Archivi tag: Thomas Ravenscroft

Good luck to the barley mow

Leggi in italiano

A popular drinking song from rural England, Ireland and Scotland (and the Americas) that could not miss after the “crying of the neck” or during a “Harvest supper“; this auspicious song is also a tavern game: the most common form of the game sees only one singer, while the audience lifts the glass to drink twice in the refrain responding to the auspicious verse with a joyful “Good luck!”; in the second version a soloist intones the first stanza and all the participants sing in chorus the progressive refrain, whom that mistakes the words, or takes a breath to sing, must drink. Obviously the goal of the game is to drink more and more, as you make mistakes!

Harvest-Scene-Barrow-Trent-1881
Harvest Scene, Barrow-on-Trent, Derbyshire, George Turner II 1881

GIVE US ONCE A DRINKE

The song is very ancient as the rituals inherent to the harvest of wheat / barley are ancient (see traditional methods); the first known publication dates back to 1609, in the Deuteromelia by Thomas Ravenscroft, with the title “Give Us Once A Drinke” is transcribed as it was sung in the Elizabethan taverns.

The song started with:
“Give us once a drink for and the black bole(1)
Sing gentle Butler(2) “balla moy”(3)
For and the black bole,
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”
and it ended with:
“Give us once a drink for and the tunne
Sing gentle Butler balla moy
The tunne, the butt The pipe, the hogshead The barrel, the kilderkin The verkin, the gallon pot The pottle pot, the quart pot, The pint pot,
for and the black bole
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”

NOTES
1) What were the beer glass like in medieval taverns? The three most common materials at the time were metal (pewter), glass and ceramics. In Italy in the fourteenth century, for example in the taverns, glass was more common. Here we quote a black bowl that makes one think more properly of a dark bowl or cup, perhaps made of wood? In the wassaling songs, which are also very old, the material of the toast cups carved in the wood is often described. Later, the use of pewter is more likely.
2) bottler
3) the scholars believe it could be for ‘Bell Ami’, only later the song became part of the songs during the Harvest festival and the verse was changed to ‘Barley Mow’, others believe that it is a Mondegreen.

BARLEY MOW

Over time, new strophes have been added and especially in the nineteenth century there are many transcriptions in the collections of old traditional songs such as in “Songs of the Peasantry of England”, by Robert Bell 1857 : This song is sung at country meetings in Devon and Cornwall, particularly on completing the carrying of the barley, when the rick, or mow of barley, is finished. On putting up the last sheaf, which is called the craw (or crow) sheaf, the man who has it cries out ‘I have it, I have it, I have it;’ another demands, ‘What have ’ee, what have ’ee, what have ’ee?’ and the answer is, ‘A craw! a craw! a craw!’ upon which there is some cheering,& c., and a supper afterwards. The effect of the Barley-mow Song cannot be given in words; it should be heard, to be appreciated properly, – particularly with the West-country dialect.
Robert Bell transcribes the widespread version in West England and also the variant sung in Suffolk

Here’s a health to the barley mow!
Here’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both harrow and plow and sow!
When it is well sown
See it is well mown,
Both raked and gavelled clean,
And a barn to lay it in.
He’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both thrash (1) and fan it clean!
NOTES
1) in the Middle Ages there were two ways to separate the wheat grains from the ear: the farmer beat the sheaves with a stick or a whip or they were trampled by the draft animals.
The sifting: wheat and chaff were separated first by placing them in a sieve and then throwing them in the air (it must of course be a breezy day) the chaff flew away and the grain returned to the sieve.

 

maste-drinking
The master of drinking Adriaen Brouwer (1606-1638)

The Barley Mow is one of the best-known cumulative songs from the English folk repertoire and was usually sung at harvest suppers, often as a test of sobriety. Alfred Williams, who noted a splendid set in the Wiltshire village of Inglesham some time prior to the Great War, wrote that he was “unable to fix its age, or even to suggest it, though doubtless the piece has existed for several centuries.” Robert Bell found the song being sung in Devon and Cornwall during the middle part of the 19th century, especially after “completing the carrying of the barley, when the rick, or mow, of barley is finished.” Bell’s comment that “the effect of The Barley Mow cannot be given in words; it should be heard, to be appreciated properly” is certainly true, and most singers who know the song pride themselves on being able to get through it without making a mistake.(Mike Yates)

So we toast to all the dimensions in which beer is marketed (and are indicated in all the existing measures in the past times from the barrel  to the “bowl” and to the health of all those who “manipulate” the beer and of all the “merry brigade” who drinks it!

Arthur Smith in’The Barley Mow’ (1955)  a typical pub in Suffolk in the fifties.See VIDEO: 

Irish Rovers


Here’s good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow, (1)
Jolly good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the pint pot, half a pint, gill, (2) half a gill, quarter gill
Nipperkin (3) and a round bowl(4)
Here’s good luck, (5)
good luck, good luck
to the barley mow.
Here’s good luck to the half gallon, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the half gallon,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill, half a gill …
Here’s good luck to the gallon,
Here’s good luck to the half barrel,
Here’s good luck to the barrel,
Here’s good luck to the daughter(6),
Here’s good luck to the landlord,
Here’s good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the brewer, (7)
Here’s good luck to the company, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the company,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the company, brewer, landlady, landlord, daughter, barrel,
Half barrel, gallon, half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill,
Half a gill, quarter gill, nipperkin and a round bowl,
Here’s good luck, good luck,
good luck to the barley mow.

NOTES
1) [shout GOOD LUCK and drink a sip!]
2) they are all units of measure ordered by the largest (barrel) to the smallest (round bowl).
But as for all units of measurement of the peasant tradition there are local differences in the measured quantity
a gill is a half-pint in a northern pub, but a quarter-pint down south“.
3) “The nipperkin is a unit of measurement of volume, equal to one-half of a quarter-gill, one-eighth of a gill, or one thirty-second of an English pint.
In other estimations, one nip (an abbreviation that originated in 1796) is either one-third of a pint, or any amount less than or equal to half a pint
“.[wiki] “A nip was also used by brewers to refer to a small bottle of ale (usually a strong one such as Barley Wine or Russian Stout) which was sold in 1/3 pint bottles“.
4) “The round bowl” sometimes also “hand-around bowl”, “brown bowl” or “bonny bowl” could be the typical cup with which toasted in the wassailing evidently a unit of measure that has been lost over time.
5) [shout GOOD LUCK, drinking is optional!]
6) the daughter of the tavern owner or more generally she is a waitress serving at the tables
7) there are those who add “the slavey” and “the drayer” to the list; “slavery” means a servant and “the draye” is the one who pulls (or guides) the cart that is the man of deliveries that in fact supplies the tavern with beer. The name derives from the fact that once such a cart was wheelless and was dragged like a sled.

slavery

HOW MUCH DOES A PINT?
therightglass

The draft beer is marketed in the Anglo-Saxon countries starting from the pint that in England and Ireland corresponds to 20 ounces (568 ml ie roughly 50cl). The American pint instead corresponds to 16 ounces; so the standard glass for beer contains exactly a pint (as we call Italian “big beer”); the shapes vary according to the time and the fashions, but the capacity of the glass is always a pint! A law by the British parliament in 1698 stated that “ale and beer” (ie beer without hops and beer with hops) must be served in public only in “pints, full quarts (two pints) * or multiples thereof”. The rule was further reiterated in 1824 by imposing the imperial unit as a unit of measure for all beverages. * The glass that contains 2 imperial pints (1.14 liters) is the yard or a narrow and long glass just a yard. Today with the adaptation to European regulations the British government has “restricted” the pint to “schooner” (as it is called in Australia, but we are still waiting for the nickname that will be given in England to the new measure!) The glass equal to 2/3 pint (400 ml)

THE BARLEY MOW (ROUD 10722)

A variant always from Suffolk

I
Well we ploughed the land and we planted it,
and we watched the barley grow.
We rolled it and we harrowed it
and we cleaned it with a hoe.(1)
Then we waited ‘til the farmer said,
“It’s time for harvest now.
Get out your axes and sharpen, boys,
it’s time for barley mow.”
Chorus
Well, here’s luck to barley mow
and the land that makes it grow.
We’ll drink to old John Barleycorn(2),
here’s luck to barley mow.
So fill up all the glasses, lads,
and stand them in a row:
A gill, a half a pint, a pint, a pint and a quart and here’s luck to barley mow.
II
Well we went and mowed the barley
and we left it on the ground.
We left it in the sun and rain ‘til it was nicely brown.
Then one day off to the maltsters,
then John Barleycorn did go.
The day he went away, we all did say,
“Here’s luck to barley mow.”
III
Have no fear of old John Barleycorn
when he’s as green as grass.
But old John Barleycorn is strong enough
to sit you on your arse.
But there’s nothing better ever brewed
than we are drinking now,
Fill them up: we’ll have another round,
here’s good luck to barley mow.

NOTES
1) weeding: cutting and shuffling of the ground for the most superficial part
2) John Barleycorn is the spirit of beer 

LINK
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/the-barley-mow/
http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/oleng10h.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/barley.htm http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/barleymow.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/tony.rose/songs/barleymow.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151726
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3873 http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1540-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-barley-mow http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/barlymow.htm

Yonder comes a courteous knight (The Baffled knight ballad)

Leggi in italiano

John Byam Liston Shaw: “The Baffled Knight”

A young knight strolls through the countryside meets a girl (sometimes he surprises her while she is intent on bathing in a river) and asks her to have sex. In truth, the approaches in secluded places between noblemen and curvy country girls even if paludated with bucolic verses, they ended much more prosaically with rape (if the gentleman “stung vagueness”)

But in this ballad the girl is a lady, and the dialogue between the two protagonists becomes rather a gallant skirmish of love, a game of love to make it more appetizing; the knight, however, does not yet know the rules because of his young age and is therefore mocked by the lady, courtesan much more experienced and cynical, skilled maneuverer of her lovers!

VERSION A: YONDER COMES A COURTEOUS KNIGHT

Child ballad #112
The gallant knight is called “Baffled knight” as usual term in the Scottish dialect of 1540-1550: “bauchle”, here in the meaning of “bewildered”, “perplexed” but also “juggled”. Originally the ballad is transcribed in Deuteromelia (1609) by Thomas Ravenscroft with a melody that he attributes to the reign of Henry VIII.

CARPE DIEM

The song is an exhortation to draw pleasure when the opportunity arises: the lady (as an expert courtesan) puts the young knight to the test by presenting the comforts of a bed that awaits them in the paternal home; so she enters first at home and closes off the naive (and inexperienced) knight. The lady does not hide her disdain for the knight who did not dare to get some among the branches!

Custer LaRue & Baltimore Consort from “Ladyes Delight: Entertainment Music of Elizabethan England”, 1998 ♪.
The Baltimore Consort give us a little musical jewel: the melody is performed in a cadenced manner and vaguely refers to the Dargason jig, as also reported in the first edition of “The Dancing Master” by John Playford (1651).

Lucie Skeaping & City Waits from” Lusty Broadside Ballads & Palyford Dances” 2011.
Sparkling and playful interpretation that I imagine salaciously mimed in the most fashionable living rooms of the time. A couple of verses are omitted from the original version. (they skip II, IV and VII )

Joel Frederiksen & Ensemble Phoenix Munich from “The Elfin Knight: Balads and Dances”

I
Yonder comes a courteous knight,
Lustely raking ouer the lay(1);
He was well ware of a bonny lasse,
As she came wandring ouer the way.
CHORUS
Then she sang downe a downe,
hey downe derry (bis)(2)
II
‘Ioue(3) you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
‘Among the leaues that be so greene;
If I were a king, and wore a crowne,
Full soone, fair lady,
shouldst thou be a queen.
III
‘Also Ioue saue you, faire lady(4),
Among the roses that be so red;
If I haue not my will of you,
Full soone, faire lady,
shall I be dead.’
IV
Then he lookt east,
then hee lookt west,
Hee lookt north, so did he south;
He could not finde a priuy place,
For all lay in the diuel’s mouth.
V
‘If you will carry me, gentle sir,
A mayde(5) vnto my father’s hall,
Then you shall haue your will of me,
Vnder purple and vnder paule(6).’
VI
He set her vp vpon a steed,
And him selfe vpon another,
And all the day he rode her by,
As though they had been sister and brother.
VII
When she came to her father’s hall,
It was well walled round about;
She yode(7) in at the wicket-gate,
And shut the foure-eard(8) foole without.
VIII
‘You had me,’ quoth she, ‘abroad in the field,
Among the corne, amidst the hay,
Where you might had your will of mee,
For, in good faith, sir, I neuer said nay.
IX
‘Ye had me also amid the field(9)
Among the rushes that were so browne,
Where you might had your will of me,
But you had not the face to lay me downe.'(10)
X
He pulled out
his nut-browne(11) sword,
And wipt the rust off with his sleeue,
And said, “Ioue’s curse
come to his heart
That any woman would beleeue(12)!
XI
When you haue you owne true-loue
A mile or twaine out of the towne,
Spare not for her gay clothing,
But lay her body flat on the ground.

NOTE
1) ‘lay’ = lea, meadow-land
2)interlayer onomatopoeic and apparently non-sense of some ballads; also in the ballad The Three Ravens always reported by Ravenscoft this time in his Melismata. Vernon Chatman proposes as a translation for a sentence in the finished sense: We find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) that ‘down’ can be used as an adverb either attributively or by ellipsis of some participial word in the sense of “dejected.”” Also, we find that ‘a’ can be used as a preposition as in ‘a live’ or as an adjective in the sense of “all.” Further, we find that ‘hay’ can be used as an interjection in the sense of “thou hast (it)” and that it occurs in the phrase ‘to make hay’ this phrase meaning “to make confusion.” Thus, the sense of line two is something like the following: 1) Dejected all dejected, thou hast dejection [thou art dejected?], thou hast dejection; or 2) Dejected all dejected, confused and dejected, confused and dejected. Relative to line four we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that ‘with’ can be used to form adverb phrases denoting “to the fullest extent.” Thus, the sense of the fourth line is something like the following: Utterly (completely) dejected. Line seven presents the gravest difficulty; however, it can be surmounted. The problem here centers upon ‘derrie.’ Checking this time with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956) we find that Londonderry was once named ‘Derry.’ Derry is an appropriate locale for the scene depicted in “The Three Ravens:” the Scandinavians plundered the city, and it is said to have been burned down at least seven times before 1200; it thus is a site of many battles. Line seven now “means” something like the following: Utterly dejected in Derry, in Derry, dejected, dejected.
3) Ioue = Jove; Jove you speed it is a kind of invocation of the type “Jupiter you assist”, but also a way of greeting. Jupiter is also the god famous for his love adventures and lust: in short, he did not miss one.
4) Lucie Skeaping sing ‘Ioue you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
5) maid
6) purple and paule =  pomp and circumstance
7) ‘yode’ = went.
8) ‘foure-ear’d’ = ‘as denoting a double ass?’ (Child)
9) Lucie Skeaping sings’You had me, abroad in the field,
10) once safe, the lady mocks the inexperienced knight!
11)  the image is burlesque: the young man with a rusty sword because he never got to use it (swordsman inexperienced or clumsy as in the love duels) raises it to the sky pointing to Jupiter to attract lightning!
12) believe

ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11201

THREE RAVENS

Child ballad #26, versione A
musica di Thomas Ravenscroft (1611).

Nella ballata tradizionale di autore anonimo, tre o due corvi osservano il cadavere di un cavaliere e decidono che potrebbe essere la loro colazione: nella versione scozzese il corpo giace nell’erba incustodito (Twa Corbies).

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: THREE RAVENS

Qui i corvi sono tre e il testo è in inglese, accanto al cadavere del cavaliere giacciono i suoi fedeli cani e falchi, e una donna-cerva lo seppellisce. Vernon Chatman in “The three ravens explicated“, 1963 ipotizza che la donna-cervo sia una sorta di donna-centauro e che l’origine della ballata sia irlandese (o quanto meno che la ballata sia derivata da una versione irlandese) (vedi anche in htm): egli ipotizza che il cavaliere appartenga al Clan del Cervo Rosso e che la donna-cervo sia lo spirito-guardiano in forma animale ma anche di fanciulla. Il riferimento però va anche alla corrigan del folklore bretone, la fata-cerva del Greenwood ovvero il bosco sacro che si pettina i capelli d’oro accanto ad una fonte in attesa del cacciatore che la sposerà (e per certi aspetti simile alle sirene) continua
Così i tre corvi sono il simbolo della dea Morrigan la triplice dea della morte che aleggia sui campi di battaglia. continua

Henry Matthew Brock ‘The Three Ravens’

Versione A – Child #26

in “Melismata Mvsicall Phansies. Fitting the Covrt, Citie, and Covntrey Hvmovrs. To 3, 4, and 5 Voyces” musica di Thomas Ravenscroft (1611).
Da ascoltare nella sua probabile esecuzione originale in epoca Tudor nelle splendide esecuzioni dei contro-tenori
ASCOLTA Henry de Rouville

ASCOLTA  Alfred Deller
ASCOLTA Andreas Scholl


I
There were three ravens sat on a tree,
downe a downe, hay downe, a downe,
They were as black as they might be.
with a downe, (downe, downe)
Then one of them said to his mate,
Where shall we now our breakfast take? With a downe, derrie, derrie, downe, downe
II
Down in yonder dear green field,
There lies a Knight slain under his shield,
His hounds they lie down at his feet,
So well do they their Master keep,
III
His hawks they fly so eagerly,
There’s no fowl dare him come nie
Down there comes a fallow doe,
As great with young as she might go
IV
She lifted up his bloody head,
And kissed his wounds that were so red,
She got him up upon her back,
And carried him to earthen lake,
V
She buried him before the prime,
She was dead herself ere even-song time.
God send every gentleman,
Such hawks, such hounds, and such a Leman
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre corvi appollaiati sull’albero
sconsolato e depresso (1)
erano neri come devono essere
assolutamente sconsolato
allora uno di loro disse ai compagni,
“Dove andremo per colazione?”
With a downe, derrie, derrie, downe, downe
II
Laggiù in quel bel campo verde
sotto allo scudo giace un cavaliere ucciso
i suoi cani gli giacciono ai piedi
e vegliano il loro padrone
III
I suoi falchi volano con foga
nessun alto uccello osa avvicinarsi
giunge là una cerva maculata (2) in stato avanzato di gravidanza
IV
Gli alzò la testa insanguinata
e baciò le sue ferite che erano così rosse
poi lo prese sulla sua schiena
e lo portò nella fossa (3)
V
Lo seppellì avanti l’ora prima (4),
ed era morta anche lei all’ora di compieta
che Dio mandi a ogni gentiluomo
tali falchi, cani e una tale amante (5)

NOTE
1)  Vernon Chatman (nella sua opera già citata) propende come traduzione per una frase in senso compiuto: We find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) that ‘down’ can be used as an adverb either attributively or by ellipsis of some participial word in the sense of “dejected.”” Also, we find that ‘a’ can be used as a preposition as in ‘a live’ or as an adjective in the sense of “all.” Further, we find that ‘hay’ can be used as an interjection in the sense of “thou hast (it)” and that it occurs in the phrase ‘to make hay’ this phrase meaning “to make confusion.” Thus, the sense of line two is something like the following: 1) Dejected all dejected, thou hast dejection [thou art dejected?], thou hast dejection; or 2) Dejected all dejected, confused and dejected, confused and dejected.
Relative to line four we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that ‘with’ can be used to form adverb phrases denoting “to the fullest extent.” Thus, the sense of the fourth line is something like the following: Utterly (completely) dejected. Line seven presents the gravest difficulty; however, it can be surmounted. The problem here centers upon ‘derrie.’ Checking this time with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956) we find that Londonderry was once named ‘Derry.’ Derry is an appropriate locale for the scene depicted in “The Three Ravens:” the Scandinavians plundered the city, and it is said to have been burned down at least seven times before 1200; it thus is a site of many battles. Line seven now “means” something like the following: Utterly dejected in Derry, in Derry, dejected, dejected.
2) letteralmente cerbiatta a maggese ma anche daino dal manto maculato.
3) lago di creta o lago asciutto o terra molle ossia un corpo d’acqua alimentato solo dalla pioggia, richiama la pozzanghera sta per indicare la fossa in cui il cavaliere sarà seppellito
4) suddivisione del tempo secondo le ore canoniche stabilite dalla chiesa cristiana per la preghiera comune (liturgia delle ore)
Mattutino: prima dell’alba
Lodi: all’alba
Prima: ore 6:00
Terza: ore 9:00
Sesta: ore 12:00
Nona: ore 15:00
Vespri: tramonto
Compieta: prima di coricarsi
5) termine arcaico per amante

32

ASCOLTA Loreena McKennitt live arpa e voce nei suoi primi concerti (con il testo standard)

ASCOLTA Cecile Corbel in Songbook Volume 1 che ha invece (come suo solito) modificato la struttura della ballata introducendo un ritornello


chorus
Down-a-down, hey! down
They were as black as they might be
Down-a-down, hey! down
With a down derry derry
Down-a-down, hey!   down
There were three ravens sat on a tree,
Down-a-down, hey! down
With a down derry derry down
I
The one of them said to his mate,
“Where shall we our breakefast take?”/”Down in a yonder green field,/There lies a knight slain under his shield.
II
His hounds they lie down at his feet,/So well they can their master keep./His hawks they fly so eagerly,/There’s no fowl dare him to come nigh.”
III
Down there comes a fallow doe
As great with young as she might goe.
She buried him before the prime,
She was dead herself ere even-song time.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Ritornello
Down-a-down, hey! down
Erano neri come devono essere
Down-a-down, hey! down
With a down derry derry
Down-a-down, hey!   down
C’erano tre corvi appollaiati sull’albero
Down-a-down, hey! down
With a down derry derry down
I
Uno di loro disse ai compagni,
“Dove andremo per colazione?”
“Laggiù in quel bel campo verde
sotto allo scudo giace un cavaliere ucciso
II
I suoi segugi gli stanno ai piedi
e vegliano il loro padrone
I suoi falchi volano con foga
e nessun alto uccello osa avvicinarsi
III
Giunge là una cerva maculata in stato avanzato di gravidanza.
Lo seppellì avanti l’ora prima
ed era morta anche lei nel tempo di una canzone

ASCOLTA Malinky in 3 Ravens, 2002


I
Three ravens sat upon a tree
Hey doun hey derrie day
Three ravens sat upon a tree
Hey doun
Three ravens sat upon a tree
And they were black as black could be
And sing la do an la do a day
II
The middle ane said tae his mate
“Oh where shall we our dinner get?”
III
“Well, it’s doun intae yon grass green field/There lies a knight that’s newly killed”
IV
And his horse is standing at his side
And thinks he might get up and ride
V
And his hounds are lying at his feet
And they lick his wounds sae sore and deep
VI
There came a lady full of woe
As big wi’ child as she could go
VII
And she’s stretched hersel’ doon at his side
And for the love of him she’s died
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Tre corvi appollaiati sull’albero
Hey doun hey derrie day
Tre corvi appollaiati sull’albero
Hey doun
Tre corvi appollaiati sull’albero
neri proprio come devono essere
e canta la do an la do a day
II
quello in mezzo disse ai suoi compagni,
“Dove andremo per colazione?”
III
“Beh laggiù in quel bel campo verde
giace un cavaliere che è stato appena ucciso”
IV
Il suo cavallo gli sta al fianco
e pensa che dovrebbe alzarsi e correre
V
I suoi cani gli giacciono ai piedi
e gli leccano le ferite terribili e così profonde
VI
Giunge là una dama addolorata
in stato avanzato di gravidanza
VII
Si è distesa al suo fianco e per amor suo è morta

ASCOLTA Sonne Hagal (neo folk germanico)

WELCOME YULE

hollykingDurante le feste natalizie in Epoca Tudor il grosso ceppo di Yule (Yule Log) veniva portato nelle case e tenuto acceso per i dodici giorni dello Yule. Così il solstizio d’inverno fissato dal calendario il 21 dicembre segnava il primo giorno delle feste invernali e la dodicesima notte era il 2 gennaio, però già nel Medioevo i dodici giorni iniziarano con il 25 dicembre il “Giorno Santo” (e la nascita di Gesù finì per coincidere con la nascita del Nuovo Sole) per concludersi, come oggi, il 6 gennaio, all’Epifaniache tutte le feste spazza via“. Ma il “mese” del Natale in realtà andava dall’Epifania fino al 2 Febbraio giorno in cui Maria fu riaccolta al Tempio giorno in cui secondo la’tnica tradizione finisce l’Inverno.

I DODICI GIORNI DEL NATALE

Nel Medioevo i dodici giorni del Natale erano per la nobiltà, occasione di festa con quotidiane cene di gala, musica, danze e tanti canti (con maschere, pantomime e sregolatezze), ma le più sontuose si svolgevano il 25 dicembre il 1 e il 6 di gennaio. E sebbene Enrico VIII avesse fondato la sua Chiesa, mantenne i riti cattolici e le consuetudini del Natale. (vedi)

WELCOME YULE

Welcome Be Thou, Heaven-king” è un canto natalizio il cui testo è stato trovato nel “Manoscritto Sloane” risalente agli inizi del Quattrocento ovvero al tempo di Enrico VI. E’ stato ipotizzato che “Welcome Yule” fosse un canto dei mummers medievali in una sorta di rappresentazione tra il sacro e il profano, in cui gli attori impersonavano i 12 giorni del Natale o quantomeno il Re del Cielo con la corona che raffigurava i raggi del sole e il personaggio dell’Anno Nuovo adornato con rami di agrifoglio.

Successivamente sono state diverse le melodie abbinate al testo: ad esempio quella di Thomas Ravenscroft, (Deuteromelia 1609). vedi, un altro spartito si trova nel “The English Carol Book“, edizione di Martin Shaw e Percy Dearmer con musica di Sydnay H. Nicholson vedi o l’arrangiamento di Sir Cherles H. Parry (1848-1918)

Inevitabile la selezione di una corale essendo tradizionalmente nel repertorio dei cori natalizi
The Ranelagh singers (melodia Sir Cherles H. Parry)

Ma ho scovato questa versione country (dalla Nuova Scozia, Canada)
ASCOLTA The Rankin Sisters


I
Welcome be thou, heaven-king(1),
Welcome born in one morning,
Welcome for whom we shall sing,
Welcome Yule
II
Welcome be ye, Stephan(2) and John(3),
Welcome Innocents(4) every one
Welcome Thomas Martyr(5) one,
Welcome Yule.
III
Welcome be ye, good New Year(6),
Welcome Twelfth Day, both in fere,(7)
Welcome saints lef(8) and dear,
Welcome Yule.
IV
Welcome be ye Candlemas(9),
Welcome be ye, Queen of Bliss (10),
Welcome both to more and less,(11)
Welcome Yule.
V
Welcome be ye that are here,
Welcome all and make good cheer;
Welcome all, another year,
Welcome Yule.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Benvenuto celeste sovrano
Benvenuto, nato al mattino,
Benvenuto da coloro che canteranno
“Benvenuto Yule”
II
Benvenuti a voi, Stefano e Giovanni
Benvenuti,  Santi Innocenti, uno ad uno
Benvenuto, Tommaso Martire,
Benvenuto Yule.
III
Benvenuto a te, buon Anno Nuovo
Benvenuti 12 giorni, tutti insieme, Benvenuti Santi amati e cari, Benvenuto Yule
IV
Benvenuto a te Candelora
Benvenuto a te Regina della Grazia
Benvenuti grandi e piccini
Benvenuto Yule
V
Benvenuti a voi che siete qui
Benvenuti a tutti e tanti auguri
Benvenuti a tutti un altro anno
Benvenuto Yule

NOTE
1) il re del Cielo originariamente doveva essere il Sole rinato dopo il Solstizio d’Inverno, è lo Yule, diventato Gesù che nasce il 25 dicembre di mattino
2) Santo Stefano, il primo martire cristiano è festeggiato il 26 dicembre con il Boxing Day
3) San Giovanni Evangelista è festeggiato il 27 dicembre
4) il giorno degli Innocenti massacrati da Erode è commemorato il 28 dicembre continua
5) San Tommaso era festeggiato il 21 dicembre (il Vaticano ha spostato solo recentemente il St Thomas’s Day al 3 luglio), mentre San Tomas Becket è commemorato il 29 dicembre
6) l’ottavo giorno di Natale è il 1 gennaio, l’inizio del nuovo anno, tradizionalmente raffigurato con rami d’agrifoglio
7) in fere= in company, together. Nel canto i Mummers impersonavano i 12 giorni del Natale
8) Loved
9)  la festa della Candelora è la festa della purificazione della vergine che coincide con il 2 febbraio: secondo la consuetudine ebraica la donna che partorisce è considerata impura fino al 40esimo giorno. “In seguito al contatto con una donna in questo stato, il mosto inacidisce, i semi diventano sterili, gli alberi appassiscono, quelli da frutto si seccano e i loro frutti cadono solo che essa si sieda sotto;.. solo che ne venga guardato uno sciame d’api immediatamente morrà, mentre il bronzo e il ferro immediatamente arrugginiranno ..un cane che ne assaggi il sangue, impazzirà ed il suo morso diventerà velenoso come nella rabbia. Inoltre, il bitume che in certi periodi dell’anno si vede galleggiare sulla superficie del lago di Galilea può essere ridotto in pezzi unicamente mediante un filo che sia stato immerso in detta infetta materia. Un filo da un vestito infetto è sufficiente. Il lino,toccato da una donna durante la bollitura o la lavatura in acqua diventa nero. Così magico è il potere delle donne durante i periodi mestruali che la grandine ed i turbini sono trascinati se il sangue mestruale è esposto ai bagliori dei lampi” da Plinio il Vecchio, Storia Naturale , libro 28, cap. 23, 78-80; libro 7, cap. 65. La festa è celebrata 40 giorni dopo il Natale ma tradizionalmente segnava la fine dell’Inverno. E’ questo il campanellino d’allarme che ci ricorda come un tempo a febbraio si festeggiasse Imbolc e Bride. continua
10) anche Maria rientra  nelle Benedizioni natalizie anche se la sua festa si svolgerà un mese dopo a febbraio
11) ovvero Great and small.

continua

FONTI
http://www.thetudorswiki.com/page/CHRISTMAS+with+The+Tudors
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1236809/Stuffed-peacock-fake-snow-lashings-dancing-girls–Henry-VIII-VERY-merry-Christmas-indeed.html
http://www.thetudorswiki.com/page/CHRISTMAS+with+The+Tudors
http://www.womenpriests.org/it/traditio/unclean.asp
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/
Hymns_and_Carols/welcome_yule.htm

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40923

http://forums.canadiancontent.net/history/148524-medieval-christmas-how-celebrated.html

WE BE THREE POOR MARINERS

Un brano da danza di Epoca Tudor che arriva dalla moda francese di danzare i branles a corte e che è stato adattato a canzone dei marinai, risalente probabilmente al regno di Enrico VIII: trascritta da Thomas Ravenscroft nel suo Deuteromelia (1609), è chiaramente abbinata a una melodia da danza riportata anche con il titolo di “The Brangill of Poictu” (ovvero il Branle di Poitou) nello Skene Manuscript (16010-20)

I
We be three poor mariners
Newly come from the seas.
We spend our lives in jeopardy
While others live at ease.
CHORUS:
Shall we go dance the round, the round, the round;
And shall we go dance the round, the round, the round?
And he that is a bully(1) boy
Come pledge me on the ground, the ground, the ground.
II
We care not for those martial men
That do our states disdain,
But we care for those merchantmen
Which do our states maintain.

NOTE
1) in antico il termina aveva un significato positivo

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Siamo tre poveri marinai appena arrivati dal mare; mettiamo le nostre vite in pericolo, mentre gli altri vivono comodamente. Andiamo a ballare il branle? E colui che è un gaudente venga a terra a brindare con me. Non ci interessano gli uomini marziali che disprezzano le nostre abilità, ma ci interessano gli uomini sui mercantili che preservano le nostre abilità.

three-mariners

FONTI
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/deuteromelia/deut_15.pdf
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ravenscroft/deuteromelia/deut_14.pdf
http://ingeb.org/songs/webethre.html
http://www.goodbagpipes.com/pipetunes/daydawes.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/branles-gervaise.htm

Yonder comes a courteous knight (The Baffled knight)

John Byam Liston Shaw: “The Baffled Knight”

Read the post in English

Un giovane cavaliere a spasso per la campagna incontra una  fanciulla (a volte la sorprende mentre è intenta a farsi il bagno in un fiume) e le chiede di fare sesso. Per la verità gli approcci in luoghi appartati tra nobiluomini e procaci contadinelle (o pastorelle) anche se paludati con versi bucolici, si concludevano molto più prosaicamente con lo stupro (se al gentiluomo “pungeva vaghezza” cioè se gli veniva voglia!).

Ma in questa ballata la fanciulla è una lady, e il dialogo tra i due protagonisti diventa piuttosto una galante schermaglia d’amore, un gioco d’amore per renderlo più stuzzicante; il cavaliere tuttavia non ne conosce ancora le regole a causa della sua giovane età ed è perciò preso in giro dalla dama, cortigiana molto più esperta e cinica, abile manovratrice dei suoi amanti!

VERSIONE A: YONDER COMES A COURTEOUS KNIGHT

Child ballad #112
Il cavaliere galante è etichettato come “Baffled knight” termine usuale nel dialetto scozzese del 1540-1550: bauchle“, qui nel significato di “sconcertato”, “perplesso” ma anche “raggirato”. In origine la ballata è trascritta nel Deuteromelia (1609) di Thomas Ravenscroft con una melodia che egli attribuisce al regno di Enrico VIII.

CARPE DIEM

La canzone è un’esortazione a trarre il piacere quando se ne ha l’opportunità: la dama (da esperta cortigiana) mette alla prova il giovane cavaliere prospettando gli agi del comodo letto che li aspetta nella casa paterna; così entra per prima in casa e chiude fuori l’ingenuo (e inesperto) cavaliere. La dama non nasconde il disprezzo verso il cavaliere che non ha osato prenderla tra le verdi frasche!!
Custer LaRue & Baltimore Consort in “Ladyes Delight: Entertainment Music of Elizabethan England”, 1998 ♪.
Come sempre i Baltimore Consort ci regalano un piccolo gioiello musicale: la melodia è eseguita in modo cadenzato e richiama vagamente la Dargason jig, come riportata anche nella prima edizione del “The Dancing Master” di John Playford (1651).

Lucie Skeaping & City Waits in” Lusty Broadside Ballads & Palyford Dances” 2011.
Le parti dialogate sono a due voci: interpretazione frizzante e scherzosa che mi immagino mimata salacemente nei salotti più alla moda del tempo. Sono omesse un paio di strofe rispetto alla versione originale. (saltano le strofe II, IV e VII)

Joel Frederiksen & Ensemble Phoenix Munich in “The Elfin Knight: Balads and Dances”


I
Yonder comes a courteous knight,
Lustely raking ouer the lay(1);
He was well ware of a bonny lasse,
As she came wandring ouer the way.
CHORUS
Then she sang downe a downe,
hey downe derry (bis)(2)
II
‘Ioue(3) you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
‘Among the leaues that be so greene;
If I were a king, and wore a crowne,
Full soone, fair lady,
shouldst thou be a queen.
III
‘Also Ioue saue you, faire lady(4),
Among the roses that be so red;
If I haue not my will of you,
Full soone, faire lady,
shall I be dead.’
IV
Then he lookt east,
then hee lookt west,
Hee lookt north, so did he south;
He could not finde a priuy place,
For all lay in the diuel’s mouth.
V
‘If you will carry me, gentle sir,
A mayde(5) vnto my father’s hall,
Then you shall haue your will of me,
Vnder purple and vnder paule(6).’
VI
He set her vp vpon a steed,
And him selfe vpon another,
And all the day he rode her by,
As though they had been sister and brother.
VII
When she came to her father’s hall,
It was well walled round about;
She yode(7) in at the wicket-gate,
And shut the foure-eard(8) foole without.
VIII
‘You had me,’ quoth she, ‘abroad in the field,
Among the corne, amidst the hay,
Where you might had your will of mee,
For, in good faith, sir, I neuer said nay.
IX
‘Ye had me also amid the field(9)
Among the rushes that were so browne,
Where you might had your will of me,
But you had not the face to lay me downe.'(10)
X
He pulled out
his nut-browne(11) sword,
And wipt the rust off with his sleeue,
And said, “Ioue’s curse
come to his heart
That any woman would beleeue(12)!
XI
When you haue you owne true-loue(13)
A mile or twaine out of the towne,
Spare not for her gay clothing,
But lay her body flat on the ground.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Da lungi giunse un cavaliere cortese,
che razzolava lussurioso per i campi;
si accorse di una bella fanciulla,
mentre arrivava a passeggio per la via.
CORO
downe a downe,
hey downe derry
II
“Per Giove bella dama che andate spedita tra le foglie rigogliose,
se fossi re con indosso la corona, tosto bella dama,
voi sareste la mia regina.
III
Che Giove vi preservi bella dama,
tra le rose sì rosse,
se  non vi farò mia,
tosto bella dama
io morirò.”
IV
Così guardò a Est
e poi guardò a Ovest,
guardò a Nord e anche a Sud,
ma non riusciva a trovare un posto appartato che fosse nelle fauci del diavolo.
V
“Se condurrete me, gentile signore
una fanciulla, fino alla dimora paterna, allora potrete fare di me ciò che vorrete
tra gli agi e il lusso”.
VI
Egli la accomodò sul destriero
e lui ne montò un altro per sè
e per tutto il giorno le cavalcò accanto, proprio come se fossero sorella e fratello.
VII
Quando giunsero alla dimora paterna
si era ormai a buon punto,
ma ella entrò nel portone
e chiuse fuori lo sciocco asino.
VIII
“Potevate avermi – disse lei – fuori nei campi, tra il grano e l’avena, dove avreste potuto fare di me secondo la vostra volontà, perchè in verità Signore, non vi avrei detto di no.
IX
Potevate avermi anche in mezzo alla brughiera tra i giunchi maturi,
dove avreste avreste potuto fare di me secondo la vostra volontà,
ma non avete avuto il coraggio di stendermi a terra”
X
Egli sguainò
la spada arrugginita ,
la pulì sulla manica,
e disse”La maledizione di Giove
scenda su questo mio cuore
che crede ad ogni donna”.
XI
Quando hai la tua femmina innamorata
a un miglio o due fuori dalla città,
non risparmiare le sue gaie vesti,
ma appiattisci il suo corpo a terra!

NOTE
1) ‘lay’ = lea, meadow-land: il giovanotto è infoiato, gli basta vedere una dama sola per la campagna!
2) intercalare onomatopeico e apparentemente non-sense proprio di alcune ballate; anche nella ballata The Three Ravens sempre riportata da Ravenscoft questa volta nel suo Melismata. Vernon Chatman propende come traduzione per una frase in senso compiuto: We find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) that ‘down’ can be used as an adverb either attributively or by ellipsis of some participial word in the sense of “dejected.”” Also, we find that ‘a’ can be used as a preposition as in ‘a live’ or as an adjective in the sense of “all.” Further, we find that ‘hay’ can be used as an interjection in the sense of “thou hast (it)” and that it occurs in the phrase ‘to make hay’ this phrase meaning “to make confusion.” Thus, the sense of line two is something like the following: 1) Dejected all dejected, thou hast dejection [thou art dejected?], thou hast dejection; or 2) Dejected all dejected, confused and dejected, confused and dejected. Relative to line four we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that ‘with’ can be used to form adverb phrases denoting “to the fullest extent.” Thus, the sense of the fourth line is something like the following: Utterly (completely) dejected. Line seven presents the gravest difficulty; however, it can be surmounted. The problem here centers upon ‘derrie.’ Checking this time with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956) we find that Londonderry was once named ‘Derry.’ Derry is an appropriate locale for the scene depicted in “The Three Ravens:” the Scandinavians plundered the city, and it is said to have been burned down at least seven times before 1200; it thus is a site of many battles. Line seven now “means” something like the following: Utterly dejected in Derry, in Derry, dejected, dejected.
3) Ioue = Jove; Jove you speed è una specie d’invocazione del tipo “Giove ti assista”, ma anche un modo di salutare. Giove è anche il dio famoso per le sue avventure amorose e la lussuria: insomma non se ne faceva scappare una.
4) Lucie Skeaping dice ‘Ioue you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
5) maid
6) purple and paule = pompa magna, ossia tra gli agi e il lusso
7) ‘yode’ = went.
8) ‘foure-ear’d’ = così commenta il professor Child: ‘as denoting a double ass?’
9) Lucie Skeaping dice ‘You had me, abroad in the field,
10) una volta al sicuro la dama sbeffeggia il cavaliere inesperto!
11)  l’immagine è burlesca: il giovanotto con una spada arrugginita perchè non ha mai avuto modo di usarla (spadaccino inesperto o maldestro come nei duelli amorosi) la alza al cielo puntandola su Giove pluvio per attirarne i fulmini!!( uno spasso)
12) believe
13) nelle ballate non si andava tanto per il sottile, ogni femmina era una true-love ovvero il vero-amore

ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11201

Alla salute del covone d’orzo

Read the post in English

Una drinking song diffusa nell’Inghilterra rurale, Irlanda e Scozia (e Americhe) che non poteva mancare dopo il “crying of the neck” o durante una “Harvest supper“; questa canzone benaugurale è anche un gioco da taverna: la forma più comune del gioco vede un solo cantante, mentre il pubblico alza il calice per bere due volte nel ritornello rispondendo alla strofa benaugurale con un gioioso “Good luck!“; nella seconda versione un solista intona la prima strofa e tutti i partecipanti cantano in coro il ritornello progressivo, chi sbaglia le parole, o prende fiato per cantare, deve bere. Ovviamente lo scopo del gioco è quello di bere sempre di più, man mano che si sbaglia!

Harvest-Scene-Barrow-Trent-1881
Harvest Scene, Barrow-on-Trent, Derbyshire, George Turner II 1881

GIVE US ONCE A DRINKE

La canzone è molto antica così come sono antichi i rituali inerenti alla raccolta del grano/orzo (vedi i metodi tradizionali); la prima pubblicazione conosciuta risale al 1609, nel Deuteromelia di Thomas Ravenscroft, con il titolo “Give Us Once A Drinke” viene trascritta così come era cantata nelle taverne elisabettiane.

La canzone iniziava con:
“Give us once a drink for and the black bole(1)
Sing gentle Butler(2) “balla moy”(3)
For and the black bole,
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”
e finiva con:
“Give us once a drink for and the tunne
Sing gentle Butler balla moy
The tunne, the butt The pipe, the hogshead The barrel, the kilderkin The verkin, the gallon pot The pottle pot, the quart pot, The pint pot,
for and the black bole
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”

NOTE
1) Com’erano i bicchieri da birra nelle taverne medievali? I tre materiali più diffusi al tempo erano il metallo (peltro), il vetro e la ceramica. In Italia nel Trecento, ad esempio nelle taverne era più diffuso per i bicchieri l’uso del vetro, e per i contenitori di servizio la ceramica (terra cotta invetriata internamente). Qui si cita una black bowl che fa pensare più propriamente a una ciotola o coppa scura, forse in legno? Nelle canzoni del wassaling, esse pure molto antiche, si descrive spesso il materiale delle coppe per il brindisi intagliate nel legno. Successivamente è più probabile l’uso del peltro.
2) bottler
3) gli studiosi ritengono che potrebbe stare per ‘Bell Ami’, solo in un secondo tempo la canzone è entrata a far parte dei canti durante la festa del Raccolto e il verso si è modificato in ‘Barley Mow’, altri ritengono che si tratti di un mondegreen.

BARLEY MOW

Nel tempo si sono aggiunte nuove strofe e soprattutto nell’Ottocento si hanno molte trascrizioni nelle raccolte di vecchie canzoni tradizionali come ad esempio in “Songs of the Peasantry of England”, di Robert Bell 1857 che così scrive: “Questa canzone è cantata durante le riunioni di paese nel Devon e in Cornovaglia, in particolare per completare il trasporto dell’orzo, quando il rick, o la falciatura dell’orzo, è finito. Prendendo l’ultimo covone, che è chiamato the craw (o crow), l’uomo che lo tiene grida “Ce l’ho, ce l’ho, ce l’ho”, un altro chiede: “Che cosa hai? ‘e la risposta è, ‘ Un crow con una cosa allegra ecc”, dopo c’è una cena. L’effetto della Canzone d’orzo non può essere dato a parole; dovrebbe essere ascoltato, per essere apprezzato correttamente, in particolare con il dialetto del Paese Occidentale
Robert Bell riporta la versione diffusa nell’Inghilterra Ovest e anche la variante cantata nel Suffolk

Here’s a health to the barley mow!
Here’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both harrow and plow and sow!
When it is well sown
See it is well mown,
Both raked and gavelled clean,
And a barn to lay it in.
He’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both thrash (1) and fan it clean!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Alla salute del covone d’orzo
alla salute dell’uomo
che con perizia sa come usare l’erpice, l’aratro e seminare!
Quando è tutto seminato
si vedrà ben falciato
e raccolto e legato bene
e portato in un fienile.
Alla salute dell’uomo
che con perizia lo trebbia (1) e vaglia bene

NOTE
1) La Trebbiatura: nel medioevo esistevano due modi per separare i chicchi di grano dalla spiga: il contadino batteva i covoni con un bastone o una frusta (detto correggiato) oppure li faceva calpestare dagli animali da tiro.
La Vagliatura: chicchi di grano e pula erano separati prima mettendoli in un setaccio e poi gettandoli in aria (doveva ovviamente essere una giornata ventilata) la pula volava via e il chicco tornava nel setaccio.

maste-drinking
The master of drinking Adriaen Brouwer (1606-1638)

The Barley Mow è una delle canzoni cumulative più conosciute del repertorio folk inglese e veniva solitamente cantata nelle cene della vendemmia, spesso come prova di sobrietà. Alfred Williams, che annotò uno splendido set nel villaggio di Inglesham nel Wiltshire qualche tempo prima della Grande Guerra, scrisse che era “incapace di definire la sua età, e nemmeno suggerirla, anche se senza dubbio il pezzo esiste da diversi secoli”. Robert Bell ha trovato la canzone cantata nel Devon e in Cornovaglia durante la metà del XIX secolo, specialmente dopo “aver completato il trasporto dell’orzo, quando la falciatura dell’orzo è finita”. Bell commenta che “l’effetto della ” Barley Mow” non può essere reso a parole; dovrebbe essere ascoltato, per essere apprezzato correttamente ” è certamente vero, e la maggior parte dei cantanti che conoscono la canzone si vantano di poterla superare senza commettere errori.(Mike Yates)

Così si brinda a tutte le dimensioni in cui viene commercializzata la birra (e sono indicati in tutte le misure esistenti nei tempi passati dal fusto (barrel) alla “bowl” e alla salute di tutti coloro che “manipolano” la birra per arrivare fino alla “allegra brigata” che la beve!

Arthur Smith nel film ; ‘The Barley Mow’ (1955) un tipico pub a Suffolk negli anni cinquanta. VIDEO

Irish Rovers


Here’s good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow, (1)
Jolly good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the pint pot, half a pint, gill, (2) half a gill, quarter gill
Nipperkin (3) and a round bowl(4)
Here’s good luck, (5)
good luck, good luck
to the barley mow.
Here’s good luck to the half gallon, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the half gallon,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill, half a gill …
Here’s good luck to the gallon,
Here’s good luck to the half barrel,
Here’s good luck to the barrel,
Here’s good luck to the daughter(6),
Here’s good luck to the landlord,
Here’s good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the brewer, (7)
Here’s good luck to the company, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the company,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the company, brewer, landlady, landlord, daughter, barrel,
Half barrel, gallon, half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill,
Half a gill, quarter gill, nipperkin and a round bowl,
Here’s good luck, good luck,
good luck to the barley mow.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Ecco alla salute della pinta
alla salute del covone d’orzo
Alla salute della pinta
alla salute del covone d’orzo
la pinta, la mezza pinta, un quarto di pinta, metà gill, un quarto di gill
nippekin e la grolla
Ecco alla salute
alla salute
del covone d’orzo
Ecco alla salute del mezzo gallone
alla salute del covone d’orzo
alla salute del mezzo gallone
alla salute del covone d’orzo
il mezzo gallone, la pinta, la mezza pinta, il gill, il mezzo gill..
Ecco alla salute del gallone
Ecco alla salute del mezzo barrel
Ecco alla salute della figlia
Ecco alla salute della padrone
Ecco alla salute della padrona
buona salute della padrona
buona salute al birraio
ecco alla salute della compagnia
alla salute del covone d’orzo
ecco alla salute della compagnia
alla salute del covone d’orzo
oh la compagnia, il birrario, la padrona, il padrone, la figlia, il barile
etc

NOTE
1) [gridare GOOD LUCK e bere un sorso!]
2) sono tutte unità di misura in volume ordinate dalla più grande (barrel) alla più piccola (round bowl).
Le misure di capacità inglesi sono le seguenti:
gallone, detto anche imperial gallon, (abbreviato con la sigla gall) che equivale a l 4,545.
Il gallone si divide in 4 quarti (abbreviato con la sigla qt). Un quarto è pari a l 1,136.
Il quarto si divide in 2 pinte (abbreviate con la sigla pt). Una pinta è pari a l 0,568.
Il quarto si divide in 4 gills (abbreviato con la sigla gill). Un gill è pari a 0,142.
Ma come per tutte le unità di misura della tradizione contadina ci sono differenze locali nella quantità misurata
a gill is a half-pint in a northern pub, but a quarter-pint down south“.
3) “The nipperkin is a unit of measurement of volume, equal to one-half of a quarter-gill, one-eighth of a gill, or one thirty-second of an English pint.
In other estimations, one nip (an abbreviation that originated in 1796) is either one-third of a pint, or any amount less than or equal to half a pint
“.[wiki] “A nip was also used by brewers to refer to a small bottle of ale (usually a strong one such as Barley Wine or Russian Stout) which was sold in 1/3 pint bottles“.
4) “The round bowl” a volte anche “hand-around bowl”, “brown bowl” oppure “bonny bowl” potrebbe essere la coppa tipica con la quale si brindava nel wassailing evidentemente un’unità di misura che si è andata persa nel tempo.
5) [gridare GOOD LUCK, bere è opzionale!]
6) è la figlia del proprietario della taverna oppure più genericamente una cameriera che serve ai tavoli
7) c’è chi aggiunge nell’elenco anche “the slavey” e “the drayer“; per “slavery” si intende una servetta e “the draye” è colui che tira (o guida) il carretto cioè l’uomo delle consegne che appunto rifornisce di birra la taverna. Il nome deriva dal fatto che un tempo tale carretto era senza ruote e veniva trascinato come una slitta.

slavery

QUANTO MISURA UNA PINTA?
therightglass

La birra alla spina viene commercializzata nei paesi anglosassoni a partire dalla pinta che in Inghilterra e Irlanda corrisponde a 20 once (568 ml cioè grosso modo 50cl). La pinta americana invece corrisponde a 16 once; così il bicchiere standard con in cui si spilla la birra contiene esattamente una pinta (come viene detta da noi italiani “la birra grande”); le forma variano a seconda del tempo e delle mode, ma la capacità del bicchiere resta sempre di una pinta! Una legge dal parlamento inglese nel 1698 ha dichiarato che “ale and beer” (cioè la birra senza luppolo e la birra con il luppolo) devono essere servite in pubblico solo in “pints, full quarts (two pints)* or multiples thereof”. La regola venne ulteriormente ribadita nel 1824 imponendo come unità di misura per tutte le bevande quella imperiale. *Il bicchiere che contiene 2 pinte imperiali (1,14 lt) è lo yard ossia un bicchiere stretto e lungo appunto una iarda. Oggi con l’adeguamento alle normative europee anche il governo inglese ha “ristretto” la pinta allo “schooner” (come viene chiamata in Australia, ma siamo ancora in attesa del nomignolo che verrà data in Inghilterra alla nuova misura!) il bicchiere pari a 2/3 di pinta (400 ml)

THE BARLEY MOW (ROUD 10722)

Una variante sempre dal Suffolk


I
Well we ploughed the land and we planted it,
and we watched the barley grow.
We rolled it and we harrowed it
and we cleaned it with a hoe.(1)
Then we waited ‘til the farmer said,
“It’s time for harvest now.
Get out your axes and sharpen, boys,
it’s time for barley mow.”
Chorus
Well, here’s luck to barley mow
and the land that makes it grow.
We’ll drink to old John Barleycorn(2),
here’s luck to barley mow.
So fill up all the glasses, lads,
and stand them in a row:
A gill, a half a pint, a pint, a pint and a quart and here’s luck to barley mow.
II
Well we went and mowed the barley
and we left it on the ground.
We left it in the sun and rain ‘til it was nicely brown.
Then one day off to the maltsters,
then John Barleycorn did go.
The day he went away, we all did say,
“Here’s luck to barley mow.”
III
Have no fear of old John Barleycorn
when he’s as green as grass.
But old John Barleycorn is strong enough
to sit you on your arse.
But there’s nothing better ever brewed
than we are drinking now,
Fill them up: we’ll have another round,
here’s good luck to barley mow.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Abbiamo arato la terra e abbiamo seminato, e poi abbiamo guardato l’orzo crescere.
L’abbiamo sarchiato con la zappa
e poi abbiamo aspettato fino a quando il contadino diceva
“E’ il tempo del raccolto.
Prendete le vostre falci e affilatele ragazzi, è il tempo per i covoni d’orzo”
CORO:
Alla salute dei covoni d’orzo
e della terra che li fa crescere,
berremo al vecchio John Barleycorn
alla salute del covone d’orzo.
Così riempite tutti i bicchieri, ragazzi,
e metteteli in fila: un quarto di pinta, mezza pinta, una pinta, una pinta e un quarto e alla salute del covone d’orzo.
II
Siamo andati a falciare l’orzo
e l’abbiamo lasciato a terra,
sotto il sole e la pioggia affinchè diventasse bello scuro. Poi dopo un giorno di riposo dai produttori di malto John Barleycorn è andato.
Il giorno che andò via tutti dicemmo
“Alla salute del covone d’orzo”
III
Non abbiamo paura del vecchio John Barleycorn quando è verde come l’erba, ma il vecchio John Barleycorn è forte abbastanza
da farti sedere con il culo per terra,
eppure non c’è niente di meglio mai birrificato di quanto stiamo bevendo adesso,
riempiteli di nuovo: faremo un altro giro alla salute del covone di d’orzo

NOTE
1) lavori sarchiatura: taglio e rimescolamento del terreno per la parte più superficiale
2) John Barleycorn è lo spirito della birra vedi

FONTI
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/the-barley-mow/
http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/oleng10h.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/barley.htm http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/barleymow.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/tony.rose/songs/barleymow.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151726
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3873 http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1540-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-barley-mow http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/barlymow.htm