Concealed death: Clerk Colvill & Georges Collins

Leggi in Italiano

Concealed death

LORD OLAF AND THE ELVES 
SCANDINAVIAN VARIANTS
BRITISH AND AMERICAN VERSIONS
FRENCH VERSIONS
ITALIAN VERSION

In The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, in Child ballad # 42 Clerck Colven (other titles Clerck Colvill or Earl Colvin) we find the same medieval ballad focused on the meeting between a knight about to marry and a fairy creature (or a jealous lover)

SCOTTISH VERSION:CLERK COLVILL CHILD # 42

The ballad begins with a quarrel between boyfriends: the future bride beseeches him not to visit his lover, a washerwoman, just on the eve of their wedding!
The knight denies any sexual involvement (normal administration!) but he is anxious to meet his lover again.
For a comparison between the versions A, B, C see the analysis by Christian Souchon (here)

Clerk-Colvill-ArthurRackhamThey have an obvious sexual relationship (in the coded language of the time), but then the man complains about his headache, she gives him a strip of fabric (poisoned) and announces his imminent death (or poisoning him by giving him one last kiss). The woman is clearly a water nymph and in fact as soon as the young man draws his sword to take revenge, she turns into a fish and dives into the water.

Frankie Armstrong from Till the Grass o’ergrew the corn 2006, ♪
The melody is an arrangement by Frankie from the one heard by Mrs. Brown from Falkirk, Stirling County.
Kate Fletcher & Corwen Broch from  Fishe or Fowle 2017, ♪
“One of many ballads from across Europe in which a man is doomed to death by his Other-Worldly lover.
We have used the words of Child 42 version B and the only existing melody for them from Mrs Brown (Anna Gordon) of Falkland. The transcribed melody has given rise to endless debate about how the words should fit to the refrain line of the music. We have chosen to sidestep the argument and sing the verses as given omitting the problematic line of melody.”

VERSION A
I
Clerk Colven (1) and his gay (2) lady
Were walking in yon garden green,
A belt (3) around her middle so small
Which cost Clerk Colven crowns fifteen.
II
“O harken to me, my lord,” she says
“O, harken well to what I do say:
If you go to the walls of Stream (4),
Be sure you touch no well fair’d maid.”
III
“O, hold your tongue,” Clerk Colven said,
“And do not vex me with your din.
I never saw a fair woman
But with her body I could sin.” (5)
IV
He’s mounted on his berry-brown steed
And merrily merrily rode he on,
Until he came to the walls of Stream,
And there he spied the mermaiden (6).
V
“You wash, you wash you mermaiden”,
“O, I will wash your sark of the silk (7).
It’s all for you, my gentle knight,
My skin is whiter than the milk(8).”
VI
He’s taken her by the milk white hand
And likewise by the grass-green sleeve,
he’s laid her down all on the grass,
Nor of his lady need he ask leave (9).
VII
“Alas! Alas!” says Clerk Colven,
“For oh so sore is grown my head.”
Merrily laughed the mermaiden,
“Aye, even on, till you be dead.”
VIII
“But you pull out your little pen-knife,
And from my sark you shear a gore,
And bind it round your lovely head,
And you shall feel the pain no more.”
IX
So he’s took out his little pen-knife,
And from her sark he sheared a gore,
He’s bound it round his lovely head;
But the pain it grew ten-times more.
X
“Alas! Alas!” cries Clerk Colven,
“For now so sore is grown my head.”
Merrily laughed the mermaiden,
“’twill I be away and you’ll be dead.”
XI
So he’s pulled out his trusty sword,
And thought with it to spill her blood;
But she’s turned to a fish again
And merrily sprang into the flood.
XII
He’s mounted on his berry-brown steed,
And drear and dowie rode he home,
Until he’s come to his lady’s bower
And heavily he’s lighted down.
XIII
“O, mother, mother, make my bed,
O, gentle lady, lay me down(10);
O brother, brother, unbend my bow(11),
It’ll ne’er be bent by me again.”
XIV
His mother she has made his bed,
His gentle lady laid him down,
His brother he unbent his bow,
It ne’er was bent by him again.

NOTES
1) according to the Danish folklorist Svend Grundtvig the name Colven is a corruption of Olafur in “Olvill” from the Faroese language (the Norse has long been spoken in the islands of Scotland). Also Clerck is a mispronunciation of Herr for Lord, in the stanza V the siren calls him “gentle knight”
2) as Giordano Dall’Armellina observes, the lady in other versions is defined lusty, that is greedy and ultimately possessive.
3) the belt is clearly a love token, it was customary, in fact, to exchange the promise of engagement, giving a “trinket” to the lady, not necessarily a diamond ring as we use today, but a hair clip or belt (obviously not less expensive)
4) in version B it is “Wells of Slane” misunderstood as “Wall of Stream” in version A; it could refer to the “Loch o ‘Strom” on the Mainland the largest of the Shetland Islands. The sacred well is generally a cleft in the earth in which the magical and healing water flows from the mother goddess’s womb, but if the spirit of the place is not placated it becomes deadly water. But here it represents the erotic energy that attracts the knight
5) translated into simple words: “do you think I’m the kind of man who goes to bed with every woman he meets?”
6) mermaiden is the siren, but he could be a nymph or an undine, the term with which the magical creatures of the inner waters are classified (see more). In Scotland and especially in the islands it is identified with a selkie
7) the beautiful girl is depicted as a washerwoman washing clothes by beating them on a marble stone (variant C and D). The image recalls the girl of the ford of the Irish tradition that is a harbinger of imminent death (banshee)
8) it is known that a snow skin was a fundamental requirement for the sexual excitement of the medieval knight
9) the whole stanza is a coded language to say that they have had a sexual intercourse
10) death in this case is not concealed and even the girlfriend immediately learns the news
11) in other versions says “O brother, take my sword and spear” to indicate that he will be buried with the warrior’s set as it was the custom in burials for people of rank in ancient European civilizations.

AMERICAN VERSION: GEORGE COLLINS 

Published in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs it is the D version collected by George Gardiner in 1906 from the voice of Henry Stansbridge of Lyndhurst, Hampshire. The version, however, is very corrupt and diversified compared to the ballad of Norse origins.
It is the version on which American variants are modeled, almost transformed into a murder ballad.

Sam Lee The Ballad of George Collins from ‘Ground of its own’ 2012 (winner of the Barclaycard Mercury Prize 2012 see more) : amazing video clip

Shirley Collins from The Sweet Primroses 1967Alan Moores in a folk-country arrangement by Spud Gravely  version (in Ballads and Song of the Blue Ridge Mountains) also known as George Allen

 Sam Lee Version ( da qui)
I
George Collins walked out one may
morning, when may was all in bloom
and who  should he see but a fair pretty maid, washing her white marble stone (1)
II
She whooped she hollered she called so loud,
she waved her lilly white hand
“Come hither to me George Collins -cried she- for your life it won’t last you long”
III
He put his foot on the broad water side,
across the river sprung he,
he gripped his hands round her middle (2) so small and he kissed her red ruby lips (3)
IV
Then he road home to his father’s old house, loudly knocked with the ring
“arise, arise my father- he cried-
rise and please let me in”
V
“Oh arise, arise dear mother -he cried-
rise and make up my bed”
“arise, arise dear sister -he cried-
get a napkin (4) to tie round my head.
VI
For if I should die tonight
As I suppose I shall
Please bury me under that marble stone
That lies in fair Ellender’s hall(5)”
VII
Fair Ellender sat in her hall
weaving her silk so fine
who should she see but the finest corpse(6) that ever her eyes shone on
VIII
Fair Ellender called unto her head maid
‘Whose corpse is this so fine?’
she made her reply “George Collins is corpse an old true lover of mine”
IX
“Oh put him down my brave little boys
and open his coffin so wide
but I may kiss his red ruby lips
ten thousand times he has kissed mine”
X
This news been carried to fair London town
And wrote on London gate(7),
“six pretty maids died all in one night
‘twas all for George Collins’ sake”

NOTES
1) It is the stone on which the washerwoman beats and rubs her clothes. Another “marble stone” returns cited in the VI stanza, the marble slab in the hall or hill of Ellender
2) in the modest language of ballads it indicates a sexual relationship. Despite the jealous lover threatened him with death, George kisses her and embraces her: he probably does not consider her a danger
3) it is the deadly kiss of the nymph, (or the kiss of the plague) the woman is never described as a supernatural creature
4) the poisoned cloth that we saw in version A and B of Clerck Colven still comes back to wrap the sufferer’s head, but this time it’s a normal bandage
5) elsewhere written as hill. George is in his father’s house announcing his imminent death and asking to be buried in Ellender’s property. Shirley Collins sings
Bury me by the marble stone
That’s against Lady Eleanor’s hall.”
6) 6) the coffin was brought into the house of the lady who asked to remove the lid so that she could still kiss the lips of her lover. The sentence is a bit to be interpreted, it is the lady-in-waiting (or the housekeeper) to ask who is the corpse in the coffin. And it is Ellender who answers that he was her lover.
7) The final stanza seems to be a nineteenth-century addition in an ironic key, the six women died because of the venereal disease of George

french and breton versions 

LINK
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch042.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch085.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/colvill.htm
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio1.htm
http://www.gestsongs.com/16/collins.htm

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18313
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/georgecollins.html
http://www.promonews.tv/videos/2012/11/01/sam-lee-ballad-george-collins-andrew-steggall
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2210
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41600
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140832
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64646

La Morte Occultata nelle Ballate popolari: Scozia e America

Read the post in English

IL TEMA DELLA MORTE OCCULTATA

LORD OLAF E GLI ELFI DEL BOSCO
VARIANTI SCANDINAVE
VERSIONI ISOLE BRITANNICHE E AMERICA 
VERSIONI FRANCIA
VERSIONE PIEMONTE

In The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, nella Child ballad # 42 Clerck Colven (altri titoli Clerck Colvill o Earl Colvin -in italiano “il giovane Colvin”) ritroviamo la stessa ballata incentrata sull’incontro tra un cavaliere in procinto di sposarsi e una creatura fatata (o l’amante gelosa).

VERSIONE SCOZZESE CLERK COLVILL CHILD # 42

La ballata ha inizio con un bisticcio tra fidanzati: la promessa sposa prega il cavaliere di non andare  a trovare l’amante proprio alla vigilia delle loro nozze!
Il cavaliere nega ogni addebito (normale amministrazione!) ma poi ci va.
Per un raffronto tra le versioni A, B, C vedasi l’analisi di Christian Souchon (qui)

Clerk-Colvill-ArthurRackhamI due hanno un evidente rapporto sessuale (con il linguaggio in codice del tempo), ma poi l’uomo si lamenta per il mal di testa, lei gli dà una pezza (avvelenata) e gli annuncia la morte imminente (oppure lo avvelena dandogli un ultimo bacio). La donna è chiaramente una ninfa dell’acqua e infatti non appena il giovane sguaina la spada per vendicarsi della fanciulla, lei si trasforma in ondina (o in pesce) e si tuffa nelle acque.

Frankie Armstrong in Till the Grass o’ergrew the corn 2006, ♪
La melodia è un arrangiamento di Frankie da quella ascoltata dalla signora Brown di Falkirk, contea di Stirling.
Kate Fletcher & Corwen Broch in Fishe or Fowle 2017, ♪
che scrivono nelle note “Una delle tante ballate provenienti da tutta Europa in cui un uomo è condannato a morte dalla sua amante soprannaturale. Abbiamo usato il testo della versione B Child # 42 e l’unica melodia esistente dalla signora Brown (Anna Gordon) di Falkland. La melodia trascritta ha dato luogo a un dibattito senza fine su come le parole dovrebbero adattarsi al ritornello. Abbiamo scelto di eludere la discussione e cantare i versi omettendo la linea problematica della melodia.”

VERSIONE A
I
Clerk Colven (1) and his gay (2) lady
Were walking in yon garden green,
A belt (3) around her middle so small
Which cost Clerk Colven crowns fifteen.
II
“O harken to me, my lord,” she says
“O, harken well to what I do say:
If you go to the walls of Stream (4),
Be sure you touch no well fair’d maid.”
III
“O, hold your tongue,” Clerk Colven said,
“And do not vex me with your din.
I never saw a fair woman
But with her body I could sin.” (5)
IV
He’s mounted on his berry-brown steed
And merrily merrily rode he on,
Until he came to the walls of Stream,
And there he spied the mermaiden (6).
V
“You wash, you wash you mermaiden”,
“O, I will wash your sark of the silk (7).
It’s all for you, my gentle knight,
My skin is whiter than the milk(8).”
VI
He’s taken her by the milk white hand
And likewise by the grass-green sleeve,
he’s laid her down all on the grass,
Nor of his lady need he ask leave (9).
VII
“Alas! Alas!” says Clerk Colven,
“For oh so sore is grown my head.”
Merrily laughed the mermaiden,
“Aye, even on, till you be dead.”
VIII
“But you pull out your little pen-knife,
And from my sark you shear a gore,
And bind it round your lovely head,
And you shall feel the pain no more.”
IX
So he’s took out his little pen-knife,
And from her sark he sheared a gore,
He’s bound it round his lovely head;
But the pain it grew ten-times more.
X
“Alas! Alas!” cries Clerk Colven,
“For now so sore is grown my head.”
Merrily laughed the mermaiden,
“’twill I be away and you’ll be dead.”
XI
So he’s pulled out his trusty sword,
And thought with it to spill her blood;
But she’s turned to a fish again
And merrily sprang into the flood.
XII
He’s mounted on his berry-brown steed,
And drear and dowie rode he home,
Until he’s come to his lady’s bower
And heavily he’s lighted down.
XIII
“O, mother, mother, make my bed,
O, gentle lady, lay me down(10);
O brother, brother, unbend my bow(11),
It’ll ne’er be bent by me again.”
XIV
His mother she has made his bed,
His gentle lady laid him down,
His brother he unbent his bow,
It ne’er was bent by him again.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Clerk Colven e la sua bella  dama
passeggiavano nel prato del giardino,
una cintura  intorno ai suoi esili fianchi, era costata a Clerk Colven quindici corone.
II
“Ascoltami mio signore, -disse lei-
ascolta bene ciò che dico: se andrai ai pozzi di Stream, bada di non toccare la bella fanciulla del pozzo”
III
“Frena la lingua, –
disse Clerk Colven-
e non mi infastidire con i tuoi sospetti,
non ho ancora visto una bella donna
con la quale peccherei”
IV
Montò sul destriero
morello
e cavalcò tutto gaio,
finchè arrivò ai pozzi di Stream,
e lì vide la sirena.
V
“Lava, lava sirena”
“Oh laverò la tua camicia di seta;
solo per te, gentile cavaliere,
ho la pelle più bianca del latte”
VI
La prese per la mano bianco latte,
e per la manica verde come l’erba,
e la distese sul prato, senza bisogno di chiederle permesso
VII
“Ahime! – disse Clerk Colven –
che mal di testa”
Allegra rise la sirena: “Certo, e continuerà fino a che sarai morto.
VIII
Allora prendi il tuo piccolo pugnale,
e dalla mia camicia taglia un lembo,
e avvolgilo intorno alla tua bella testa
e non sentirai più dolore”
IX
Così egli prese il suo piccolo pugnale,
e dalla camicia tagliò un lembo,
e se lo avvolse intorno alla bella testa
ma il dolore aumentò dieci volte tanto!
X
“Ahime! – gridò Clerk Colven –
ora la mia testa mi fa così male”
Allegra rise la sirena
“Sarà così fino a quando morirai”
XI
Allora lui sguainò la fida spada
pensando di farle versare il sangue,
ma lei si era trasformata in pesce
e allegramente si gettò nell’acqua.
XII
Lui montò sul suo destriero
morello
e triste e sofferente cavalcò a casa,
finchè arrivò alla stanza della sua Signora, e pesantemente smontò.
XIII
“Oh madre, madre, fammi il letto,
o dama gentile, fammi sdraiare,
Oh fratello, fratello togli la corda al mio arco che mai più tenderò.”
XIV
La madre fece il letto
la sua dama gentile lo mise a letto
e il fratello tolse la corda dell’arco
che non sarà mai più teso.

NOTE
1) Clerk Colven Colvill; secondo il folklorista danese Svend Grundtvig il nome Colven è una corruzione di Olafur in “Olvill” dalla lingua faroese (il norreno è stato a lungo parlato nelle isole della Scozia). Anche Clerck è una storpiatura di Herr per Lord, nella strofa V la sirena gli si rivolge come “gentle knight”
2) come osserva Giordano Dall’Armellina la dama in altre versioni è definita lusty=vigorosa, ma anche bramosa e in ultima analisi possessiva.
3) la cintura è chiaramente un pegno d’amore, era consuetudine infatti, allo scambio delle promesse di fidanzamento, regalare un “gingillo” alla dama, non necessariamente un anello con diamante come si usa oggi, ma un fermaglio per capelli o una cintura (ovviamente non meno costosa )
4) nella versione B è “Wells of Slane” fraintesa come “Wall of Stream” nella versione A; potrebbe riferirsi al “Loch o ‘Strom” sulla Mainland la più grande delle isole Shetland. il pozzo sacro è in genere una fenditura nella terra nella quale sgorga l’acqua magica e curativa proveniente dal grembo della dea madre, ma se lo spirito del luogo non è placato diventa acqua mortifera. Qui però rappresenta l’energia erotica che attrae il giovane
5) letteralmente “con la quale peccherei con il mio corpo”; tradotto in parole povere: “credi che io sia il tipo d’uomo che va a letto con ogni donna che incontra?”
6) mermaiden è la sirena, ma potrebbe essere una ninfa o un ondina il termine con cui si classificano le creature magiche delle acque interne (vedi). In Scozia e soprattutto nelle isole è identificata con la selkie
7) la bella fanciulla è raffigurata come una lavandaia che lava i panni battendoli su una pietra di marmo (variante C e D). L’immagine richiama la fanciulla del guado della tradizione irlandese che è presagio di morte imminente (banshee)
8) è risaputo che la pelle nivea era un requisito fondamentale per l’eccitazione sessuale del cavaliere medievale
9) tutta la strofa è un linguaggio in codice per dire che i due hanno avuto un rapporto sessuale
10) la morte in questo caso non è occultata e anche la fidanzata apprende subito la notizia
11) in altre versioni dice “O brother, take my sword and spear” [in italiano fratello prendi la mia spada e la mia lancia] per indicare che sarà seppellito con la panoplia del guerriero come era usanza nelle sepolture per le persone di rango nelle antiche civiltà europee.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE/AMERICANA GEORGE COLLINS 

Pubblicata in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs è la versione D collezionata da George Gardiner nel 1906 dalla voce di Henry Stansbridge di Lyndhurst, Hampshire. La versione però è molto corrotta e diversificata rispetto alla ballata della morte occultata di origini norrene.
E’ la versione su cui si modellano le varianti americane, trasformata quasi in una murder ballad.

Sam Lee The Ballad of George Collins in ‘Ground of its own’ 2012 (vincitore del Barclaycard Mercury Prize 2012 vedi) : magnifica video-clip

Shirley Collins in The Sweet Primroses 1967Alan Moores in un arrangiamento folk-country di Spud Gravely (in Ballads and Song of the Blue Ridge Mountains) versione conosciuta anche con il titolo di George Allen.

VERSIONE SAM LEE ( da qui)
I
George Collins walked out one may
morning, when may was all in bloom
and who  should he see but a fair pretty maid, washing her white marble stone (1)
II
She whooped she hollered she called so loud,
she waved her lilly white hand
“Come hither to me George Collins -cried she- for your life it won’t last you long”
III
He put his foot on the broad water side,
across the river sprung he,
he gripped his hands round her middle (2) so small and he kissed her red ruby lips (3)
IV
Then he road home to his father’s old house, loudly knocked with the ring
“arise, arise my father- he cried-
rise and please let me in”
V
“Oh arise, arise dear mother -he cried-
rise and make up my bed”
“arise, arise dear sister -he cried-
get a napkin (4) to tie round my head.
VI
For if I should die tonight
As I suppose I shall
Please bury me under that marble stone
That lies in fair Ellender’s hall(5)”
VII
Fair Ellender sat in her hall
weaving her silk so fine
who should she see but the finest corpse(6) that ever her eyes shone on
VIII
Fair Ellender called unto her head maid
‘Whose corpse is this so fine?’
she made her reply “George Collins is corpse an old true lover of mine”
IX
“Oh put him down my brave little boys
and open his coffin so wide
but I may kiss his red ruby lips
ten thousand times he has kissed mine”
X
This news been carried to fair London town
And wrote on London gate(7),
“six pretty maids died all in one night
‘twas all for George Collins’ sake”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
George Collins uscì una mattina di Maggio, quando maggio era tutto in fiore e incontrò una bella fanciulla
che lavava alla pietra bianca come il marmo.
II
Lei urlò, strillò e gridò
così forte
e agitò la sua bianca mano
“Vienimi vicino George Collins
-gridava- che la tua vita non durerà a lungo”
III
Lui mise il piede sul bordo
dell’acqua
e nel fiume balzò,
e strinse le mani attorno ai suoi fianchi così sottili e le baciò le labbra rosso-rubino.
IV
Allora lui ritornò nella vecchia casa avita, e forte bussò con il batacchio
“Alzati, padre mio – gridò-
alzati e fammi entrare per favore”
V
“Alzati cara madre – gridò
Alzati e preparami il letto”
“alzati cara sorella  gridò- e prendi un panno per avvolgere la mia testa.
VI
Perchè se dovessi morire stanotte
come penso che accadrà, per favore seppellitemi sotto a quella pietra di marmo che si trova (accanto) alla sala della bella Ellender”
VII
La bella Ellender sedeva nella sua sala
a tessere la sua bella seta
e vide il più bel cadavere
che i suoi occhi avessero mai visto.
VIII
La bella Ellender chiamò la sua dama di compagnia
“Di chi è questo così bel cadavere?” e lei rispose “George Collins è il cadavere, uno dei miei vecchi amanti”
IX
“Oh mettetelo giù miei bravi ragazzi
e aprite la sua grande bara che devo baciare le sue labbra rosso-rubino per le diecimila volte che lui ha baciato le mie”
X
Questa notizia ha fatto il giro di Londra
e fu scritto sul “London gate”
“sei belle fanciulle sono morte in una sola notte per amore di George Collins”

NOTE
1) E’ la pietra su cui la lavandaia batte e strofina i panni. Un’altra “marble stone” ritorna citata nella VI strofa, la lastra di marmo nella sala o collina di Ellender
2) nel linguaggio pudico delle ballate sta ad indicare un rapporto sessuale. Nonostante l’amante gelosa l’abbia minacciato di morte George la bacia e l’abbraccia: probabilmente non la considera un pericolo
3) è il bacio mortifero della ninfa, (o il bacio del contagio) la donna non viene mai descritta come una creatura soprannaturale
4) la stoffa avvelenata che avevamo visto nella versione A e B di Clerck Colven ritorna ancora per fasciare la testa del malato, ma questa volta è una normale benda
5) altrove scritto come hill. George è nella casa paterna ad annunciare la sua morte imminente e dove chiede di essere sepolto nella proprietà di Ellender. Shirley Collins  canta “Bury me by the marble stone
That’s against Lady Eleanor’s hall.”
6) la bara è stata portata nella casa della dama che chiede di levare il coperchio per poter ancora baciare le labbra del suo innamorato. La frase è un po’ da interpretare, è la dama di compagnia (o la governante) a chiedere di chi sia il cadavere nella bara. Ed è Ellender a rispondere che si tratta di un suo amante. Nelle altre varianti è la dama a rispondere che si tratta dell’amante di Ellender
7) La strofa finale sembra essere un’aggiunta ottocentesca in chiave ironica, le sei donne sono morte perchè contagiate dalla malattia venerea di George

terza parte: le versioni francesi e bretoni

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch042.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch085.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/colvill.htm
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio1.htm
http://www.gestsongs.com/16/collins.htm

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18313
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/georgecollins.html
http://www.promonews.tv/videos/2012/11/01/sam-lee-ballad-george-collins-andrew-steggall
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2210
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41600
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140832
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64646