Windy old weather (Fishes Lamentation)

Leggi in italiano

The songs of the sea run from shore to shore, in particular “Windy old weather”, which according to Stan Hugill is a song by Scottish fishermen entitled “The Fish of the Sea”, also popular on the North-East coasts of the USA and Canada.
TITLES: Fishes Lamentation, Fish in the Sea, Haisboro Light Song (Up Jumped the Herring), The Boston Come-All-Ye, Blow Ye Winds Westerly, Windy old weather

A forebitter sung occasionally as a sea shanty, redating back to 1700 and probably coming from some broadsides with the title “The Fishes’ Lamentation“. “This song appears on some broadsides as The Fishes’ Lamentation and seems to have survived as a sailor’s chantey or fisherman’s song. Whall (1910), Colcord (1938) and Hugill (1964) include it in their chantey books. We also recorded it from Bob Roberts on board his Thames barge, The Cambria. It also appears in the Newfoundland and Nova Scotia collections of Ken Peacock and Helen Creighton“. (from here)

A fishing ship is practicing trawling on a full moon night, and as if by magic, the fishes start talking and warning sailors about the arrival of a storm. The fishes described are all belonging to the Atlantic Ocean and are quite commonly found in the English Channel and the North Sea (as well as in the Mediterranean Sea).
The variants can be grouped into two versions

FIRST VERSION  Blow the Man down tune

In this version the fish warn (or threaten) the fishermen on the arrival of the storm, urging them to head to the ground. The text is reported in “Oxford Book of Sea Songs”, Roy Palmer

Bob Roberts, from Windy old weather, 1958

David Tinervia · Nils Brown · Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · David Gossage from Assassin’s Creed – Black Flag
“Windy Old Weather”

Dan Zanes &  Festival Five Folk from Sea Music 2003 a fresh version between country and old time.

I
As we were a-fishing
off Happisburgh(1) light
Shooting and hauling
and trawling all night,
In the windy old weather,
stormy old weather
When the wind blows
we all pull together
II
When up jumped a herring,
the queen (king) of the sea(2)
Says “Now, old skipper,
you cannot catch me,”
III
We sighted a Thresher(3)
-a-slashin’ his tail,
“Time now Old Skipper
to hoist up your sail.”
IV (4)
And up jumps a Slipsole
as strong as a horse(5),
Says now, “Old Skipper
you’re miles off course.”
V
Then along comes plaice
-who’s got spots on his side,
Says “Not much longer
-these seas you can ride.”
VI
Then up rears a conger(6)
-as long as a mile,
“Winds coming east’ly”
-he says with a smile.
VII
I think what these fishes
are sayin’ is right,
We’ll haul up our gear(7)
now an’ steer for the light.

NOTES
1) Happisburgh lighthouse (“Hazeboro”) is located in the English county of ​​Norfolk, it was built in 1790 and painted in white and red stripes; It is managed by a foundation that deals with the maintenance of more than one hundred lighthouses throughout Great Britain. 112 are the steps to reach the tower that still works without the help of man. The headlights at the beginning were two but the lower one was dismantled in 1883 due to coastal erosion. The two lighthouses marked a safe passage through the Haagborough Sands
2) In the Nordic countries herrings (fresh or better in brine or smoked) are served in all sauces from breakfast to dinner. “It is a fish that loves cold seas and lives in numerous herds.The herring fishing in the North Seas has been widespread since the Middle Ages.It is clearly facilitated by the quantity of fish and the limited range of their movements. trawlers and start the fishing season on May 1, to close it after two months.In all the countries of North America and Northern Europe this fishing has an almost sacred character, because it has been for years the providence of fishermen and is a real natural wealth In the Netherlands and Sweden, for example, the first day of herring fishing is organized in honor of the queen and is proclaimed a national holiday ” (from here)
3) Thresher shark thresher, thrasher, fox shark, alopius vulpinus.with a characteristic tail with a very elongated upper part (almost as much as the length of the body) that the animal uses as a whip to stun and overwhelm its prey. The name comes from Aristotle who considered this fish very clever, because he was skilled in escaping from the fishermen
4) the mackerel stanza is missing:
then along comes a mackerel with strips on his back
“Time now, old skipper, to shift yout main tack”
5) perhaps refers to halibut or halibut, of considerable size, has an oval and flattened body, similar to that of a large sole, with the eyes on the right side
6) the “conger” is a fish with an elongated body similar to eel but more robust, can reach a length of two or three meters and exceeds ten kilos of weight. It is a fundamental ingredient in the Livorno cacciucco dish!
7) another translation of the sentence could be: we recover our networks

SCOTTISH VERSION, Blaw the Wind Southerly tune

In this version the fish take possession of the ship, it seems the description of the ghost ship of “Davy Jone”, the evil spirit of the waters made so vividly in the movie “Pirates of the Caribbean”. An old Scottish melody accompanies a series of variations of the same song.
davy-jones

 

Quadriga Consort from Ship Ahoy, 2011 ♪ 

Michiel Schrey, Sean Dagher, Nils Brown from, Assasin’s Creed – Black Flag  titled “Fish in the sea” (stanzas from I to III and VIII)

I
Come all you young sailor men,
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish in the sea;
(Chorus)
And it’s…Windy weather, boys,
stormy weather, boys,
When the wind blows,
we’re all together, boys;
Blow ye winds westerly,
blow ye winds, blow,
Jolly sou’wester, boys,
steady she goes.
II
Up jumps the eel
with his slippery tail,
Climbs up aloft
and reefs the topsail.
III
Then up jumps the shark
with his nine rows of teeth,
Saying, “You eat the dough boys,
and I’ll eat the beef!”
IV
Up jumps the lobster
with his heavy claws,
Bites the main boom
right off by the jaws!
V
Up jumps the halibut,
lies flat on the deck
He says, ‘Mister Captain,
don’t step on my neck!’
VI
Up jumps the herring,
the king of the sea,
Saying, ‘All other fishes,
now you follow me!’
VII
Up jumps the codfish
with his chuckle-head (1),
He runs out up forward
and throws out the lead!
VIII
Up jumps the whale
the largest of all,
“If you want any wind,
well, I’ll blow ye a squall(2)!”

NOTES
1) literally “stupid head” is a common saying among the fishermen that the cod is stupid, because it does not recognize the bait and lets himself hoist docilely on board.
2) the fishermen were / are very superstitious men, in all latitudes, it takes little or nothing to attract misfortune in the sea, it is still a widespread belief that the devil or the evil spirit has power over the sea and storms.

AMERICAN VARIANT: THE BOSTON COME-ALL-YE

Of the second version, the best-known in America bears the title “The Boston as-all-ye” as collected by Joanna Colcord in her “Songs of American Sailormen” which she writes”There can be little doubt that [this] song, although it was sung throughout the merchant service, began life with the fishing fleet. We have the testimony of Kipling in Captains Courageous that it was a favourite within recent years of the Banks fishermen. It is known as The Fishes and also by its more American title of The Boston Come-All-Ye. The chorus finds its origin in a Scottish fishing song Blaw the Wind Southerly. A curious fact is that Captain Whall, a Scotchman himself, prints this song with an entirely different tune, and one that has no connection with the air of the Tyneside keelmen to which our own Gloucester fishermen sing it. The version given here was sung by Captain Frank Seeley.”

Peggy Seeger from  Whaler Out of New Bedford, 1962

I
Come all ye young sailormen
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish of the sea.
Then blow ye winds westerly,
westerly blow;
we’re bound to the southward,
so steady she goes
.
II
Oh, first came the whale,
he’s the biggest of all,
he clumb up aloft,
and let every sail fall.
III
Next came the mackerel
with his striped back,
he hauled aft the sheets
and boarded each tack(1).
IV
The porpoise(2) came next
with his little snout,
he grabbed the wheel,
calling “Ready? About!(3”
V
Then came the smelt(4),
the smallest of all,
he jumped to the poop
and sung out, “Topsail, haul!”
VI
The herring came saying,
“I’m king of the seas!
If you want any wind,
I’ll blow you a breeze.”
VII
Next came the cod
with his chucklehead (5),
he went to the main-chains
to heave to the lead.
VIII
Last come the flounder(6)
as flat as the ground,
saying, “Damn your eyes, chucklehead, mind how you sound”!

NOTES
1) In sailing, tack is a corner of a sail on the lower leading edge. Separately, tack describes which side of a sailing vessel the wind is coming from while under way—port or starboard. Tacking is the maneuver of turning between starboard and port tack by bringing the bow (the forward part of the boat) through the wind. (from Wiki)
2) porpoise is often considered as a small dolphin, has a distinctive rounded snout and has no beak like dolphins
3) it  is the helmsman shouting
4 ) smelt it (osmero) is a small fish that lives in the Channel and in the North Sea; its name derives from the fact that its flesh gives off an unpleasant odor
5) literally “stupid head” is a common saying among the fishermen that the cod is stupid, because it does not recognize the bait and lets himself hoist docilely on board.

Blow the Wind Southerly

LINK
http://www.pubblicitaitalia.com/ilpesce/2013/1/12262.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/fishes.html
http://moodpoint.com/lyrics/unknown/song_of_the_fishes.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/windy-old-weather.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/windyoldweather.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149445
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49498
https://thesession.org/tunes/11479
http://bestpossiblejob.blogspot.it/2008/09/come-all-ye-young-and-not-so-young.html

Windy old weather (Fishes Lamentation)

Read the post in English

Le canzoni del mare si rincorrono da sponda a sponda, in particolare “Windy old weather“, che secondo Stan Hugill è una canzone dei pescatori scozzesi dal titolo “The Fish of the Sea, popolare anche sulle coste Nord- Est degli USA e del Canada.
TITOLI: Fishes Lamentation, Fish in the Sea, Haisboro Light Song (Up Jumped the Herring), The Boston Come-All-Ye, Blow Ye Winds Westerly, Windy old weather

Una forebitter song cantata occasionalmente come canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) risalente al 1700 e proveniente con tutta probabilità da alcuni broadsides con il titolo di “The Fishes’ Lamentation“. “Questa canzone appare su dei broadsides comeThe Fishes’ Lamentation potrebbe essere il resto di una canzone marinaresca o canzone dei pescatori. Whall (1910), Colcord (1938) e Hugill (1964) la includono nelle loro raccolte di shanty. E’ stata registrasta da Bob Roberts a bordo della sua chiatta sul Thames, The Cambria. La troviamo anche nelle raccolte di Terranova e Nuova Scozia di  Ken Peacock e Helen Creighton“. (tratto da qui)

Una nave di pescatori sta praticando la pesca a strascico in una notte di luna piena, e come per magia i pesci si mettono a parlare per avvisare i marinai dell’arrivo di una tempesta. I pesci descritti sono tutti appartenenti all’oceano atlantico e si trovano abbastanza comunemente nel Canale della Manica e nel Mare del Nord (come pure nel Mar Mediterraneo).
Le varianti si possono raggruppare in due versioni

PRIMA VERSIONE Melodia Blow the Man down

In questa versione i pesci avvisano (o minacciano) i pescatori  sull’arrivo della tempesta esortandoli a dirigersi verso terra. Il testo è riportato in “Oxford Book of Sea Songs”, Roy Palmer

Bob Roberts, in Windy old weather, 1958

David Tinervia · Nils Brown · Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · David Gossage in Assassin’s Creed – Black Flag con il titolo di “Windy Old Weather”

Dan Zanes &  Festival Five Folk in Sea Music 2003 una piacevole versione tra il country e l’ Old Time.


I
As we were a-fishing
off Happisburgh(1) light
Shooting and hauling
and trawling all night,
In the windy old weather,
stormy old weather
When the wind blows
we all pull together
II
When up jumped a herring,
the queen (king) of the sea(2)
Says “Now, old skipper,
you cannot catch me,”
III
We sighted a Thresher(3)
-a-slashin’ his tail,
“Time now Old Skipper
to hoist up your sail.”
IV (4)
And up jumps a Slipsole
as strong as a horse(5),
Says now, “Old Skipper
you’re miles off course.”
V
Then along comes plaice
-who’s got spots on his side,
Says “Not much longer
-these seas you can ride.”
VI
Then up rears a conger(6)
-as long as a mile,
“Winds coming east’ly”
-he says with a smile.
VII
I think what these fishes
are sayin’ is right,
We’ll haul up our gear(7)
now an’ steer for the light.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre eravamo a pescare
al largo del faro di Happisburgh
calando e recuperando
le reti da strascico per tutta la notte
con un tempo ventoso
un vento di tempesta,

quando il vento soffia
allora tiriamo tutti insieme.
II
Ecco che saltò in alto un’aringa,
la regina del mare
“Vecchio capitano
non riesci a prendermi!”
III
Avvistammo uno squalo volpe
che dimenava la coda
“E’ tempo vecchio capitano
di issare la vela”
IV
Salta su una sogliola
forte come un cavallo
“Vecchio capitano
sei fuori rotta”
V
Poi arrivò una platessa
con le macchie sul fianco
“Per non molto ancora
potrai solcare questi mari”
VI
Poi salta su un grongo
lungo un miglio
“I venti provengono da est”
dice con un sorriso.
V
Credo che questi pesci
dicano la verità
dispieghiamo le vele ora
e dirigiamoci verso la luce !

NOTE
1) il faro di Happisburgh (“Hazeboro”) si trova nella conta inglese di Norfolk, costruito nel 1790 è verniciato a righe bianche e rosse; è gestito da una fondazione che si occupa del mantenimento di più di cento fari in tutta la Gran Bretagna. 112 sono gli scalini per raggiungere la torre che funziona tutt’ora senza l’ausilio dell’uomo. I fari all’inizio erano due ma quello più basso è stato smantellato nel 1883 a causa dell’erosione costiera. I due fari segnavano un passaggio sicuro attraverso le Haagborough Sands
2) Nei paesi nordici (Scozia in testa of course) le aringhe (fresche o meglio in salamoia oppure affumicate)  sono servite in tutte le salse dalla prima colazione alla cena. “E’ un pesce che ama i mari freddi e vive in branchi numerosi. La pesca dell’aringa nei mari del Nord è diffusa sin dal Medioevo. È chiaramente facilitata dalla quantità dei pesci e dal raggio limitato dei loro spostamenti. I pescatori adoperano la rete a strascico e iniziano la stagione di pesca il primo maggio, per chiuderla dopo due mesi. In tutti i paesi del Nord America e del Nord Europa questa pesca ha un carattere quasi sacro, perché è stata per anni la provvidenza dei pescatori ed è una vera e propria ricchezza naturale. In Olanda e in Svezia, per esempio, il primo giorno di pesca all’aringa viene organizzato in onore della regina e viene proclamata festa nazionale. (tratto da qui)
3) Thresher shark thresher, thrasher, fox shark, alopius vulpinus. In italiano è lo “squalo volpe” dalla caratteristica coda con la parte superiore molto allungata (quasi quanto la lunghezza del corpo) che l’animale utilizza come scudiscio per stordire e sopraffare le prede. Il nome gli viene da Aristotele che considerava tale pesce molto furbo, perchè abile nello sfuggire ai pescatori
4) manca la strofa dello sgombro
then along comes a mackerel with strips on his back
“Time now, old skipper, to shift yout main tack”
5) forse si riferisce all’ippoglosso o halibut, di dimensioni notevoli, ha corpo ovale e schiacciato, simile a quello di una grande sogliola, con gli occhi sul lato destro
6) il “conger” (grongo) è un pesce dal corpo allungato simile all’anguilla ma più robusto, può arrivare alla lunghezza di due o tre metri e supera i dieci chili di peso. E’ un ingrediente fondamentale nel cacciucco livornese!
7)un’altra traduzione della frase potrebbe essere: recuperiamo le nostre reti

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE Melodia Blaw the Wind Southerly

In questa versione  i pesci s’impossessano della nave, sembra la descrizione della nave-fantasma di “Davy Jone”, lo spirito maligno delle acque reso così vividamente nel film “I pirati dei caraibi”.
davy-jones

Una vecchia melodia scozzese accompagna una serie di varianti della stessa canzone.

Quadriga Consort in Ship Ahoy, 2011 (versione completa)

Michiel Schrey, Sean Dagher, Nils Brown in Assasin’s Creed – Black Flag  con il titolo di “Fish in the sea” (da I a III e VIII)


I
Come all you young sailor men,
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish in the sea;
(Chorus)
And it’s…Windy weather, boys,
stormy weather, boys,
When the wind blows,
we’re all together, boys;
Blow ye winds westerly,
blow ye winds, blow,
Jolly sou’wester, boys,
steady she goes.
II
Up jumps the eel
with his slippery tail,
Climbs up aloft
and reefs the topsail.
III
Then up jumps the shark
with his nine rows of teeth,
Saying, “You eat the dough boys,
and I’ll eat the beef!”
IV
Up jumps the lobster
with his heavy claws,
Bites the main boom
right off by the jaws!
V
Up jumps the halibut,
lies flat on the deck
He says, ‘Mister Captain,
don’t step on my neck!’
VI
Up jumps the herring,
the king of the sea,
Saying, ‘All other fishes,
now you follow me!’
VII
Up jumps the codfish
with his chuckle-head (1),
He runs out up forward
and throws out the lead!
VIII
Up jumps the whale
the largest of all,
“If you want any wind,
well, I’ll blow ye a squall(2)!”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti voi, giovani marinai, ascoltatemi,
vi canterò una canzone
sui pesci del mare,
(coro)
è tempo ventoso, ragazzi,
tempo di tempesta,

quando il vento soffia,
stiamo tutti insieme.
Soffiate voi venti occidentali
soffiate venti, soffiate
vivaci (venti) di sud-ovest, ragazzi,

la barca dritta va.
II
A bordo salta l’anguilla
con la sua coda scivolosa
si arrampica in alto
e fa scendere le vele di gabbia.
III
Poi salta dentro lo squalo
con la sua chiosa di denti
dicendo ” Mangiatevi la pasta ragazzi che io mi mangio l’arrosto”
IV
Salta dentro l’aragosta
con le sue pesanti chele
morde il boma
proprio con le ganasce
V
Salta dentro l’ippoglosso
e si appiattisce sul ponte
dice “Singor Capitano
non pestarmi il collo!”
VI
Salta dentro l’aringa
il re del mare
dicendo ” Che tutti gli altri pesci
mi seguano!”
VII
Salta dentro il merluzzo
con la sua testina
corre avanti e indietro
e getta fuori i pesi!
VIII
Poi salta dentro la balena,
il pesce più grosso di tutti
“Se volete vento,
bene vi darò una burrasca!”

NOTE
1) letteralmente “testa da stupido”  è un detto comune tra i pescatori che il merluzzo sia stupido (minchione) perchè non riconosce le esche e si lascia issare docilmente a bordo.
2) i pescatori erano/sono uomini molto superstiziosi, a tutte le latitudini, ci vuole poco o niente per attirarsi la sfortuna in mare, è infatti ancora una credenza molto diffusa che il diavolo ovvero lo spirito maligno abbia potere sul mare e sulle tempeste.

LA VARIANTE AMERICANA: THE BOSTON COME-ALL-YE

Della seconda versione quella più conosciuta in America porta il titolo “The Boston come-all-ye” come collezionata da Joanna Colcord nel suo “Songs of American Sailormen” che così scrive “Non c’è dubbio che [questa] canzone, sebbene fosse cantata sulle navi mercantili, era nata sulle flotte dei pescatori. Abbiamo la testimonianza di Kipling in Capitani Coraggiosi che sia stata una delle preferite negli ultimi anni dei pescatori sui Banchi [di Terranova]. È conosciuta come The Fishes e anche con il titolo più americano di The Boston Come-All-Ye. Il coro trova la sua origine in una canzone di pesca scozzese Blaw the Wind Southerly. Un fatto curioso è che il Capitano Whall, proprio uno scozzese, stampò questa canzone con un motivo completamente diverso, senza collegamento con la melodia delle chiatte sul Tyneside con cui i nostri pescatori di Gloucester la cantano. La versione data qui è stata cantata dal capitano Frank Seeley.”

Peggy Seeger in  Whaler Out of New Bedford, 1962


I
Come all ye young sailormen
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish of the sea.
Then blow ye winds westerly,
westerly blow;
we’re bound to the southward,
so steady she goes
.
II
Oh, first came the whale,
he’s the biggest of all,
he clumb up aloft,
and let every sail fall.
III
Next came the mackerel
with his striped back,
he hauled aft the sheets
and boarded each tack(1).
IV
The porpoise(2) came next
with his little snout,
he grabbed the wheel,
calling “Ready? About!(3”
V
Then came the smelt(4),
the smallest of all,
he jumped to the poop
and sung out, “Topsail, haul!”
VI
The herring came saying,
“I’m king of the seas!
If you want any wind,
I’ll blow you a breeze.”
VII
Next came the cod
with his chucklehead (5),
he went to the main-chains
to heave to the lead.
VIII
Last come the flounder
as flat as the ground,
saying, “Damn your eyes, chucklehead, mind how you sound”!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti voi,  giovani marinai
ascoltatemi
vi canterò una canzone
sui pesci del mare,
allora soffiate voi venti occidentali
occidentali soffiate
siamo diretti a sud

così la barca dritta va.
II
Prima venne la balena
che è la più grande
si arrampicò in alto
e fece scendere ogni vela.
III
Poi venne lo sgombro
con il suo dorso a strisce
alò a poppa le vele e virò di bordo per cambiare di mura.
IV
La focena venne poi
con il suo piccolo muso
afferrò il comando del timone
“Pronti a virare”
V
Poi arrivò lo sperlano
il più piccolo di tutti
saltò a poppa
urlando”tira le vele di gabbia”
VI
Venne l’aringa dicendo
“Sono il re dei mari!
Se vuoi del vento,
ti soffierò una brezza”
VII
Poi venne il merluzzo
con la  sua testina,
si recò all’ancora
per tirare la cima.
VIII
Per ultimo venne la passera
piatta come una suola
dicendo ” Dannati i tuoi occhi,
stupido, bada a come parli!”

NOTE
1) in termini nautici tack = mure indica il lato della barca a vela da cui arriva il vento; virare, manovrare per cambiare di mura, vale a dire per ricevere il vento da un’altra direzione in modo da cambiare l’andatura;
2) la focena è considerato spesso come un delfino piccolo, ha un caratteristico muso arrotondato e non ha il becco come i delfini
3) è il timoniere a gridare “Pronti a virare” (to go about)
4) lo sperlano (osmero) è un piccolo pesce che vive nella Manica e nel Mare del Nord; il suo nome deriva dal fatto che le sue carni emanano un odore sgradevole
5) “testa da stupido” è un detto comune tra i pescatori che il merluzzo sia stupido (minchione) perchè non riconosce le esche e si lascia issare docilmente a bordo. Tutti i pescatori desiderano un mare pescoso e una preda ingenua!

Blow the Wind Southerly

FONTI
http://www.pubblicitaitalia.com/ilpesce/2013/1/12262.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/fishes.html
http://moodpoint.com/lyrics/unknown/song_of_the_fishes.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/windy-old-weather.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/windyoldweather.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149445
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49498
https://thesession.org/tunes/11479
http://bestpossiblejob.blogspot.it/2008/09/come-all-ye-young-and-not-so-young.html