Carrickfergus or Do Bhí Bean Uasal

Leggi in italiano

“Carrickfergus” comes from a Gaelic song titled Do Bhí Bean Uasal (see) or “There Was a Noblewoman” and is also known by the name of “The Sick Young Lover”, which appeared in a broadside distributed in Cork and dated 1840 and also in the collection of George Petrie “Ancient Music of Ireland” 1855 with the name of “The Young Lady”. Text and melody passed through the oral tradition have spread and changed, without leaving a consistent trace in the collections printed in the nineteenth century. This song has been attributed to the irish bard Cathal “Buí”

IRISH BREIFNE
cathal buiCathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna (c1680-c1756) a rake-poet from Co. Cavan.
Curious character nicknamed “Buil” the yellow, a bard vagabond storyteller and composer of poems, which have spread throughout Ireland and are still sung today.
The scholar Breandán Ó Buachalla has published his collection in the book “Cathal Bui: Amhráin” in 1975. In Blacklion County of Cavan there is also a small stele in his memory and it is celebrated the Cathal Bui Festival (month of June).
A incomplete priest able with words and with women, he also had a lot of “irish humor” and was obviously a heavy drinker, he went around Breifne, the Irish name of the area including Cavan, Leitrim, and south of Fermanagh ( one of the many traveler with his caravan or even less).

PETER O’TOOLE

But it is the version known by Peter O’Toole that was the origin of the version of Dominic Behan recorded in the mid-1960s under the title “The Kerry Boatman“, and also the version recorded by Sean o’Shea always in the same years with the title “Do Bhí Bean Uasal”. Also the Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem made their own version with the title “Carrickfergus” in the 1964 “The First Hurray” LP.

Chieftains from “The Chieftains Live” 1977

DO BHÍ BEAN UASAL

This version has been attributed musically to Seán Ó Riada (John Reidy 1931-1971) it is not clear if it is only an arrangement or a real writing of the melody. Certainly the text is taken from the poetry of Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna.

Sean o’Shea in “Ò Riada Sa Gaiety” live in Dublino with the Ceoltóirí Chualann, 1969.

English translation
I
A lady was betrothed to me for a while
And she refused me, oh my hundred woes
I went to towns with her
And she made a cuckold (or a fool ) of  me before the world,
If I had got that head of hers into the church
And if I were again  n command of myself,
But now I’ weak and sore,  and there’s no getting of a  cure for me,
And my people will be weeping after me
II
I wish I had you in   Carrickfergus
not far from that place ‘Quiet Town”
Sailing over the deep blue waters
my bright love from a northern sky
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I
III
The cold and the heat are going together [in me]
and I can’t quench my thirst
And if I took my oath from November to February
I wouldn’t be ready until Michaelmas
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, my little darling, now   lay me down!

I

Do bhí bean uasal seal dá lua liom,
‘s do chuir sí suas díomsa faraoir géar;
Do ghabhas lastuas di sna bailte móra
Ach d’fhag sí ann é os comhair an tsaoil.
Dá bhfaighinnse a ceannsa faoi áirsí an teampaill,
Do bheinnse gan amhras im ‘ábhar féin;
Ach anois táim tinn lag is gan fáil ar leigheas agam.
Is beidh mo mhuintir ag gol im’ dhéidh.
II
I wish I had you in Carrickfergus
Ní fada ón áit sin go Baile Uí Chuain(1)/Sailing over the deep blue waters/ I ndiaidh mo ghrá geal is í ag ealó uaim./For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I.
III
Tá an fuacht ag teacht is an teas ag tréigint
An tart ní féidir liom féin é do chlaoi,
Is go bhfuil an leabhar orm ó Shamhain go Fébur
Is ní bheidh sí reidh liom go Féil’ Mhichíl;/I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, a stóirín, now lay me down!

NOTE
1) “baile cuain”= “quiet town” or Harbour Town

THE VERSION OF THE YEARS 60 AND MEANING

And we come to what remains of this song in our day, that is the version of Carrickfergus spread by the major interpreters of Celtic music.
The sweet melancholy of the melody and its uncertain textual interpretation have made the song very popular, some capture the romantic side and also play it at weddings, others at the funeral (for example that of John F. Kennedy Jr -1999).
Certainly it has something magical, sad and nostalgic, the man drowns in alcohol the pain of separation from his beloved (or more likely he drinks because he has a particular predilection for alcohol): a vast ocean divides them (or a stretch of sea) and he would like to be in Ireland, in Carrickfergus: he would like to have wings or to swim across the sea or more realistically find a boatman to take him to her, and finally he can die in her arms ( or at her tombstone) now that he is old and tired.

In my opinion, the general meaning of the text remains clear enough, but if you go into detail then many doubts arise, which I tried to summarize in the notes.

Loreena McKennitt & Cedric Smith  from Elemental, 1985


I
I wish I was
in Carrighfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrant (2)
I would swim over
the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrant.
But the sea is wide,
and I can’t swim over
Neither have I wings to fly
If I could find me a handsome boatman
To ferry me over
to my love and die(3)

II
Now in Kilkenny (4), it is reported
They’ve marble stones there as black as ink,
With gold and silver
I would  transport her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now,
till I get a drink
I’m drunk today,
but I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah, but I am sick now,
my days are over
Come all you young lads
and lay me down.(6)

NOTES
1) Carrickfergus (from the Gaelic Carraig Fhearghais, ‘Rocca di Fergus’) is a coastal town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, one of the oldest settlements in Northern Ireland. Here the protagonist says he wants to be at Carrickfergus (but evidently he is somewhere else) while in other versionssays “I wish I had you in Carrickfergus”: the meaning of the song changes completely.
Some want to set the story in the South of Ireland and they see the name of Fergus,as the river that runs through Ennis County of Clare.
2) Ballygran – Ballygrant – Ballygrand. There are three interpretations: the first that Ballygrant is in Scotland on the Hebrides (Islay island), the second that is the village of Ballygrot (from the Gaelic Baile gCrot means “settlement of hills”), near Helen’s Bay that it is practically in front of Carrickfergus over the stretch of sea that creeps over the north-east coast of Ireland (the Belfast Lough). It seems that the locals call it “Ballygrat” or Ballygrant “and that it is an ancient settlement and that at one time there were some races with the Carrickfergus boats at Ballygrat.The third is a corrupt translation from the Gaelic” baile cuain “of the eighteenth-century version and therefore both a generic quiet location, a small village.
But between the two sentences there is already an incongruity or better there is need of an interpretation, ascertained that Ballygrant is not a particular place of Carrickfergus for which the protagonist feels nostalgia for some specific connection with his love story passed in youth, then it is the place where it is at the moment. So the protagonist could be an Irishman who found himself in the Hebrides, but who would like to return to Carrickfergus from his old love or he is a Scot (who was a young soldier in Ireland) and remembers with regret the Irish woman loved in youth.
The protagonist could be in Helen’s Bay on the opposite side of the inlet that separates it from Carrickfergus: if he were healthy and young nothing would prevent him to go to Carrickfergus even on foot, but he is tired and he is dying and so in his fantasy or delirium he is looking at the sea in the direction of Carrickfergus deaming of flying towards his love of the past or he wants to be ferried by a boatman to be able to die next to her.
3) “and die” tells us that the protagonist who is in Ballygrant (wherever he is) would like to go to Carrickfergus to die in the arms of his love of youth.
In other versions the phrase is written as “To ferry me over my love and I” the protagonist would like to be transported by the boatman, together with his woman, to Carrickfergus. So nostalgia is about the place where the protagonist is supposed to have spent his youth and would like to see again before he died.
4) and 5)
Now on the Kilkenny stone it is written,
on black marble like ink,
with gold and silver I would like to comfort her
Replacing the verb “to transport” used by Loreena with “to support” more used in other versions. That is: on the black stone of Kilkenny (in the sense that it is usually a type of stone such as Carrara marble,  the black stone extracted from Kilkenny but also used in Ballygrant, wherever it is) that will be my tombstone where I have recorded my epitaph, I also wrote a sentence of comfort for my love
4) Kilkenny = Kilmeny some see a typo and note that Kilmeny is the parish church of Ballygrant (Islay Island) formerly a medieval church, also here there is a stone quarry, which was the main industry of Ballygrant in the eighteenth century and XIX. Now I ask myself: but with all these references to the Islay Island, (where at least there should be the tomb of the protagonist) how is it that the song is not known in the local tradition of the Hebrides and instead is it in Belfast?
6) the protagonist urges his friends to bury him

Nella versione live aggiunge anche la strofa intermedia che è stata scritta da Dominic Behan per la sua versione registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”.

Jim McCann in Dubliners Now 1975 (I and III)

Jim McCann live (with the second stanza written by Dominic Behan for his version recorded in the mid-1960s under the title “The Kerry Boatman”.

JIM MCCANN
I
I wish I was
in Carrickfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrand(2)
I would swim
over the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrand.
But the sea is wide
and I cannot swim over
And neither have I the wings to fly
I wish I had a handsome boatman
To ferry me over my love and I(3)
II
My childhood days
bring back sad reflections
Of happy time there spent so long ago
My boyhood friends
and my own relations
Have all passed on now
like the melting snow
And I’ll spend my days
in this endless roving
Soft is the grass and my bed is free
How to be back now
in Carrickfergus
On the long road down to the sea
 

III
And in Kilkenny
it is reported
On marble stone
there as black as ink
With gold and silver
I would support her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now
till I get a drink
‘cause I’m drunk today
and I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah but I am sick now
my days are numbered
Come all me young men
and lay me down

LINK
http://www.eofeasa.ie/cathalbui/public_html/danta_CB/who_was_CB.html
http://lookingatdata.com/m/204-mac-giolla-ghunna-cathal-bui.html
http://www.munster-express.ie/opinion/views-from-the-brasscock/the-yellow-bitternan-bonnan-bui/

http://jungle-bar.blogspot.it/2009/03/carrickfergus-ballad-of-peter-otoole.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16707
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=90070

Ring a ring a rosie.. in the rare auld time

work in progress

Una storia triste e nostalgica composta nel 1978 dal poeta-scrittore e cantante di Dublino Pete St. John, ovvero Peter Mooney.
Per certi versi una storia autobiografica, in quanto lo stesso autore nativo di Dublino, emigrò in America e ritornò in Irlanda solo alla fine del 1970. Nel ritrovarsi la sua amata città così cambiata, iniziò a scrivere canzoni entrate in repertorio di molti gruppi e solisti irlandesi, e più in generale della scena folk internazionale.

Dublin-Nelsons_Pillar
Ciò che restava della colonna di Nelson, distrutta nel 1966, che si ergeva di fronte al General Post Office in O’Connell Street

Il protagonista nato in un quartiere operaio di Dublino, si ritrova invecchiato, e non riconosce più la Dublino dei suoi ricordi; anche se non è espressamente citata l’emigrazione, si legge tra le righe che era andato via dalla città per trovare lavoro.

Il protagonista amareggiato dalla vecchiaia e dai ricordi confronta l’immagine della sua Dublino, quella della giovinezza di quanto corteggiava la bella Peggy, dei music-hall e delle case di mattoni, con quella di vetro e cemento a cui sente di non appartenere più, perchè lui è rimasto parte della Dublino dei tempi andati, the rare old times, i vecchi tempi di “rara bellezza“, quelli per lui erano gli anni ’50 o ’60.
A mio avviso il protagonista non è contro il progresso “tout court”, è semplicemente un vecchio solo, che dice addio alla Dublino di oggi: perchè preferisce rifugiarsi in casa propria, a rimuginare sul passato più rassicurante e consolatorio.

VIDEO Dublino anni 30 e 40
VIDEO Dublino negli anni 50
VIDEO Dublino negli anni 60
VIDEO Dublino negli anni 60

Ma si sa, un luogo non è solo un fatto topografico, è un luogo della memoria e degli affetti, sono le persone che ci vivono, e ogni generazione ha la sua immagine della città. Così nel documentario We are Dublin WINNER 2013 del St Patrick Special Prize (Eat Myshorts “I LOVE MY CITY” Showcase Dublino)
Based on the idea that people are the very essence of a city, this documentary attempts to show Dublin from the inside, giving back to the people what the city owes them. We, people, are the ones who make the city. We make Dublin, We are Dublin!
Director/Editor: Wissame Cherfi

Ronnie Drew in The Dubliners’ Guide to Dublin City


I
Raised on songs and stories,
heroes of renown.
The passing tales and glories,
that once was Dublin town.
The hallowed halls and houses,
the haunting children’s rhymes.
That once was Dublin city,
in the rare old times.
Chorus:
Ring a ring a rosie, as the light declines,
I remember Dublin city in the rare oul’ times.
II
My name it is Sean Dempsey,
as Dublin as can be (1),
Born hard and late in Pimlico (2),
in a house that ceased to be.
By trade I was a cooper,
lost out to redundancy.
Like my house that fell to progress,
my trade’s a memory.
III
And I courted Peggy Dignan,
as pretty as you please,
A rogue and a child of Mary (3),
from the rebel Liberties (2).
I lost her to a student chap,
with skin as black as coal (4).
When he took her off to Birmingham,
she took away my soul.
IV
The years have made me bitter,
the gargle (5) dims my brain,
‘Cause Dublin keeps on changing,
and nothing seems the same.
the Pillar(6) and the Met (7) have gone, the Royal (7) long since pulled down,
As the grey unyielding concrete,
makes a city of my town.
V
Fare thee well sweet Anna Liffey (8),
I can no longer stay.
And watch the new glass cages,
that spring up along the Quay.
My mind’s too full of memories,
too old to hear new chimes,
I’m part of what was Dublin,
in the rare ould times.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Cresciuto con canzoni e storie,
di eroi famosi,
i racconti del passato e le glorie
che un tempo erano Dublino
le sacre magioni e le case,
le filastrocche incalzanti dei bambini
che una volta erano Dublino
nei bei tempi andati 
Ritornello:
“Giro giro tondo”, quando la luce cala,
ricordo la città di Dublino nei bei tempi andati.
II
“Il mio nome è Sean Dempsey,
lo giuro su Dublino ,
nato da un parto difficile a Pimlico,
in una casa che non c’è più.
Di mestiere fui un bottaio,
sconfitto dal licenziamento,
come la mia casa che crollò per il progresso, così il mio mestiere è solo un ricordo.
III
E corteggiai Peggy Dignan,
carina tanto quanto basta,
una canaglia e una santa,
dalle Libertà ribelli.
La perdetti per uno studentello,
con la pelle nera come il carbone.
Quando lui se la portò a Birmingham,
lei mi portò via l’anima
IV
Gli anni mi hanno fatto diventare amaro,
la birra mi offusca la mente,
perchè Dublino continua a cambiare
e niente rimane lo stesso,
La Colonna e il Metropole sono andati,
il Royal da tempo demolito,
mentre il saldo cemento grigio
fa della mia città una città d’affari
V
Addio dolce Anna Liffey
non posso trattenermi a lungo
e osservare le nuove gabbie di vetro,
che spuntano lungo il molo.
La mia mente è satura di ricordi,
troppo vecchia per sentire nuove storie,
faccio parte di quella che fu Dublino,
nei bei tempi andati
“The Spire of Dublin” è stato eretto nel 2002 e come un gigantesco ago, si rastrema in punta (dal diametro di 3 metri a 15 cm in cima)

NOTE
1) letteralmente: “come è vero che Dublino è tale”
2) Pimlico quartiere operaio di Dublino così come il Coombie sono le antiche Liberties. il quartiere popolare di Dublino tra le cattedrali Christchurch e Saint Patrick, che fin dal Medioevo era sotto le giurisdizione della Chiesa cattolica e dava asilo e protezione alla povera gente.
Si dicevano Liberties (=Libertà) perchè situate fuori dalle mura della città e dalla sua giurisdizione e ancora oggi insieme a quello di Saint James, intorno alla birreria Guinness sono la Dublino storica popolare (soprannominata “The Four Corners of Hell“, perché c’era un pub in ogni angolo)
3) letteralmente “una figlia di Maria” ovvero una congregazione religiosa
4) alcuni storcono il naso e bollano la canzone come razzista, ma qui si dice semplicemente che il colore della pelle dello studente è nero scuro
5) in irlandese colloquiale per beer
6) Pillar si riferisce alla colonna di Lord Nelson distrutta dall’IRA nel 1966. Al suo posto è stato innalzato “The Spire” ufficialmente intitolato “Monument of Light” (=Monumento della Luce), è  un palo d’acciaio di 121.2 metri d’altezza che sovrasta O’Connell Street progettato da Ian Ritchie; i suoi soprannomi oltre al già citato “The Spire” (il pinnacolo) sono: “The Spike” (lo spuntone), o il malizioso “The Erection at the Intersection” (l’erezione all’incrocio). Quando l’IRA fece detonare l’esplosivo per distruggere la tracotanza del dominio inglese immortalata nell’Ammiraglio Nelson saltò di botto la metà superiore della colonna senza però causare nessun danno. Furono invece gli ingegneri della Irish Army a mandare in frantumi le vetrate lungo la strada quando si risolsero a demolire il resto della struttura!
7) Met. abbraviazione di Metropole Cinema e il Theatre Royal erano cinema-teatro di Dublino:gli ultimi music-hall di Dublino, il Royal fu smantellato nei primi anni 60 (vedi), il Met (anche Dancing Hall) è stato abbattuto nel 1970 (vedi)
8) Anna Liffey, è il personaggio allegorico di Anna Livia Plurabelle di James Joyce: la personificazione del fiume Liffey, ossia, il corso d’acqua che attraversa la città di Dublino da Ovest a Est

LINK
http://www.petestjohn.com/biography/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32605
http://www.irishhistorylinks.net/History_Links/Ireland_1950s.html

APPROFONDIMENTO
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/dicey-riley.html

ILLUSTRAZIONE
La Nelson’s Pillar
http://www.european-architecture.info/EIR/D-EIR-011.htm

BOOLAVOGUE

E’ il titolo di un canto patriottico irlandese (rebel song) scritto da Patrick Joseph McCall (1861–1919) nel 1898 per commemorare il centenario della Ribellione Irlandese del 1798.
Boolavogue è un piccolo paese nella diocesi cattolica di Ferns passato alla storia per le gesta di Padre Murphy che vi risiedeva come parroco.

LA RIBELLIONE IRLANDESE DEL 1798

united-irishLa rivolta durò una breve stagione dal maggio al settembre del 1798 e venne chiamata con il nome di “United Irishmen Rebellion” perché condotta da un gruppo politico denominato Society of United Irishmen ovvero un gruppetto di intellettuali e di eminenti cittadini per lo più di confessione presbiteriana e anglicana che volevano riunire tutti gli Irlandesi (senza distinzione di fede) in una repubblica indipendente. continua

LA RIBELLIONE A WEXFORD

murphyNella contea di Wexford (Irlanda Sud-Est) i ribelli (mobilitati in grande numero) sconfissero i governativi a maggio, nella prima fase della rivolta. Uno dei capi dei ribelli fu Padre John Murphy parroco di Boolavogue (dal 1785), lui non era un affiliato della Society of United Irishmen, ma un semplice prete di campagna che durante i primi fallimenti della ribellione esortava i suoi parrocchiani a cedere le armi e a dichiarare la loro fedeltà alla Corona, convinto che il nazionalismo irlandese avrebbe dovuto ottenere le riforme con mezzi pacifici.

Ha cambiato opinione dopo che gli Yeomen nella notte del 27 maggio hanno bruciato la sua chiesa (per la verità una cappella di paglia) e alcune case del paese! Pare che consigliasse allora alla gente “di morire coraggiosamente in battaglia piuttosto che essere massacrata nella propria casa“.
Nel 1798 Padre Murphy aveva 45 anni ed era ancora un uomo possente, agile e di piccola statura. Diventato il capo dei ribelli del sua paese, seppe condurre la gente comune, inesperta e equipaggiata alla meglio alle vittorie di Oulart Hill, The Harrow, Camolin, Ferns e Enniscorthy.
Fu a Wexford (abbandonata dagli Inglesi in fuga) che l’esercito sempre più numeroso dei ribelli si diede una struttura di comando: Bagenal Harvey, un ricco protestante e leader degli Irlandesi Uniti di Wexford, liberato dal carcere, assunse il ruolo di comandante generale. L’esercito venne diviso in tre gruppi e al gruppo in cui era Padre Murphy venne dato l’ordine di prendere Gorey e Arlow. Ad Arlow però i ribelli furono sconfitti e ricevettero l’ordine dal nuovo comandante in capo padre Philip Roche di ripiegare a Vinegar Hill dove era stato montato il campo centrale dell’esercito.
La collina fu lo scontro di una battaglia il 21 giugno che infranse le speranze della repubblica di Wexford: da allora i ribelli si dispersero in azioni di guerriglia e razzie che si trascinarono fino agli inizio dell’Ottocento. 

Padre Murphy, Miles Byrne ed i resti dell’esercito irlandese di Wexford cercarono di ricollegarsi agli altri gruppi ribelli nelle Midlands, per attendere l’arrivo della fantomatica spedizione francese mandata in soccorso all’Irlanda; separatosi dal gruppo nei pressi di Scullogue Gap padre Murphy fu intercettato nella campagna di Tullow contea di Carlow, il 2 luglio: venne catturato e brutalmente ucciso (picchiato, impiccato, bruciato e impalato). Così come sempre quando la malvagità arriva all’apice John Murphy è stato trasformato in martire e eroe e non sarà mai dimenticato. I resti carbonizzati del suo corpo sono sepolti nel cimitero cattolico di Ferns.

GUIDA ALL’ASCOLTO

Il testo della canzone riesce a riassumere la rivolta di Wexford in poche strofe dense di storia, accompagnate da una vecchia melodia irlandese, una slow air dal nome “Calad n-Eocaill” o anche “Eochaill” (“Youghal Harbour“) vedi
Boolavogue è un brano diventato subito popolare ed è quasi un inno per la contea di Wexford, ieri come oggi è cantata dalla gente irlandese anche se negli arrangiamenti più recenti si tende a tagliare la V e la VI strofa
ASCOLTA The Dubliners con la voce di Jim McCann (strofe da I a IV e VII, VIII)

ASCOLTA The High Kings in Memory Lane (strofe da I a IV e VII, VIII)

I
At Boolavogue as the sun was setting
O’er the bright May meadows of Shelmalier,
A rebel hand set the Heather blazing
and brought the neighbours from far and near.
II
Then Father Murphy(2) from old Kilcormack(3)
Spurred up the rocks with a warning cry:
‘Arm! Arm!’ he cried, ‘For I’ve come to lead you;
For Ireland’s freedom we’ll fight or die!'(4)
III
He led us on against the coming soldiers,
And the cowardly yeomen(7) we put to flight:
‘Twas at the Harrow(1) the boys of Wexford
Showed Bookey’s regiment(5) how men could fight.
IV
Look out for hirelings, King George of England;
Search every kingdom where breathes a slave,
For Father Murphy of County Wexford
Sweeps o’er the land like a mighty wave.
V
We took Camolin(1) and Enniscorthy(1)
And Wexford storming drove out our foes
‘Twas at Slieve Coilte our pikes were reeking(6)
With the crimson blood of the beaten Yeos(7).
VI
At Tubberneering(1) and Ballyellis(1)
Full many a Hessian(8) lay in his gore,
Ah! Father Murphy had aid come over(9)
The green flag floated from shore to shore!
VII
At Vinegar Hill(10), o’er the pleasant Slaney(11)
Our heros vainly stood back to back,
and the Yeos at Tullow took Father Murphy
and burned his body upon a rack.(12)
VIII
God grant you glory, brave Father Murphy
And open Heaven to all your men,
The cause that called you may call tomorrow
In another fight for the Green(13) again.

NOTE
1) tutte località sede di scontri vittoriosi per i ribelli. Nel pomeriggio del 27 maggio (la domenica di Pentecoste) un migliaio di ribelli si erano uniti a Oulart Hill, erano male armati, alcuni con picche e armi da fuoco, ma la maggior parte con forconi e falcetti, eppure sconfissero la milizia e gli yeomen. Il 29 maggio 5000 ribelli conquistarono la cittadina di Enniscorthy. Dopo pochi giorni l’esercito ribelle era arrivato a 15.000 uomini.
2) in realtà all’epoca Murphy era chiamato semplicemente “Mister Murphy” perchè l’appellativo di Padre divenne una consuetudine per i preti irlandesi sono nel 1860
3) Kilcormuck è il comune a cui fa riferimento la località di Boolavogue, nella baronia di Shelmaliere ovvero il luogo dei discendenti di Maol Lughra, il cuore della ribellione nella contea di Wexford
murphy-flag4) la bandiera di padre Murphy era un vessillo verde con una croce bianca al centro e la scritta “Libertà o Morte”
5) il tenente Thomas Bookey, era il capo della Camolin Cavalry nella zona di Boolavogue, un membro della piccola nobiltà locale. Bookey è stato ucciso nell’incursione a Boolavogue
6) sulla cima di Slieve Coillte c’è un monumento commemorativo della battaglia. La postazione era stata scelta dai ribelli come ottimo punto d’osservazione trovandosi a quasi 900 mt. Un altro monumento eretto nel 1998 a Ballysop reca la targa con la citazione di questa frase
7) Yeos è il diminutivo con cui venivano chiamati gli Yeomen : originariamente il nome dato ai coltivatori diretti inglesi del XVII secolo che fornirono soldati per lo più nel corpo a cavallo dell’esercito inglese. Nel 1790 vennero formati i reggimenti Yeomen in risposta alla minaccia rappresentata dalla Francia in seguito alla rivoluzione francese. Era una forza riservista e volontaria, composta principalmente da piccoli agricoltori e proprietari terrieri che erano fedeli alla Corona. Essi si trovavano in tutta la Gran Bretagna, ma fu in Irlanda, che vennero coinvolti come prima linea di difesa contro i ribelli. Qui indica una unità militare britannica la Camolin Cavalry. Occorre osservare che le yeomanry nel XVIII secolo erano composte anche da volontari irlandesi, per lo più orangisti ovvero appartenenti all’Orange Order. Tra le forze governative c’era anche la milizia del North Cork composta però da cattolici che per dimostrare di non essere dalla parte dei ribelli si diede alle consuete brutalità.
8) hessian sta per indicare il mercenario nome o aggettivo dato a un signore della guerra germanico anche più in generale sinonimo di barbaro
9)  l’aiuto francese tanto promesso arrivò troppo tardi e in numero scarso: un migliaio di soldati francesi occuparono una parte della contea di Mayo, ma finirono per arrendersi alle forze inglesi. Wolfe Tone che era sbarcato con i francesi preferì la cattura alla fuga e si suicidò poco dopo in carcere.
10) i ribelli furono sconfitti nella battaglia di Vinegar Hill appena fuori Enniscothy
11) Slaney è il fiume che attraversa Enniscothy
12) Padre Murphy e il suo compagno James Gallagher vennero portati a Tullow dove furono condannati a morte. James Gallagher è stato spogliato e frustato davanti a Murphy, prima di essere impiccato. Nella piazza del mercato di Tullow, Murphy fu brutalmente picchiato, spogliato dei suoi vestiti e impiccato. Eppure gli Inglesi non seppero mai i nomi dei due uomini catturati.
Il corpo di Padre Murphy venne sottoposto ad un ulteriore profanazione, poiché dalla stola trovata indosso sapevano che era un sacerdote: prima fu decapitato e il suo cadavere fu bruciato in un barile di catrame davanti alla casa di una famiglia cattolica (costretta a tenere le finestre di casa aperte per far entrare il “Santo Fumo”). La testa fu impalata su uno spuntone di fronte alla Chiesa cattolica, come monito per tutti gli altri che ribelli.
13) l’Irlanda la verde

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO CATTIA SALTO
I
A Boolavougue al tramonto del sole
sopra i prati primaverili di Shelmalier
una mano ribelle coglieva l’erica,
tracciava per far radunare il vicinato
II
Allora Padre Murphy(2) della vecchia Kilcormack(3), incitava dalle alture con un grido d’avvertimento
“Alle armi – urlava – che sono venuto a guidarvi;
per la libertà d’Irlanda noi combatteremo o moriremo”
III
Ci guidò contro i soldati in arrivo
e il vile cavalleggero(7) mettemmo in fuga:
fu ad Harrow(1) che i ragazzi di Wexford
mostrarono al reggimento di Bookey(5) come combattono gli uomini.
IV
Cercate i mercenari, re Giorgio d’Inghilterra
cercateli in ogni regno dove respira uno schiavo
che Padre Murphy della contea di Wexford
si abbatte sulla terra come un’onda possente.
V
Prendemmo Camolin ed Enniscorthy(1)
e lo stormo di Wexford cacciò via i nostri nemici,
fu a Slieve Coilte che le nostre picche puzzarono(6)
del sangue cremisi degli Yeos(7) sconfitti
VI
A Tubberneering e Ballyellis (1)
un gran numero di mercenari(8) giacevano nel sangue,
Ah! Padre Murphy aspettava un aiuto (9),
la bandiera verde sventolava da costa a costa
VII
A Vinegar Hill(10) sul bel Slaney(11)
i nostri eroi invano stavano schiena contro schiena
e gli Yeos a Tullow presero Padre Murphy
e arsero il suo corpo in un barile(12).
VIII
Dio ti conceda la gloria, coraggioso Padre Murphy
e spalanchi il Paradiso a tutti i tuoi uomini,
la causa che hai invocato tu si potrà invocare domani
in un’altra lotta ancora per l’Irlanda(13).
FONTI
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=48361&lang=it
http://thesession.org/tunes/5322
http://thesession.org/tunes/2173
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/boolavogue
http://multitext.ucc.ie/d/The_1798_Rebellion_in_Wexford
http://www.historyireland.com/18th-19th-century-history/the-military-strategy-of-the-wexford-united-irishmen-in-1798/
http://homepage.eircom.net/~horeswoodns/slieve_coillte.htm

ILLUSTRAZIONI
probabile ritratto di Padre Murphy
la bandiera di Padre Murphy dalle tavole di F. G. Thompson

Carrickfergus ovvero Do Bhí Bean Uasal

Read the post in English

Il brano “Carrickfergus” proviene da un canto in gaelico dal titolo Do Bhí Bean Uasal (vedi) ovvero “There Was a Noblewoman” ed è conosciuto anche con il nome di “The Sick Young Lover“, comparso in un broadside distribuito a Cork e datato 1840 e anche nella raccolta di George Petrie “Ancient Music of Ireland” 1855 con il nome di “The Young Lady”. Testo e melodia passati attraverso la tradizione orale si sono diffusi e modificati, senza però lasciare una traccia consistente nelle raccolte stampate nell’Ottocento. E’ stato attribuito al bardo irlandese Cathal “Buí”

IRISH BREIFNE
cathal buiCathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna (c1680-c1756).
Curioso personaggio soprannominato “Builil giallo, un bardo vagabondo di cui non si ha notizia suonasse uno strumento particolare, ma sicuramente cantastorie e compositore di poesie, che si sono diffuse per tutta l’Irlanda e ancora oggi cantate.
Lo studioso Breandán Ó Buachalla ha pubblicato una raccolta nel libro “Cathal Bui: Amhráin” nel 1975. A Blacklion contea di Cavan c’è anche una piccola stele in sua memoria e si celebra il Cathal Bui Festival (mese di Giugno).
Sacerdote mancato ci sapeva fare con le parole e con le donne, era inoltre dotato di molto “irish humour” ed era ovviamente un forte bevitore, girava per il Breifne, il nome irlandese della zona che comprende Cavan, Leitrim, e a sud di Fermanagh (uno dei tanti traveller con il suo carrozzone o anche meno).

PETER O’TOOLE

Ma è la versione conosciuta da Peter O’Toole ad essere stata l’origine della versione di Dominic Behan registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”, e anche della versione registrata da Sean o’Shea sempre negli stessi anni con il titolo Do Bhí Bean Uasal. Anche i Clancy Brothers con Tommy Makem fecero una loro versione con il titolo “Carrickfergus” nell’LP “The First Hurrah” del 1964.

E qui è doveroso aprire una parentesi sugli anni 60: in America il presidente è John F. Kennedy, un discendete di emigranti irlandesi, gli irlandesi Clancy Brothers diventano delle star; in Irlanda e Inghilterra scoppia il “Ballad boom” e si affermano i Dubliners e i Wolfe Tones. Ma a questo successo riscosso dalla musica irlandese sulla scena internazionale per gran parte contribuì il lavoro dei Ceoltóirí Chualann, da cui si formerà il gruppo più rappresentativo della musica irlandese: i Chieftains.

Chieftains in “The Chieftains Live” 1977 quando c’era ancora l’arpa di Dereck Bell (1935-2002).

DO BHÍ BEAN UASAL

Questa versione è stata attribuita musicalmente a Seán Ó Riada (ovvero John Reidy 1931-1971) non è chiaro se si tratti solo di un arrangiamento o di una vera e propria scrittura della melodia. Di certo il testo è preso dalla poesia di Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna.

Sean o’Shea in “Ò Riada Sa Gaiety” live in Dublino con i Ceoltóirí Chualann nel 1969.

I
Do bhí bean uasal seal dá lua liom,
‘s do chuir sí suas díomsa faraoir géar;
Do ghabhas lastuas di sna bailte móra
Ach d’fhag sí ann é os comhair an tsaoil.
Dá bhfaighinnse a ceannsa faoi áirsí an
teampaill,
Do bheinnse gan amhras im ‘ábhar féin;
Ach anois táim tinn lag is gan fáil ar leigheas agam.
Is beidh mo mhuintir ag gol im’ dhéidh.
II
I wish I had you in Carrickfergus
Ní fada ón áit sin go Baile Uí Chuain(1)
Sailing over the deep blue waters
I ndiaidh mo ghrá geal is í ag ealó uaim.
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I.
III
Tá an fuacht ag teacht is an teas ag tréigint
An tart ní féidir liom féin é do chlaoi,
Is go bhfuil an leabhar orm ó Shamhain go Fébur
Is ní bheidh sí reidh liom go Féil’ Mhichíl;
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, a stóirín, now lay me down!

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
A lady was betrothed to me for a while
And she refused me, oh my hundred woes
I went to towns with her
And she made a cuckold (or a fool ) of  me before the world,
If I had got that head of hers into the church
And if I were again  n command of myself, But now I’ weak and sore,  and there’s no getting of a  cure for me, And my people will be weeping after me
II
I wish I had you in   Carrickfergus
not far from that place ‘Quiet Town”
Sailing over the deep blue waters
my bright love from a northern sky
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I
III
The cold and the heat are going together [in me]
and I can’t quench my thirst
And if I took my oath from November to February
I wouldn’t be ready until Michaelmas
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, my little darling, now   lay me down!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Una Lady mi fu promessa sposa per un certo tempo,
e lei mi rifiutò,
oh i miei cento affanni
andai in città con lei
e lei mi ha reso pazzo (o cornuto) di fronte a tutti
se avessi avuto lei al fianco in quella chiesa
e se fossi ancora padrone di me stesso
ma ora sono debole e malato e nessuno si prende cura di me
e la mia gente mi piangerà
II
Vorrei essere a Carrickfergus
non lontano da quella città portuale
a navigare sul vasto oceano
il mio amore che brilla nel cielo del Nord
perché il mare è profondo, amore, e non riesco restare a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare,
vorrei incontrare un abile barcaiolo
che possa trasportare il mio amore e me.
III
Caldo e freddo dentro di me
e non riesco a placare la mia sete
e se ho fatto il giuramento da Novembre a Febbraio
non sarà pronto che al giorno di San Michele
Sono raramente ubriaco, senza mai essere completamente sobrio
un bel vagabondo da città in città.
Vieni Molly, mia cara, e fammi distendere ora.

NOTE
1) “baile cuain” letteralmente significa “quiet town” tradotta anche come Harbour Town

LA VERSIONE DEGLI ANNI 60 E SIGNIFICATO

E veniamo a ciò che resta del brano ai nostri giorni, ovvero della versione di Carrickfergus diffusa dai maggiori interpreti della musica celtica.
La dolce malinconia della melodia e la sua incerta interpretazione testuale hanno reso il brano molto popolare, alcuni ne colgono il lato romantico e lo suonano anche ai matrimoni, altri ai funerali (ad esempio quello di John F. Kennedy Jr -1999).
Di certo ha un che di magico, triste e nostalgico, l’uomo annega nell’alcool il dolore per la separazione dalla sua amata (o più probabilmente beve perché ha una particolare predilezione per l’alcool): un vasto oceano li divide (o un tratto di mare) e lui vorrebbe essere in Irlanda, a Carrickfergus: vorrebbe avere le ali o poter attraversare la distesa d’acqua a nuoto o più realisticamente trovare un barcaiolo che lo porti da lei, e finalmente potrà morire tra le sue braccia (o presso la di lei lapide) adesso che è vecchio e stanco.

Il senso generale del testo resta quindi a mio avviso abbastanza chiaro, ma se si va nel dettaglio allora nascono molte perplessità, che ho cercato di riassumere nelle note.

Carrighfergus (Music Video) versione di Loreena McKennitt e Cedric Smith  in Elemental, 1985


VERSIONE DI LOREENA MCKENNITT
I
I wish I was
in Carrighfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrant (2)
I would swim over
the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrant.
But the sea is wide,
and I can’t swim over
Neither have I wings to fly
If I could find me a handsome boatman
To ferry me over
to my love and die(3)
II
Now in Kilkenny (4), it is reported
They’ve marble stones there as black as ink,
With gold and silver
I would  transport her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now,
till I get a drink
I’m drunk today,
but I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah, but I am sick now,
my days are over
Come all you young lads
and lay me down.(6)

traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei essere
a Carrighfergus
solo per le notti
a Ballygrant
avrei nuotato
nell’oceano più profondo
solo per le notti a Ballygrant.
Ma il mare è vasto
e non posso rimanere a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare
se potessi trovare un abile barcaiolo
per traghettarmi fino
al mio amore e morire.
II
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny è scritto,
un marmo nero
come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento
che vorrei confortarla
ma non canterò più ora,
se non prendo da bere.
Adesso sono ubriaco,
ma raramente sono sobrio
un bel vagabondo
da città in città
Ah, eppure adesso sono malato
i miei giorni stanno finendo,
venite tutti ragazzi
e fatemi distendere.

NOTE
1) Carrickfergus (dal gaelico Carraig Fhearghais, ‘Rocca di Fergus’) è una città costiera nella Contea di Antrim , Irlanda del Nord, uno dei più antichi insediamenti in Irlanda del Nord. Qui il protagonista dice di voler essere a Carrickfergus (ma evidentemente è da qualche altra parte) mentre in altre versioni troviamo I wish I had you in Carrickfergus: il significato della canzone cambia completamente.
Alcuni vogliono ambientare la storia nel Sud dell’Irlanda ed ecco che allora vedono il nome del Fergus, il fiume che attraversa Ennis contea di Clare.
2) Ballygran – Ballygrant – Ballygrand. Ci sono ameno tre interpretazioni: la prima che Ballygrant sia in Scozia sulle Isole Ebridi (l’isola di Islay), la seconda che sia il villaggio di Ballygrot (dal gaelico Baile gCrot significa “insediamento di collinette”), vicino a Helen’s Bay che si trova in pratica di fronte a Carrickfergus oltre il tratto di mare che si insinua a frastagliare la costa Nord-est dell’Irlanda (il Belfast Lough). Pare che gli abitanti del posto lo chiamino “Ballygrat” o Ballygrant” e che sia un antico insediamento e che un tempo si tenevano delle gare con le barche da Carrickfergus a Ballygrat. La terza che sia una traduzione corrotta dal gaelico “baile cuain” della versione settecentesca e quindi sia una generica località tranquilla, un piccolo paesello.
Ma tra le due frasi c’è già un incongruenza o meglio c’è bisogno di un’interpretazione, appurato che Ballygrant non sia un posto particolare di Carrickfergus per il quale il protagonista prova nostalgia per qualche collegamento specifico con la sua storia d’amore passata in gioventù, allora si tratta del posto in cui invece si trova al momento. Quindi il protagonista potrebbe essere un irlandese che si è ritrovato nelle Isole Ebridi, ma che vorrebbe ritornare a Carrickfergus dal suo vecchio amore o che è uno scozzese (che quando era giovane faceva il soldato in Irlanda) e ricorda con rimpianto la donna irlandese amata in gioventù; oppure che il protagonista si trova a Helen’s Bay dalla parte opposta dell’insenatura che lo divide da Carrickfergus. Ma qui il ragionamento fa un po’ acqua (tanto per restare in tema), però solo fino a un certo punto: se fosse infatti sano e giovane niente gli impedirebbe di andare a Carrickfergus anche a piedi, ma lui è stanco e morente e quindi nella sua fantasia o delirio guardando il mare in direzione di Carrickfergus sogna di volare verso il suo amore del passato o desidera essere traghettato da un barcaiolo per poter morire accanto a lei.
3) “and die” ci dice che il protagonista che si trova a Ballygrant (ovunque esso sia) vorrebbe andare a Carrickfergus per morire tra le braccia del suo amore di gioventù.
In altre versioni la frase è scritta come “To ferry me over my love and I” e questo a parte la sgrammaticatura vorrebbe significare che il protagonista vorrebbe essere trasportato dal barcaiolo, insieme con la sua donna, a Carrickfergus. Quindi la nostalgia si condensa sulla località in cui si presume il protagonista abbia trascorso la gioventù e che vorrebbe rivedere prima di morire.
4) e 5) io per dare un senso compiuto alla frase ho tradotto come:
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny è scritto,
su marmo nero come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento che vorrei confortarla

Sostituendo il verbo “to transport” utilizzato da Loreena con “to support” più utilizzato nelle altre versioni. Ossia: sulla pietra nera di Kilkenny (nel senso che si da in genere ad una tipologia di pietra ad esempio marmo di Carrara, quindi la pietra nera estratta a Kilkenny ma utilizzata anche a Ballygrant, ovunque esso sia) che sarà la mia pietra tombale dove ho inciso il mio epitaffio, ho scritto anche una frase di conforto per il mio amore
4) Kilkenny = Kilmeny alcuni vedono un refuso e notano che Kilmeny è la chiesa parrocchiale di Ballygrant (Isola di Islay) già località di una chiesa d’epoca medievale, anche qui c’è una cava di pietre, che era l’industria principale di Ballygrant nei secoli XVIII e XIX. Ora io mi domando: ma con tutte questi riscontri nell’Isola di Islay, (dove come minimo dovrebbe esserci la tomba del protagonista) com’è che il brano non è noto nella tradizione locale delle Isole Ebridi e invece lo è a Belfast?
6) il protagonista esorta gli amici a seppellirlo

Ho selezionata per l’ascolto anche questa versione che mi piace molto per la sua raffinata sobrietà nell’arrangiamento strumentale e l’interpretazione vocale di Jim McCann. Nella versione live aggiunge anche la strofa intermedia che è stata scritta da Dominic Behan per la sua versione registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”.

The Dubliners (voce Jim McCann) in Dubliners Now 1975 dove canta la I e la III strofa

live Jim McCann con tutte e tre le strofe


VERSIONE DI JIM MCCANN
I
I wish I was
in Carrickfergus
Only for nights
in Ballygrand(2)
I would swim
over the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrand.
But the sea is wide
and I cannot swim over
And neither have I the wings to fly
I wish I had a handsome boatman
To ferry me over my love and I(3)
II
My childhood days
bring back sad reflections
Of happy time there spent so long ago
My boyhood friends
and my own relations
Have all passed on now
like the melting snow
And I’ll spend my days
in this endless roving
Soft is the grass and my bed is free
How to be back now
in Carrickfergus
On the long road down to the sea
III
And in Kilkenny
it is reported
On marble stone
there as black as ink
With gold and silver
I would support her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now
till I get a drink
‘cause I’m drunk today
and I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah but I am sick now
my days are numbered
Come all me young men
and lay me down

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei essere
a Carrighfergus
solo per le notti
a Ballygrand
avrei nuotato
nell’oceano più profondo
solo per le notti a Ballygrant.
Ma il mare è vasto
e non posso rimanere a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare
se potessi trovare un abile barcaiolo
per traghettare il mio amore e me.
II
I giorni della gioventù
richiamano tristi pensieri
di momenti felici oramai trascorsi
gli amici di gioventù
e le mie storie d’amore
sono svaniti adesso
come neve al sole
e trascorrerò i giorni
in questo eterno girovagare.
Soffice è l’erba e il giaciglio è gratis
come vorrei ssere di nuovo
a Carrickfergus
sulla lunga strada verso il mare
III
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny
è scritto,
marmo nero
come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento
che vorrei confortarla
ma non canterò più,
se non prendo da bere,
perché oggi sono ubriaco,
e raramente sono sobrio
un bel vagabondo
da città in città
Ah,eppure adesso sono malato
i miei giorni stanno finendo,
venite tutti ragazzi
e fatemi distendere.

FONTI
Su Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna
http://www.eofeasa.ie/cathalbui/public_html/danta_CB/who_was_CB.html
http://lookingatdata.com/m/204-mac-giolla-ghunna-cathal-bui.html
http://www.munster-express.ie/opinion/views-from-the-brasscock/the-yellow-bitternan-bonnan-bui/

http://jungle-bar.blogspot.it/2009/03/carrickfergus-ballad-of-peter-otoole.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16707
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=90070