Carrickfergus or Do Bhí Bean Uasal

Leggi in italiano

“Carrickfergus” comes from a Gaelic song titled Do Bhí Bean Uasal (see) or “There Was a Noblewoman” and is also known by the name of “The Sick Young Lover”, which appeared in a broadside distributed in Cork and dated 1840 and also in the collection of George Petrie “Ancient Music of Ireland” 1855 with the name of “The Young Lady”. Text and melody passed through the oral tradition have spread and changed, without leaving a consistent trace in the collections printed in the nineteenth century. This song has been attributed to the irish bard Cathal “Buí”

IRISH BREIFNE
cathal buiCathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna (c1680-c1756) a rake-poet from Co. Cavan.
Curious character nicknamed “Buil” the yellow, a bard vagabond storyteller and composer of poems, which have spread throughout Ireland and are still sung today.
The scholar Breandán Ó Buachalla has published his collection in the book “Cathal Bui: Amhráin” in 1975. In Blacklion County of Cavan there is also a small stele in his memory and it is celebrated the Cathal Bui Festival (month of June).
A incomplete priest able with words and with women, he also had a lot of “irish humor” and was obviously a heavy drinker, he went around Breifne, the Irish name of the area including Cavan, Leitrim, and south of Fermanagh ( one of the many traveler with his caravan or even less).

PETER O’TOOLE

But it is the version known by Peter O’Toole that was the origin of the version of Dominic Behan recorded in the mid-1960s under the title “The Kerry Boatman“, and also the version recorded by Sean o’Shea always in the same years with the title “Do Bhí Bean Uasal”. Also the Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem made their own version with the title “Carrickfergus” in the 1964 “The First Hurray” LP.

Chieftains from “The Chieftains Live” 1977

DO BHÍ BEAN UASAL

This version has been attributed musically to Seán Ó Riada (John Reidy 1931-1971) it is not clear if it is only an arrangement or a real writing of the melody. Certainly the text is taken from the poetry of Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna.

Sean o’Shea in “Ò Riada Sa Gaiety” live in Dublino with the Ceoltóirí Chualann, 1969.

English translation
I
A lady was betrothed to me for a while
And she refused me, oh my hundred woes
I went to towns with her
And she made a cuckold (or a fool ) of  me before the world,
If I had got that head of hers into the church
And if I were again  n command of myself,
But now I’ weak and sore,  and there’s no getting of a  cure for me,
And my people will be weeping after me
II
I wish I had you in   Carrickfergus
not far from that place ‘Quiet Town”
Sailing over the deep blue waters
my bright love from a northern sky
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I
III
The cold and the heat are going together [in me]
and I can’t quench my thirst
And if I took my oath from November to February
I wouldn’t be ready until Michaelmas
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, my little darling, now   lay me down!

I

Do bhí bean uasal seal dá lua liom,
‘s do chuir sí suas díomsa faraoir géar;
Do ghabhas lastuas di sna bailte móra
Ach d’fhag sí ann é os comhair an tsaoil.
Dá bhfaighinnse a ceannsa faoi áirsí an teampaill,
Do bheinnse gan amhras im ‘ábhar féin;
Ach anois táim tinn lag is gan fáil ar leigheas agam.
Is beidh mo mhuintir ag gol im’ dhéidh.
II
I wish I had you in Carrickfergus
Ní fada ón áit sin go Baile Uí Chuain(1)/Sailing over the deep blue waters/ I ndiaidh mo ghrá geal is í ag ealó uaim./For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I.
III
Tá an fuacht ag teacht is an teas ag tréigint
An tart ní féidir liom féin é do chlaoi,
Is go bhfuil an leabhar orm ó Shamhain go Fébur
Is ní bheidh sí reidh liom go Féil’ Mhichíl;/I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, a stóirín, now lay me down!

NOTE
1) “baile cuain”= “quiet town” or Harbour Town

THE VERSION OF THE YEARS 60 AND MEANING

And we come to what remains of this song in our day, that is the version of Carrickfergus spread by the major interpreters of Celtic music.
The sweet melancholy of the melody and its uncertain textual interpretation have made the song very popular, some capture the romantic side and also play it at weddings, others at the funeral (for example that of John F. Kennedy Jr -1999).
Certainly it has something magical, sad and nostalgic, the man drowns in alcohol the pain of separation from his beloved (or more likely he drinks because he has a particular predilection for alcohol): a vast ocean divides them (or a stretch of sea) and he would like to be in Ireland, in Carrickfergus: he would like to have wings or to swim across the sea or more realistically find a boatman to take him to her, and finally he can die in her arms ( or at her tombstone) now that he is old and tired.

In my opinion, the general meaning of the text remains clear enough, but if you go into detail then many doubts arise, which I tried to summarize in the notes.

Loreena McKennitt & Cedric Smith  from Elemental, 1985


I
I wish I was
in Carrighfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrant (2)
I would swim over
the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrant.
But the sea is wide,
and I can’t swim over
Neither have I wings to fly
If I could find me a handsome boatman
To ferry me over
to my love and die(3)

II
Now in Kilkenny (4), it is reported
They’ve marble stones there as black as ink,
With gold and silver
I would  transport her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now,
till I get a drink
I’m drunk today,
but I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah, but I am sick now,
my days are over
Come all you young lads
and lay me down.(6)

NOTES
1) Carrickfergus (from the Gaelic Carraig Fhearghais, ‘Rocca di Fergus’) is a coastal town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, one of the oldest settlements in Northern Ireland. Here the protagonist says he wants to be at Carrickfergus (but evidently he is somewhere else) while in other versionssays “I wish I had you in Carrickfergus”: the meaning of the song changes completely.
Some want to set the story in the South of Ireland and they see the name of Fergus,as the river that runs through Ennis County of Clare.
2) Ballygran – Ballygrant – Ballygrand. There are three interpretations: the first that Ballygrant is in Scotland on the Hebrides (Islay island), the second that is the village of Ballygrot (from the Gaelic Baile gCrot means “settlement of hills”), near Helen’s Bay that it is practically in front of Carrickfergus over the stretch of sea that creeps over the north-east coast of Ireland (the Belfast Lough). It seems that the locals call it “Ballygrat” or Ballygrant “and that it is an ancient settlement and that at one time there were some races with the Carrickfergus boats at Ballygrat.The third is a corrupt translation from the Gaelic” baile cuain “of the eighteenth-century version and therefore both a generic quiet location, a small village.
But between the two sentences there is already an incongruity or better there is need of an interpretation, ascertained that Ballygrant is not a particular place of Carrickfergus for which the protagonist feels nostalgia for some specific connection with his love story passed in youth, then it is the place where it is at the moment. So the protagonist could be an Irishman who found himself in the Hebrides, but who would like to return to Carrickfergus from his old love or he is a Scot (who was a young soldier in Ireland) and remembers with regret the Irish woman loved in youth.
The protagonist could be in Helen’s Bay on the opposite side of the inlet that separates it from Carrickfergus: if he were healthy and young nothing would prevent him to go to Carrickfergus even on foot, but he is tired and he is dying and so in his fantasy or delirium he is looking at the sea in the direction of Carrickfergus deaming of flying towards his love of the past or he wants to be ferried by a boatman to be able to die next to her.
3) “and die” tells us that the protagonist who is in Ballygrant (wherever he is) would like to go to Carrickfergus to die in the arms of his love of youth.
In other versions the phrase is written as “To ferry me over my love and I” the protagonist would like to be transported by the boatman, together with his woman, to Carrickfergus. So nostalgia is about the place where the protagonist is supposed to have spent his youth and would like to see again before he died.
4) and 5)
Now on the Kilkenny stone it is written,
on black marble like ink,
with gold and silver I would like to comfort her
Replacing the verb “to transport” used by Loreena with “to support” more used in other versions. That is: on the black stone of Kilkenny (in the sense that it is usually a type of stone such as Carrara marble,  the black stone extracted from Kilkenny but also used in Ballygrant, wherever it is) that will be my tombstone where I have recorded my epitaph, I also wrote a sentence of comfort for my love
4) Kilkenny = Kilmeny some see a typo and note that Kilmeny is the parish church of Ballygrant (Islay Island) formerly a medieval church, also here there is a stone quarry, which was the main industry of Ballygrant in the eighteenth century and XIX. Now I ask myself: but with all these references to the Islay Island, (where at least there should be the tomb of the protagonist) how is it that the song is not known in the local tradition of the Hebrides and instead is it in Belfast?
6) the protagonist urges his friends to bury him

Nella versione live aggiunge anche la strofa intermedia che è stata scritta da Dominic Behan per la sua versione registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”.

Jim McCann in Dubliners Now 1975 (I and III)

Jim McCann live (with the second stanza written by Dominic Behan for his version recorded in the mid-1960s under the title “The Kerry Boatman”.

JIM MCCANN
I
I wish I was
in Carrickfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrand(2)
I would swim
over the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrand.
But the sea is wide
and I cannot swim over
And neither have I the wings to fly
I wish I had a handsome boatman
To ferry me over my love and I(3)
II
My childhood days
bring back sad reflections
Of happy time there spent so long ago
My boyhood friends
and my own relations
Have all passed on now
like the melting snow
And I’ll spend my days
in this endless roving
Soft is the grass and my bed is free
How to be back now
in Carrickfergus
On the long road down to the sea
 

III
And in Kilkenny
it is reported
On marble stone
there as black as ink
With gold and silver
I would support her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now
till I get a drink
‘cause I’m drunk today
and I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah but I am sick now
my days are numbered
Come all me young men
and lay me down

LINK
http://www.eofeasa.ie/cathalbui/public_html/danta_CB/who_was_CB.html
http://lookingatdata.com/m/204-mac-giolla-ghunna-cathal-bui.html
http://www.munster-express.ie/opinion/views-from-the-brasscock/the-yellow-bitternan-bonnan-bui/

http://jungle-bar.blogspot.it/2009/03/carrickfergus-ballad-of-peter-otoole.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16707
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=90070

THE WATER IS WIDE: RELICS FROM THE PAST

Si tratta di una canzone popolare diffusa in Gran Bretagna e in America, talvolta reputata di origine irlandese, dai molteplici testi riferibili ad una melodia univoca. In merito c’è un po’ di confusione essendo la versione cantata attualmente quella degli anni 60 di Pete Seeger, per cui molti ritengono che “The water is wide” appartenga alla balladry americana.

Come sempre Jürgen Kloss nel suo articolo “The Water Is Wide” The History Of A “Folksong” effettua un analisi accurata ed esaustiva dei testi e della melodia, pertanto mi limiterò a riassumere i punti salienti. Quando Pete Seeger registrò la canzone non era poi così popolare in America come voleva far credere ( in American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 2 1958). La versione originale del brano si trova nel Folk Songs From Somerset di Cecil Sharp e Charles Marson pubblicata a Londra nel 1906 con il titolo di “Waly, Waly” Sharp però non aveva raccolto la canzone da un’unica fonte bensì aveva messo insieme a tavolino strofe prese da vari frammenti. Come scrive Kloss “this is a very fascinating story that shows how mutilated relics of ancient popular songs were reinterpreted as remainders of “old folk songs” and then – restored to honor and patched together to a new “old” song – started a second, even more successful life”

Alcuni versi di “Waly, Waly” si trovano inglobati nella ballata “Jamie Douglas” (riportata in Child #204) che narra dell’infelice matrimonio tra il Marchese e Lady Barbara Erskine (vedi) e Allan Ramsay pubblica il brano con il titolo di “O Waly, Waly” nel suo Tea-Table Miscellany. Di certo la melodia fu molto popolare nel Settecento e nell’Ottocento e compare nelle maggiori raccolte scozzesi di allora come pure il testo “Waly, Waly” classificato come “vecchia ballata scozzese” venne regolarmente stampato.

Henry John Yeend King - Gathering Flowers

LA VERSIONE DI PETE SEEGER

Pete Seeger prende il testo di Cecil Sharp e gli mette un nuovo titolo, leva qualche verso, modifica la melodia e lo fa diventare il modello della versione “standard” dei nostri giorni. Jürgen Kloss riporta le tre fonti diverse delle registrazioni sul campo di Sharp, notando che già nel 1750 una ballata dal titolo “A new love song” pubblicata come broadside, era una raccolta di versi da ballate più antiche ribattezzata poi come “The Unfortunate Swain“. Anche Sharp nel restituire il testo “Waly, Waly” compie un frullato fra le varie fonti
E così conclude Kloss:“It seems that the original “Oh Waly, Waly” was literally broken into pieces by the writers of all those broadsides. They systematically plundered Ramsay’s text as well as those of other related songs. These verses were then disseminated by songs like “The Unfortunate Swain”, “I’m Often Drunk”, “The Wheel Of Fortune”, “Forsaken Lover”, “The Effects Of Love” and therefore the people kept them in their memory. In case of “The Water Is Wide” the route of transmission is easy to follow. At first there were the texts of “Oh Waly, Waly, Gin Love Be Bonny” as published by Allan Ramsay and William Thomson in the 1720s as well as some other songs printed on broadsides in the 17th century like “The Seaman’s Leave…”, “Arthur’s Seat Shall Be My Bed” and Martin Parker’s “Distressed Virgin”. Some verses from these texts were then borrowed and included in “new” songs like “The Unfortunate Swain” and “I’m Often Drunk And Seldom Sober” that were published on popular broadside sheets during the second half of the 18th century and in the early 19th century. Fragments of these songs were recalled by Mrs. Cox, Mr. Thomas and Mrs. Mogg during the years 1904 and 1906 for song collector Cecil Sharp. He then compiled his own new “old” song from those fragments and published it as “Oh Waly, Waly” in 1906 in Folk Songs From Somerset and in 1916 in One Hundred Folk Songs.
Cecil Sharp’s “Oh Waly, Waly” is the starting-point for the development of the modern “The Water Is Wide”. It was in effect a new song constructed from relics of two popular songs. He tried to put together a “Folk”-version of “Oh Waly, Waly” but the only connection to that old Scottish ballad was that the creators of the two broadside texts themselves had cribbed one respectively two verses from that song. Interestingly Sharp’s methods were strikingly similar to those of the writers of “The Unfortunate Swain” and other broadsides. They had compiled their songs from verses borrowed from different sources and claimed it was “new” while Sharp did exactly the same thing but preferred to regard his work as an “old” song. In fact both were only half right. In some way he had unwittingly followed the rules of the genre. A modern Folklorist will not regard his song as “authentic” but a professional author of broadside songs from the 18th or 19th century and also the singing “Folk” surely would not have been bothered by his methods.”

La ballata interpretata da Joan Baez e Bob Dylan è spesso accreditata erroneamente come american folk song:  è il lamento di un innamorato non più corrisposto, il mare che lo separa dall’altro può essere sia fisico (un emigrante che va a cercare fortuna in America) che spirituale (il mare dell’incomprensione) o la metafora di un ostacolo insormontabile (i marosi della vita). Ma si può trattare più semplicemente del raffreddarsi della passione da parte di uno dei due. Testo e melodia ricordano una canzone altrettanto enigmatica “Carrickfergus

LA MELODIA
ASCOLTA Mark Knopfler

ASCOLTA Rowena Taheny, Laurel MacDonald & Eleanor McCain in “Irish Roses: Women of Celtic Song” (strofe I, III, V, I)

ASCOLTA Holly Near, Arlo Guthrie, Ronnie Gilbert & Pete Seeger live

Una canzone entrata nel repertorio della musica classica
ASCOLTA Andreas Scholl in “English Folksongs & Lute Songs” 1996
(strofe I, II, III, V, VI)

VERSIONE STANDARD
I
The water is wide and I can’t cross over, and neither have I wings to fly,
Build me a boat that can carry two,
and both shall row my love and I.
II(1)
O, down in the meadows the other day
A-gath’ring flow’rs both fine and gay,
A-gathering flowers, both red and blue,
I little thought what love can do.
III
I leaned my back up against an oak,
Thinkin’ it was a trusty tree,
But first it bent and then it broke,
just like my own false love to me.
IV
I put my hand into some soft bush,
Thinking the sweetest flower to find.
I pricked my finger to the bone,
And left the sweetest flower alone.
V
There is a ship and it sails on the sea,
loaded deep as deep can be,
But not as deep as the love I’m in,
I know not if I sink or swim.
VI
Oh love is gentle and love is kind,
Gay as a jewel when first it’s new,
But love grows old and waxes cold,
And fades away like the morning dew.
VII
The seagulls wheel, they turn and dive,
The mountain stands beside the sea.
This world we know turns round and round,
And all for them – and you and me.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
L’oceano è vasto e non lo posso attraversare e nemmeno ho ali per volare, costruiscimi una barca che possa portarci in due, ed entrambi remeremo, io e il mio amore
II(1)
O per i prati l’altro giorno
a raccogliere fiori sia belli che gai,
a raccogliere fiori sia rossi
che blu, pensai poco a ciò che amore può fare
III
Appoggiai la schiena contro una quercia, credendo che fosse un albero fidato, ma prima si piegò e poi si ruppe
proprio come il mio falso amore con me
IV
Misi la mano in un soffice cespuglio
pensando di trovare il fiore più bello, punsi il dito con una spina e lascia il fiore più bello solo.
V
C’è una barca che naviga sul mare
a piano carico affonda quanto possibile, ma non così profondamente come l’amore che ho, così non so se affondare o nuotare
V
Oh amore è gentile e amore è bello,
gaio come un gioiello quando dapprima è nuovo, ma amore invecchia e si raffredda e svanisce come la rugiada del mattino.
VI
I gabbiani volteggiano, virano e si tuffano,
la montagna si erge sul mare
il mondo che conosciamo gira in torndo per loro – e per te e me

NOTE
1) i versi eXtra sono in  Folk Songs   From Somerset. Third Series e in One   Hundred English Folk Songs, Cecil Sharp; un’altra versione in One Hundred English Folk Songs Cecil Sharp diventa:
Where love is planted, O there it grows,
It buds and blossoms like some rose;
It has a sweet and a pleasant smell,
No flow’r on earth can it excel.
(in italiano: Dove l’amore è piantato, là cresce, spunta e sboccia come delle rose, ha un dolce profumo piacevole, nessun fiore sulla terra lo può superare.)

Con il titolo “When Cockle Shells Turn Silver Bells” parte del testo è abbinato però a una diversa melodia sebbene la canzone sia sottotitolata anche come Waly, Waly.

ASCOLTA Eva Cassidy in “American tune” 2003

I
When cockleshells turn to silvery bells
Then will my love return to me
When roses bloom in the wintry snow
Then will my love return to me
II
Oh waly waly love be Bonnie
And bright as a jewel when it’s first new
But love grows old and waxes cold
And fades away like morning dew
III
There is a ship it’s sailing the sea
It’s loaded high and deep can be
But not so deep as my love for you
I know not if I’ll sink or swim
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Quando le conchiglie diventeranno campanelle d’argento,
quando le rose fioriranno nella neve d’inverno, allora il il mio amore tornerà da me
II
Ahimè, ahimè amore è bello
e brilla come un gioiello quando dapprima è nuovo,
ma amore invecchia e si raffredda e svanisce come la rugiada del mattino.
III
C’è una barca che naviga sul mare
a piano carico affonda quanto possibile, ma non così profondamente come il mio more per te, così non so se affondare o nuotare

FONTI
http://www.justanothertune.com/html/wateriswide.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6823

(Cattia Salto febbraio 2014)

Carrickfergus ovvero Do Bhí Bean Uasal

Read the post in English

Il brano “Carrickfergus” proviene da un canto in gaelico dal titolo Do Bhí Bean Uasal (vedi) ovvero “There Was a Noblewoman” ed è conosciuto anche con il nome di “The Sick Young Lover“, comparso in un broadside distribuito a Cork e datato 1840 e anche nella raccolta di George Petrie “Ancient Music of Ireland” 1855 con il nome di “The Young Lady”. Testo e melodia passati attraverso la tradizione orale si sono diffusi e modificati, senza però lasciare una traccia consistente nelle raccolte stampate nell’Ottocento. E’ stato attribuito al bardo irlandese Cathal “Buí”

IRISH BREIFNE
cathal buiCathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna (c1680-c1756).
Curioso personaggio soprannominato “Builil giallo, un bardo vagabondo di cui non si ha notizia suonasse uno strumento particolare, ma sicuramente cantastorie e compositore di poesie, che si sono diffuse per tutta l’Irlanda e ancora oggi cantate.
Lo studioso Breandán Ó Buachalla ha pubblicato una raccolta nel libro “Cathal Bui: Amhráin” nel 1975. A Blacklion contea di Cavan c’è anche una piccola stele in sua memoria e si celebra il Cathal Bui Festival (mese di Giugno).
Sacerdote mancato ci sapeva fare con le parole e con le donne, era inoltre dotato di molto “irish humour” ed era ovviamente un forte bevitore, girava per il Breifne, il nome irlandese della zona che comprende Cavan, Leitrim, e a sud di Fermanagh (uno dei tanti traveller con il suo carrozzone o anche meno).

PETER O’TOOLE

Ma è la versione conosciuta da Peter O’Toole ad essere stata l’origine della versione di Dominic Behan registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”, e anche della versione registrata da Sean o’Shea sempre negli stessi anni con il titolo Do Bhí Bean Uasal. Anche i Clancy Brothers con Tommy Makem fecero una loro versione con il titolo “Carrickfergus” nell’LP “The First Hurrah” del 1964.

E qui è doveroso aprire una parentesi sugli anni 60: in America il presidente è John F. Kennedy, un discendete di emigranti irlandesi, gli irlandesi Clancy Brothers diventano delle star; in Irlanda e Inghilterra scoppia il “Ballad boom” e si affermano i Dubliners e i Wolfe Tones. Ma a questo successo riscosso dalla musica irlandese sulla scena internazionale per gran parte contribuì il lavoro dei Ceoltóirí Chualann, da cui si formerà il gruppo più rappresentativo della musica irlandese: i Chieftains.

Chieftains in “The Chieftains Live” 1977 quando c’era ancora l’arpa di Dereck Bell (1935-2002).

DO BHÍ BEAN UASAL

Questa versione è stata attribuita musicalmente a Seán Ó Riada (ovvero John Reidy 1931-1971) non è chiaro se si tratti solo di un arrangiamento o di una vera e propria scrittura della melodia. Di certo il testo è preso dalla poesia di Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna.

Sean o’Shea in “Ò Riada Sa Gaiety” live in Dublino con i Ceoltóirí Chualann nel 1969.

I
Do bhí bean uasal seal dá lua liom,
‘s do chuir sí suas díomsa faraoir géar;
Do ghabhas lastuas di sna bailte móra
Ach d’fhag sí ann é os comhair an tsaoil.
Dá bhfaighinnse a ceannsa faoi áirsí an
teampaill,
Do bheinnse gan amhras im ‘ábhar féin;
Ach anois táim tinn lag is gan fáil ar leigheas agam.
Is beidh mo mhuintir ag gol im’ dhéidh.
II
I wish I had you in Carrickfergus
Ní fada ón áit sin go Baile Uí Chuain(1)
Sailing over the deep blue waters
I ndiaidh mo ghrá geal is í ag ealó uaim.
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I.
III
Tá an fuacht ag teacht is an teas ag tréigint
An tart ní féidir liom féin é do chlaoi,
Is go bhfuil an leabhar orm ó Shamhain go Fébur
Is ní bheidh sí reidh liom go Féil’ Mhichíl;
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, a stóirín, now lay me down!

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
A lady was betrothed to me for a while
And she refused me, oh my hundred woes
I went to towns with her
And she made a cuckold (or a fool ) of  me before the world,
If I had got that head of hers into the church
And if I were again  n command of myself, But now I’ weak and sore,  and there’s no getting of a  cure for me, And my people will be weeping after me
II
I wish I had you in   Carrickfergus
not far from that place ‘Quiet Town”
Sailing over the deep blue waters
my bright love from a northern sky
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I
III
The cold and the heat are going together [in me]
and I can’t quench my thirst
And if I took my oath from November to February
I wouldn’t be ready until Michaelmas
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, my little darling, now   lay me down!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Una Lady mi fu promessa sposa per un certo tempo,
e lei mi rifiutò,
oh i miei cento affanni
andai in città con lei
e lei mi ha reso pazzo (o cornuto) di fronte a tutti
se avessi avuto lei al fianco in quella chiesa
e se fossi ancora padrone di me stesso
ma ora sono debole e malato e nessuno si prende cura di me
e la mia gente mi piangerà
II
Vorrei essere a Carrickfergus
non lontano da quella città portuale
a navigare sul vasto oceano
il mio amore che brilla nel cielo del Nord
perché il mare è profondo, amore, e non riesco restare a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare,
vorrei incontrare un abile barcaiolo
che possa trasportare il mio amore e me.
III
Caldo e freddo dentro di me
e non riesco a placare la mia sete
e se ho fatto il giuramento da Novembre a Febbraio
non sarà pronto che al giorno di San Michele
Sono raramente ubriaco, senza mai essere completamente sobrio
un bel vagabondo da città in città.
Vieni Molly, mia cara, e fammi distendere ora.

NOTE
1) “baile cuain” letteralmente significa “quiet town” tradotta anche come Harbour Town

LA VERSIONE DEGLI ANNI 60 E SIGNIFICATO

E veniamo a ciò che resta del brano ai nostri giorni, ovvero della versione di Carrickfergus diffusa dai maggiori interpreti della musica celtica.
La dolce malinconia della melodia e la sua incerta interpretazione testuale hanno reso il brano molto popolare, alcuni ne colgono il lato romantico e lo suonano anche ai matrimoni, altri ai funerali (ad esempio quello di John F. Kennedy Jr -1999).
Di certo ha un che di magico, triste e nostalgico, l’uomo annega nell’alcool il dolore per la separazione dalla sua amata (o più probabilmente beve perché ha una particolare predilezione per l’alcool): un vasto oceano li divide (o un tratto di mare) e lui vorrebbe essere in Irlanda, a Carrickfergus: vorrebbe avere le ali o poter attraversare la distesa d’acqua a nuoto o più realisticamente trovare un barcaiolo che lo porti da lei, e finalmente potrà morire tra le sue braccia (o presso la di lei lapide) adesso che è vecchio e stanco.

Il senso generale del testo resta quindi a mio avviso abbastanza chiaro, ma se si va nel dettaglio allora nascono molte perplessità, che ho cercato di riassumere nelle note.

Carrighfergus (Music Video) versione di Loreena McKennitt e Cedric Smith  in Elemental, 1985


VERSIONE DI LOREENA MCKENNITT
I
I wish I was
in Carrighfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrant (2)
I would swim over
the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrant.
But the sea is wide,
and I can’t swim over
Neither have I wings to fly
If I could find me a handsome boatman
To ferry me over
to my love and die(3)
II
Now in Kilkenny (4), it is reported
They’ve marble stones there as black as ink,
With gold and silver
I would  transport her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now,
till I get a drink
I’m drunk today,
but I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah, but I am sick now,
my days are over
Come all you young lads
and lay me down.(6)

traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei essere
a Carrighfergus
solo per le notti
a Ballygrant
avrei nuotato
nell’oceano più profondo
solo per le notti a Ballygrant.
Ma il mare è vasto
e non posso rimanere a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare
se potessi trovare un abile barcaiolo
per traghettarmi fino
al mio amore e morire.
II
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny è scritto,
un marmo nero
come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento
che vorrei confortarla
ma non canterò più ora,
se non prendo da bere.
Adesso sono ubriaco,
ma raramente sono sobrio
un bel vagabondo
da città in città
Ah, eppure adesso sono malato
i miei giorni stanno finendo,
venite tutti ragazzi
e fatemi distendere.

NOTE
1) Carrickfergus (dal gaelico Carraig Fhearghais, ‘Rocca di Fergus’) è una città costiera nella Contea di Antrim , Irlanda del Nord, uno dei più antichi insediamenti in Irlanda del Nord. Qui il protagonista dice di voler essere a Carrickfergus (ma evidentemente è da qualche altra parte) mentre in altre versioni troviamo I wish I had you in Carrickfergus: il significato della canzone cambia completamente.
Alcuni vogliono ambientare la storia nel Sud dell’Irlanda ed ecco che allora vedono il nome del Fergus, il fiume che attraversa Ennis contea di Clare.
2) Ballygran – Ballygrant – Ballygrand. Ci sono ameno tre interpretazioni: la prima che Ballygrant sia in Scozia sulle Isole Ebridi (l’isola di Islay), la seconda che sia il villaggio di Ballygrot (dal gaelico Baile gCrot significa “insediamento di collinette”), vicino a Helen’s Bay che si trova in pratica di fronte a Carrickfergus oltre il tratto di mare che si insinua a frastagliare la costa Nord-est dell’Irlanda (il Belfast Lough). Pare che gli abitanti del posto lo chiamino “Ballygrat” o Ballygrant” e che sia un antico insediamento e che un tempo si tenevano delle gare con le barche da Carrickfergus a Ballygrat. La terza che sia una traduzione corrotta dal gaelico “baile cuain” della versione settecentesca e quindi sia una generica località tranquilla, un piccolo paesello.
Ma tra le due frasi c’è già un incongruenza o meglio c’è bisogno di un’interpretazione, appurato che Ballygrant non sia un posto particolare di Carrickfergus per il quale il protagonista prova nostalgia per qualche collegamento specifico con la sua storia d’amore passata in gioventù, allora si tratta del posto in cui invece si trova al momento. Quindi il protagonista potrebbe essere un irlandese che si è ritrovato nelle Isole Ebridi, ma che vorrebbe ritornare a Carrickfergus dal suo vecchio amore o che è uno scozzese (che quando era giovane faceva il soldato in Irlanda) e ricorda con rimpianto la donna irlandese amata in gioventù; oppure che il protagonista si trova a Helen’s Bay dalla parte opposta dell’insenatura che lo divide da Carrickfergus. Ma qui il ragionamento fa un po’ acqua (tanto per restare in tema), però solo fino a un certo punto: se fosse infatti sano e giovane niente gli impedirebbe di andare a Carrickfergus anche a piedi, ma lui è stanco e morente e quindi nella sua fantasia o delirio guardando il mare in direzione di Carrickfergus sogna di volare verso il suo amore del passato o desidera essere traghettato da un barcaiolo per poter morire accanto a lei.
3) “and die” ci dice che il protagonista che si trova a Ballygrant (ovunque esso sia) vorrebbe andare a Carrickfergus per morire tra le braccia del suo amore di gioventù.
In altre versioni la frase è scritta come “To ferry me over my love and I” e questo a parte la sgrammaticatura vorrebbe significare che il protagonista vorrebbe essere trasportato dal barcaiolo, insieme con la sua donna, a Carrickfergus. Quindi la nostalgia si condensa sulla località in cui si presume il protagonista abbia trascorso la gioventù e che vorrebbe rivedere prima di morire.
4) e 5) io per dare un senso compiuto alla frase ho tradotto come:
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny è scritto,
su marmo nero come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento che vorrei confortarla

Sostituendo il verbo “to transport” utilizzato da Loreena con “to support” più utilizzato nelle altre versioni. Ossia: sulla pietra nera di Kilkenny (nel senso che si da in genere ad una tipologia di pietra ad esempio marmo di Carrara, quindi la pietra nera estratta a Kilkenny ma utilizzata anche a Ballygrant, ovunque esso sia) che sarà la mia pietra tombale dove ho inciso il mio epitaffio, ho scritto anche una frase di conforto per il mio amore
4) Kilkenny = Kilmeny alcuni vedono un refuso e notano che Kilmeny è la chiesa parrocchiale di Ballygrant (Isola di Islay) già località di una chiesa d’epoca medievale, anche qui c’è una cava di pietre, che era l’industria principale di Ballygrant nei secoli XVIII e XIX. Ora io mi domando: ma con tutte questi riscontri nell’Isola di Islay, (dove come minimo dovrebbe esserci la tomba del protagonista) com’è che il brano non è noto nella tradizione locale delle Isole Ebridi e invece lo è a Belfast?
6) il protagonista esorta gli amici a seppellirlo

Ho selezionata per l’ascolto anche questa versione che mi piace molto per la sua raffinata sobrietà nell’arrangiamento strumentale e l’interpretazione vocale di Jim McCann. Nella versione live aggiunge anche la strofa intermedia che è stata scritta da Dominic Behan per la sua versione registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”.

The Dubliners (voce Jim McCann) in Dubliners Now 1975 dove canta la I e la III strofa

live Jim McCann con tutte e tre le strofe


VERSIONE DI JIM MCCANN
I
I wish I was
in Carrickfergus
Only for nights
in Ballygrand(2)
I would swim
over the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrand.
But the sea is wide
and I cannot swim over
And neither have I the wings to fly
I wish I had a handsome boatman
To ferry me over my love and I(3)
II
My childhood days
bring back sad reflections
Of happy time there spent so long ago
My boyhood friends
and my own relations
Have all passed on now
like the melting snow
And I’ll spend my days
in this endless roving
Soft is the grass and my bed is free
How to be back now
in Carrickfergus
On the long road down to the sea
III
And in Kilkenny
it is reported
On marble stone
there as black as ink
With gold and silver
I would support her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now
till I get a drink
‘cause I’m drunk today
and I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah but I am sick now
my days are numbered
Come all me young men
and lay me down

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei essere
a Carrighfergus
solo per le notti
a Ballygrand
avrei nuotato
nell’oceano più profondo
solo per le notti a Ballygrant.
Ma il mare è vasto
e non posso rimanere a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare
se potessi trovare un abile barcaiolo
per traghettare il mio amore e me.
II
I giorni della gioventù
richiamano tristi pensieri
di momenti felici oramai trascorsi
gli amici di gioventù
e le mie storie d’amore
sono svaniti adesso
come neve al sole
e trascorrerò i giorni
in questo eterno girovagare.
Soffice è l’erba e il giaciglio è gratis
come vorrei ssere di nuovo
a Carrickfergus
sulla lunga strada verso il mare
III
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny
è scritto,
marmo nero
come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento
che vorrei confortarla
ma non canterò più,
se non prendo da bere,
perché oggi sono ubriaco,
e raramente sono sobrio
un bel vagabondo
da città in città
Ah,eppure adesso sono malato
i miei giorni stanno finendo,
venite tutti ragazzi
e fatemi distendere.

FONTI
Su Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna
http://www.eofeasa.ie/cathalbui/public_html/danta_CB/who_was_CB.html
http://lookingatdata.com/m/204-mac-giolla-ghunna-cathal-bui.html
http://www.munster-express.ie/opinion/views-from-the-brasscock/the-yellow-bitternan-bonnan-bui/

http://jungle-bar.blogspot.it/2009/03/carrickfergus-ballad-of-peter-otoole.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16707
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=90070