origin takes place in full romantic fervor from the nationalisms and the antiquarian taste of traditional songs. I therefore refer to the excellent treatment of Christian Souchon for all the interweaving and in-depth analysis on the subject of Concealed Death  in  France (here).

Breton Ballad: An Aotrou Nann hag ar Gorrigan

In Brittany the ballad “Aotroù Nann” (Sir Nann and the Fairy) is circulated in dozens of versions but the pattern is always identical: the meeting with the fairy, the refusal of the knight, the choice to die slowly among the toments or by a fulminant death and the concealment of knight death to his young bride about to give birth. The rest are details varied according to singer taste. (see here and here).

Gwennyn from Avalon 2017  (track 8)
(under review)

FRENCH VERSION: LE ROI RENAUD

The French version sends king back home from war, wounded to death. (no enchanted forest and fairy here!) To his queen they concealed his death until his burial,probably because they do not want to create complications in the imminence of childbirth. However, after giving birth and finally getting out of bed to go to mass (and after a kilometer ballad full of concealment) The ballad ends tragically with queen who invokes death and immediately the earth opens up from under her feet swallowing her.

Even today the ballad is sung by folk singers  with medieval-inspired arrangements.
Pierre Bensusan
Le Poème Harmonique from Aux marches du palais


I
Le roi Renaud de guerre vint
tenant ses tripes dans ses mains.
Sa mère était sur le créneau
qui vit venir son fils Renaud.
II
– Renaud, Renaud, réjouis-toi!
Ta femme est accouché d’un roi!
– Ni de ma femme ni du fils
je ne saurais me réjouir.
III
Allez ma mère, allez devant,
faites-moi faire un beau lit blanc.
Guère de temps n’y resterai:
à la minuit trépasserai.
IV
Mais faites-le moi faire ici-bas
que l’accouchée n’l’entende pas.
Et quand ce vint sur la minuit,
le roi Renaud rendit l’esprit..
V
Il ne fut pas le matin jour
tous les valets pleuraient très tous.
Il ne fut temps de déjeuner
que les servantes ont pleuré.
VI
– Mais dites-moi, mère, m’amie,
que pleurent nos valets ici ?
– Ma fille, en lavant nos chevaux
ont laissé noyer le plus beau.
VII
– Oh pourquoi donc, mère m’amie,
pour un cheval pleurer ainsi ?
Quand Renaud reviendra,
plus beaux chevaux ramènera.
VIII
– Et dites-moi, mère m’amie,
que pleurent nos servantes ici ?
– Ma fille, en lavant nos linceuls
ont laissé aller le plus neuf.
XIX
– Oh pourquoi donc, mère m’amie,
pour un linceul pleurer ainsi ?
Quand Renaud reviendra,
plus beau linceul ramènera.
X
– Ah, dites-moi, mère m’amie,
Qu’est-ce que j’entends cogner ici ?
– Ma fille, ce sont les charpentiers
Qui raccommodent le plancher.
XI
– Ah ! Dites-moi, mère m’amie,
Pourquoi les cloches sonnent ici ?
– Ma fille, c’est la procession
Qui sort pour les rogations.  (1)
XII
– Mais, dites-moi, mère m’amie,
C’est que j’entends chanter ici ?
– Ma fille, c’est la procession
Qui fait le tour de la maison.
XIII
Or quand ce fut passé huit jours,
A voulut faire ses atours.
Or, quand ce fut pour relever,
à la messe  (2) elle voulut aller,
XIV
– Mais dites-moi, mère m’amie,
quel habit mettrai-je aujourd’hui ?
– Mettez le blanc, mettez le gris,
mettez le noir pour mieux choisir.
XV
– Mais dites-moi, mère m’amie,
qu’est-ce que ce noir-là signifie
– A femme relèvant d’enfant,
le noir lui est bien plus séant.
XVI
Mais quand elles fut parmi les champs,
Trois pastoureaux allaient disant :
– Voici la femme du seignour
Que l’on enterra l’autre jour !
XVII
– Ah ! Dites-moi, mère m’amie,
Que disent ces pastoureaux-ci ?
– Il disent de presser le pas,
Ou que la messe n’aura pas.
XVIII
Or quand elle fut dans l’église entrée,
un cierge on lui a présenté.
Aperçoit en s’agenouillant
la terre fraîche sous son banc.
XIX
– Ah ! Dites-moi, mère m’amie,
pourquoi la terre est rafraîchie?
– Ma fille, ne puis plus vous celer,
Renaud est mort et enterré.
XX
Puisque le roi Renaud est mort,
voici la clé (3) de mon trésor.
Voici mes bagues et mes joyaux,
prenez bien soin du fils Renaud.
XXI
Terre, ouvre-toi, terre fends-toi,
que j’aille avec Renaud, mon roi!
Terre s’ouvrit, et se fendit,
et ci fut la belle engloutie.
English translation*
I
King Renaud comes back from the war,
Holding his guts in his hands.
His mother who was on the battlement, Saw her son Renaud come.
II
– Renaud, Renaud, cheer you up!
Your wife has given birth to a king!
– Neither for my wife, nor for my son,
May I cheer up.
III
Go, my mother, hurry up.
Have a fine white bed set ready for me;
I have short time to remain here:
By midnight I shall pass away.
IV
But have it done it down here
So my wife in childbirth will not hear!
And when midnight came,
King Renaud gave back his soul.
V
Morning had not broken yet,
And soon the valets were all weeping.
And even before breakfast,
All the maidservants have wept.
VI
– Tell me my mother dear,
What are our valets weeping for?
– My daughter, while washing our horses,
They let the finest drown.
VII
– And why, mother dear,
Such a weeping for a horse?
When King Renaud comes back,
He will bring finer horses.
VIII
– Ah! Tell me, my mother dear,
why do our women servants weep?
– Dear, while washing our linen sheets
they have lost the newest.
XIX
-And why, mother dear,
should they weep so for a linen sheet?
When King Renaud returns,
he will buy finer linen sheets.
X
– Ah! Tell me, my mother dear,
What are those beatings I hear?
– My daughter, it’s the carpenters
Repairing the floor.
XI
– Ah! Tell me, mother dear
What do I hear ringing here?
– My daughter, it is the procession,
Going out for the rogations.(1).
XII
– Ah! Tell me, mother dear,
What are the priests singing here?
– My daughter, it is the procession,
Turning round the house.
XIII
And when eight days had passed,
She wanted to dress up to the nines.
And when she could get up
She wanted to go to the Mass.
XIV
-Ah! Tell me mother dear,
Which dress shall I wear today?
– Wear the white, wear the grey,
Wear the black to choose best
XV
– Ah! Tell me mother dear,
What does this black mean?
-To a woman who has given birth to a child,
Black is the most convenient.
XVI
But when they were amidst the fields
Three shepherds were saying:
-Look at the wife of that lord
Who was buried the other day!
XVII
-Ah! Tell me mother dear,
What are those shepherds saying?
_ They say to hurry up,
Otherwise we’ll miss the Mass.
XVIII
When she stepped inside the church
She was given a church candle.
he realized, while kneeling,
That the earth was fresh under her bench.
XIX
– Ah, Tell me, mother dear
Why is the earth fresh here?
– My daughter, I cannot hide it any longer:
Renaud is dead and buried.
XX
Since King Renaud is dead,
Here are the keys to my treasure.
Take my rings and my jewels,
Feed well Renaud’s son!
XXI
Earth, open up! Earth, burst open!
Let me join Renaud, my king!
Earth opened up, earth burst open,
And the beauty was swallowed.

NOTES
* from here and here
1) the rogations were processional chants mixed with prayers with which they went to bless the fields in the three days before Ascension (continued)
2) at one time woman was considered impure after childbirth and she could return to the community only after 40 days. The ballad reflects an archaic conception of woman in marriage: her only role is to generate descent and her destiny is to follow her husband in death. In reality, in the Middle Ages, high-ranking widows were conveniently remarried or sended in a convent.
3) the married woman was entrusted with house keys, pantry and wardrobe and they hanged them on the belt as a hallmark of their rank
4) holy ground for church

OCCITAN VERSION: LO COMTE ARNAUD

We realize immediately that death does not occur because of an evil mermaid or fairy. The war is responsible for the tragedy. The tale becomes more realistic and universal and stresses on the dramatisation by focusing more on the concealed death.
Arnau joins in a war, he is wounded and comes back at the beginning of summer (on Saint John’s day). He asks to have his bed made and after his last conversation with his mother he announces his death. Once the magical elements have been disregarded and substituted by a more realistic view of life, the second part can continue by adapting the version from Brittany to the story. The most important difference is that the hero’s wife has just given birth to a child. That makes the story more dramatic and the concealed death creates a sympathetic suspense in the audience until it is revealed. This is a common trait in most European variants. Another curiosity found in most versions concerns the dress she will have to wear while going to church: it must be black! It is basically a theatrical device. The listeners of ballads used to visualize the story with their third eye and could “see” the mother in law who actually spoke to them. It was as if she said: “You and I know why I have answered so.” The story is then similar to a Greek tragedy, like Oedipus King. We know the truth, but the characters do not; the truth will be revealed only in the topic and dramatic moment of the tragedy. In both cases the concealed truth gives vent to pietas as sympathetic attention toward the fragile and mortal. It is in this way that the tragedy of Arnau’s wife, amplified by the birth of a child, becomes a projection of something already lived, or hypothetically lived, in which we all recognize ourselves. With all the other listeners we become a sort of silent Greek chorus expressing a feeling of pietas. (from here)
Rosina de Pèira & Martina from Cançons de femnas 1980


I
Lo comte Arnau, lo chivalièr,
dins lo Piemont va batalhier.
Comte Arnau, ara tu ten vas;
digas-nos quora tornaras.
II
Enta Sant Joan ieu tornarai
e mort o viu  aici serai.
Ma femna deu, enta Sant Joan
me rendre lo pair d’un bel enfant.
III
Mas la Sant Joan ven d’arribar,
lo Comte Amau ven a mancar.
Sa mair, del pus naut de l’ostal,
lo vei venir sus son caval.
IV
“Mair, fasetz far prompte lo leit
que longtemps non i dormirai.
Fasetz-lo naut, fasetz-lo bas,
Que ma miga n’entenda pas.”
V
Comte Arnau, a que vos pensatz
qu’un bel enfant vos quitariatz?
Ni per un enfant ni per dus,
mair, ne ressuscitarai plus.
VI
“Mair, que es aquel bruch dins l’ostal?
Sembla las orasons d’Arnau.
La femna que ven d’enfantar
orasons non deu escotar.”
VII
“Mair, per la festa de deman
quina rauba me botaran?
La femna que ven d’enfantar
la rauba negra deu portar!”
VIII
“Mair, porque tant de pregadors?
Que dison dins las orasons?”
Dison: la que ven d’enfantar
a la misseta deu anar.
IX
A la misseta ela se’n va,
vei lo Comt’ Arnau enterar.
“V’aqui las claus de mon cinton,
mair, torni plus a la maison.”
X
“Terra santa, tel cal obrir,
Voli parlar a mon marit;
Terra santa, te cal barrar,
amb Arnau voli demorar.
English translation*
I
Earl Arnau, the knight
Joins in a war in Piedmont.
“Earl Arnau, now you are going;
Tell us when you come back.”
II
“I’ll come back before Saint John’s day.
Either dead or alive I will be here.
My wife, just before Saint John’s day,
Will make me father of a beautiful son.”
III
But Saint John’s day comes,
Earl Arnau is missing.
His mother sees him coming on horseback
From the top of the house.
IV
“Mother have my bed made,
I won’t sleep long.
Make it high or make it low,
Provided that my wife doesn’t hear.”
V
“Earl Arnau, what are you thinking of,
That you will leave your beautiful son?”
Neither for one son, nor for two,
Mother, I won’t raise from the dead.”
VI
“Mother what’s that noise in the house?
It sounds as if they were Arnau’s prayers.”
“Woman who has just given birth to a child
Must not listen to prayers.”
VII
“Mother, for tomorrow’s feast,
What will they wear me with?”
Woman who has just given birth to a child,
Must wear a black dress!”
VIII
“Mother, why so many people praying?
What do they say in the prayers?”
“They say: who has given birth to a child/Must go to the Mass.”.
IX
She goes to the Mass
Sees Earl Arnau buried:
“Here is the key of my belt,
I won’t come back home anymore.”
X
“Holy land, you must open up,
I want to talk to my husband.
Holy land, you must close,
With Arnau I want to remain.”

NOTE
* (from here)

Version from Piedmont (Italy)

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/nann.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/nannf.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/trador.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/roirenau.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/arnaud.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=2499
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=1049&lang=it
http://www.coroasiago.it/rinaldo.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8862

The Concealed Death: Re Giraldin

Leggi in Italiano

 Concealed death

LORD OLAF AND THE ELVES 
SCANDINAVIAN VARIANTS
BRITISH AND AMERICAN VERSIONS
FRENCH VERSIONS
ITALIAN VERSION

Just as professor Child also Costantino Nigra brings back the theme of concealed death by a story of the old farmers of Castelnuovo.

The fairy’s present

rackham_fairy There was a hunter who often hunted on the mountainside. Once he saw a very beautiful and richly dressed woman under a rock bottom. The woman, who was a fairy, nodded to the hunter to approach and asked him to take her as his wife. The hunter told her he was just married and did not want to leave his young bride. The fairy gives him a casket containing a gift for the young wife, and advises him to hand it out only to her and by no means to open it. Of course, on his way home he cannot refrain from opening it and finds a splendid belt interwoven with gold and silver threads. Just to know what it will look like when worn by his wife, he ties it round the trunk of a tree. Suddenly the belt catches fire when the tree is hit by a flash of lightning. The hunter is hit, too and he hardly manages to drag himself home. He crumbles on his bed and dies.

Arthur_Rackham_1909_Undine_(7_of_15)In the Breton and Piedmontese version, the accent is placed more precisely on the second part of the story, that of the Concealed Death, a tipicall feature in all Romance languages of the ballad: Comte Arnau (in the Occitan version), Le Roi Renaud (the French one) and Re Gilardin (the Piedmontese one). The relationship between the knight-king and the fairy-mermaid is more nuanced than the Nordic versions, it seems to prevail a more “catholic” and intransigent view on sexual relations … in fact in the ballad greenwood and fairy disappear while the knight returns from the war wounded to death.

RE GILARDIN

La Ciapa Rusa (founders Maurizio Martinotti and Beppe Greppi) made many ethnographic researches with the elderly singers and the players of the musical tradition of the Four provinces -to be precise in Alta Val Borbera – a mountain area straddling four different provinces Al, Ge, Pv and Pc.
The ballad of medieval high origin, had already been collected and published in different versions by Costantino Nigra in his “Popular Songs of Piedmont”

The Ciapa Rusa in 1982 makes an initial arrangement of Re Gilardin
In this first version there is a sort of dramatic representation with the narrating voice (Alberto Cesa) the king (Maurizio Martinotti), the mother, the widow, the altar boy. We can imagine all the most tragic and comical scenes – turned into horror with the dead man who snatches a last kiss from his widow!

La Ciapa Rusa from  “Ten da chent l’archet che la sunada l’è longa – Canti e danze tradizionali dell’ alessandrino” 1982: compared to the translation, it seems more like a “literary” language than a dialect.

Gordon Bok and hig group, 1988 ♪ 
they follow with a good skill the Piedmontese version and in the notes Gordon says he has received the Ciapa Rusa version through the Italian music journalist Mauro Quai

The group refounded with the name of Tendachent (remain Maurizio Martinotti – ghironda and voice, Bruno Raiteri -violin and viola- and Devis Longo – voice, keyboards and flutes) again proposes the ballad in theri first album “Ori pari”, 2000 , with a more progressive sound (now the group is called Nord-Italian progressive folk-rock)

Donata Pinti from “Io t’invoco, libertà!: La canzone piemontese dalla tradizione alla protesta” 2010 ♪ featuring Silvano Biolatti on the guitar

RE GILARDIN*
I
Re Gilardin, lü ‘l va a la guera
Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada
(Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada)
O quand ‘l’è stai mità la strada(1)
Re Gilardin ‘l’è restai ferito.
Re Gilardin ritorna indietro
Dalla sua mamma vò ‘ndà a morire.
II
O tun tun tun, pica a la porta
“O mamma mia che mi son morto”.
“O pica pian caro ‘l mio figlio
Che la to dona ‘l g’à ‘n picul fante(2)”
“O madona la mia madona(3)
Cosa vol dire ch’i  sonan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria al tuo fante”
III
“O madona la mia madona
Cosa vol dire ch’i cantan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria ai soldati
“O madona , la mia madona
Disem che moda ho da vestirmi”
“Vestati di rosso, vestati di nero
Che le brunette stanno più bene”
IV
O quand l’è stai ‘nt l üs de la chiesa
D’un cirighello si l’à incontrato
“Bundì bongiur an vui vedovella”
“O no no no che non son vedovella
g’l fante in cüna e ‘l marito in guera”
“O si si si che voi sei vedovella
Vostro marì l’è tri dì che ‘l fa terra”
V
“O tera o tera apriti ‘n quatro
Volio vedere il mio cuor reale”
“La tua boca la sa di rose(4)
‘nvece la mia la sa di terra”
English translation**
I
King Gilardin was in the war,
Was in the war wielding his word.
(Was in the war wielding his word.)
When he was Midway, upon the journey, King Gilardin was wounded.
King Gilardin goes back home,/At his mother’s house he whished to die.
II
Bang, bang! He thumped at the door.
“O Mother, I am near to die.”
“Don’t thump so hard, my son,
Your wife has just given birth to a boy.”
“My Lady my mother-in-law
What does all their chanting mean?”
“O my daughter-in-law,
They want to feast your baby.”
III
“My Lady my mother-in-law
What does all their singing mean?”
“O my daughter-in-law,
They want to entertain the soldiers.”
“My Lady my mother-in-law
Tell me, how shall I dress?”
“Dress in red or dress in black,
It fits brunettes perfectly .”
IV
When she came to the church gate,
She encountered an altar boy:
“A wish you a good day, new widow.”
“By no means am I a new widow,
I’ve a child in its cradle and a husband at war.”
“O yes, you are a new widow,
Your husband was buried three days ago.”
V
“O earth, open up in four corners!
I want to see the king of my heart.”
“Your mouth has a taste of rose,
Whereas mine has a taste of earth.”

NOTES
* (From an original recording by Maurizio Martinotti in the upper Val Borbera)
** (revised by here)
1) it’s inevitable remembering Dante “Midway, upon the journey of our life” (with forest corollary), in this context it’s a point that changes forever the life of the king, or the hero.
2) probably he knew about his fatherhood at the time of his death
3) in the answers the real reason for the preparations is hidden: the king’s funeral is being set up
4) it is the dead king who speaks to his wife, but also the popular wisdom, the tearful burial times are still to come .. In the French (and Occitan) version of Re Renaud the earth opens up to swallow up the lady

RE ARDUIN

Cantovivo recorded the same ballad with the title “King Arduin” already collected from the oral tradition by Franco Lucà, in 1984 to Alpette Canavese, performer Battista Goglio “Barba Teck” (1898-1985)

RE ARDUIN
I
Re Arduin (1) a ven da Turin
Re Arduin a ven da Turin
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
II
“O mamma mia preparmi ‘l let
La cuerta noira e i linsöi di lin
III
O mamma mia cosa diran
Le fije bele ca na stan lì”
IV
“O no no no parla en tan
La nostra nora l’à avù n’infan”
V
“O mamma mia (2) disimi ‘n po’
Che i panatè a na piuren tan”
VI
“A l‘àn brüsà tüti i biciulan (3)
L‘è par sulì c’a na piuren tan”
VII
“O mamma mia cosa diran
Perché da morto na sunen tan”
VIII
“Sarà mort prinsi o quai signor
Tüte le cioche a i fan unur”
IX
“Re Arduin a ven da Turin
L‘è ndà a la guera l’è stai ferì”
X
“O tera freida apriti qui
Ch io vada col mio marì”
English Translation Cattia Salto
I
King Arduin comes from Turin
King Arduin comes from Turin
comes from the war and he was wounded, comes from the war and he was wounded
II
O mother dear, prepare me my bed
the black blanket and linen sheets
III
O mother dear what will they say
the fine ladies who stay there?
IV
Do not talk a lot / our daughter in law has had a baby
V
O  mother dear tell me why the bakers so cry?
VI
They burned all their breads
for they cry so much
VII
O mother dear what’s the news
for stroking the funeral bells?
VIII
The prince or some Lord will be dead/ all the bells do him honor
IX
King Arduin comes from Turin
comes from the war and he was wounded,
X
O  earth, open up now
that I’ll go with my husband

NOTES
* from here
1) King Arduin (Marquis of Ivrea and first king of Italy) is still extremely popular in the Canavese, tributing him in many historical re-enactments
2) in reality it is the daughter-in-law who asks for information on the laments and the dead bells (theme of hidden death) while in the first part (verses II and III) it is Arduino who speaks. Only in the 9th stanza is the death of Arduino announced
3) the “bicciolani” are biscuits typical of Vercellese, but in Turin the biciulan are long and thin breads (a bit pot-bellied in the middle and thin at the tips) the Piedmontese version of the baguette!

LINK
https://minimazione.wordpress.com/2007/08/22/re-gilardin-alla-guerra/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=1048
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/italren.htm
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio1.htm
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/child-ballads-v2/child8-v2%20-%200371.htm
http://amischanteurs.org/wp-content/uploads/Canti-di-Donata-Pinti.pdf

La morte occultata nelle ballate piemontesi: Re Giraldin

Read the post in English

IL TEMA DELLA MORTE OCCULTATA

LORD OLAF E GLI ELFI DEL BOSCO 
VARIANTI SCANDINAVE
VERSIONI ISOLE BRITANNICHE E AMERICA 
VERSIONI FRANCIA
VERSIONE PIEMONTE

Così come il professor Child anche il nostro Costantino Nigra riporta il tema della Morte occultata da un racconto delle vecchie contadine di Castelnuovo.

IL DONO DELLA FATA

rackham_fairyC’era un cacciatore che cacciava spesso per la montagna. Una volta vide sotto una balza una donna molto bella e riccamente vestita. La donna, che era una fata, accennò al cacciatore di avvicinarsi e lo richiese di nozze. Il cacciatore le disse che era ammogliato e non voleva lasciare la sua giovane sposa. Allora la fata gli diede una scatola chiusa, dicendogli che dentro v’era un bel dono per la sua sposa; e gli raccomandò di consegnare la scatola a questa, senza aprirla. Il cacciatore partì colla scatola. Strada facendo, la curiosità  lo spinse a vedere che cosa c’era dentro. L’aperse, e ci trovò una stupenda cintura, tinta di mille colori, tessuta d’oro e d’argento. Per meglio vederne l’effetto, annodò la cintura a un tronco d’albero. Subitamente la cintura s’infiammò e l’albero fu fulminato. Il cacciatore, toccato dal folgore, si trascinò fino a casa, si pose a letto e morì

Nella versione bretone e piemontese della storia si pone maggiormente l’accento proprio sulla seconda parte della storia, quello della Morte Occultata, caratteristica che permea un po’ tArthur_Rackham_1909_Undine_(7_of_15)utte le versioni della ballata nelle lingue romanze:  Comte Arnau (nella versione occitana), Le Roi Renaud (quella francese) e Re Gilardin (quella piemontese). La relazione tra il cavaliere-re e la fata-sirena è più sfumata rispetto alle versioni nordiche, sembra prevalere una visione più “cattolica”  e intransigente in merito alle relazioni sessuali… infatti nella ballata bosco e  fata scompaiono mentre il cavaliere ritorna dalla guerra ferito a morte.

RE GILARDIN

Il gruppo alessandrino La Ciapa Rusa (fondatori Maurizio Martinotti e Beppe Greppi) raccolse sul campo -tra le tante ricerche etnografiche presso gli anziani cantori e i suonatori della tradizione musicale delle Quattro province,il canto popolare Re Gilardin. (per la precisione in Alta Val Borbera -area appartenente dal punto di vista della tradizione musicale alle Quattro Province, una zona pedo-montana a cavallo di quattro diverse province Al, Ge, Pv e Pc.)
La ballata di origine alto medievale, era già stata raccolta e pubblicata in diverse versioni da Costantino Nigra nel suo “Canti popolari del Piemonte”

La Ciapa Rusa nel 1982 ne fa un primo arrangiamento.
In questa prima versione è allestita una sorta di  rappresentazione drammatica sul modello  delle compagnie dei guitti di un tempo con la voce narrante, il re, la madre, la vedova, il chierichetto in chiesa. Ci possiamo immaginare tutta la sceneggiata più tragica che comica – virata in horror con il morto che strappa un ultimo bacio alla sua vedova!!

La Ciapa Rusa in “Ten da chent l’archet che la sunada l’è longa – Canti e danze tradizionali dell’ alessandrino” 1982. La lingua usata è un italiano piemontizzato o viceversa, si confronti con la traduzione, sembra più un linguaggio “letterario” che dialettale.

Gordon Bok e il suo gruppo, 1988 ♪ 
ricalcano con una discreta bravura la versione piemontese e nelle note Gordon dice di aver ricevuto la versione della Ciapa Rusa tramite il giornalista musicale italiano Mauro Quai

Il gruppo rifondatosi con il nome di Tendachent (restano Maurizio Martinotti – ghironda e canto, Bruno Raiteri -violino e viola- e Devis Longo – canto, tastiere e fiati) ripropone ancora la ballata nel primo album della  nuova formazione “Ori pari“, 2000, con un sound più progressive (ora il gruppo è definito folk-rock progressivo nord-italiano)

Donata Pinti in “Io t’invoco, libertà!: La canzone piemontese dalla tradizione alla protesta” 2010 ♪ con l’accompagnamento alla chitarra di Silvano Biolatti

RE GILARDIN*
I
Re Gilardin, lü ‘l va a la guera
Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada
(Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada)
O quand ‘l’è stai mità la strada(1)
Re Gilardin ‘l’è restai ferito.
Re Gilardin ritorna indietro
Dalla sua mamma vò ‘ndà a morire.
II
O tun tun tun, pica a la porta
“O mamma mia che mi son morto”.
“O pica pian caro ‘l mio figlio
Che la to dona ‘l g’à ‘n picul fante(2)”
“O madona la mia madona(3)
Cosa vol dire ch’i  sonan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria al tuo fante”
III
“O madona la mia madona(3)
Cosa vol dire ch’i cantan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria ai soldati
“O madona , la mia madona
Disem che moda ho da vestirmi”
“Vestati di rosso, vestati di nero
Che le brunette stanno più bene”
IV
O quand l’è stai ‘nt l üs de la chiesa
D’un cirighello si l’à incontrato
“Bundì bongiur an vui vedovella”
“O no no no che non son vedovella
g’l fante in cüna e ‘l marito in guera”
“O si si si che voi sei vedovella
Vostro marì l’è tri dì che ‘l fa terra”
V
“O tera o tera apriti ‘n quatro
Volio vedere il mio cuor reale”
“La tua boca la sa di rose(4)
‘nvece la mia la sa di terra”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Re Gilardino va alla guerra
va alla guerra a tirar di spada
(va alla guerra a tirar di spada)
e quando si è trovato a metà strada,
Re Gilardino è stato ferito
Re Gilardino ritorna indietro, vuole andare a morire vicino alla madre
II
Tum-Tum batte alla porta
“O mamma mia, sono morto”
“Batti piano, caro figliolo che la tua signora ha un piccolo in fasce”
“O signora, mia signora
perchè suonano tanto?!”
“O mia nuorina, la mia piccola nuora
fanno festa al tuo bambino”
III
“O signora, mia signora
perchè cantano tanto?!”
“O mia nuorina, la mia piccola nuora
sono i soldati che fanno baldoria”
“O signora, mia signora
ditemi in che modo mi devo vestire”
“Vestiti di rosso e nero che addosso alle brunette stanno meglio”
IV
E quando è stata sulla porta della chiesa ha incontrato un chierichetto
“Buon giorno a voi vedovella”
“O no no non che non sono vedovella ho il bambino nella culla e il marito in guerra”
“O si si che voi siete vedovella
Vostro marito è da tre giorni sotto terra”
V
“O terra apriti in quattro
voglio vedere il mio cuore di re”
“La tua bocca sa di rose
invece la mia sa di terra!”

NOTE
*(Da una registrazione originale di Maurizio Martinotti in alta Val Borbera)
1) inevitabile il richiamo dantesco “nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita” (con corollario di bosco), in questo contesto il trovarsi a metà strada allude ad un cambiamento che muta per sempre la vita del re, ovvero dell’eroe.
2) probabilmente il figlio è nato mentre il re era in guerra e quindi egli apprende della sua paternità nel momento della morte!
3) è la nuora che parla per chiedere il motivo del trambusto e nelle risposte le si occulta il vero motivo dei preparativi: si sta allestendo il funerale del re
4) è il re defunto che parla alla moglie, ossia la saggezza popolare, i tempi della sepoltura lacrimata sono ancora a venire.. Nella versione francese (e occitana) di Re Renaud invece la terra si spalanca e la bella viene inghiottita

RE ARDUIN

Cantovivo registrò la stessa ballata col titolo “Re Arduin” già raccolta dalla tradizione orale da Franco Lucà, nel 1984 ad Alpette Canavese, esecutore Battista Goglio “Barba Teck” ( 1898-1985 )

RE ARDUIN
I
Re Arduin (1) a ven da Turin
Re Arduin a ven da Turin
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
II
O mamma mia preparmi ‘l let
La cuerta noira e i linsöi di lin
III
O mamma mia cosa diran
Le fije bele ca na stan lì
IV
O no no no parla en tan
La nostra nora l’à avù n’infan
V
O mamma mia (2) disimi ‘n po’
Che i panatè a na piuren tan
VI
A l‘àn brüsà tüti i biciulan (3)
L‘è par sulì c’a na piuren tan
VII
O mamma mia cosa diran
Perché da morto na sunen tan
VIII
Sarà mort prinsi o quai signor
Tüte le cioche a i fan unur
IX
Re Arduin a ven da Turin
L‘è ndà a la guera l’è stai ferì
X
O tera freida apriti qui
Ch io vada col mio marì
traduzione italiano*
I
Re Arduino viene da Torino
Re Arduino viene da Torino
viene dalla guerra è stato ferito
viene dalla guerra è stato ferito
II
O mamma mia preparami il letto
la coperta nera e le lenzuola di lino
III
O mamma mia cosa diranno
le figlie belle che stanno lì
IV
O non parlar tanto/ la nostra nuora ha avuto un bambino
V
O mamma mia ditemi un poco perché i panettieri piangono tanto
VI
Hanno bruciato tutti i “biciulan”
è per quello che piangono tanto
VII
O mamma mia cosa diranno
perché da morto suonano tanto
VIII
Sarà morto il principe o qualche
signore/ tutte le campane gli fanno onore
IX
Re Arduino viene da Torino/ è andato alla guerra è
stato ferito/
X
O terra fredda apriti qui/ che io vada con il mio marito.

NOTE
* da qui
1) Arduino d’Ivrea (marchese di Ivrea e primo re d’Italia) è ancora estremamente popolare nel Canavese omaggiato in molte rievocazioni storiche
2) in realtà è la nuora che chiede informazioni sui lamenti e le campane a morto (tema della morte occultata) mentre nella prima parte (strofe II e III) è Arduino che parla. Solo nella IX strofa è annunciata la morte di Arduino
2) “hanno bruciato tutto il pane” i bicciolani sono dei biscotti tipici del Vercellese, ma a Torino i biciulan sono dei pani di forma lunga e sottile (un po’ panciuta nel mezzo e sottile alle punte), la versione piemontese della baguette!

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/italren.htm
https://minimazione.wordpress.com/2007/08/22/re-gilardin-alla-guerra/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=1048
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio1.htm
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/child-ballads-v2/child8-v2%20-%200371.htm
http://amischanteurs.org/wp-content/uploads/Canti-di-Donata-Pinti.pdf

La Morte Occultata, versioni bretoni, francesi e occitane

Read the post in English

IL TEMA DELLA MORTE OCCULTATA

LORD OLAF E GLI ELFI DEL BOSCO
VARIANTI SCANDINAVE
VERSIONI ISOLE BRITANNICHE E AMERICA 
VERSIONI FRANCIA
VERSIONE PIEMONTE

Il professor Child riporta una versione bretone della storia comunemente denominata “Morte Occultata” (o Morte Occulta secondo l’arcaicismo del Nigra) che potrebbe rappresentare il punto di congiunzione tra la versioni scandinave e quelle del Sud francese e del Nord d’Italia.

LA LEGGENDA BRETONE: Il conte Nann

Il conte Nann e sua moglie si sposarono che avevano rispettivamente tredici e dodici anni. L’anno seguente nacque un figlio e il conte chiese alla moglie che cosa desiderasse in dono. Lei disse di volere della selvaggina e allora Nann prese la sua lancia e si diresse al bosco. All’ingresso del bosco incontrò una fata che gli disse che lo aspettava da tanto tempo e aggiunse: «Ora che mi hai incontrato mi devi sposare». «Sposarti?! Io sono già sposato.» A queste parole la fata disse: «E allora scegli se vivere sette anni da infermo o se morire entro tre giorni». «Preferisco morire entro tre giorni», rispose risoluto.
Tornato a casa Nann chiamò sua madre, le raccontò tutto e le chiese di fargli il letto e di non dire nulla della sua morte alla sposa.
La moglie cominciò a chiedere come mai Nann non fosse ancora di ritorno. Le dissero che era andato a caccia nel bosco per prenderle qualcosa. Chiese perché i servitori stessero piangendo e le risposero che i migliori cavalli erano affogati mentre li lavavano. Disse che non c’era da preoccuparsi: Nann ne avrebbe portati degli altri. Allora domandò perché i preti stessero cantando e le campane suonassero. Le risposero che un uomo al quale avevano dato alloggio era morto quella stessa notte. Chiese quale vestito avrebbe dovuto mettersi per andare in chiesa il giorno dopo, quello rosso o quello blu? Le consigliarono quello nero. Quando andò in chiesa notò una tomba con terra fresca e a questo punto le dissero la verità. Disperata, lasciò detto di prendersi cura di suo figlio e finì con questa frase rivolta alla madre di Nann: «Vostro figlio è morto, vostra figlia è morta».

Ritroviamo la stessa storia nella ballata medievale francese Le Roi Renaud che nell’area di lingua occitana diventa Comte Arnau (Arnau è Renaud). La riscoperta della ballata di origine medievale avviene in pieno fervore romantico per i nazionalismi e il gusto antiquario dei canti tradizionali. Rimando quindi all’ottima trattazione di Christian Souchon per tutti gli intrecci e gli approfondimenti sul tema della Morte occultata in terra di Francia (qui).

LA BALLATA BRETONE: An Aotrou Nann hag ar Gorrigan

Della ballata “Aotroù Nann”  (il Singore Nann e la fata) in Bretagna circolarono decine di versioni ma lo schema è sempre identico l’incontro con la fata-sirena, il rifiuto del cavaliere, la scelta se morire piano piano tra i tomenti oppure di morte fulminante (non c’è che dire) e l’occultamento della morte del cavaliere alla giovane sposa in procinto di partorire. Il resto sono dettagli variati in base al gusto di chi  cantava (quialtre versioni testuali).

Gwennyn in Avalon 2017  (traccia 8)
in fase di revisione

LA VERSIONE FRANCESE: LE ROI RENAUD

Conosciuta in Italia come “Re Rinaldo ritorna dalla Guerra” e in repertorio presso i gruppi corali, la versione perde tutta la prima parte dell’incontro  con la fata e invece che dal bosco incantato, fa ritornare il re dalla guerra, ferito a morte. Alla Regina viene occultata la morte del re fino alla sua avvenuta sepoltura, si evince dal racconto che la regina è in attesa di un bambino e probabilmente non le si vuole creare complicazioni nell’imminenza del parto. Tuttavia dopo aver partorito e finalmente essersi alzata dal letto per andare a messa (e dopo una kilometrica ballata piena di occultamenti) alla regina viene data la notizia del re morto e sepolto.  La ballata finisce tragicamente con la donna che invoca la morte e subito la terra le si apre da sotto i piedi e la inghiotte.

Ancora oggi la ballata è cantata nell’ambito della canzone popolare francese con temi mesti e arrangiamenti d’ispirazione medievale.
Pierre Bensusan
Le Poème Harmonique in Aux marches du palais


I
Le roi Renaud de guerre vint
tenant ses tripes dans ses mains.
Sa mère était sur le créneau
qui vit venir son fils Renaud.
II
– Renaud, Renaud, réjouis-toi!
Ta femme est accouché d’un roi!
– Ni de ma femme ni du fils
je ne saurais me réjouir.
III
Allez ma mère, allez devant,
faites-moi faire un beau lit blanc.
Guère de temps n’y resterai:
à la minuit trépasserai.
IV
Mais faites-le moi faire ici-bas
que l’accouchée n’l’entende pas.
Et quand ce vint sur la minuit,
le roi Renaud rendit l’esprit..
V
Il ne fut pas le matin jour
tous les valets pleuraient très tous.
Il ne fut temps de déjeuner
que les servantes ont pleuré.
VI
– Mais dites-moi, mère, m’amie,
que pleurent nos valets ici ?
– Ma fille, en lavant nos chevaux
ont laissé noyer le plus beau.
VII
– Oh pourquoi donc, mère m’amie,
pour un cheval pleurer ainsi ?
Quand Renaud reviendra,
plus beaux chevaux ramènera.
VIII
– Et dites-moi, mère m’amie,
que pleurent nos servantes ici ?
– Ma fille, en lavant nos linceuls
ont laissé aller le plus neuf.
XIX
– Oh pourquoi donc, mère m’amie,
pour un linceul pleurer ainsi ?
Quand Renaud reviendra,
plus beau linceul ramènera.
X
– Ah, dites-moi, mère m’amie,
Qu’est-ce que j’entends cogner ici ?
– Ma fille, ce sont les charpentiers
Qui raccommodent le plancher.
XI
– Ah ! Dites-moi, mère m’amie,
Pourquoi les cloches sonnent ici ?
– Ma fille, c’est la procession
Qui sort pour les rogations.  (1)
XII
– Mais, dites-moi, mère m’amie,
C’est que j’entends chanter ici ?
– Ma fille, c’est la procession
Qui fait le tour de la maison.
XIII
Or quand ce fut passé huit jours,
A voulut faire ses atours.
Or, quand ce fut pour relever,
à la messe  (2) elle voulut aller,
XIV
– Mais dites-moi, mère m’amie,
quel habit mettrai-je aujourd’hui ?
– Mettez le blanc, mettez le gris,
mettez le noir pour mieux choisir.
XV
– Mais dites-moi, mère m’amie,
qu’est-ce que ce noir-là signifie
– A femme relèvant d’enfant,
le noir lui est bien plus séant.
XVI
Mais quand elles fut parmi les champs,
Trois pastoureaux allaient disant :
– Voici la femme du seignour
Que l’on enterra l’autre jour !
XVII
– Ah ! Dites-moi, mère m’amie,
Que disent ces pastoureaux-ci ?
– Il disent de presser le pas,
Ou que la messe n’aura pas.
XVIII
Or quand elle fut dans l’église entrée,
un cierge on lui a présenté.
Aperçoit en s’agenouillant
la terre fraîche sous son banc.
XIX
– Ah ! Dites-moi, mère m’amie,
pourquoi la terre est rafraîchie?
– Ma fille, ne puis plus vous celer,
Renaud est mort et enterré.
XX
Puisque le roi Renaud est mort,
voici la clé (3) de mon trésor.
Voici mes bagues et mes joyaux,
prenez bien soin du fils Renaud.
XXI
Terre (4), ouvre-toi, terre fends-toi,
que j’aille avec Renaud, mon roi!
Terre s’ouvrit, et se fendit,
et ci fut la belle engloutie.
Traduzione italiano Giovanni Cappellaro
I
Tornò dalla guerra re Renaud
con le budella in mano.
Sua madre dai merli del castello
vide arrivare il figlio Renaud.
II
– Renaud, Renaud, rallegrati!
Tua moglie ha partorito un re!
– Ne’ di mia moglie ne’ di mio figlio
rallegrarmi potrò.
III
Andate madre, andate avanti,
fatemi preparare un bel letto bianco.
Non ci resterò per molto:
a mezzanotte morirò.
IV
Ma fatemelo preparare quaggiù,
che il neonato non lo senta.
E quando si fu verso mezzanotte
re Renaud spirò.
V
Non era ancora giunto il mattino
che tutti i valletti piangevano.
Non era ancora ora di pranzo
che le domestiche piangevano.
VI
– Ma ditemi, madre, amica mia,
cosa piangono i valletti?
– Figlia mia, lavando i cavalli
hanno lasciato annegare il più bello.
VII
– Ma perchè, madre, amica mia,
piangere così per un cavallo?
Quando Renaud tornerà
cavalli più belli porterà.
VIII
– E ditemi, madre, amica mia,
perchè piangono le domestiche?
– Figlia mia, lavando le lenzuola
si sono fatto scappare il più nuovo.
XIX
-Ma perchè dunque, madre amica mia,
piangere tanto per un lenzuolo?
Quando Renaud tornerà
uno più bello ne porterà.
X
– Ah, ditemi, madre, amica mia,
cos’è che sento battere ora?
– Figlia mia, sono i carpentieri
che sistemano il pavimento.
XI
– Ah Ditemi, madre, amica mia
Perchè ora suonano le campane?
– Figlia mia, è la processione
che esce per le rogazioni (1).
XII
– Ma ditemi, madre, amica mia,
cos’è ora che sento cantare?
– Figlia mia, è la processione
che fa il giro della casa.
XIII
E passati otto giorni
volle prepararsi l’acconciatura.
E quando fu pronta per alzarsi
alla messa (2) volle andare,
XIV
-Ma ditemi, madre, amica mia,
che abito metterò oggi?
– Mettete quello bianco, quello grigio,
o meglio quello nero.
XV
– Ma ditemi, madre amica mia,
cosa significa quello nero?
– Per una puerpera
quello nero è il più adatto.
XVI
Ma quando fu nei campi,
tre pastorelli stavano dicendo:
– Ecco la moglie del signore
Che abbiamo seppellito l’altro giorno!
XVII
– Ah, ditemi, madre amica mia,
Che dicono questi pastorelli?
_ Dicono di affrettarsi,
o la messa finirà.
XVIII
Ora quando fu entrata in chiesa,
le presentarono un cero.
Inginocchiandosi vide
la terra fresca sotto al banco.
XIX
– Ah! Ditemi madre, amica mia,
perchè la terra è smossa?
– Figlia mia, non posso più nascondervelo
Renaud è morto e sepolto.
XX
Poichè re Renaud è morto
ecco la chiave (3) del mio tesoro.
Ecco i miei anelli e i miei gioielli,
abbiate cura del figlio di Renaud.
XXI
Terra (4) apriti, squarciati,
che io vada con Renaud, il mio re!
La terra si aprì, si squarciò,
e la bella fu inghiottita.

NOTE
Una simile versione testuale (con traduzione) qui
1) le rogazioni erano canti processionali misti a preghiere con cui si andava a benedire i campi  nei tre giorni precedenti l’Ascensione (continua)
2) un tempo la donna era considerata impura dopo il parto e poteva rientrare nella comunità solo dopo 40 giorni. La ballata riflette una concezione arcaica della donna nel matrimonio: suo unico ruolo è quello di generare la discendenza e il suo destino quello di seguire il marito nella morte. In realtà nel Medioevo le vedove di rango venivano convenientemente rimaritate o finivano in convento.
3) alla donna maritata erano affidate le chiavi della casa, della dispensa e del guardaroba e erano portate appese alla cintura come segno distintivo del proprio rango
4) riferita alla terra consacrata della chiesa

LA VERSIONE OCCITANA: LO COMTE ARNAUD

Ci si rende subito conto che la morte non avviene più per mano di una sirena o di una fata, ma è la guerra la responsabile della tragedia. Il racconto si fa più realistico e universale e accentua la tragicità con l’occultamento della verità sulla morte dell’eroe.
Arnau, nome comune anche per le varianti catalane, parte per la guerra e torna ferito all’inizio dell’estate, precisamente a San Giovanni. In tutte le varianti di questa ballata la madre vede arrivare da lontano (o attende) il figlio che in genere le chiederà, dopo una breve conversazione, che gli si faccia il letto dove aspetterà la morte.
Un’altra novità è la presenza di una moglie che ha appena partorito la quale, all’oscuro della morte del marito, chiede lumi alla suocera su quale vestito dovrà mettersi per la festa o per andare in chiesa. La risposta in tutte le versioni sarà: “Mettiti quello nero!” Qui subentra la teatralità nel racconto nel quale noi auditori, ma in realtà spettatori grazie al nostro terzo occhio che visualizza la storia, sappiamo la verità ed assistiamo a queste conversazioni con animo partecipe e compassionevole. La frase Mettili quello nero! è più rivolta a noi che alla moglie e va letta come richiesta di complicità da parte della suocera. E’ come se ci dicesse: “Io e voi sappiamo perché ho risposto così.” Diventa così, in nuce, una tragedia di tipo greco, come Edipo Re, nella quale noi sappiamo la verità, ma non i protagonisti i quali verranno a conoscerla nel momento topico e drammatico della rappresentazione. In entrambi i casi la verità occultata nello spettatore genera la pietas, intesa come attenzione compassionevole verso ciò che è fragile e mortale. E’ in questo modo che la tragedia della moglie di Arnau, accentuata dalla nascita di un figlio, diventa la proiezione di un nostro vissuto, reale o ipotetico, nel quale tutti ci riconosciamo. Siamo noi, ciascuno per conto proprio ma insieme agli altri auditori, che formiamo il coro greco, silente e dolente, dei sentimenti di pietas.
La versione francese che segue esalta ancora di più la drammaticità aumentando le domande della puerpera e i tentativi pietosi della suocera per occultare la verità. (stralciato da qui)

Rosina de Pèira e Martina in Cançons de femnas 1980


I
Lo comte Arnau, lo chivalièr,
dins lo Piemont va batalhier.
Comte Arnau, ara tu ten vas;
digas-nos quora tornaras.
II
Enta Sant Joan ieu tornarai
e mort o viu  aici serai.
Ma femna deu, enta Sant Joan
me rendre lo pair d’un bel enfant.
III
Mas la Sant Joan ven d’arribar,
lo Comte Amau ven a mancar.
Sa mair, del pus naut de l’ostal,
lo vei venir sus son caval.
IV
“Mair, fasetz far prompte lo leit
que longtemps non i dormirai.
Fasetz-lo naut, fasetz-lo bas,
Que ma miga n’entenda pas.”
V
Comte Arnau, a que vos pensatz
qu’un bel enfant vos quitariatz?
Ni per un enfant ni per dus,
mair, ne ressuscitarai plus.
VI
“Mair, que es aquel bruch dins l’ostal?
Sembla las orasons d’Arnau.
La femna que ven d’enfantar
orasons non deu escotar.”
VII
“Mair, per la festa de deman
quina rauba me botaran?
La femna que ven d’enfantar
la rauba negra deu portar!”
VIII
“Mair, porque tant de pregadors?
Que dison dins las orasons?”
Dison: la que ven d’enfantar
a la misseta deu anar.
IX
A la misseta ela se’n va,
vei lo Comt’ Arnau enterar.
“V’aqui las claus de mon cinton,
mair, torni plus a la maison.”
X
“Terra santa, tel cal obrir,
Voli parlar a mon marit;
Terra santa, te cal barrar,
amb Arnau voli demorar.
traduzione italiano*
I
Il Conte Arnau, il cavaliere
Va a battagliare in Piemonte
“Conte Arnau, ora te ne vai,
dicci quando tornerai.”
II
“Tornerò entro San Giovanni
E vivo o morto sarò qui.
Mia moglie entro San Giovanni
deve Farmi il dono di un bel bambino.
III
Ma San Giovanni arriva,
Il Conte Arnau manca ancora;
Sua madre, dall’alto della casa,
Lo vede arrivare sul suo cavallo.
IV
“Madre, fatemi fare subito il letto
Ché non dormirò a lungo.
Fatelo alto, fatelo basso,
basta che mia moglie non senta.”
V
“Conte Arnau a cosa pensate,
che lascerete un bel bambino?”
Né per un figlio, né per due,
Madre, non risusciterò più.”
VI
“Madre, cos’è quel rumore dentro la casa?
Sembrano le preghiere di Arnau.”
“La donna che ha appena partorito
non deve ascoltare le preghiere.”
VII
“Madre, per la festa di domani
quale vestito mi metteranno?”
La donna che ha appena partorito
deve mettere il vestito nero.”
VIII
“Madre, perchè così tante preghiere?
Cosa dicono nelle preghiere?”
Dicon: “La donna che ha partorito
Deve andare alla messa”.
IX
Lei se ne va allora alla messa
e vede il Conte Arnau seppellito.
“Eccovi le chiavi della mia cintura,
Madre, non torno più a casa.”
X
“Terra santa, apriti,
voglio parlare a mio marito.
Terra santa, chiuditi,
con Arnau voglio restare.”

NOTE
* (da qui):  io parlo piemontese come lingua madre (nella versione canavese-monferrina) e mi emoziona molto sentire la cadenza nelle versioni dell’occitano antico (mi sembra di risentire parlare i miei nonni).

continua: la versione piemontese

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/nann.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/nannf.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/trador.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/roirenau.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/arnaud.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=2499
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=1049&lang=it
http://www.coroasiago.it/rinaldo.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8862

THE CRUEL BROTHER

Child ballad #11

201111161900ALTRI TITOLI: The Bride’s Testament, Ther waur three ladies, The Three Knights and Fine Flowers in the Valley, Brother’s Revenge, The Rose and the Lily.

Una ballata di stampo cavalleresco in cui il fratello uccide, apparentemente per un futile motivo, la sorella che si è appena sposata. La ballata inizia sempre con un corteggiamento: un cavaliere o tre cavalieri venuti da lontano chiedono la mano alle figlie (o alla figlia) del re. La più giovane acconsente al matrimonio, ma solo dopo che il cavaliere avrà ottenuto il permesso da tutta la famiglia di lei; tuttavia al fratello non viene richiesto il consenso delle nozze (senza chiarire per quale motivo, fosse anche una fatale dimenticanza) e tanto basta per scatenarne l’ira.
Sembra la storia di Barbablù (vedi) alla rovescia in cui il predatore non è il cavaliere venuto da lontano, ma il fratello della vittima, così alcuni autori vedono nell’uccisione un gesto di gelosia frutto di un legame incestuoso fratello-sorella.
Altri studiosi vedono nella ballata le vestigia di una antica società matriarcale in cui la linea di sangue e l’eredità famigliare (non ultima la successione al trono) passavano attraverso le figlie: è interessante notare ad esempio che il diritto di maggiorasco (cioè il diritto del figlio primogenito ad ereditare tutto il patrimonio famigliare) in alcune zone dell’Europa centrale era riservato al “minorasco” cioè al figlio minore. Eppure della ballata non si riesce ad avere interpretazione né archetipe, né tantomeno rituali. In genere le ballate di questo tipo trovano riscontro nella tradizione scandinava così “Dr. Prior remarks that the offence given by not asking a brother’s assent to his sister’s marriage was in ballad: times regarded as unpardonable. Other cases which show the importance of this preliminary, and the some times fatal consequences of omitting it, are: ‘Hr. Peder og Mettelille,’ Grundtvig, No 78, II, 325, sts 4, 6; ‘Jomfruen i Skoven,’ Danske Viser, m, 99, st. 15; ‘Jomfru Ellensborg og Hr. Olof,’ ib., m, 316, st. 16; ‘Iver Lang og hans S0ster,’ ib., iv, 87, st. 116; ‘Herr Helmer Blaa,’ ib., iv, 251, st. 8; ‘Jomfru Giselmaar,’ ib., iv, 309, st. 13. See Prior’s Ancient Danish Ballads, m, 112, 232 f, 416.” (tratto da qui)

VERSIONE SCOZZESE

Child #11 Versione A

ASCOLTA The Batterfield Band in Open Moves 1995


There were three ladies played at ba’
Hey wi’ the rose and the linsey o(1)
But a knight came by, played o’er them a’(2)
Doon by the greenwood sidey o(3)
…(4)
This knight bowed low tae a’ the three
But tae the youngest he bent his knee
…(5)
O lady fair, gie me your hand
And I’ll mak ye lady o’er all my land
Sir knight ere you my favour win
Ye maun gain consent o’er all my kin
He gained consent fae her parents dear
And likewise fae her sisters fair
He’s gained consent o’er all her kin
He forgot tae speak tae her brother John.
When the wedding day was come
This knight would take his bonnie bride home
..(6)
Her mother led her through the close
And her brother John stood her on her horse
..(7)
He took a knife baith long and sharp
And he stabbed the bonnie bride tae her heart
…(8)
Lead me tae yon high high hill
And I’ll lie doon and I’ll mak my will
.. (9)
And what will you gie tae your brother John
The gallows tree for tae hang him on
And what will you gie to your brother John’s wife(10)
The wilderness tae end her life
..(11)
TRADUZIONE RICCARDO VENTURI
C’eran tre dame che giocavano a palla
Hey, con la rosa e il bel giglio (1)
venne un cavaliere e le corteggiò tutte (2)
nel bosco più profondo (3)
(Versi stralciati) (4)
Il cavaliere s’inchinò davanti a tutte e tre, ma s’inginocchiò davanti alla minore” (Versi stralciati) (5)
“Bella signora, dammi la tua mano
e ti farò signora delle mie terre.”
“Signore, prima di avere la mia mano
Dovete aver l’assenso di tutta la mia famiglia.”
Ha avuto l’assenso dai suoi genitori cari,
L’ha avuto anche dalle belle sorelle.
Ha avuto l’assenso di ogni parente,
Ma s’è scordato di chiederlo a John, il di lei fratello.
Quando il giorno delle nozze fu giunto,
Il cavaliere voleva portarsi la sua bella sposa a casa. (Versi stralciati) (6)
La madre traversò con lei il giardino
E suo fratello John la fece montare a cavallo.
(Versi stralciati) (7)
Lui ha preso un coltello lungo e tagliente
E ha trafitto il cuore della bella sposa.
(Versi stralciati) (8)
“Portami piano su quella collina,
Mi stenderò giù e farò testamento.”
(Versi stralciati) (9)
“E che cosa lasci a tuo fratello John?”
“La forca, perché ci rimanga appeso.”
“E che cosa lasci alla moglie di tuo fratello?”
“Le oscure foreste, perché ci vada a morire.”
(Versi stralciati) (11)

NOTE
1) il refrain è lo stesso della ballata Cruel Mother (qui) ma non la melodia: linsey si traduce come lino; ma “linden” è anche il nome del tiglio. Un ulteriore significato del verso vede il temine lino come metafora per indicare i capelli biondi: “flaxen hair” o lint-white (in scozzese) è una sfumatura di giallo chiaro che tende al dorato, quindi il verso è come se descrivesse la fanciulla dal pallido incarnato e dai capelli biondi. Del resto la parola potrebbe essere la corruzione di lillie gay in quanto nella versione del Brown Manuscript il verso diventa” With a hey ho and a lillie gay
2) letteralmente= il migliore a giocare (o a suonare)
3) nella versione del Brown Manuscript il verso diventa: As the primrose spreads so sweetly [in italiano Quando la primula sboccia dolcemente.]
Il greenwood è la parte del bosco più impenetrabile dove i Celti credevano si celasse l’ingresso dell’AltroMondo (vedi), ma è anche il luogo “fuori legge” fuori dalla società civile dove accadono incontri fatati e illeciti
4) i versi stralciati:
The eldest was baith tall and fair,
Bit the youngest was beyond compare.
The midmost had a graceful mien,
Bit the youngest look’d like beautie’s queen.
[In italiano: La maggiore era alta e bellissima, Ma la minore non aveva l’eguale. La mediana aveva un aspetto grazioso, Ma la minore pareva la regina delle belle.]
5) i versi stralciati:
The ladie turned her head aside,
The knicht he woo’d her to be his bride. The ladie blush’d a rosy red,
An’ sayd, Sir knicht, I’m too young to wed.
[in italiano: La donna voltò da una parte la testa, Il cavaliere voleva che fosse la sua sposa. La donna diventò d’un rosso rosato, E disse, “Signore, son troppo giovane per sposarmi”]
6) i versi stralciati:
An’ monie a lord an’ mony a knichte
Came to behold that ladie brichte.
An’ there was nae man that did her see,
Bit wishit himsell bridegroom to be.
Her father deir led her doun the stair,
An’ her sisters twain they kissit her there.
(in italiano: E molti signori, molti cavalieri, Vennero per vedere quella splendida dama. Non c’era uomo che la guardasse Che non dicesse, “Vorrei esser lo sposo.” Il suo caro padre scese con lei la scala, Le sue due sorelle le diedero un bacio)
7) i versi stralciati:
She lean’d her o’er the saddle-bow,
To gie him a kiss ere she did go.
[in italiano: Lei si sporse giù dalla sella montata Per dargli un bacio prima di partire.]
8) I versi stralciati:
She had noo ridden half thro’ the town,
Until her hart’s bluid stain’d her gown.
Ride saftly on, says the best young man,
For methinks our bonny bride looks pale and wan.
[in italiano: Non era che a mezza strada, in città, Che il sangue del cuore le macchiò la gonna. “Cavalca piano”, dice lo splendido giovane, “Credo che la mia sposa sia pallida e smorta.”]
9) nella versione estesa del testamento il dialogo diventa:
O what will ye leive to your father deir?
The siller-shod steed that brocht me here.
O what will ye leive to your mither deir?
My velvet pall an’ my silken geir.
O what will ye leive to your sister Anne?
My silken scarf an’ my gowden fan.
O what will ye leive to your sister Grace?
My bluidie cloathe to wash an’ dress
[“Che cosa lasci al tuo caro padre?” “Il cavallo ferrato d’argento che qui m’ha portato.” “E che cosa lasci alla tua cara madre?” “La mia veste di velluto e le robe di seta.” “E che cosa lasci a tua sorella Anne?” “La mia sciarpa di seta e il ventaglio d’oro.” “E che cosa lasci a tua sorella Grace?” “Le mie vesti insanguinate, le lavi e le indossi.”]
10) nella maledizione viene inclusa anche la moglie del fratello John
11) i versi finali:
This ladie fair in her grave was laid,
An’ mony a mass was o’er her said.
Bit it would hae made your hart richt sair
To see the bridegroom rive his hair.
[traduzione italiano: La bella dama fu deposta nella tomba E per lei furon dette tante e tante messe. Ma avrebbe proprio fatto male al cuore Veder lo sposo come si strappava i capelli]

Child #11 Versione C

ASCOLTA Archie Fisher in The Man with a Rhyme 1976

ASCOLTA Colleen Raney in Here this is Home 2013 (in una versione testuale sostanzialmente simile)


There were three sisters lived in a ha’(1)
Hech, hey, and the lily gay,
By cam a knicht and he woo’d them a’
And the rose is aye the redder aye(2).
And the first ane she was dressed in green.
“Would ye fancy me and be my queen?”
And the second ane she was dressed in yellow.
“Would ye fancy me and be my marrow(3)?”
And the first(4) ane she was dressed in red(5).
“Would ye fancy me and be my bride?”
“Ye may seek(6) me frae my faither dear,
And frae my mither wha’ did me bear.
Ye may seek me frae my sister Anne,
And dinna forget my brither John.”
And he socht her frae her faither, the king,
And he socht her frae her mither, the queen.
And he socht her frae her sister Anne,
But forgot tae speir(7) at her brither John.
And her mither dressed her in her gown,
And her sister tied the flounces ‘round.
Her faither mounted her on her horse,
And her brither led her doon the close(8).
And he’s ta’en a knife baith lang and sharp,

he’s pierced the bonnie bride through the heart.(9)
“Oh, lead me, lead me up yon hill,
And there I’ll sit and mak’ my will(10).”
“What will ye leave tae your faither dear?”
“The bonnie white steed that brocht me here.”
“What will ye leave tae your mither dear?”
“The bloody robes that I do wear.”
“What will ye leave tae your sister Anne?”
“The gowden ring frae off my hand.”
“What will ye leave tae your brither John?”
“The gallows tree for tae hang him on.”
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
C’eran tre sorelle che vivevano in un castello (1)
Hey, ho, e il bel giglio,
venne un cavaliere e tutte le corteggiò
e la rosa è la più rossa.(2)
La maggiore era vestita
in verde
“Ti piacerebbe essere la mia
regina?”
E la seconda era vestita
in giallo
“Ti piacerebbe essere la mia compagna? (3)”
Ma la minore(4) era vestita
di rosso(5)
“Ti piacerebbe essere la mia sposa?”
“Devi chiederlo (6) al mio amato
padre
e a mia madre che mi generò,
devi chiederlo a mia sorella Anna
e non ti scordare mio fratello John”
Egli la domandò al padre,
il re,
la domandò alla madre,
la regina
e la chiese alla sorella Anna,
ma dimenticò di interrogare(7)
il fratello John.
La madre l’aiutò a indossare l’abito (da sposa)
e la sorella le sistemò bene
le balze
il padre la fece montare a cavallo
e il fratello traversò con lei
il giardino(8)
Lui ha preso un coltello lungo e tagliente
e ha trafitto il cuore della
bella sposa.(9)
“Portami piano su quella collina,
mi siederò e farò testamento.”(10)
“Che cosa lasci al tuo caro
padre?”
“Il bel cavallo bianco che qui m’ha portato.”
“E che cosa lasci alla tua cara
madre?”
“Le vesti insanguinate che indosso.”
“E che cosa lasci a tua sorella
Anne?”
“L’anello d’oro che ho tra le mani.”
“E che cosa lasci a tuo fratello
John?”
“La forca, per impiccarlo.”

NOTE
1) le fanciulle in altre versioni sono intente nel gioco della palla oppure stanno ballando, in effetti l’inglese “to play at ball” vuol dire entrambi le cose
2) The rose (primrose) it smells so sweetly
3) marrow= mate.
4) In questa versione il cavaliere chiede la mano a tutte e tre le sorelle così “the first” è certamente un refuso in quanto le sorelle sono tre e la richiesta di diventare la propria sposa viene rivolta anche alla terza presumibilmente le minore, la quale è l’unica ad acconsentire.
5) anticamente il rosso è il colore della sposa
6) il cavaliere chiede alla donna il suo parere in merito, ma il consenso al matrimonio passa attraverso la mediazione dei genitori, contrariamente alla consuetudini, risulta vincolante anche il consenso dei fratelli e delle sorelle della futura sposa.
7) inquire of
8) courtyard
9) sebbene la sposa sia stata pugnalata a morte dal proprio fratello in un primo momento cerca di nascondere l’accaduto e si allontana dalla propria famiglia, solo quando è allo stremo delle forze allora si lascia cadere a terra per fare testamento. La stilettata ricevuta furtivamente e rapidamente è simile al morso di un serpente ed è tutto sommato il cardine della ballata: la sposa riceve un colpo mortale subito dopo la sua festa di nozze mentre viene condotta nella sua nuova casa (bride bringing-home).
Il tema è centrale anche in una canzone popolare italiana “Rizzardo Bello” riportata in Volkslieder aus Venetien (Adolf Wolf 1864) numero 83
83. Rizzardo bello.
Rizzardo belo mena a casa sposa.
Per la stradela streta la menava,
II brazz’ il col’ e la boca le basava.
Il suo fratelo ha visto quest’onore,
Ciapa la spada e pungeli sul cuore.
“Sposeta mia, veni a pass’ a passo,
Davanti vado far la parechiada.
O mama mia! versime quà ste porte,
La sposa xe quà e mi son ferì a morte.
O mama mia ! versime i portoni.
La sposa e quà e mi son ferì dai tuoni.
Sposeta mia ! magnè quatro boconi,
Rizzardo belo è soto i spavegioni.”
“Non posso più bever e non magnar,
In leto corizzarlo voglio andar,
Non posso più magnar e più bevere,
In leto corizzato lo voglio vedere.
Sposeto mio! dormio o veglieo?
La morte sempiterna vu speteo?”
“Sposeta mia ! cavevi quel’ anelo,
Che vi dirano: La sposa verginela.
Sposeta mia ! cavevi quel anelo.
La morte mia è stà vostro fratelo.
Sposeta mia ! cavevi quei aneli
Che siè la moglier di du frateli.”
“Morir io voglio in mezzo a do corteli
Piutosto ch’esser moglier di do frateli.”
“Quale sarà quela, o cara sorela.
Che tien in casa vedova verginela?”
10) il lascito testamentario è tipico nelle ballate del genere la morte occultata

seconda parte: continua

FONTI http://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/thethreeknights.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=33567 http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_11 http://www.contemplator.com/child/revenge.html http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/c/cruelbro.html http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/three_knights.htm http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/lib/libcollections/collections/special/flanders/node/107781 http://www.jstor.org/stable/534425?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

Lord Randal

A folk ballad that inaugurates a narrative genre collected in multiple variations called “The will of the poisoned man“: the story of a dying son, because he has been poisoned, who returns to his mother to die in his bed and make a will; in all likelihood the ballad starts from Italy, passes through Germany to get to Sweden and then spread to the British Isles (Lord Randal) until it lands in America.
During the “Folk Revival” of the 1960s and 1970s Bob Dylan has transformed the traditional Scottish ballad “Lord Randal” into the American folk song “A Hard Rain’s a-skirt Fall“.

[Una ballata popolare che inaugura un genere narrativo ripreso in molteplici varianti detto “il testamento dell’avvelenato”: la  storia di un figlio morente, perchè è stato avvelenato, che ritorna dalla madre per coricarsi a letto e fare testamento; con tutta  probabilità la ballata parte dall’Italia, passa per la Germania per arrivare  in Svezia e poi diffondersi nelle isole britanniche (Lord Randal) fino a sbarcare in  America.
Com’è noto ai più, Bob Dylan ha trasformato la ballata tradizionale scozzese “Lord Randal” nella folksong americana d’autore “A Hard Rain’s a-gonna Fall” durante il “Folk Revival” degli anni 60-70, mantenendovi la metrica e il messaggio, pur sviluppando un argomento diverso (l’ha trasformata in una canzone contro la guerra)]

This is how Riccardo Venturi teaches us “This ballad may have originated very far from the moors and lochs, and very close to our home [Italy].The poison, in fact, is a very strange weapon in the fierce ballads of Britain, where they kill themselves with sword, it is a subtle, ‘feminine’ means of killing, and it is not by chance that it has always been considered, on a popular level, a really Italian thing. However, there is another hypothesis on the origin of the ballad, which would like to trace back the story to Ranulf, Count of Chester (mentioned by the farmer Sloth in ‘Piers Plowmanì by William Langland together with the’ Rhymes of Robin Hood ‘). Some versions lack the will of the moribund hunter, but the legacies are of the most varied.

[Così c’insegna Riccardo VenturiQuesta ballata può avere avuto origine molto lontano dalle brughiere e dai lochs, e molto vicino a casa nostra. Il veleno, infatti, è un’arma assai strana nelle fiere ballate britanniche, dove ci si ammazza a colpi di spada; è un mezzo subdolo, ‘femminile’ di uccidere, e non a caso è stato sempre considerato, a livello popolare, proprio degli italiani.”
E prosegue “Esiste comunque un’altra ipotesi sull’origine della ballata, che la vorrebbe far risalire alle vicende di Ranulf, conte di Chester (menzionate dal contadino Sloth nel ‘Piers Plowmanì di William Langland assieme alle ‘Rhymes of Robin Hood’). Alcune versioni mancano del testamento del cacciatore moribondo, ma i lasciti sono dei più svariati.”
[Randal (Ranulph) III, sesto conte di Chester morì nel 1232 forse avvelenato dalla moglie che si sposò poco dopo con il suo amante.]
Sir Walter Scott associò la ballata con la morte di Thomas Randolph (Randal), Conte di Murray (Moray), che morì nel 1332 in modo inaspettato (e ci fu chi pensò al veleno).]

The ballad collected by the professor Child at number 12 is widespread in popular tradition and there are many textual variations combined with as many melodies.

[La ballata raccolta dal professor Child al numero 12 è ampiamente diffusa presso la tradizione popolare e si conoscono numerosissime varianti testuali abbinate ad altrettante numerose melodie.]

SCOTTISH VERSION (Child # 12)
[LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE]

The ballad is to be considered strictly connected with the theme of “the Concealed Death” or the dying hero who returns from hunting and makes a will (Lord Olaf ).
So Giordano Dall’Armellina writes in his book “European Ballads from Boccaccio to Bob Dylan”: “our hero, to prove to be worthy to pass into the world of adults and become a” real man “, challenges the taboo and goes to hunt right in the greenwood, but he cannot catch anything; or because he is hungry or more likely he is under a spell, he will accept the fried eels that he believes are given to him by his true-love.From a rational point of view it would have been an absurd story: what is she doing in the greenwood with a pan? It is likely that the woman the hero encounters is death in the cloak of a fairy. If we want to translate the tale from a psychoanalytic point of view, we can assume that the fairy, by looking like his true-love, becomes a projection of the hero’s unconscious. Lord Randal is punished for two different reasons: he has not overcome the trial through which he would have entered the world of the adults, and he has broken a taboo, while at the same time his lady punishes him because he has shown not being able to take care of her. On the contrary it is her who feeds him, and humiliates him by offering him the symbol of his missed manhood. Before him, the hawks and the dogs will die, the same animals that accompanied Oluf in some Scandinavian versions of the Concealed death, equally guilty for not being able to help him. “

[La ballata è da considerarsi considerare strettamente connessa con il tema della Morte occultata ovvero dell’eroe morente che torna dalla caccia e che fa testamento (vedi Lord Olaf).
Così Giordano Dall’Armellina scrive nel suo libro  “Ballate Europee da Boccaccio a Bob Dylan”:“il nostro eroe, per dimostrare di essere degno di passare nel mondo degli adulti e di diventare un “vero uomo”, sfida il tabù e va a cacciare proprio nel greenwood. Tuttavia non riesce a prendere niente e, o perché affamato o più probabilmente perché sotto incantesimo, accetterà le anguille fritte che lui crede gli siano date dalla sua innamorata. Da un punto di vista razionale sarebbe stata una storia assurda. Che ci fa l’innamorata di Lord Randal nel greenwood con una padella e delle anguille? È presumibile che la donna che l’eroe incontra sia la morte nei panni di una fata. Tradotto in termini psicanalitici la fata, prendendo le sembianze della sua innamorata, diventa una proiezione dell’inconscio dell’eroe. Lei lo punisce non solo per non aver superato la prova, ma anche per aver infranto il tabù. Nello stesso tempo anche la sua dama lo punisce poiché ha dimostrato di non essere in grado di prendersi cura di lei. Anzi, è lei che lo nutre e lo umilia offrendogli il simbolo della sua mancata virilità. Prima di lui moriranno i falchi e i cani, gli stessi animali che accompagnavano Oluf in alcune versioni scandinave della morte occultata, ugualmente colpevoli per non essere stati in grado di aiutarlo.“]

12 Lord Randal
Arthur Rackham

The illustration by Arthur Rackham portrays Lord Randal while at the table eating the eels with some dogs alongside him (waiting for leftovers or having just eaten the poisoned morsel); next to a lady with a treacherous look, who is supposed to be his wife, looks at him stealthily. The illustrator thus resolves the incongruity of a banquet with fried eel in pan into the greenwood, that the son says he ate shortly before arriving at his mother’s house. In the typical temporal jumps of ballads in fact the son could very well have gone hunting in the woods, then being returned to his home and having eaten with his wife, then being gone to his mother’s house to make a will. In this way, rationalizing the ballad it is a simple history of conjugal revenge poisoning.

[L’illustrazione di Arthur Rackham ritrae Lord Randal mentre è a tavola a mangiare le anguille con al fianco i suoi cani (che aspettano per gli avanzi o che hanno appena mangiato il boccone avvelenato); accanto una dama dallo sguardo perfido, che si presume sia la moglie, lo osserva furtivamente. L’illustratore così risolve l’incongruenza di un bacchetto con anguille fritte in padella nel folto del bosco che il figlio dice di aver mangiato poco prima di arrivare a casa della madre. Nei tipici salti temporali delle ballate infatti il figlio potrebbe benissimo essere andato a caccia nel bosco poi essere tornato alla sua dimora e aver mangiato con la moglie, poi essere andato alla casa della madre per fare testamento. Razionalizzando così la ballata la si riduce ovviamente ad una semplice storia di avvelenamento per vendetta coniugale.]

Giordano Dall’Armellina

Lucy Ward live, she is performing the traditional song ‘Lord Randall’ with great talent
[intensa e lacerante interpretazione della giovane cantautrice]

Roanoke (Ilaria Paladino & Nicola Alianelli)

Emily Smith Lord Donald (I, II, III, VI, IX, X)


I
“O where ha you been,
Lord Randal (Lord Donald), my son?
And where ha you been,
my handsome (bonnie) young man?”
“I ha been at the greenwood(1);
mother, mak my bed soon,
For I’m wearied wi hunting,
and fain wad lie doon
. (2)
II
“An wha met ye there (3)?
And wha met ye there?”
“O I met wi my true-love;”
III
“And what did she give you (4)?
And wha did she give you?”
“Eels fried in a pan; mother”
IV
“And what gat your leavins?
And wha gat your leavins?”
“My hawks and my hounds”
V
“And what becam of them?
And what becam of them?”
“They stretched their legs out and died”
VI
“O I fear you are poisoned(5)!
I fear you are poisoned!”
“O yes, I am poisoned
For I’m sick at the heart,
and fain wad lie down
.”(6)
VII
“What d’ye leave to your mother?
What d’ye leave to your mother?”
“Four and twenty milk kye”
VIII
“What d’ye leave to your sister?
What d’ye leave to your sister?”
“My gold and my silver”
IX
“What d’ye leave to your brother?
What d’ye leave to your brother?”
“My houses and my lands”
X
“What d’ye leave to your true-love (7)?
What d’ye leave to your true-love?”
“I leave her hell and fire”
Traduzione italiano di Giordano Dall’Armellina
I
“O dove sei stato,
Lord Randal, figlio mio?
O dove sei stato, mio bel giovanotto?”
“Sono stato nel bosco sacro;
madre mia, presto fammi il letto,
che sono stanco di cacciare
e volentieri mi stenderei
.”
II
“E chi hai incontrato?
E chi hai incontrato?”
“Ho incontrato la mia innamorata”
III
“E che cosa ti ha dato?
E che cosa ti ha dato?”
“Anguille fritte in padella”
IV
“E chi si è preso gli avanzi?
E chi si è preso gli avanzi?”
“I miei cani e i miei falchi”
V
“E cosa ne è stato di loro?
E cosa ne è stato di loro?”
“Hanno tirato le cuoia e sono
morti”
VI
“Temo tu sia avvelenato!
Temo tu sia avvelenato!”
“Sì, sono avvelenato,
sento male al cuore
e vorrei coricarmi
.”
VII
“Cosa lasci a tua madre?
Cosa lasci a tua madre?”
“Ventiquattro mucche da latte”
VIII
“Cosa lasci a tua sorella?
Cosa lasci a tua sorella?”
“Il mio oro e l’argento”
IX
“Cosa lasci a tuo fratello?
Cosa lasci a tuo fratello?”
“Le mie case e le mie terre”
X
“Cosa lasci alla tua dama?
Cosa lasci alla tua dama?”
“Le lascio l’inferno e le fiamme”

NOTE
1) the greenwood is not just a common forest, but a sacred one the entrance to Otherword. Dall’Armellina notes “It was the thickest part of the forest where the Celts believed there was the entrance to the world of the dead and to Fairyland. That entrance could be identified with a hollow trunk, a hole in the ground, a well and was defended and protected by fairies and elves. On Halloween night the spirits of the dead used to come out of the greenwood to pay a visit to the living ones. The people were afraid of going to the greenwood and if they could, they avoided it. I remember Robin Hood also hiding in the greenwood and that the soldiers of Nottingham’s sheriff, dared not come in for fear of the fairies and the spirits of the dead. The stories about Robin Hood, all deriving from ballads, are not by chance called The Greenwood Stories.
In any case if they ventured to pass by it, they would not speak in a loud voice so as not to disturb the spirits of the dead, they would not damage nature and above all, they would not hunt. According to local beliefs, they were taboos that, if broken, could cause death”
[il greenwood non è solo la foresta oscura, ma è il bosco sacro, la parte più nascosta che cela l’ingresso all’Altromondo celtico. Così racconta Dall’Armellina “Il greenwood era la parte più nascosta e fitta del bosco dove i celti credevano vi fosse l’ingresso del mondo dei morti e della terra delle fate e degli elfi (Fairyland). Tale ingresso, che poteva essere identificato in un tronco d’albero cavo, in una buca nel terreno, in un pozzo, era difeso e protetto dalle fate e dagli elfi. Nella notte di Halloween gli spiriti dei morti uscivano da questi antri naturali con le fate e gli elfi per far visita ai vivi. La gente temeva queste creature soprannaturali e se poteva evitava di inoltrarsi nel greenwood. Ricordo che anche Robin Hood si nascondeva nel greenwood e che i soldati dello sceriffo di Nottingham non osavano entrarci per paura delle fate e degli spiriti dei morti. I racconti riguardanti Robin Hood, tutti derivanti da ballate, non a caso si chiamano The greenwood stories.
In ogni caso, se vi si fossero avventurati, sapevano che non avrebbero potuto parlare ad alta voce, danneggiare il bosco, né tanto meno cacciare. Secondo le credenze locali erano dei tabù che, se infranti, avrebbero potuto causare la morte.”]
3) Emily Smith version
Wha did ye meet in the green woods
I met wi my sweethairt
4) or
What did ye hae for your dinner?
I had eels boiled in bree
5) In Celtic tradition, fairy food is magical with often hallucinogenic powers; those who taste it will not be able to eat other food, dying of hunger (did anorexics eat fairy food?)
[Nella tradizione celtica il cibo delle fate è magico con poteri spesso allucinogeni; coloro che lo assaggiano non potranno mangiare altro cibo terrestre e finiscono per morire di fame (gli anoressici hanno mangiato  cibo fatato?)]
6) variation of the refrain [variazione del ritornello]
7) Emily Smith 
What will ye leave tae your sweethairt
A noose in yon high tree

Amhrán na hEascainne 

Amhrán na hEascainne (The Song of the Eel) is the Irish Gaelic version of the folk ballad called “the Poisoned Man”

[Amhrán na hEascainne (La canzone dell’anguilla) è la versione in gaelico irlandese della popolarissima ballata detta dell’Avvelenato]

Port BBC Liam Ó Maonlaí
[Per Port la trasmissione della BBC Liam Ó Maonlaí (da The Hothouse Flowers) con Julie Fowlis]

Irish version

LINK
Giordano Dall’Armellina: “Ballate Europee da Boccaccio a Bob Dylan”.
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/english-and-other-versions–12-lord-randal.aspx
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_12
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/
bamepec/multimedia/saggio2.htm

http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/37.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/107.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/lordrandall.html

http://www.macsuibhne.com/amhran/teacs/181.htm

Il Testamento dell’Avvelenato

Read the post in English

Una ballata popolare che inaugura un genere narrativo ripreso in molteplici varianti detto “il testamento dell’avvelenato”: la  storia di un figlio morente, perchè è stato avvelenato, che ritorna dalla madre per morire nel suo letto e lasciare il testamento; con tutta  probabilità la ballata parte dall’Italia, passa per la Germania per arrivare  in Svezia e poi diffondersi nelle isole britanniche (Lord Randal) fino a sbarcare in  America.
Così c’insegna Riccardo VenturiQuesta ballata può avere avuto origine molto  lontano dalle brughiere e dai lochs, e molto vicino  a casa nostra. Il veleno, infatti,  è un’arma assai strana nelle fiere ballate britanniche, dove ci si ammazza a  colpi di spada; è un mezzo subdolo,  ‘femminile’ di uccidere, e non a caso è stato sempre considerato, a  livello popolare, proprio degli italiani.  “

avvelenato
tratta da qui

LA VERSIONE ITALIANA:  IL TESTAMENTO DELL’AVVELENATO
“L’avvelenato”, o “Il testamento dell’Avvelenato”, è una ballata italiana attestata per la prima volta in un repertorio di canti popolari pubblicato nel 1629 a Verona da un fiorentino, Camillo detto il Bianchino. È stata poi riprodotta anche da Alessandro d’Ancona nel suo saggio ‘La Poesia Popolare Italiana’, Livorno, 1906 (vol. II, p. 126): l’autore esprime l’opinione che il testo originale fosse toscano e ne riporta alcune versioni provenienti dall’area comasca e lucchese.

Ad oggi si contano quasi 200 versioni regionali della ballata dell’Avvelenato. La ballata è costituita dal solo dialogo tra madre (o a volte la moglie) e figlio che in alcune regioni si chiama Enrico, in altre Peppino in altre ancora, come in Canton Ticino, Guerino: intervengono poi altri personaggi come il dottore, il confessore e il notaio, solo nel finale apprendiamo che il colpevole dell’avvelenamento è la moglie (in alcune versioni la sorella oppure più raramente la madre)

ANGUILLA O SERPENTE?

L’avvelenamento avviene per mezzo di un’anguilla. L’anguilla era un cibo molto apprezzato nel Medioevo, e consumato anche in zone lontane dal mare in quanto si poteva conservare a lungo viva. Ma si sa l’anguilla ha un aspetto serpentino e in effetti il capitone (cioè l’anguilla con la grossa testa) è spesso paragonato, almeno in Italia, al pene maschile.
A prima vista l’avvelenamento potrebbe trattarsi di una vendetta da parte della moglie o dell’amante a causa di un tradimento e viene spontaneo il parallelo con un altro filo rosso tracciato per l’Europa quello della “Morte Occultata” (vedi) anzi le due ballate si potrebbero dire originate da una stessa antica fonte mitologica: l’eroe va a caccia nel bosco e viene avvelenato da una misteriosa dama, quindi ritorna a casa e lascia il suo testamento.
Secondo l’interpretazione psicanalitica di Giordano Dall’Armellina in chiave archetipa ecco che intravediamo l’insegnamento-rito di passaggio che veniva impartito anticamente tramite il racconto “Le lezioni relative alla morte occultata sono sicuramente più antiche e propenderei per una derivazione da queste per lo sviluppo delle versioni italiane ed europee in genere, relative al testamento dell’avvelenato. Per questa versione comasca si potrebbe ritenere che l’eroe sia andato a caccia con la sua cagnola. Deve dimostrare di essere un vero uomo, ovvero di essere passato nel mondo degli adulti, e di poter procacciare cibo attraverso la caccia come era consuetudine nelle società arcaiche. Tuttavia, l’eroe fallisce e incontra la sua dama che gli offre un’anguilla arrosto avvelenata. La dama è in realtà la morte, ma il suo senso di frustrazione per la prova fallita gli fa vedere nella dama/morte il volto della donna amata la quale, in una specie di transfert, lo umilia e lo punisce nella virilità offrendogli il suo stesso sesso rappresentato da un’anguilla avvelenata. Se non si passa nel mondo degli adulti il pene perde del tutto la sua forza ed è quindi rifiutato dalla donna che lo vuole invece garante come generatore della vita e della famiglia. In mancanza di queste garanzie, in una società dove generare tanti figli era la prova di massima virilità, la morte prende il sopravvento. Nella morte è coinvolta anche la cagnola; ritenuta colpevole in egual misura dal padrone per non averlo aiutato nella caccia, mangerà l’altra mezza anguilla. Alle fine, nel testamento, all’ultima domanda provocatrice della mamma, l’avvelenato lancerà una maledizione augurando la forca alla dama, che essendo la morte, non può morire. Tuttavia è anche una maledizione verso la donna amata per la quale si è sottoposto alla prova, fallita, di virilità. Nell’evoluzione della ballata si sono persi i contatti con le radici più profonde e rimane una storia di presunti tradimenti dove in ogni caso è una donna, derivazione della strega-morte, a compiere l’omicidio.
Il ritorno dell’eroe morente dalla mamma va visto come il ritorno alla madre terra che accoglierà il figlio di nuovo nel proprio grembo. Una figura paterna avrebbe disturbato, nell’inconscio collettivo, la visione archetipica dell’abbraccio consolatorio della Grande Madre.”

Le melodie sono quanto mai varie e spaziano dal lamento alla musica da danza o quanto meno allegra

Il canzoniere del Piemonte (voce Donata Pinti)
In questa versione il marito si rivolge alla moglie accusando un forte dolore e viene chiamato il notaio per fare testamento.

versione piemontese in Costantino Nigra #26 
“Moger l’ái tanto male,
signura moger

«Coz’ l’as-to mangià a sinha
cavaliero gentil
«Mangià d’ün’ anguilëlla
che ‘l mi cör stà mal!
“L’as-to mangià-la tüta
cavaliero gentil?»
«Oh sül che la testëta:
signora mojer”
«Coz’ l’as-to fáit dla resta
cavaliero gentil?»
«L’ái dà-la alla cagnëta:
signora mojer”
«Duv’ è-lo la cagnëta
cavaliero gentil?»
«L’è morta per la strada
signora mojer”
«Mandè a ciamè ’l nodaro
che ‘l mi cör stà mal!
«Coz’ vos-to dal nodaro,
cavaliero gentil?»
«Voi fare testamento:
oh signur nodar»
«Coz’ lass-to ai to frateli,
cavaliero gentil?»
«Tante bele cassinhe
oh signor notar”
«Coz’ lass-to ale tue sorele,
cavaliero gentil?»
Tanti bei denari
oh signor notar»
«Coz’ lass-to a la to mare,
cavaliero gentil?»
“La chiave del mio cuore
oh signur nodar»
«Coz’ lass-to a tua mogera,
cavaliero gentil?»
«La forca da impichela:
oh signur nodar»
L’è chila ch’ l’à ‘ntossià-me
oh signur nodar»
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
“Moglie mi fa tanto male,
signora moglie”
“Cos’hai mangiato a cena
gentile cavaliere?”
“Ho mangiato un’anguilla
che il mio cuore sta male”
“L’hai mangiata tutta
gentile cavaliere?”
“Solo la testa
signora moglie”
“Cosa ne hai fatto del resto
gentile cavaliere?”
“L’ho dato alla cagnolina
signora moglie”
“Dov’è la cagnolina
gentile cavaliere?”
“E’ morta per la strada,
signora moglie
Mandate a chiamare il notaio
che il mio cuore sta male”
“Cosa volete dal notaio
gentile cavaliere?”
“Vorrei fare testamento:
oh signor notaio”
“Cosa lasciate ai vostri fratelli
gentile cavaliere?”
“Tante belle cascine
oh signor notaio”
“Cosa lasciate alle vostre sorelle
gentile cavaliere?”
“Tanti bei soldi
oh signor notaio”
“Cosa lasciate a vostra madre
gentile cavaliere?”
“La chiave del mio cuore
oh signor notaio”
“Cosa lasciate a vostra moglie
gentile cavaliere?”
“La forca per impiccarla
oh signor notaio
perchè è lei che mi ha avvelenato
signor notaio!”

i Gufi, area lombarda

IL TESTAMENTO DELL’AVVELENATO (come cantato da Nanni Svampa)
I
Dove sii staa jersira
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Dove sii staa jersira?
II
Son staa da la mia dama
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Son staa da la mia dama.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
III
Cossa v’halla daa de cena
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa v’halla daa de cena?
IV
On’inguilletta arrosto
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
On’inguilletta arrosto.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
V
L’avii mangiada tuta
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
L’avii mangiada tuta?
VI
Non n’ho mangiaa che meza
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Non n’ho mangiaa che meza.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
VII
Cossa avii faa dell’altra mezza
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa avii faa dell’altra mezza?
VIII
L’hoo dada alla cagnola,
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
L’hoo dada alla cagnola.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
IX
Cossa avii faa de la cagnola
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa avii faa de la cagnola?
X
L’è morta ‘dree a la strada,
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
L’è morta ‘dree a la strada.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XI
La v’ha giust daa ‘l veleno
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil,
la v’ha giust daa ‘l veleno?
XII
Mandee a ciamà ‘l dottore
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Mandee a ciamà ‘l dottore.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè.
XIII
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l dottore
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l dottore?
XIV
Per farmi visitare
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Per farmi visitare.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XV
Mandee a ciamà ‘l notaro
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Mandee a ciamà ‘l notaro.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XVI
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l notaro
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Perchè vorii ciamà ‘l notaro?
XVII
Per fare testamento
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Per fare testamento.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XVIII
Cossa lassee alli vostri fratelli
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alli vostri fratelli?
XIX
Carozza coi cavalli
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
Carozza coi cavalli.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XX
Cossa lassee alle vostre sorelle
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alle vostre sorelle?
XXI
La dote per maritarle
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
La dote per maritarle.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XXII
Cossa lassee alli vostri servi
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alli vostri servi?
XXIII
La strada d’andà a messa
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
La strada d’andà a messa.
Ohimè ch’io moro, ohimè!
XXIV
Cossa lassee alla vostra dama
figliol, mio caro fiorito e gentil?
Cossa lassee alla vostra dama?
XXV
La forca da impicarla
signora mamma, mio core sta mal!
La forca da impicarla.
Ohimèèèè ch’io mooooooro, ohiiiiiiiimè!

Monica Bassi & Bandabrian la versione dal Veneto (accorata interpretazione e bellissime immagini in bianco e nero)

La Piva dal Carner (diventati poi BEV, Bonifica Emiliana Veneta), 1995. La versione emiliana. Qui il protagonista è un cavaliere cortese di nome Enrico

Musicanta Maggio (sempre di area emiliana) in cui si aggiunge la strofa della cagnolina pure lei morta avvelenata per aver mangiato un pezzo d’anguilla. Il finale prosegue con il testamento

Angelo Branduardi in Futuro Antico III

Piva del Carner
I
Dov’è che sté ier sira,
fiól mio Irrico?
Dov’è che sté ier sira,
cavaliere gentile?
Sun ste da me surèla,
mama la mia mama
sun ste da me surèla
che il mio core sta male.
II
Che t’à dato da cena,
fiól mio Irrico?
Che t’à dato da cena,
cavaliere gentile?
Un’anguillina arosto,
mama la mia mama
un’anguillina arosto
che il mio core sta male.
III
Dove te l’ha condita,
fiól mio Irrico?
Dove te l’ha condita,
cavaliere gentile?
In un piattino d’oro,
mama la mia mama
in un piattino d’oro
che il mio core sta male.
IV
Che parte è stè la tua,
fiól mio Irrico?
Che parte è stè la tua,
cavaliere gentile?
La testa e non la coda,
mama la mia mama/
la testa e non la coda
che il mio core sta male.
V
Andè a ciamèr al prete,
mama la mia mama
andè a ciamèr al prete
che il mio core sta male.
Sin vot mai fèr dal prete,
fiól mio Irrico?
sin vot mai fèr dal prete,
cavaliere gentile?
VI
Mi devo confessare,
mama la mia mama
Mi devo confessare,
che il mio core sta male
m’avete avvelenato
mama la mia mama.
m’avete avvelenato
e il mio core sta male.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Dove sei stato ieri sera,
Enrico, figlio mio,
Dove sei stato ieri sera,
cavaliere cortese?
Sono stato da mia sorella,
mamma mia, 
da mia sorella
e il mio cuore è ammalato
II
Che cosa ti ha dato per cena 
Enrico, figlio mio,
Che cosa ti ha dato per cena
cavaliere cortese?
L’anguilla arrosto
mamma mia,
l’anguilla arrosto 
e il mio cuore è ammalato
III
Come te l’ha acconciata 
Enrico, figlio mio, 
Come te l’ha acconciata 
cavaliere cortese?
In un piattino d’oro 
mamma mia,
in un piattino d’oro
e il mio cuore è ammalato
IV
Qual’è stato il tuo pezzo 
Enrico, figlio mio,
Qual’è stato il tuo pezzo
cavaliere cortese?
La testa e non la coda 
mamma mia, mamma,
la testa e non la coda
 e il mio cuore è ammalato
V
Andate a chiamare il prete 
mamma mia,
andate a chiamare il prete
che il mio cuore è ammalato.
Che te ne farai del prete 
Enrico, figlio mio,
Che te ne farai del prete 
cavaliere cortese?
VI
Mi devo confessare
mamma mia, mamma,
mi devo confessare  
che il mio cuore è ammalato,
mi avete avvelenato
mamma, mamma mia
mi avete avvelenato
e il mio cuore è ammalato

Paolo Galloni ci testimonia la seguente storia che ci permette di rintracciare “Il testamento dell’avvelenato” anche nelle zone dell’Appennino Parmigiano o Piacentino con il nome de “Il figliol Rico” (il figlio Enrico)
Lord Randal è stata una bella canzone tra le tante fino al 1995. Nell’estate di quell’anno in un mercatino di seconda mano ho trovato un disco intitolato ‘Canti popolari della Valle dei Cavalieri’; il nome evocativo si riferisce all’alta val d’Enza, che separa l’Appennino parmigiano da quello reggiano. Era una raccolta di canzoni registrate dalla viva voce degli anziani di lassù. Uno dei titoli, eseguito da due anziane sorelle del paese di Carbonizza, si chiamava ‘Il testamento dell’avvelenato’. Fin dalle prime note ha rivelato qualcosa di famigliare. Invece di perdere tempo in spiegazioni, riporto le prime due strofe:
In dove t’è stè ier sira, figliol mio Rico?
In dove t’è stè ier sira, cavaliere gentile?
Son stè da me soréla, mama la mia mama
Son sté da me sorella, che il mio cuore sta male
Cosa t’ha dato da cena, figliol mio Rico?
Cosa t’ha dato da cena, cavaliere gentile?
Un’anguillina arrosto, mama la mia mama
Un’anguillina arrosto, che il mio cuore sta male
Rico riferisce anche di averne gettato una porzione alla cagnetta, la quale “è già morta e sotterrata”. Diverso e inquietante è l’epilogo: sono la cara mamma e la sorellina ad aver pianificato l’avvelenamento del povero Rico. Le due ballate hanno la stessa trama (con tanto di anguilla) e, questo è il dato più sorprendente, la medesima struttura arcaica. In entrambi i casi i ritornelli formulari stanno al termine delle singole frasi e non delle strofe, come è tipico delle ballate ‘moderne’. Ascoltando Rico e Randal ho pensato -e penso tuttora- che certe canzoni hanno viaggiato come le merci e come i microbi, ma a differenza delle prime non costano nulla, a differenza dei secondi possono aiutare a guarire.”

Ulteriori versioni di Giordano Dall’Armellina con testo tratto dallo spartito musicale dalla raccolta del Bolza “Fonti Lombarde I, Canti di Como, Verese, Somma Lombardo” e del gruppo anconetano La Macina, sempre accompagnato dal testo. vedi

Ancora una versione proveniente da Riolunato cantata con l’idioma di Fanano (Mo)
Francesco Benozzo in Terracqueo 2013

FONTI
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio2.htm
https://igiornicantati.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/ballata-narrativa/