Hares on the Mountain with Sally the dear

Leggi in italiano

Cecil Sharp has collected nine different versions of the ballad “Hares on the Mountain”, a love hunt perhaps derived from “The Two Magicians
amorinoSome believe that the text was written by Samuel Lover (1797-1865) because he appears in his novel “Rory o ‘More”. But the theme of this love-hunting is antecedent and recalls an ancient initiation ritual if not a true enchantment of transformation (or concealment) fith fath.

Still popular in England, we find it more sporadically in Ireland, the United States and Canada, but in the 60s and 70s it was very popular in folk clubs, less widespread, however, the version from the male point of view.

Steeleye Span from Parcel of Rogues 1973: a sweet lullaby

HARES ON THE MOUNTAIN
I
Young women they’ll run
Like hares(1) on the mountains,
Young women they’ll run
Like hares on the mountains
If I were but a young man
I’d soon go a hunting,
To my right fol diddle de ro,
To my right fol diddle dee.
II
Young women they’ll sing
Like birds in the bushes,
If I were but a young man,
I’d go and bang those bushes.
III
Young women they’ll swim
Like ducks in the water,
If I were but a young man,
I’d go and swim after

NOTES
1) hare, birds and duck are animals associated with the three kingdoms, the middle world (Earth), above (Heaven) and below (Sea)

OH SALLY, MY DEAR

The same pattern is taken up in a ballad called with the same title or “Oh Sally my dear” of which we know mainly two melodies. Here the textual part is rendered as a blow and a response between the two lovers.

Shirley Collins & Davey Graham .  Fine arrangement of Davey on guitar

Jonny Kearney & Lucy Farrell slower melody, very magical

Alt-J in Bright: The Album 2017,  indie-rock version (I, III, IV, VI)

OH SALLY MY DEAR
I
“Oh Sally, my dear,
it’s you I’d be kissing,
Oh Sally, my dear,
it’s you I’d be kissing,”
She smiled and replied,
“you don’t know what you’re missing”.
II
“Oh Sally, my dear,
I wish I could wed you,
Oh Sally my dear,
I wish I could bed you”
She smiled and replied,
“then you’d say I’d misled you”.
III
“If all you young men
were hares on the mountain,
How many young girls
would take guns and go hunting?
IV
If the young men could sing like blackbirds and thrushes,
How many young girls
would go beating the bushes?
V
If all you young men
were fish in the water,
How many young girls
would undress and dive after?”
VI
“But the young men
are given to frisking and fooling (1),
Oh, the young men are given to frisking and fooling,
So I’ll leave them alone
and attend to my schooling”

NOTES
1) to take relationships with the girls lightly, without serious intentions. In this version the ballad has become a warning song on the old adage that man is a hunter

THE BLACKBIRDS AND THE THRUSHES

Same ballad handed down with another title
Niamh Parsons from “Blackbirds & Thrushes” 1999

Catherine Merrigan & Marion Camastral from “Wings O’er The Wind

Seamus Ennis

BLACKBIRDS AND THRUSHES
I
If all the young ladies
were blackbirds (1) & thrushes
If all the young ladies
were blackbirds & thrushes
Then all the young men
would go beating the bushes
Rye fol de dol diddle lol iddle lye ay
II
If all the young ladies
were ducks on the water..
Then all the young men
would go swimming in after
III
If all the young ladies
were rushes a-growing..
Then all the young men would get scythes and go mowing
IV
If the ladies were all
trout and salmon so lively
Then divil the men
would go fishing on Friday(2)
V
If all the young ladies
were hares on the mountain
Then men with their hounds
would be out without counting

NOTES
1) In the Celtic tradition: The blackbird (druid dhubh) is associated with the goddess Rhiannon. Legend has it that the birds of Rhiannon are three blackbirds, which are perched and sing on the tree of life on the edge of the otherworldly worlds. Their song, puts the listener in a state of trance, which allows him to go to the parallel worlds. (from here) see more
2) the expression perhaps refers to the fact that in the weekend you go fishing or that on Friday you eat fish

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=58904
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=73890 http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/haresonthemountain.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31052

Beltane Love Chase: The Two Magicians

Leggi in italiano

63_rackham_siegfried_grimhildeLove Chase is a typical theme of popular songs, according to the proper ways of the courting song it is the contrast between two lovers, in whice he tries to conquer her and she rejects him or banters in a comic or coarse situation
So the ballad “The Twa Magicians” is a Love Hunt in which the natural prudery of the maid teases the man, because her denial is an invitation to conquer.

THE TWA MAGICIANS

The ballad originates from the north of Scotland and the first written source is in Peter Buchan’s “Ancient Ballads and Song of the North of Scotland” – 1828, later also in Child # 44 (The English and Scottish Popular Ballads by Francis James Child ). It is believed to come from the Norse tradition. The versions are numerous, as generally happens for popular ballads spread in the oral tradition, and even with different endings. In its “basic” form it is the story of a blacksmith who intends to conquer a virgin; but the girl flees, turning into various animals and even objects or elements of Nature; the man pursues her by changing form himself.
There is a written trace of the theme already in 1630 in a ballad entitled “The two kind and Lovers” – in which however the woman is to chase the man.
The ballad begins with the woman who says

if thou wilt goe, Love,
let me goe with thee
Because I cannot live,
without thy company
Be thou the Sunne,
Ile be the beames so bright,
Be thou the Moone.
Ile be the lightest night:
Be thou Aurora,
the usher of the day,
I will be the pearly dew,
upon the flowers gay.
Be thou the Rose,
thy smell I will assume,
And yeeld a sweet
odoriferous perfume

It is therefore a matter of complementary and non-opposing couples, a sort of total surrender to love on the part of the woman who declares her fidelity to man. Let us not forget that ancient ballads were also a form of moral teaching.
And yet we find buried in the text traces of initiation rituals, pearls of wisdom or druidic teachings, so the two wizards are transformed into animals associated with the three kingdoms, Nem (sky), Talam (Earth) Muir (sea) or world above, middle and below and the mystery is that of spiritual rebirth.
Other similarities are found with the ballad “Hares on the Mountain

BUCHAN VERSION

In general, the Love Chase ends with the consensual coupling.
Today’s version of “The Two Magicians” is based on the rewriting of the text and the musical arrangement of Albert Lancaster Lloyd (1908-1982) for the album “The Bird in the Bush” (1966);

(all the verses except XV and XVI)

Celtic stone from Celtic Stone, 1983: (American folk-rock group active in the 80s and 90s), an ironic vocal interpretation, a spirited musical arrangement that happily combines acoustic guitar with the dulcimer hammer (verses from I to VII, XI, IX, XIV, X, XV, XVI, XVII)

Damh the Bard from Tales from the Crow Man, 2009. Another minstrel of the magical world in a more rock version (verses from I to VII, XI, IX, XII, X, XIV, XV, XVI,XVII, XVIII)

Jean-Luc Lenoir from “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads” 2013 (voice Joanne McIver) 
– a lively and captivating arrangement taken from a traditional (it’s a mixer between the two melodies)
Owl Service from Wake The Vaulted Echo (2006)
Empty Hats from The Hat Came Back, 2000 the choice of speech is very effective

VERSIONE A.L. Lloyd
I
The lady stood at her own front door
As straight as a willow wand
And along come a lusty smith (1)
With his hammer in his hand
CHORUS
Saying “bide lady bide
there’s a nowhere you can hide
the lusty smith will be your love
And he will lay your pride”.
II
“Well may you dress, you lady fair,
All in your robes of red  (2)
Before tomorrow at this same time
I’ll have your maidenhead.”
III
“Away away you coal blacksmith
Would you do me this wrong?
To have me maidenhead
That I have kept so long”
IV
I’d rather I was dead and cold
And me body in the grave
Than a lusty, dusty, coal black smith
Me maide head should have”
V
Then the lady she held up her hand
And swore upon the spul
She never would be the blacksmith’s love
For all of a box of gold  (3)
VI
And the blacksmith he held up his hand/And he swore upon the mass,
“I’ll have you for my love, my girl,
For the half of that or less.”
VII
Then she became a turtle dove
And flew up in the air
But he became an old cock pigeon
And they flew pair and pair
VIII
And she became a little duck,
A-floating in the pond,
And he became a pink-necked drake
And chased her round and round.
IX
She turned herself into a hare  (4)
And ran all upon the plain
But he became a greyhound dog
And fetched her back again
X
And she became a little ewe sheep
and lay upon the common
But he became a shaggy old ram
And swiftly fell upon her.
XI
She changed herself to a swift young mare, As dark as the night was black,
And he became a golden saddle
And clung unto her back.
XII
And she became a little green fly,
A-flew up in the air,
And he became a hairy spider
And fetched her in his lair.
XIII
Then she became a hot griddle (5)
And he became a cake,
And every change that poor girl made
The blacksmith was her mate.
XIV
So she turned into a full-dressed ship
A-sailing on the sea
But he became a captain bold
And aboard of her went he
XV 
So the lady she turned into a cloud
Floating in the air
But he became a lightning flash
And zipped right into her
XVI
So she turned into a mulberry tree
A mulberry tree in the wood
But he came forth as the morning dew
And sprinkled her where she stood.
XVII
So the lady ran in her own bedroom
And changed into a bed,
But he became a green coverlet
And he gained her maidenhead
XVIII
And was she woke, he held her so,
And still he bad her bide,
And the husky smith became her love
And that pulled down her pride.

NOTES
1) in popular songs the blacksmith is considered a synonym of virility, a very gifted lover with a portentose force. Here he is also a magician armed with a hammer while the girl is a antagonist (or complementary) holds a willow wand.
One thinks of a sort of duel or challenge between two practicing wizards
2) in ancient ballads some words are codes that make the alarm bells ring out in the listener: red is the color of fairies or creatures with Magic powers. Red was also the color of the bride in antiquity and is a favorable color for fertility
3) also written as “pot of gold” and immediately it come to mind the leprechaun
4) the hare-hound couple is the first of the transformations in the Welsh myth of Taliesin’s birth. Gwion is the pursued that turns into a lunar animal, takes in itself the female principle symbol of abundance-fertility, but also creativity-intuition, becomes pure instinct, frenzy.
The dog is not only predator, but also guardian and psychopomp ‘The dog plays with many populations the function of guardian of the sacred places, guide of the man on the night of death, defender of the kingdom of the dead, overseer in all cases of the kingdom spiritual.
In particular among the Celts it was associated with the world of the Warriors. In fact, the dog was present in the Warrior initiations. Hunting, like war, was a sacred act that could be accomplished only after an initiation and a ritual preparation of divine protection. (Riccardo Taraglio from Il Vischio e la Quercia) 
see more
5) scottish pancake: a special tool to cook the Beltane bannock.The two iron griddle could be smooth or variously decorated honeycomb or floral carvings, written or geometric designs, were hinged on one side and equipped with a long handle: placed on the fire it was turned over for cooking on the other side. In the Middle Ages they had become masterpieces of forging made by master wares or refined silversmiths, and they were a traditional engagement gift. see more

Ferro da cialde, Umbria, sec. XVI

SHARP VERSION

The song is reported by Cecil Sharp in One Hundred English Folksongs (1916) in the notes he says he heard it from Mr. Sparks (a blacksmith), Minehead, Somerset, in 1904.

Steeleye Span from “Now we are six”, 1974 – a funny video animation

I
She looked out of the window
as white as any milk
And he looked in at  the window
as black as any silk
CHORUS
Hello, hello, hello, hello,
you coal blacksmith

You have done me no harm
You never shall  have my maidenhead
That I have kept so long
I’d rather die a maid
Ah, but then she said
and be buried all in my grave

Than to have such a nasty,
husky, dusky, fusky, musky

Coal blacksmith,
a maiden, I will die

II
She became a duck,
a duck all on the stream
And he became a water dog (1)
and fetched her back again.
She became a star,
a star all in the night
And he became a thundercloud
And muffled her out of sight.
III
She became a rose,
a rose all in the wood
And he became a bumble bee  (2)
And kissed her where she stood.
She became a nun,
a nun all dressed in white
And he became a canting priest
And prayed for her by night.
IV
She became a trout,
a trout all in the brook
And he became a feathered fly
And caught her with his hook.
She became a corpse,
a corpse all in the ground
And he became the cold clay
and smothered her all around (3)

NOTES
1) water dog is a large swimmer retriever dog or a dog trained for swamp hunting,
2) the bumblebee is related to the bees, but does not produce honey and is much larger and stocky than the bee
3) “Which part of the word NO do not you understand?” that is, the categorical and virginal refusal of the woman to the sexual act repeatedly attempted by an ugly, dark and even stinking blacksmith. In escaping the man’ s longing she turns into duck, star, rose, nun and trout (and he in marsh dog, cloud, bumblebee, priest, fishing hook); apparently the girl prefers her death rather than undergoing a rape: this is a distorted way of interpreting the story, it is the “macho” mentality convinced that woman is not a victim but always in complicit with the violence and therefore to be condemned.
In my opinion, instead, it is the return to the earth with the fusion of the feminine principle with the male one; the two, now lost in the vortex of transformations, merge into a single embrace of dust and their death is a death-rebirth.

Beltane Fire Festival

THE BLACKSMITH

The hunter man here is a “supernatural” figure, the blacksmith was considered in ancient times a creature endowed with magical powers, the first blacksmiths were in fact the dwarves (the black or dark elves) able to create weapons and enchanted jewels. The art of forge was an ancient knowledge that was handed down among initiates.
So in the Middle Ages the figure of the blacksmith took on negative connotations, just think of the many “forges of the devil” or “the pagan” that gave the name to a place once a forge.

Vulcan Roman God, Andrea Mantegna

By virtue of his craft, the smith is a mighty man with well-developed muscles, yet precisely because of his knowledge and power the smith is often lame or deformed: if he is a mortal his impairment is a sign that he has seen some divine secret, that is, it has seen a hidden aspect of the divinity thus it is punished forever; it is the knowledge of the secret of fire and of metals, which turn from solid to liquid and blend into alloys. In many mythologies the same gods are blacksmiths (Varuna, Odin), they are wizards and they have paid a price for their magic.
The lameness also hides another metaphor: that of the overcame test that underlies the research, be it a spiritual conquest or a healing or revenge act (a fundamental theme in the Grail cycle).

But the magicians of the ballad are two so the girl is also a shapeshifter or perhaps a shaman.

SHAPE-SHIFTER

Cerridwen_EmpowermentThe theme of transformation is in Ovid’s Metamorphoses: a succession of Olympian gods who, through their lust, transform themselves into animals (but also in golden rain) and seduce beautiful mortals or nymphs.
The pursuit through the mutation of the forms recalls the chase between Cerridwen and his apprentice in the Welsh history of the the bard Taliesin birth (534-599) . A boy is escaping, having drunk the magic potion from the cauldron he was watching over; he escapes the wrath of the goddess by becoming various animals (hare, fish, bird). At the end he is a wheat grain to hide like a classic needle in a haystack, but the goddess changed into a hen eating it. From this unusual coupling is born Taliesin alias Merlin

THE SONG OF AMERGIN *
I am a stag: of seven tines,
I am a flood: across a plain,
I am a wind: on a deep lake,
I am a tear: the Sun lets fall,
I am a hawk: above the cliff,
I am a thorn: beneath the nail,
I am a wonder: among flowers,
I am a wizard: who but I
Sets the cool head aflame with smoke?


That is, in order to become Wisdom, to Understand, one must experience the elements …

This poem by Taliesin could condense the mystery of the initiatory journey, in which Wisdom is conquered with the knowledge of the elements, which is profound experience, identification, through the penetration of their own essence, becoming the same traveler the essence of the elements.
Changing shape means experiencing everything, experiencing oneself in everything in continuous change and experiencing the encounter between the self and the other, prey and predator, not separated but inseparably linked, as in a dance.from here)

SCIAMANIC FLIGHT

The main characteristic of the shaman is to “travel” in conditions of ecstasy in the spirit world. The techniques for doing this are essentially the ecstatic sleep (mystical trance) and the transformation of one’s spirit into an animal. As a magical practice it involves a transformation of a part of the soul into the spirit of an animal to leave the body and travel in both the sensitive and the supersensible world. Another technique is to leave your body and take possession of the body of a living animal.

In this way the shaman “rides”, that is, takes as a means to move, the bodies of animals that are also his driving spirits. In some rituals, psychoactive plants are used, or the drum beat, or the skins or the mask of the animal that you want to “ride” are worn. This practice is not free from risks: it may happen that the shaman can no longer return to his body because he forgets himself, his human being, or travels too far from the body and falls into a coma or the physical body dies because too weakened by separation.
The spirit can be captured in the afterlife or the animal can be wounded or killed on the ground level and therefore, as the soul of the shaman is captured or wounded or killed, so does his body report its consequences.

second part 

LINK
http://web.tiscali.it/artigianidaltritempi/fabbro.htm
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=252
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thetwomagicians.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sciamani.html
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch044.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/child/2magics.html
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=247
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40723
http://www.yourultimateresource.com/the-two-magicians/

Una caccia d’amore: le lepri sulle montagne

Read the post in English

Cecil Sharp ha raccolto nove diverse versioni della ballata “Hares on the Mountain”, una caccia d’amore forse derivata da “The Two Magicians
amorinoLa Caccia d’Amore è un tema tipico dei canti popolari, secondo modi propri della canzone d’amore cortese o di “genere” ovvero i contrasti tra due innamorati, in questi lui cerca di conquistare e lei respinge o dileggia e spesso il contesto è comico o anche scurrile.
Alcuni ritengono che il testo sia stato scritto da Samuel Lover (1797-1865) perchè compare nella sua novella “Rory o’ More”. Ma il tema di questa caccia d’amore è antecedente e richiama un antico rituale d’iniziazione se non un vero e proprio incantesimo di trasformazione (o di occultamento) il fith fath.

Ancora diffusa in Inghilterra la ballata si ritrova più sporadicamente in Irlanda, Stati Uniti e Canada, ma negli anni 60-70 era molto popolare nei folk club . Con lo stesso titolo anche la versione testuale al femminile meno diffusa però della versione dal punto di vista maschile.

Steeleye Span in Parcel of Rogues 1973: la versione propende per una melodia tipo ninna-nanna


I
Young women they’ll run
Like hares(1) on the mountains,
Young women they’ll run
Like hares on the mountains
If I were but a young man
I’d soon go a hunting,
To my right fol diddle de ro,
To my right fol diddle dee.

II
Young women they’ll sing
Like birds in the bushes,
If I were but a young man,
I’d go and bang those bushes.
III
Young women they’ll swim
Like ducks in the water,
If I were but a young man,
I’d go and swim after
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Le ragazze andranno
come lepri sulle montagne,
Le ragazze andranno
come lepri sulle montagne,
se fossi giovane
andrei subito a caccia.
To my right fol diddle de ro,
To my right fol diddle dee.

II
Le ragazze canteranno
come uccelli sui cespugli
se io fossi giovane
andrei a scuotere i cespugli .
III
Le ragazze nuoteranno
come anatre nell’acqua,
se io fossi giovane
andrei a tuffarmi

NOTE
1) lepre, uccelli e anatra sono animali associati ai tre regni, mondo di mezzo (Terra), di sopra (Cielo) e di sotto (Mare)

OH SALLY, MY DEAR

Lo stesso schema è ripreso in una ballata chiamata sempre con lo stesso titolo oppure come “Oh Sally my dear” della quale si conoscono prevalentemente due melodie. Qui la parte testuale è resa come con botta e risposta tra i due innamorati.

Shirley Collins & Davey Graham . Pregevole arrangiamento di Davey alla chitarra

Jonny Kearney & Lucy Farrell melodia più lenta, molto magica

Alt-J in Bright: The Album 2017 -per il film Bright, versione indie-rock (I, III, IV, VI)


I
“Oh Sally, my dear,
it’s you I’d be kissing,
Oh Sally, my dear,
it’s you I’d be kissing,”
She smiled and replied,
“you don’t know what you’re missing”.
II
“Oh Sally, my dear,
I wish I could wed you,
Oh Sally my dear,
I wish I could bed you”
She smiled and replied,
“then you’d say I’d misled you”.
III
“If all you young men
were hares on the mountain,
How many young girls
would take guns and go hunting?
IV
If the young men could sing like blackbirds and thrushes,
How many young girls
would go beating the bushes?
V
If all you young men
were fish in the water,
How many young girls
would undress and dive after?”
VI
“But the young men
are given to frisking and fooling (1),
Oh, the young men are given to frisking and fooling,
So I’ll leave them alone
and attend to my schooling”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
“Oh Sally mia cara
sei tu che vorrei baciare
Oh Sally mia cara
sei tu che vorrei baciare”;
lei sorrise e rispose
” Non sai cosa ti perdi”
II
“Oh Sally mia cara
vorrei poterti sposare,
Oh Sally mia cara
vorrei portarti a letto”;
lei sorrise e rispose
“Allora dirai che io ti ho sedotto”
III
” Se tutti i ragazzi
fossero lepri di montagna,
quante ragazze prenderebbero le armi per andare a caccia?
IV
Se i ragazzi potessero cantare
come merli e tordi,
quante ragazze andrebbero
a scuotere i cespugli?
V
Se tutti i ragazzi fossero pesci nell’acqua,
allora quante ragazze
si spoglierebbero per tuffarsi?”
IV
“Ma ai giovanotti
è concesso sfarfallare e divertirsi
ai giovanotti
è concesso sfarfallare e divertirsi
così li lascerò stare
e baderò ai miei affari”

NOTE
1) nel nenso di prendere i rapporti con le ragazze con leggerezza, senza serie intenzioni. In questa versione la ballata è diventata una warning song sul vecchio adagio che l’uomo è cacciatore e ci prova con tutte

THE BLACKBIRDS AND THE THRUSHES

E infine la stessa ballata tramandata con un altro titolo
Niamh Parsons in “Blackbirds & Thrushes” 1999

Catherine Merrigan & Marion Camastral in “Wings O’er The Wind

Seamus Ennis


I
If all the young ladies
were blackbirds (1) & thrushes
If all the young ladies
were blackbirds & thrushes
Then all the young men
would go beating the bushes
Rye fol de dol diddle lol iddle lye ay
II
If all the young ladies
were ducks on the water..
Then all the young men
would go swimming in after
III
If all the young ladies
were rushes a-growing..
Then all the young men would get scythes and go mowing
IV
If the ladies were all
trout and salmon so lively
Then divil the men
would go fishing on Friday(2)
V
If all the young ladies
were hares on the mountain
Then men with their hounds
would be out without counting
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Se tutte le ragazze
fossero merli e tordi,
se tutte le ragazze
fossero merli e tordi,
allora tutti i ragazzi
andrebbero a scuotere i cespugli.
Rye fol de dol diddle lol iddle lye ay
II
Se tutte le ragazze
fossero anatre nell’acqua,
allora tutti i ragazzi
andrebbero a tuffarsi .
III
Se tutte le ragazze
fossero alti giunchi,
allora tutti i ragazzi prenderebbero la falce e andrebbero a falciare.
IV
Se tutte le donne fossero trote
e salmoni così guizzanti,
allora diavolo se gli uomini
andrebbero a pescare di Venerdì.
V
Se tutte le ragazze
fossero lepri sulla montagna,
allora gli uomini con i loro segugi andrebbero a caccia senza indugi

NOTE
1) Nella tradizione celtica: Il merlo (druid dhubh) è associato alla Dea Rhiannon. La leggenda dice che gli uccelli di Rhiannon sono tre merli, che sono appollaiati e cantano sull’albero della vita ai confini con i mondi ultraterreni. Il loro canto, mette l’ascoltatore in uno stato di trance, che gli consente di recarsi nei mondi paralleli. (da qui) continua
2) l’espressione vuole forse riferirsi al fatto che nel week-end si va a pescare o che di venerdì si mangia pesce

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=58904
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=73890 http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/haresonthemountain.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31052

La Caccia d’Amore di Beltane: Two Magicians

Read the post in English

63_rackham_siegfried_grimhildeLa Caccia d’Amore è un tema tipico dei canti popolari, secondo modi propri della canzone d’amore cortese ovvero i contrasti tra due innamorati, in questi lui cerca di conquistare e lei respinge o dileggia e spesso il contesto è comico o anche scurrile.
Così la ballata “The Twa Magicians” è una Caccia d’Amore in cui la naturale ritrosia della virginale fanciulla ringalluzzisce l’uomo, perchè il di lei diniego è in realtà un invito alla conquista.

THE TWA MAGICIANS

La ballata è originaria del Nord della Scozia e la prima fonte scritta si trova in “Ancient Ballads and Song of the North of Scotland” di Peter Buchan – 1828, successivamente anche in Child #44 (The English and Scottish Popular Ballads di Francis James Child). Si ritiene che provenga dalla tradizione norrena. Le versioni giunte fino a noi sono numerose, come accade in genere per le ballate popolari diffuse nella tradizione orale, e anche con finali diversi tra loro. Nella sua forma “base” si tratta della storia di un fabbro che intende conquistare una vergine; la fanciulla però fugge, trasformandosi in vari animali ed anche oggetti o elementi della Natura; l’uomo la insegue mutando forma egli stesso.
Si trova traccia scritta del tema già nel 1630 in una ballata dal titolo  The two kinde Lovers (The Maydens resolution and will, To be like her true Lover still) – vedi testo in cui però è la donna a inseguire l’uomo.
La ballata inizia con la donna che dice


if thou wilt goe, Love,
let me goe with thee
Because I cannot live,
without thy company

Se tu andrai, Amore
lasciami venite con te
perché non posso vivere
senza la tua compagnia

e prosegue dicendo:
se tu sei il sole io sarò la luna,
se tu sarai l’aurora io sarò la rugiada,
se tu sarai la rosa io sarò il profumo  
..

Si tratta quindi di coppie complementari e non opposte, una sorta di resa totale all’amore da parte della donna che dichiara la sua fedeltà all’uomo. Non dimentichiamoci che le antiche ballate erano anche una forma d’insegnamento o se si vuole di educazione dei giovani.
E tuttavia troviamo sepolte nel testo tracce di rituali d’iniziazione, perle di saggezza o insegnamenti druidici, così i due maghi si trasformano in animali associati ai tre regni, Nem (cielo), Talam (Terra) Muir (mare) o se vogliamo mondo di sopra, di mezzo e di sotto e il mistero è quello della rinascita spirituale.
Altre analogie si riscontrano con la ballata “Hares on the Mountain

VERSIONE BUCHAN

In genere la Caccia d’Amore si conclude con l’accoppiamento consensuale.
La versione diffusa oggi di “The two magicians” è basata sulla riscrittura del testo e l’arrangiamento musicale di Albert Lancaster Lloyd   (1908-1982) per l’album “The Bird in the   Bush” (1966 );

ASCOLTA (tutte le strofe tranne XV e XVI)

Celtic stone in Celtic Stone, 1983: (gruppo americano folk-rock attivo negli   anni 80 e 90), un’ironica interpretazione vocale da consumati menestrelli, un brioso arrangiamento musicale che accosta felicemente chitarra acustica con l’hammer dulcimer
l’ordine delle strofe è alterato rispetto alla versione”standard” e si inseriscono due strofe aggiuntive (strofe da I a VII, XI, IX, XIV, X, XV, XVI, XVII)

Damh the Bard in Tales from the Crow Man, 2009. Altro menestrello del mondo magico in una versione più rock (strofe da I a VII, XI, IX, XII, X, XIV, XV, XVI,XVII, XVIII)

Jean-Luc Lenoir in “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads” 2013 (voce Joanne McIver) 
– un arrangiamento brioso e accattivante tratto da un traditional (è un mixer tra le due melodie)
Owl Service in Wake The Vaulted Echo (2006)
Empty Hats in The Hat Came Back, 2000 molto efficace la scelta del parlato

VERSIONE A.L. Lloyd
I
The lady stood at her own front door
As straight as a willow wand
And along come a lusty smith (1)
With his hammer in his hand
CHORUS
Saying “bide lady bide
there’s a nowhere you can hide
the lusty smith will be your love
And he will lay your pride”.
II
“Well may you dress, you lady fair,
All in your robes of red  (2)
Before tomorrow at this same time
I’ll have your maidenhead.”
III
“Away away you coal blacksmith
Would you do me this wrong?
To have me maidenhead
That I have kept so long”
IV
I’d rather I was dead and cold
And me body in the grave
Than a lusty, dusty, coal black smith
Me maide head should have”
V
Then the lady she held up her hand
And swore upon the spul
She never would be the blacksmith’s love
For all of a box of gold  (3)
VI
And the blacksmith he held up his hand/And he swore upon the mass,
“I’ll have you for my love, my girl,
For the half of that or less.”
VII
Then she became a turtle dove
And flew up in the air
But he became an old cock pigeon
And they flew pair and pair
VIII
And she became a little duck,
A-floating in the pond,
And he became a pink-necked drake
And chased her round and round.
IX
She turned herself into a hare  (4)
And ran all upon the plain
But he became a greyhound dog
And fetched her back again
X
And she became a little ewe sheep
and lay upon the common
But he became a shaggy old ram
And swiftly fell upon her.
XI
She changed herself to a swift young mare, As dark as the night was black,
And he became a golden saddle
And clung unto her back.
XII
And she became a little green fly,
A-flew up in the air,
And he became a hairy spider
And fetched her in his lair.
XIII
Then she became a hot griddle (5)
And he became a cake,
And every change that poor girl made
The blacksmith was her mate.
XIV
So she turned into a full-dressed ship
A-sailing on the sea
But he became a captain bold
And aboard of her went he
XV 
So the lady she turned into a cloud
Floating in the air
But he became a lightning flash
And zipped right into her
XVI
So she turned into a mulberry tree
A mulberry tree in the wood
But he came forth as the morning dew
And sprinkled her where she stood.
XVII
So the lady ran in her own bedroom
And changed into a bed,
But he became a green coverlet
And he gained her maidenhead
XVIII
And was she woke, he held her so,
And still he bad her bide,
And the husky smith became her love
And that pulled down her pride.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
La dama si sedette alla porta di casa, dritta come una bacchetta di salice
e un gagliardo fabbro le viene vicino
con il martello in mano
CORO:
Dicendo “Aspetta, fanciulla, aspetta, perché non c’è posto dove tu possa nasconderti, il fabbro gagliardo sarà il tuo amante, e vincerà il tuo orgoglio!
II
Ti credi al sicuro, bella dama,
tutta vestita di rosso
ma prima che venga domani a questa stessa ora avrò la tua verginità“.
III
Via, via fabbro nero carbone,
perchè mi faresti questo affronto?
Prendere la verginità
che ho serbato così a lungo!
IV
Preferirei essere morta stecchita
seppellita nella tomba

piuttosto che un fabbro così nero-carbone e grosso, abbia la mia verginità.”
IV
Così la dama alzò la mano
e giurò sulla terra
che non sarebbe mai stata l’amante del fabbro
nemmeno per un sacco d’oro.
VI
Ma il fabbro alzò la mano
e giurò sulla lancia
Ti avrò come amante, ragazza mia
per la metà o molto meno“.
VII
Così lei si trasformò in colomba
e volò alto in cielo,
ma lui divenne un vecchio piccione e volavano appaiati,
VIII
Così lei si trasformò in una paperella
che nuotava nello stagno
ma lui divenne un papero dal collo rosa
che le girava in tondo
IX
Così lei si trasformò in lepre
e corse per tutta la piana
e lui si trasformò in un levriero
e la raggiunse di nuovo
X
Così lei si trasformò in pecorella che pascolava per la brughiera,
ma lui divenne un vecchio ariete
e lesto la montò.
XI
Così lei si trasformò in un’agile cavalla nera come la notte,
ma lui divenne una sella dorata
e le montò sulla schiena.
XII
Così lei divenne una piccola verde mosca per svolazzare nell’aria,
ma lui divenne un ragno peloso
e la trascinò nella sua tana.
XIII
Allora lei divenne un testo rovente
e lui una torta
e a ogni giro che la ragazza faceva,
il fabbro le stava attaccato
XIV
Così lei si trasformò in una nave tutta impavesata e salpò per il mare,
ma lui divenne un intrepido capitano e salì a bordo.
XV
Così la dama si trasformò in una nuvola che fluttuava nell’aria,
ma lui divenne un fulmine luminoso e zigzagò verso di lei.
XVI
Così lei si trasformò in un albero di gelso, un gelso nella foresta,
ma lui divenne rugiada di mattino
e si sparpagliò su di lei.
XVII
Così lei corse nella propria stanza
e si trasformò nel letto,
ma lui diventò un copriletto verde e  prese la sua verginità
XVIII
E quando lei si svegliò la prese ancora, finchè lei capitolò,
così il fabbro divenne il suo amante, e ciò fece capitolare l’orgoglio di lei.

NOTE
1) da sempre nelle canzoni popolari il maniscalco è considerato sinonimo di virilità, amante molto dotato e dalla forza portentosa. Qui egli è anche mago armato di martello mentre la fanciulla sua antagonista (o complementare) impugna una bacchetta di salice.
Viene da pensare a una sorta di duello o sfida tra due praticanti maghi
2) letteralmente: “Come siete ben vestita con i vostri abiti in rosso” come sempre nelle antiche ballate alcune parole sono dei codici che fanno risuonare dei campanelli d’allarme in chi ascolta: il rosso è il colore delle fate ossia delle creature dotate di poteri magici. Rosso era anche il colore della sposa nell’antichità ed è un colore propizio per la fertilità
3) anche scritto come “pot of gold” e subito vengono in mente le pentole piene d’oro del leprecauno
4) la coppia lepre-segugio è la prima delle trasformazioni nel mito gallese della nascita di Taliesin. Gwion è l’inseguito che si muta in un animale lunare, prende in sè il principio femminile simbolo di abbondanza-fertilità, ma anche creatività-intuizione, diventa puro istinto, frenesia.
E’ il cane non solo predatore, ma anche guardiano e psicopompo  ‘Il cane riveste presso moltissime popolazioni la funzione di guardiano dei luoghi sacri, guida dell’uomo nella notte della morte, difensore del regno dei morti, sorvegliante in tutti i casi del regno spirituale.
In particolare presso i Celti era associato al mondo dei Guerrieri. Il cane, infatti, era presente nelle iniziazioni dei Guerrieri. La caccia, come la guerra, era un atto sacro che si poteva compiere solo dopo un’iniziazione e una preparazione rituale di protezione divina’.
(Riccardo Taraglio in  Il Vischio e la Quercia) continua
5) ferri da cialda: il testo è un speciale attrezzo per cucinare il pane o le cialde di Beltane detto anche ferro o meglio al plurale ferri con cui venivano schiacciati e cotti dei piccoli pezzi di pasta all’interno di piatti metallici arroventati sul fuoco. Le due piastre che potevano essere lisce o variamente decorate a nido d’ape o a intagli floreali, scritte o disegni geometrici, erano incernierate da una parte e dotate li un lungo manico: poste sul fuoco man mano che si arroventavano da un lato venivano rigirate per la cottura dall’altro lato. Nel Medioevo erano diventati dei capolavori di forgiatura realizzati da mastri ferrai o raffinati argentieri, ed erano un tradizionale dono di fidanzamento.

Ferro da cialde, Umbria, sec. XVI

VERSIONE SHARP

Il brano è riportato da Cecil Sharp in One Hundred English Folksongs  (1916) nelle note dice di averlo ascoltato  dal signor Sparks (di mestiere fabbro), Minehead, Somerset, nel 1904.

Steeleye Span nell’album “Now we are six”, 1974

VERSIONE STEELEYE SPAN
I
She looked out of the window
as white as any milk
And he looked in at  the window
as black as any silk
CHORUS
Hello, hello, hello, hello,
you coal blacksmith

You have done me no harm
You never shall  have my maidenhead
That I have kept so long
I’d rather die a maid
Ah, but then she said
and be buried all in my grave

Than to have such a nasty,
husky, dusky, fusky, musky

Coal blacksmith,
a maiden, I will die

II
She became a duck,
a duck all on the stream
And he became a water dog (1)
and fetched her back again.
She became a star,
a star all in the night
And he became a thundercloud
And muffled her out of sight.
III
She became a rose,
a rose all in the wood
And he became a bumble bee  (2)
And kissed her where she stood.
She became a nun,
a nun all dressed in white
And he became a canting priest
And prayed for her by night.
IV
She became a trout,
a trout all in the brook
And he became a feathered fly
And caught her with his hook.
She became a corpse,
a corpse all in the ground
And he became the cold clay
and smothered her all around (3)
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Dalla finestra lei guardava fuori ,
pallida come del latte
Dalla finestra lui guardava dentro,
scuro come una calza di seta
Coro
Ciao, ciao, ciao
nero fabbro ferraio 

non mi hai fatto del male
e mai avrai la mia verginità
che ho custodito così a lungo,
preferisco  morire da fanciulla
allora lei disse
e essere sepolta nella tomba,
piuttosto che avere un fabbro ferraio così brutto, grosso, scuro e puzzolente,
nero come carbone.
Morirò vergine”

II
Lei diventò un anatra,
un anatra nel fiume
e lui si trasformò in un cane
per darle la caccia.
Lei diventò una stella,
una stella nella notte
e lui diventò una nuvola di temporale e la nascose alla vista.
III
Lei  diventò una rosa,
una rosa del bosco
e lui in un bombo
e la baciò sul posto.
Lei diventò una monaca,
una monaca vestita di bianco
e lui diventò un prete  ipocrita, per pregare con lei tutta la notte.
IV
Lei diventò una trota,
una trota nel ruscello
e lui diventò un amo con l’esca
e la prese con il suo uncino.
Lei diventò un cadavere,
steso sul terreno
e lui diventò fredda terra
e l’avvolse tutta

NOTE
1) water dog è una cane di riporto grande nuotatore ossia un cane addestrato per la caccia di palude, insomma una parola troppo lunga da utilizzare per la traduzione in italiano
2) il bombo è imparentato con le api, ma non produce il miele ed è molto più grosso e tozzo dell’ape
3) Qui la storia si potrebbe tradurre come “Quale parte della parola NO non capisci?” ossia il categorico e virginale rifiuto della donna all’atto sessuale ripetutamente tentato da un fabbro brutto, scuro e anche un po’ puteolente   (oggi si direbbe puzzone). Per sfuggire alla bramosia dell’uomo lei si trasforma in anatra, stella, rosa, monaca e trota (e lui nei suoi persecutori, ossia cane da palude, nuvola, bombo, prete, amo da pesca); apparentemente la fanciulla preferisce la morte piuttosto che subire uno stupro: questo è un modo distorto d’interpretare la storia, è la mentalità “maschilista” convinta che la donna sia sempre complice della violenza e quindi da condannare, non una vittima.
A mio avviso invece è  il ritorno alla terra nella fusione del principio femminile con quello maschile; i due, ormai persi nel vortice delle trasformazioni, si fondono in un unico abbraccio di polvere e la loro morte è una morte-rinascita .

Beltane Fire Festival 

IL FABBRO

L’uomo cacciatore qui è però una figura “soprannaturale”, il fabbro considerato nei tempi antichi una creatura dotata di poteri magici, i primi fabbri furono infatti i nani (gli elfi neri o oscuri) capaci di creare armi e gioielli incantati. L’arte della forgia era una conoscenza antica che si tramandava tra iniziati.
Così nel Medioevo la figura del fabbro assunse delle connotazioni negative basti pensare alle tante “fucine del diavolo” o “del pagano” che davano il nome a località un tempo sede di forgia.

Vulcano, Andrea Mantegna

In forza del suo mestiere il fabbro è uomo possente con muscoli ben sviluppati, eppure proprio a causa della sua conoscenza e del suo potere il fabbro è spesso zoppo o orbo: se comune mortale la sua menomazione è un segno che egli ha visto (si è impadronito) di un qualche segreto divino, ossia ha visto un aspetto nascosto della divinità dal quale viene punito per sempre; è la conoscenza del segreto del fuoco e dei metalli, che si tramutano da solido a liquido e si mescolano in leghe. In molte mitologie sono gli stessi dei ad essere fabbri (Varuna, Odino) sono dei maghi e anche loro hanno pagato un prezzo per la loro magia.
La zoppia inoltre nasconde un’ulteriore metafora: quello della prova che è alla base della ricerca, sia essa una conquista spirituale oppure un’atto risanatore o di vendetta (un tema fondamentale nel ciclo del Graal).

Ma i maghi della ballata sono due dunque anche la fanciulla è una mutaforma o forse una sciamana.

MUTAFORMA

Cerridwen_EmpowermentIl tema della trasformazione è l’ispirazione delle Metamorfosi di Ovidio: un susseguirsi di divinità dell’Olimpo che per la propria lussuria si trasformano in animali (ma anche in pioggia dorata) e seducono belle mortali o ninfe dei boschi (le quali a loro volta si trasformano nel loro antagonista).
Del resto l’inseguimento attraverso la mutazione delle forme ricorda quello tra Cerridwen e il suo apprendista nella storia gallese della nascita del bardo Taliesin. A fuggire è qui un ragazzo, avendo bevuto la pozione magica dell’Ispirazione dal calderone che stava sorvegliando, si sottrae all’ira della dea trasformandosi in vari animali (lepre, pesce, uccello). Alla fine diventa chicco di grano per nascondersi come il classico ago nel pagliaio, ma la dea mutata in gallina se lo mangia. Da questo insolito accoppiamento nasce   Taliesin (534-599) alias Merlino..

IL CANTO DI AMERGIN
Sono stato una goccia di pioggia nei cieli,
sono stato la più lontana delle stelle.
Sono stato cibo al festino,
sono stato corda di un’arpa.
Sono stato una lancia aguzza
scudo nella battaglia
spada nella stretta delle mani.
Nell’acqua e nella schiuma
Sono stato temprato nel fuoco.


Ovvero, per divenire Saggezza, per Comprendere, si devono sperimentare gli elementi…

Questo poema di Taliesin potrebbe condensare il mistero del viaggio iniziatico, in cui la Saggezza viene conquistata con la conoscenza degli elementi, che è esperienza profonda, immedesimazione, attraverso la penetrazione della loro propria essenza, divenendo il viandante stesso essenza degli elementi.
Cambiare forma significa sperimentare tutto, sperimentare se stessi in ogni cosa in continuo cambiamento e sperimentare l’incontro tra il sé e l’altro, preda e predatore, non separati ma inscindibilmente legati, come in una danza. (tratto da qui)

VOLO SCIAMANICO

La caratteristica principale dello sciamano è quella di “viaggiare” in condizioni di estasi nel mondo degli spiriti e di utilizzarne i poteri per il singolo o per l’intera comunità. Le tecniche per far questo sono essenzialmente il sonno estatico (trance mistica) e la trasformazione del proprio spirito in animale. Mutare forma come pratica magica comporta una trasformazione di una parte dell’anima nello spirito di un animale per lasciare il corpo e viaggiare sia nel mondo sensibile che in quello sovrasensibile. Un’altra tecnica consiste nel lasciare il proprio corpo e prendere possesso del corpo di un animale vivente.

In questo modo lo sciamano “cavalca”, cioè prende come mezzo per spostarsi, i corpi degli animali che sono anche suoi spiriti-guida. In alcuni rituali si utilizzano piante psicoattive oppure il   battito del tamburo, oppure si indossano le pelli o la maschera dell’animale che si desidera “cavalcare”. Tale pratica non è indenne da rischi: può accadere che lo sciamano non possa più ritornare al suo corpo perché si dimentica di sé, del suo essere umano, oppure viaggia troppo lontano dal corpo e cade in coma o il corpo fisico muore perché troppo debilitato dalla separazione.
Lo spirito può essere catturato nell’aldilà o l’animale   può essere ferito o ucciso sul piano terreno e quindi, come l’anima dello sciamano è catturata o ferita o uccisa, così il suo corpo ne riporta le conseguenze.

continua seconda parte 

vedi anche traduzioni pubblicate in
https://lyricstranslate.com/it/two-magicians-i-due-maghi.html-0
https://lyricstranslate.com/it/twa-magiciansthe-two-magicians-i-due-maghi.html

FONTI
http://web.tiscali.it/artigianidaltritempi/fabbro.htm
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=252
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thetwomagicians.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sciamani.html
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch044.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/child/2magics.html
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=247
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40723
http://www.yourultimateresource.com/the-two-magicians/