Bedfordshire May Day carols

Leggi in italiano

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]
The Lord and the Lady and the Moggers
On 1st May several customs were observed. Children would go garlanding, a garland being, typically, a wooden hoop over which a white cloth was stretched. A looser piece of cloth was fastened at the top which was used to cover the finished garland. Two dolls were fastened in the middle, one large and one small. Ribbons were sewn around the front edge and the rest of the space was filled with flowers. The dolls were supposed to represent the Virgin Mary and the Christ child. The children would stop at each house and ask for money to view the garland.

Another custom, prevalent throughout the county if not the country, was maying. It was done regularly until the outbreak of the First World War and, sporadically, afterwards. Young men would go around at night with may bushes singing May carols. In the morning a may bush was attached to the school flag pole, another would decorate the inn sign at the Crown and others rested against doors, designed to fall in when they were opened. Those maying included a Lord and a Lady, the latter the smallest of the young men with a veil and bonnet. The party also included Moggers or Moggies, a man and a woman with black faces, ragged clothes and carrying besom brushes. (from here)

VIDEO Here is a very significant testimony of Margery “Mum” Johnstone from  Bedforshide collected by Pete Caslte, with two May songs

Maypole dancers dance during May Day celebrations in the village of Elstow, Bedfordshire, in 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

From the testimony of Mrs Margery Johnstone this May Garland or “This Morning Is The 1st of May” was transcribed by Fred Hamer in his “Gay Garners”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017


MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

The carol is known as “The May Day Carol” or “Bedford May Carol” but also “The Kentucky May Carol” (as preserved in the May tradition in the Appalachian Mountains) and was collected in Bedfordshire.
A first version comes from  Hinwick as collected by Lucy Broadwood  (1858 – 1929) and transcribed into “English Traditional Songs and Carols” (London: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton from “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL
I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady, as in Cambridgshire, the contaminations with the creed of the dominant religion are inevitable
2) this sweet and fresh cream in a glass is a typically Elizabethan vintage-style drink-dessert still popular in the Victorian era, the Syllabub. The Mayers once offered “a syllabub of hot milk directly from the cow, sweet cakes and wine” (The James Frazer Gold Branch). And so I went to browse to find the historical recipe: it is a milk shake, wine (or cider or beer) sweetened and perfumed with lemon juice. The lemon juice served to curdle the milk so that it would form a cream on the surface, over time the recipe has become more solid, ie a cream with the whipped cream flavored with liqueur or sweet wine (see recipes) 

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste: in the background a tray full of syllabus glasses

3) the reference to the dew is not accidental, the tradition of May provides a bath in the dew and in the wild waters full of rain. The night is the magic of April 30 and the dew was collected by the girls and kept as a panacea able to awaken the beauty of women!! (see Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002, same tune of Cambridgeshire May Carol (not completely transcribed)

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY CAROL
I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady..
2) Syllabub (see above)
3) the stanza derives from “The Moon Shine Bright” version published by William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) see

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane from “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 ( I, II, III e IX) with The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
The song is reproposed in the Blog “A Folk song a Week”   edited by Andy Turner himself in which Andy tells us he had learned the song from the collection of Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred collected it from “Chris Marsom and others” – Mr Marsom had by that time emigrated to Canada, but Fred met him on a visit to his native Northill, Bedfordshire. Fred’s notes say “The Day Song is much too long for inclusion here and the Night Song has the same tune. It was used by Vaughan Williams as the tune for No. 638 of the English Hymnal, but he gave it the name of “Southill” because it was sent to him by a Southill man. Chris Marsom who sang this to me had many tales to tell of the reception the Mayers had from some of the ladies who were strangers to the village and became apprehensive at the approach of a body of men to their cottage after midnight on May Eve.”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (track 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy writes in the sleeve notes “May Song came from a Cynthia Gooding record which I lost 16 years ago, words stuck in my head.” (from II to VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) according to the previous religion, water received more power from the Beltane sun. Celts made pilgrimages to the sacred springs and with the spring water they sprinkled the fields to favor the rain.

Kerfuffle from “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

Carole di Primavera nel Bedforshide

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow may day songs 
Helston Furry Dance

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]Il Primo Maggio si seguivano alcune tradizioni. I bambini portavano la ghirlanda del Maggio ossia un cerchio formato con rami decorati con nastri e fiori, nel centro erano appese due bamboline, una grande che rappresentava la Vergine Maria e una più piccola che rappresentava Cristo bambino, un panno bianco era fissato sulla sommità per coprire tutta la ghirlanda. I bambini si fermavano ad ogni casa e chiedevano dei soldi per mostrare la ghirlanda sollevando il panno.
Un’altra tradizione diffusa in tutta la contea era il Maying, si faceva regolarmente fino allo scoppio della prima guerra mondiale e dopo solo sporadicamente: i giovani andavano in giro la notte con i rami del Maggio e cantavano i canti del Maggio, al mattino un ramo del maggio era attaccato al palo portabandiera della scuola, un altro decorava l’insegna della locanda “at the Crown” e altri erano appoggiati contro le porte in modo che finissero in casa quando si aprivano. Questi maggianti includevano un Signore e una Signora (il più giovane dei ragazzi con un velo sul volto e una cuffietta), tra i mummers anche i Moggers o Moggies un uomo e una donna con le facce annerite vestiti di stracci e con le scope 
(tradotto da qui)

VIDEO Ecco una testimonianza molto significativa di Margery “Mum” Johnstone dal Bedforshide raccolta da Pete Caslte, con due canzoni del Maggio

La danza del Palo durante  la festa del Maggio a Elstow, Bedfordshire, nel 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

Ancora dalla testimonianza della signora Margery Johnstone questa May Garland ovvero “This Morning Is The 1st of May” trascritta da Fred Hamer  nel suo  “Garners Gay”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Stamattina è il Primo di Maggio
il momento più importante dell’anno
e se vivrò e resterò qui
vi visiterò un altro anno
II
I campi e i prati
sono così verdi
come il tenero porro
il nostro Padre del Cielo li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
III
L’uomo tuttavia è solo un uomo, la sua vita è breve, è molto simile a un fiore
è qui oggi e domani non c’è più,
così tutto finisce nel giro di un ora.
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, devo andare
non posso restare più a lungo
vieni e — la mia bambola del Maggio
e guarda il mio ramo del Maggio
V
Ho una borsa in tasca
che è legata con un nastro di seta
e tutto ciò che le manca
è un po’ del tuo denaro
da infilare dentro

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

La carol è conosciuta con il nome più generico di “The May Day Carol” o “Bedford May Carol” ma anche come “The Kentucky May Carol” (come preservata nella tradizione del maggio nei Monti Appalachi) ed è stata raccolta nel Bedfordshire.
Una prima versione ci viene dalla tradizione di Hinwick come collezionata da Lucy Broadwood  (1858 –  1929)  e trascritta in “English Traditional Songs and Carols” ( Londra: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton in “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017


I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ho vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e  ora  ritorno ancora qui
per portarvi il ramo del maggio
II
Lo spino del Maggio mia cara, dico,
è davanti alla tua porta
non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
III
Vai nella dispensa e portami una coppa,
una coppa della tua dolce crema,
e se dovessi restare in città
ritornerò da voi un altro anno.
IV
Le siepi e i campi sono così verdi
e ogni foglia è rifiorita
il Nostro Padre dei Cieli li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
V
E quando sarò morto e nella tomba
e ricoperto dalla fredda terra
l’usignolo si fermerà a cantare
e il tempo trascorrerà via
VI
Prendi la Bibbia in mano
e leggi un capitolo
e quando il giorno del giudizio verrà
il Signore penserà a te
VII
Ho una borsa sul braccio destro
stretta con un nastro di seta
non vuole altro che un po’ d’argento
da infilare dentro
VIII
E ora che la canzone è quasi finita
non posso restare più a lungo
Dio vi benedica, grandi e piccini
e vi auguro un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna, come nella versione del Cambridgshire, inevitabili le contaminazioni con il credo della religione dominante
2) questa crema dolce e fresca in bicchiere è una bevanda-dessert tipicamente inglese d’epoca elisabettiana ancora popolare in epoca vittoriana, il Syllabub. Un tempo ai Mayers si offriva “una syllabub di latte caldo direttamente dalla mucca, torte dolci e vino” (Il ramo d’Oro James Frazer). E così sono andata a curiosare per ritrovare la ricetta storica: si tratta di un  frappè di latte, vino (o sidro o birra) zuccherato e profumato con succo di limone. Il succo di limone serviva a far cagliare il latte in modo che si formasse una crema in superficie,  nel tempo la ricetta è diventata più solida, cioè una crema con la panna montanta aromatizzata con del liquore o vino dolce (vedi ricette)

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste sullo sfondo un vassoio pieno di bicchieri di syllabubs

3) il riferimento alla rugiada non è casuale , la tradizione del maggio prevede il bagno nella rugiada e nelle acque selvatiche ricche di pioggia. La notte è quella magica del 30 aprile e la rugiada veniva raccolta dalle fanciulle e conservata come un toccasana in grado di risvegliare la bellezza femminile! (vedi Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002 la melodia è la stessa della Cambridgeshire May Carol (purtroppo il mio orecchio non riesce a distinguere bene alcune frasi.. lasciate in punteggiatura)


I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Un ramo del Maggio, così bello e allegro, sta davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio, ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
II
Alzati, bella fanciulla e fai entrare il Maggio perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino, potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
III
?
?
IV
Se non una coppa di crema fredda  (dateci) un boccale di birra scura
e se continueremo a  restare in città
ritorneremo da voi un altro anno.
V
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
siamo qui oggi e domani non ci saremo più
saremo tutti morti nel giro di un ora
VI
La luna brilla luminosa, le stelle si accendono
tra poco sarà giorno
così ricordatevi ..
e vi auguriamo un gioioso Maggio

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna.
2) il Syllabub (vedi sopra)
3) la strofa deriva da “The Moon Shine Bright” versione pubblicata da William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) vedi

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane in “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 (strofe I, II, III e IX) e a seguire The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
La canzone viene riproposta nel Blog “A Folk song a Week”   curato dallo stesso Andy Turner  in cui Andy ci dice di aver appreso la canzone dalla raccolta di Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred la collezionò da “Chris Marsom e altri” – Mr Marsom era già emigrato in Canada,ma Fred lo incontrò in visita a Northill, il suo paese natale nel Bedfordshire. Le note di Fred dicono “The Day Song è troppo lunga per essere inclusa qui e la Night Song ha la stessa melodia. E’ stata usata da Vaughan Williams come la melodia No. 638 nell’ English Hymnal, ma con il nome di “Southill” perchè gli era stata mandata da un uomo di Southill. Chris Marsom che me la cantò aveva molte storielle sull’accoglienza delle signore forestiere che vivevano da poco nel villaggio perchè si spaventavano quando i Maggianti si avvicinavano alla loro casa nel cuore della notte alla vigilia del 1° Maggio”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick in “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (traccia 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy scrive nelle note dell’album “May Song viene dalla registrazione di Cynthia Gooding che ho perso circa 16 anni fa, ma le parole mi sono rimaste in testa.” (strofe da II a VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati mia graziosa fanciulla
e prendi il nostro spino del Maggio
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti una allegra ghirlanda (il ramo del maggio)
III
Lo spino del Maggio portiamo in giro (porta l’allegria)
e sta davanti alla tua porta non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato per il lavoro di nostro Signore
IV
Alzati bella fanciulla per far entrare il Maggio, perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
V
Le porte del paradiso sono spalancate
per far fuggire la rugiada
è qui oggi, puntuale
e cade su di me e te
VI
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
non ci sono proroghe oggi c’è
e poi svanisce nel giro di un’ora
VII
E quando sarai morto
e nella tomba
sarai ricoperto dalla fredda terra
i vermi mangeranno la tua carne, buonuomo
e le tue ossa si consumeranno.
VIII
La canzone è finita ed è tempo di andare, non posso restare più a lungo. Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!
IX
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) secondo la precedente religione l’acqua riceveva maggior potere dal sole di Beltane. Si facevano pellegrinaggio alle sorgenti sacre e con l’acqua della sorgente si aspergevano i campi per favorire la pioggia.

Kerfuffle in “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati, dolce fanciulla,
a prendere lo Spino del Maggio,
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce
e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte del giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti il ramo del maggio
III
Un ramo del Maggio ti abbiamo portato, ed è davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio,
ma è ben sbocciato
per mano di Nostro Signore
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/