Souling songs

Leggi in italiano

Souling songs are the songs of begging that the poor (mostly children) sang going from house to house during the evenings between the end of October and the beginning of November in the event of the celebration of All Saints (All Hallows Day = All- Souls’ eve) and the Feast of the Dead.

The banquet of the dead

Halloween is a pale echo of Samahin (Samain or Samhain), which in Gaelic means “End of the Summer”, or the Celtic New Year, a magical night in which the gods were asked for protection againts the coming of Winter.
Formerly it was customary to move from house to house during the celebrations of All Saints’ Eve with a small procession of masked people led by the “Ambassador of the dead” to ask for the donation of ritual food for the banquet of the Dead in which the whole community would have celebrated the anniversary.
In the Middle Ages in Ireland and Great Britain there was the custom of preparing a soul cake of round form as an offering to satiate the hunger of the dead who were believed to visit the living during Samain: to keep them good throughout the coming year, the housewives prepared some special sweets, which soon ended up satisfying the much more earthy and voracious appetites of the poor! These cakes were distributed in charity or given to the Soulers.
Even in certain regions of Italy (Emilia Romagna, or Sardinia and more generally in southern Italy) the practice of food begging was widespread among the poor and children: “Ceci cotti per l’anima dei morti” [“Chickpeas cooked for the soul of the dead“], they sang armed of spoons and bowls, in front of the gentry’ s houses.

SOULING

The tradition of “a-souling” or “a-soalin” is identical to wassailing and Christmas caroling (see), but here in exchange for cakes, often called Soul, the beggars promised to recite prayers for the dead. More prosaically it was said that every cake eaten represented a soul freed from Purgatory. The custom is often seen as the origin of the modern “Trick or Treating” of children masked by ghosts or monsters that play at the doors of the houses asking for “some good thing to eat”.
Already at the end of the 1800s the tradition of the soul cake had faded, and where the begging tradition still survived, the children were given apples or coins: in general the children did their begging by day.
CHORUS
Soul! soul! for a soul-cake;
Pray, good mistress, for a soul-cake.
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Them who made us all.
Soul! soul! for an apple or two;
If you’ve got no apples, pears will do.
Up with your kettle, and down with your pan;
Give me a good big one, and I’ll be gone.
An apple or pear, a plum or a cherry,
Is a very good thing to make us merry.

Another Soulers song was transcribed by John Brand in his “Popular Antiquities” (1777) taken directly from the lips of “the merry pack, who sing from door to door, on the eve of All – Soul’s Day, in Cheshire
Chorus
“Soul day, soul day, Saul
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Him who made us all.
Put your hand in your pocket and pull out your keys,
Go down into the cellar, bring up what you please;
A glass of your wine, or a cup of your beer,
And we’ll never come souling till this time next year.
We are a pack of merry boys, all in a mind,
We are come a souling for what we can find,
Soul, soul, sole of my shoe,
If you have no apples, money will do;
Up with your kettle and down with your pan,
Give us an answer and let us be gone
An apple, a pear, a plum or a cherry,
Any good thing that will make us all merry.

SOUL CAKE

The song “Soul cake” also known as “A Soalin”, “Souling Song Cheshire” “Hey ho, nobody home” was published (text and melody) by Lucy Broadwood and JA Fuller Maitland in the English County Songs in 1893, reporting the tradition still alive in Cheshire and Shropshire (West Midlands) of “souling”: the transcription was a few years earlier at the hands of Rev. MP Holme of Tattenhall, Cheshire as he had heard it from a local school girl. In 1963, the American folk group Peter, Paul and Mary recorded a version of this traditional song, entitled “A ‘Soalin”, reworking the song dating back to the Elizabethan era “Hey ho, nobody home”.
During the reign of Queen Elizabeth, depending to the county or local customs, the quest was made by the poorest on the evening of Saint Stephen or Christmas Eve and it was a bad omen to send the beggars away empty-handed.

HEY HO, NOBODY HOME

Sung As a Round (XVI sec)
Voice 1: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 2 : Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Yet will I be merry.
Voice 2: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 3: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 2: Yet wiIll be merry.
Voice 3: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 1: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 2: Yet will I be merry.
Voice 1: Yet will be merry.

Peter, Paul & Mary from “A Holiday Celebration” 1988

Sting live (from II to IV)

Sting in If on a Winter’s Night 2009

Lothlorien

I
Hey ho, nobody home,
meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry,
hey ho, nobody home
Meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry,
Hey ho, nobody home
CHORUS
A soul, a soul cake,
please good missus a soul cake.
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry,
any good thing to make us all merry,

A soul, a soul cake,
please good missus a soul cake.
One for Peter, two for Paul, (1)
three for Him who made us all.
II
God bless the master of this house,
and the mistress also.
And all the little children
that round your table grow.
The cattle in your stable
and the dog by your front door. (2)
And all that dwell within your gates
we wish you ten times more.
III
Go down into the cellar
and see what you can find.
If the barrels are not empty
we hope you will be kind.
We hope you will be kind
with your apple and strawber’ (3)
For we’ll come no more a ‘soalin’
till Xmas time next year.
IV (4)
The streets are very dirty,
my shoes are very thin
I have a little pocket
to put a penny in
If you haven’t got a penny,
a ha’ penny will do
If you haven’t got a ha’ penny
then God bless you
V(5)
Now to the Lord sing praises all you within this place
And with true love and brotherhood
each other now embrace
This holy tide of Christmas,
of beauty and of grace
Oh tidings of comfort and joy
(FOOTNOTE)
1) Peter and Paul are the saints of the Roman Church: Peter, the apostle indicated in the Gospels as the canonical stone on which the Church is founded and Paul, who spread Catholicism among the Gentiles
2) or “Likewise young men and maidens, Your cattle and your store”
3) strong beer=strawber: Sitng sings “pear”
4) a typical wassail stanza
5) the verse added by Paul Stookey comes from Carol “God rest you Merry Gentlemen” (whose melody intertwines with that of Soul Cake) see

Kristen Lawrence from A broom with a view 2014: All Hallows Version- Kristen writes and arranges music she calls her Halloween Carols

Chorus 
Soul Day, Soul Day, we be come a’ souling.
Pray, good people, remember the poor,
And give us a soul cake.
Soul, soul, a soul cake!
Please, good lady, a soul cake!
An apple, a pear, a plum or a cherry,
Any good thing to make us merry.
Soul, soul, a soul cake!
Pray we for a soul cake!
One for Peter, two for Paul,
And three for Him who made us all.
I
God bless the master of this house,
the mistress also,
And all the little children
who ‘round your table grow.
Likewise, your men and maidens,
your cattle and your store,
And all that dwell within your gates,
we wish you ten times more.
I bridge
Souling Day,
so we pray for the souls departed.
Pray give us a cake,
For we are all poor people
well-known to you before.
II bridge
Little Jack, Jack sat on his gate,
Crying for butter, to butter his cake.
Up with your kettles, and down with your pans,
Give us our souling, and we’ll be gone.
II
Down into the cellar,
and see what you can find.
If your barrels are not empty,
we hope you will prove kind.
We hope you will prove kind
with your apples and your grain,
And we’ll come no more a’ souling
‘til this month comes again.
III
Soul Day, Soul Day, we have been praying
For the souls departed, so pray good people, give us a cake.
So give us a cake for charity’s sake
And our blessing we’ll leave at your door.

Samhain version

Chorus
Soul, soul, soul cakes!
We come hunting for soul cakes!
We are dead, but like we said,
On this night we’ll take your bread
And while you’re out of your abode,
Lighting fires of Samhain old,
Think of us, out of body
As we are, you, too, shall be.
I
Samhain Night, at long last,
We parade from ages past
A journey from the Otherworld
Oh, the hairs that we have curled!
CHORUS
II
Winter’s Eve surrounds us,
Its open portal astounds us.
We creep into the living sphere,
And see where memories summon here.
III
Find us in this coldness,
Visiting with much boldness.
Share your food; we’ll share our power
To discern a future hour.
IV
Summer’s End, Summer’s End
Will the sun return, vital warmth to send?
Summer’s End, Summer’s End
Darkness lengthens in its stride
across the sleeping land.
V
Little Jack, Jack sat on his gate,
Offering goblins and demons his cake.
Up with the chill and down with the sun,
Waning and waning, the Dark Half’s begun.
VI
All this night as boundaries untie,
Visitors friendly and frightful stop by.
Up with your mask and down with your feet,
Marching and marching to lead out the fleet.
VII
How about this dwelling?
Its offerings are compelling,
With drinks and cakes and porridge,
And cherries and berries from storage.
VIII
Rattles at your door!
Don’t be scared, but give us some more!
A banshee (1) or a fershee (2) might delight
by new firelight.
CHORUS

NOTE
1) “woman of the fairies”
2) Fer-side [Fershee], a male fairy

Some recipes

With the name of Soul Cake we indicate many variations of traditional sweets from sweet bun to dried fruit cake.

Parkin cakeSoul-mass Cake
http://oakden.co.uk/harcake-soul-mass-cake/
http://oakden.co.uk/yorkshire-parkin/

In Italy the tradition is mainly based on biscuits vaguely reminiscent of the bones of the dead or the fingers of hands. In Piedmont they are the “ossa d’mort”, a base of almonds, but they can also be a variant of offelle with dried figs, almonds and sultanas (Lombardy and Tuscany) or in the form of horses (Trentino Alto Adige).
FAVE E OSSA D’MORT:
http://www.lericettedellavale.com/biscotti-ossa-di-morto-1657.html
http://cookingbreakdown.blogspot.it/2011/10/ognissanti-e-il-nostro-halloween-fave.html
PANE DEI MORTI:
http://www.ricettemania.it/ricetta-pane-dei-morti-443.html

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/samain.htm
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/news/antica/
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/news/moderna/feste-e-tradizioni/santi-e-morti-e-le-fave-nere.htmlusi—curiosita/Cibo-per-i-morti.html

http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/216.html
http://www.mayflowerchorus.org/pdf/A%20Soalin.pdf
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/hey_ho_nobody_home.htm
http://paulbommer.blogspot.it/2010/12/advent-calendar-22nd-mari-lwyd.html
http://www.museumwales.ac.uk/cy/279/

GALLOWS POLE

La ballata popolare “Gallows pole”, “The Maid Freed From The Gallows”, “The Prickly Bush” oppure “The Hangman”, “Highwayman” viene dalle Isole Britanniche classificata tra le Child ballads al numero 95.
In origine era un’antica storia  del Vecchio Continente risalente al Medioevo in cui è una fanciulla ad essere in attesa di giudizio per aver perso  un bene prezioso che le era stato affidato: una pallina d’oro zecchino che rappresenta un bene supremo, il valore della castità.  (vedi prima parte)

LE VERSIONI AMERICANE

Nelle versioni americane è più spesso l’uomo il condannato all’impiccagione, il quale supplica il boia di attendere ancora un momento l’arrivo di amici e parenti venuti per salvarlo in cambio di un riscatto. Ma gli amici e anche i suoi stessi genitori giungono lì per assistere all’impiccagione, solo all’ultimo arriverà il fidanzato/a a pagare il riscatto al boia e la sua libertà. Ricollegandosi alla matrice originaria della ballata la lezione morale è sempre la stessa: la castità è un bene prezioso la cui perdita significa la rovina di una fanciulla.
ASCOLTA John Jacob Niles The Maid Freed From The Gallows


I
“Hangman, hangman,
Slack your line,
Slack it just a while,
For I think I see my papa comin’,
Travelin’ many a mile,
Travelin’ many a mile.
II
“Papa, papa,
Has you brought gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
Or did you come to see me swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree?”
III
“Daughter, daughter, daughter,
I brought no gold
For to pay that hangman’s fee,
But I come to see you swingin’, swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree.”
IV
“Hangman, hangman,
Slack your line,
Slack it just a while,
For I think I see my mama comin’,
Travelin’ many a mile,
Travelin’ many a mile.
V
“Mama, mama, mama
Have you brought gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
Or did you come to see me swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree?”
VI
“Daughter, daughter, daughter,
I brought no gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
But I come to see you swingin’, swingin’
High from that hangman’s tree,
High from that hangman’s tree.”
VII
“Hangman, hangman,
Slack your line,
Slack it just a while,
For I think I see my lover comin’,
Travelin’ many a mile,
Travelin’ many a mile.
VIII
“Sweetheart, sweetheart, sweetheart,
Did you bring gold
For to pay this hangman’s fee,
Or did you come to see me swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree?”
IX
“Darlin’, darlin’, darlin’,
I brought that gold
For to pay that hangman’s fee,
‘Cause I don’t want to see you swingin’, swingin’
High from this hangman’s tree,
High from this hangman’s tree.”
Tradotto* da Cattia Salto
I
” Boia, boia
Allenta la tua corda,
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mio papà
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata”
II
“Papà, papà
hai portato l’oro
per pagare  il mio riscatto al boia
o sei venuto per vedermi dondolare
in alto sulla forca?
In alto sulla forca?”
III
“Figlia, figlia, figlia
non  ho portato l’oro
per pagare  il
 riscatto al boia
ma sono venuto per vederti dondolare
in alto sulla forca,
in alto sulla forca”
IV
” Boia, boia
Allenta la tua corda,
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mia mamma
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata”
V
“Mamma, mamma, mamma
hai portato l’oro
per pagare  il mio riscatto al boia
o sei venuta per vedermi dondolare
in alto sulla forca?
In alto sulla forca?”
VI
“Figlia, figlia, figlia
non  ho portato l’oro
per pagare  il riscatto al boia
ma sono venuta per vederti dondolare
in alto sulla forca,
in alto sulla forca”
VII
” Boia, boia
Allenta la tua corda,
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere il mio amore
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata”
VIII
“Amore, amore, amore
hai portato l’oro
per pagare  il mio riscatto al boia
o sei venuta per vedermi dondolare
in alto sulla forca?
In alto sulla forca?”
IX
“Amore, amore, amore
ho portato l’oro (1)
per pagare  il  riscatto al boia
perchè non voglio vederti dondolare,
dondolare
in alto sulla forca,
In alto sulla forca”

NOTE
* in “Led Zeppelin, tutti i testi con traduzione a fronte”, Arcana editrice, 1994
1) solo il fidanzato con un matrimonio riparatore può ridare l’onore alla fanciulla che ha perso la verginità

ASCOLTA Peter, Paul & Mary – Hangman che aggiungono un ritornello: qui è l’uomo ad essere condannato ed è la sua fidanzata che paga il riscatto per salvarlo dalla forca.


I
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my father comin’ ridin’ many a mile
Father have you brought me hope
or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
Chorus 1
I have not brought you hope,
I have not paid your fee
Yes I have come to see you hangin’ from the gallows tree.
II
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my mother comin’ ridin’ many a mile
Mother have you brought me hope
or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
III
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my brother comin’ ridin’ many a mile
Brother have you brought me hope or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
IV
Slack your rope hangman,
slack it for a while
I think I see my true love comin’ riding’ many a mile
True love have you brought me hope
or have you paid my fee
Or have you come to see me hangin’ from the gallows tree?
Chorus 2
“Yes I have brought you hope,
yes I have paid your fee
For I’ve not come to see you hangin’ from the gallows tree.”
Tradotto* da Cattia Salto
I
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mio padre arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Padre mi hai portato della speranza
o hai pagato per il mio riscatto
o sei venuto per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
Coro
“Non ti ho portato della speranza
e non ho pagato per il tuo riscatto
si sono venuto per vederti impiccare sulla forca”
II
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mia madre arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Madre mi hai portato della speranza
o hai pagato per il mio riscatto
o sei venuta per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
III
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere mio fratello
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Fratello mi hai portato della speranza o hai pagato per il mio riscatto
o sei venuto per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
IV
Allenta la tua corda, boia
allentala per un momento
mi sembra di vedere il mio vero amore
arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata
“Amore mi hai portato della speranza o hai pagato per il mio riscatto (1)
o sei venuta per vedermi impiccare sulla forca?”
Coro
“Si ti ho portato della speranza,
si ho pagato per il tuo riscatto,
perciò non sono venuta per vederti impiccare sulla forca”

NOTE
1) lo scambio sessuale qui non è esplicitato, la fanciulla potrebbe aver pagato il riscatto con l’oro e con con la sua virtù; il finale non è completo perchè sappiamo dalla novellistica medievale che l’uomo viene impiccato ugualmente (vedi). Castità, purezza, (e fedeltà) sono doti che una donna deve considerare sacre e inviolabili e se usate come merce di scambio portano solo alla sua rovina.

La ballata è stata rivisitata anche nell’ambito del rock, in quella che è la versione più conosciuta al giorno d’oggi (su un riff blues ripreso da Leadbelly ):  la versione con il condannato che viene impiccato ugualmente si ricollega alle molteplici varianti della tradizione orale della ballata considerata oggi come una canzone di protesta, un tempo invece la dimostrazione delle infauste conseguenze dell’infedeltà (o della perdita della verginità).
ASCOLTA Led Zeppelin su Spotify  in “Led Zeppelin III”, 1970
oppure la versione live con Jimmy Page e Robert Plant riarrangiata unplugged

Traduzione di Angela Branca e Davide Sapienza da qui*

I
Hangman, hangman,
hold it a little while,
Think I see my friends coming,
riding many a mile.
Friends, did you get some silver?
Did you get a little gold?
What did you bring me, my dear friends, to keep me from the Gallows Pole?
What did you bring me to keep me from the Gallows Pole?
I couldn’t get no silver,
I couldn’t get no gold,
You know that we’re too damn poor
to keep you from the Gallows Pole.
II
Hangman, hangman,
hold it a little while,
I think I see my brother coming, riding many a mile.
Brother, did you get some silver?
Did you get a little gold?
What did you bring me, my brother, to keep me from the Gallows Pole?
Brother, I brought you some silver,
I brought a little gold, I brought a little of everything
To keep you from the Gallows Pole.
Yes, I brought you to keep you from the Gallows Pole.
III
Hangman, hangman,
turn your head awhile,
I think I see my sister coming, riding a many mile, mile, mile.
Sister, I implore you,
take him by the hand,
Take him to some shady bower, save me from the wrath of this man,
Please take him, save me from the wrath of this man, man.
IV
Hangman, hangman,
upon your face a smile,
Pray tell me that I’m free to ride,
Ride for many a mile, mile, mile.
Oh, yes, you got a fine sister,
she warmed my blood from cold,
Brought my blood to boiling hot
to keep you from the Gallows Pole,
Your brother brought me silver,
your sister warmed my soul,
But now I laugh and pull so hard and see you swinging on the Gallows Pole
Yeah, swingin’ on the gallows pole!
I
“Boia, boia,
aspetta un attimo,
mi sembra di vedere i miei amici arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata.
Amici, avete dell’argento?
Avete un po’ d’oro?
Cosa mi avete portato, amici cari,
per sottrarmi
alla forca?
Cosa mi avete portato,
per sottrarmi alla forca?”
“Non ho potuto portare argento,
non ho potuto portare oro,
sai che siamo troppo poveri, dannazione, per sottrarti alla forca.”
II
“Boia, boia,
aspetta un attimo,
mi sembra di vedere mio fratello arrivare, viene così da lontano.
Fratello, hai dell’argento?
Hai un po’ d’oro?
Cosa mi hai portato, fratello, per sottrarmi alla forca?”
“Fratello, ti ho portato dell’argento,
ti ho portato un po’ d’oro,
ti ho portato un po’ di tutto per sottrarti alla forca,
sì, ti  ho portato di che sottrarti alla forca.”
III
“Boia, boia,
volta la testa un attimo,
mi sembra di vedere mia sorella arrivare, dopo una lunga cavalcata.
Sorella, ti prego,
prendilo per mano (1),
portalo in qualche luogo nascosto ,
salvami dall’ira di questo uomo,
ti prego portalo via,
salvami dall’ira di quest’uomo.”
IV
“Boia, boia,
sul tuo viso un sorriso,
ti prego dimmi che sono libero di cavalcare, cavalcare per molte miglia.”
“Oh, sì, hai una sorella deliziosa,
ha riscaldato il mio sangue che era freddo, lo ha fatto diventare bollente
per sottrarti alla forca, sì.
Tuo fratello mi ha portato l’argento,
tua sorella mi ha riscaldato l’animo,
ma ora rido e tiro forte
e ti vedo penzolare dalla forca,
sì, penzolare dalla forca”

NOTE
* in “Led Zeppelin, tutti i testi con traduzione a fronte”, Arcana editrice, 1994.
1) il condannato chiede alla sorella di concedersi sessualmente al boia, mentre nella versione italiana della ballata conosciuta come “Cecilia” è la moglie a passare la notte con il capitano che ha fatto imprigionare il marito (vedi) in entrambe le versioni l’uomo viene ugualmente giustiziato.  Per  Murder Ballad Monday Shawnee Gee ipotizza l’influenza della ballata ungherese “Feher Anna”  e per l’approfondimento rimando alla prossima puntata

continua

FONTI
https://www.mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thepricklybush.html
https://singout.org/2012/08/13/maid-freed-from-the-gallows-gallows-pole-child-ballad-95/
https://singout.org/2012/08/17/the-price-my-dear-is-you/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=5603
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-Highwayman.html

I canti di questua di Halloween

Read the post in English

Souling songs sono le canzoni di questua che i poveri (per lo più bambini) cantavano andando di casa in casa a durante le sere tra la fine di ottobre e i primi di novembre in occorrenza della celebrazione di Tutti i Santi (All Hallows Day = All-Souls’ eve) e della Festa dei Morti.

IL BANCHETTO DEI MORTI

Halloween è una pallida eco di Samahin (Samain o Samhain), che in gaelico significa “Fine dell’Estate”, ovvero il capodanno celtico, una magica notte in cui si chiedeva protezione agli dei per l’arrivo dell’inverno. continua
Anticamente era consuetudine passare di casa in casa durante le celebrazioni della Vigilia di Ognissanti con una piccola processione di persone mascherate guidate dall’”ambasciatore dei defunti” per chiedere la donazione di cibo rituale per il banchetto dei Morti e per il banchetto con cui tutta la comunità avrebbe festeggiato la ricorrenza.

Nel Medioevo in Irlanda e Gran Bretagna si sviluppò l’usanza di preparare un dolce dei morti di forma rotonda, come offerta per saziare la fame dei defunti che si credeva visitassero i vivi durante Samain: per tenerli buoni per tutto l’anno a venire, le massaie preparavano dei dolcetti speciali, che ben presto finirono per saziare gli appetiti molto più terreni e voraci dei poveri! Erano distribuiti in beneficenza oppure dati ai soulers.
Anche in certe regioni d’Italia (Emilia Romagna, o la Sardegna e più in generale nel Sud Italia) era diffusa tra i poveri e i bambini l’usanza della questua del cibo: “Ceci cotti per l’anima dei morti”, cantavano armati di cucchiai e scodelle, davanti alle case dei signorotti. Consuetudini tra cibo e commemorazioni dei morti consolidate da antiche tradizioni più in generale del Mondo Mediterraneo oltre che Nordico.

SOULING

La tradizione del “a-souling” oppure “a-soalin” è identica al wassailing e al caroling natalizio (vedi): qui però in cambio delle torte, spesso chiamate anime (in inglese soul), i questuanti promettevano di recitare delle preghiere per i defunti. Più prosaicamente si diceva che ogni torta mangiata rappresentava un’anima che si liberava dal Purgatorio. L’usanza è spesso vista come l’origine della moderna “Trick or Treating” (in italiano “dolcetto o scherzetto”) dei bambini mascherati da fantasmi o mostri che suonano alle porte delle case chiedendo dei “dolcetti buoni da mangiare”. Già alla fine del 1800 la tradizione di preparare il dolce si era affievolita, e dove ancora sopravviveva l’usanza della questua, si dava ai bambini delle mele o delle monetine: in genere i bambini facevano la questua di giorno.


CHORUS

Soul! soul! for a soul-cake;
Pray, good mistress, for a soul-cake.
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Them who made us all.
Soul! soul! for an apple or two;
If you’ve got no apples, pears will do.
Up with your kettle, and down with your pan;
Give me a good big one, and I’ll be gone.
An apple or pear, a plum or a cherry,
Is a very good thing to make us merry.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Anime, Anime un dolce per i defunti
 Buona signora, per favore una torta dell’anima! Una per Pietro, due per Paolo, e tre per Colui che ci ha creato.
Anime, Anime! Con una mela o due;
se non avete mele, le pere andranno bene.
aprite la porta e sbloccate la serratura,
datemi una fetta grande e io me ne andrò.
Una mela o una pera, una susina o una ciliegia, sono buone cose che ci fanno contenti

Un’altra canzone dei Soulers è stata trascritta da John Brand nel suo “Popular Antiquities” (1777) presa direttamente dalle labbra di “the merry pack, who sing them from door to door, on the eve of All – Soul’s Day, in Cheshire“.


Chorus

“Soul day, soul day, Saul
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Him who made us all.
Put your hand in your pocket and pull out your keys,
Go down into the cellar, bring up what you please;
A glass of your wine, or a cup of your beer,
And we’ll never come souling till this time next year.
We are a pack of merry boys, all in a mind,
We are come a souling for what we can find,
Soul, soul, sole of my shoe,
If you have no apples, money will do;
Up with your kettle and down with your pan,
Give us an answer and let us be gone
An apple, a pear, a plum or a cherry,
Any good thing that will make us all merry.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
Il giorno dei Morti
Una per Pietro, due per Paolo, e tre per Colui che ci ha creato.
Mettetevi le mani in tasca e tirate fuori le chiavi
e andate giù in cantina e riportate su quello che volete;
un bicchiere di vino o una tazza di birra
e non ritorneremo per la questua
fino al Natale del prossimo anno.
Siamo un gruppetto di ragazzotti ben determinati
siamo venuti per la questua di quello che riusciamo a trovare
Anime, anime suole delle mie scarpe
se non avete mele, dei soldini andranno bene;
aprite la porta e sbloccate la serratura
dateci una risposta e lasciateci andare.
Una mela o una pera, una susina o una ciliegia
delle buone cose che ci faranno tutti contenti

 

SOUL CAKE

La canzone “Soul cake” nota anche come “A Soalin”, “Souling Song Cheshire” “Hey ho, nobody home” è stata pubblicata (testo e melodia) da Lucy Broadwood e J. A. Fuller Maitland nell’English County Songs nel 1893, riportando la tradizione ancora viva nel Cheshire e nel Shropshire (Midlands Occidentali) del “souling”: la trascrizione era di qualche anno prima per mano del Rev. MP Holme di Tattenhall, Cheshire così come l’aveva sentita da una bambina delle scuole locali. Nel 1963, il gruppo folk americano Peter, Paul e Mary hanno registrato una versione di questa canzone tradizionale, dal titolo “A ‘Soalin” rielaborando la canzone risalente all’epoca elisabettiana “Hey ho, nobody home”.
Durante il regno della regina Elisabetta a seconda della contea o dalle abitudini locali la questua veniva fatta dai più poveri la sera di Santo Stefano o della vigilia di Natale ed era un cattivo auspicio mandare via a mani vuote i questuanti.

HEY HO, NOBODY HOME

Sung As a Round (XVI sec): un canto in canone dal medioevo


Voice 1: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 2 : Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Yet will I be merry.
Voice 2: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 3: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 2: Yet wiIll be merry.
Voice 3: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 1: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 2: Yet will I be merry.
Voice 1: Yet will be merry.

Peter Paul & Mary in  “A Holiday Celebration” 1988, molto natalizia la versione innesta un popolarissimo carol nella strofa finale

Sting live (strofe da II a IV)

Sting in If on a Winter’s Night 2009 la versione più patinata

Lothlorien


I
Hey ho, nobody home,
meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry,
hey ho, nobody home
Meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry,
Hey ho, nobody home
CHORUS
A soul, a soul cake,
please good missus a soul cake.
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry,
any good thing to make us all merry,

A soul, a soul cake,
please good missus a soul cake.
One for Peter, two for Paul,
three for Him who made us all.
II
God bless the master of this house,
and the mistress also.
And all the little children
that round your table grow.
The cattle in your stable
and the dog by your front door.
And all that dwell within your gates
we wish you ten times more.
III
Go down into the cellar
and see what you can find.
If the barrels are not empty
we hope you will be kind.
We hope you will be kind
with your apple and strawber’
For we’ll come no more a ‘soalin’
till Xmas time next year.
IV
The streets are very dirty,
my shoes are very thin
I have a little pocket
to put a penny in
If you haven’t got a penny,
a ha’ penny will do
If you haven’t got a ha’ penny
then God bless you
V(4)
Now to the Lord sing praises all you
within this place
And with true love and brotherhood
each other now embrace
This holy tide of Christmas,
of beauty and of grace
Oh tidings of comfort and joy
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ehi, oh c’è nessuno in casa?
Non ho (non porto) cibo nè bevande, nè denaro
tuttavia ci accontenteremo.
Ehi, oh c’è nessuno in casa?
Non ho cibo nè bevande, nè denaro
tuttavia ci accontenteremo
Ehi, oh c’è nessuno in casa?
CORO
Anima, una torta dell’anima!
Buona signora, per favore, una torta dell’anima! Con mele, pere, susine, ciliegie,
ogni cosa buona per farci contenti,
anima, una torta dell’anima!
Buona signora, per favore una torta dell’anima! Una (torta o fetta) per Pietro, due per Paolo (1),
e tre per colui che ha fatto tutti noi.

II
Dio benedica il capo famiglia
e anche sua moglie
e tutti i piccoli bambini
che crescono intorno alla vostra tavola.
Il bestiame nella stalla
ed il cane davanti alla porta (2),
e tutti ciò che risiede tra le vostre mura
ve ne auguriamo 10 volte tanto.
III
Andate nella cantina
e guardate cosa trovate.
Se i barili non sono vuoti
siamo certi che sarete generosi.
Speriamo che siate generosi
con le vostre mele e birra forte (3)
Poichè non ritorneremo per la questua
fino al Natale del prossimo anno.
IV (4)
Le strade sono molto sporche,
e le scarpe sono molto sottili.
Ho una piccola tasca
dove mettere un penny.
Se non avete un penny da dare,
un mezzo penny andrà bene
Se non avete un mezzo penny da dare
allora che Dio vi benedica
V (5)
Ora cantate lodi al Signore voi tutti
in questo posto
e in vero segno di amore
e fratellanza abbracciatevi ora gli uni agli altri, questo santo periodo del Natale,
di beltà e grazia;
O, novella di conforto e gioia!

NOTE
1) Pietro e Paolo sono i santi della Chiesa romana: Pietro, l’apostolo indicato nei Vangeli canonico come la pietra su cui si fonda la Chiesa e Paolo, che ha diffuso il cattolicesimo tra i gentili
2) strofa alternativa “Likewise young men and maidens, Your cattle and your store”
3) “strong beer” storpiata in strawber’ che ovviamente non sta a indicare le fragole, che non sono di stagione d’inverno e nemmeno si candiscono come le ciliegie o si fanno seccare come la maggior parte della frutta che si consuma d’inverno. Sting canta “pear”
4) un tipico verso dei canti di questua natalizi
5) la strofa aggiunta da Paul Stookey proviene dalla Carol “God rest you Merry Gentlemen” (la cui melodia si intreccia con quella di Soul Cake) vedi

Kristen Lawrence in A broom with a view 2014:
Kristen scrive e arrangia canti e melodie che chiama “Halloween Carols” , nel ricomporre la canzone riprende molte fradi tipiche dei canti di questua e in particolare


Chorus 

Soul Day, Soul Day, we be come a’ souling.
Pray, good people, remember the poor,
And give us a soul cake.
Soul, soul, a soul cake!
Please, good lady, a soul cake!
An apple, a pear, a plum or a cherry,
Any good thing to make us merry.
Soul, soul, a soul cake!
Pray we for a soul cake!
One for Peter, two for Paul,
And three for Him who made us all.
I
God bless the master of this house,
the mistress also,
And all the little children
who ‘round your table grow.
Likewise, your men and maidens,
your cattle and your store,
And all that dwell within your gates,
we wish you ten times more.
I bridge
Souling Day,
so we pray for the souls departed.
Pray give us a cake,
For we are all poor people
well-known to you before.
II bridge
Little Jack, Jack sat on his gate,
Crying for butter, to butter his cake.
Up with your kettles, and down with your pans,
Give us our souling, and we’ll be gone.
II
Down into the cellar,
and see what you can find.
If your barrels are not empty,
we hope you will prove kind.
We hope you will prove kind
with your apples and your grain,
And we’ll come no more a’ souling
‘til this month comes again.
III
Soul Day, Soul Day, we have been praying
For the souls departed, so pray good people, give us a cake.
So give us a cake for charity’s sake
And our blessing we’ll leave at your door.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Il giorno delle anime siamo venuti in questua
ricordatevi brava gente dei poveri
e dateci una torta dell’anima
torta dell’anima!
Vi preghiamo buona signora, torta dell’anima
Con mele, pere, susine, ciliegie,
ogni cosa buona per farci contenti,
anima, una torta dell’anima!
Vi preghiamo una torta dell’anima!
Una (torta o fetta) per Pietro, due per Paolo,
e tre per colui che ha fatto tutti noi.

I
Dio benedica il capo famiglia
e anche sua moglie
e tutti i piccoli bambini
che crescono intorno alla vostra tavola.
e anche i vostri servitori e le serve
Ii bestiame nella stalla
e tutti ciò che risiede tra le vostre mura
ve ne auguriamo 10 volte tanto.
Primo intermezzo
Il giorno delle anime
così preghiamo per i defunti
per favore dateci un dolce
perchè siamo i poveri
che conoscete bene
Secondo intermezzo
Piccolo Jack, seduto all’ingresso
piange per imburrare, imburrare il suo dolce
aprite la porta e sbloccate la serratura,
dateci le nostre anime e ce ne andremo
II
Andate nella cantina
e guardate cosa trovate.
Se i barili non sono vuoti
siamo certi che sarete generosi.
Speriamo che siate generosi
con le vostre mele e il grano
Poichè non ritorneremo per la questua
finchè questo mese ritornerà di nuovo.
III
Il giorno delle anime abbiamo pregato
per i defunti, così brava gente
per favore dateci un dolce
dateci un dolce per carità
e vi lasceremo le nostre benedizioni

E la versione Samhain 


Chorus

Soul, soul, soul cakes!
We come hunting for soul cakes!
We are dead, but like we said,
On this night we’ll take your bread
And while you’re out of your abode,
Lighting fires of Samhain old,
Think of us, out of body
As we are, you, too, shall be.
I
Samhain Night, at long last,
We parade from ages past
A journey from the Otherworld
Oh, the hairs that we have curled!
CHORUS
II
Winter’s Eve surrounds us,
Its open portal astounds us.
We creep into the living sphere,
And see where memories summon here.
III
Find us in this coldness,
Visiting with much boldness.
Share your food; we’ll share our power
To discern a future hour.
IV
Summer’s End, Summer’s End
Will the sun return, vital warmth to send?
Summer’s End, Summer’s End
Darkness lengthens in its stride
across the sleeping land.
V
Little Jack, Jack sat on his gate,
Offering goblins and demons his cake.
Up with the chill and down with the sun,
Waning and waning, the Dark Half’s begun.
VI
All this night as boundaries untie,
Visitors friendly and frightful stop by.
Up with your mask and down with your feet,
Marching and marching to lead out the fleet.
VII
How about this dwelling?
Its offerings are compelling,
With drinks and cakes and porridge,
And cherries and berries from storage.
VIII
Rattles at your door!
Don’t be scared, but give us some more!
A banshee (1) or a fershee (2) might delight
by new firelight.
CHORUS
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
torte dell’anima
siamo a caccia di torte dell’anima
Siamo i morti, ma come è detto

in questa notte prenderemo il vostro pane
e mentre siete fuori casa
ad accendere i fuochi del vecchio Samain
pensate a noi, incorporei
come noi siamo così voi sarete
I
La notte di Samain, finalmente
andiamo in parata da secoli
un viaggio dall’Altromondo
Oh i capelli che abbiamo fatto rizzare!
CORO
II
La vigilia dell’Inverno ci circonda
il varco aperto ci meraviglia
scivoliamo nella sfera dei viventi
e vedere dove i ricordi qui si evocano
III
Trovateci in questo freddo
per visitarci con gran coraggio
condividete il vostro cibo: condivideremo il nostro potere di discernere il tempo futuro
IV
La fine dell’Estate,
ritornerà il sole per portare il suo calore vitale?
La fine dell’Estate,
l’oscurità allunga il suo passo
sulla terra addormentata.
V
Piccolo Jack, seduto all’ingresso
per offrire ai folletti e ai demoni la sua torta
su il gelo e giù il sole
piano piano, inizia la Metà Oscura
VI
In questa notte mentre i confini si sciolgono,
ospiti amichevoli e spaventosi passano
Su con la maschera e giù con i piedi,
Marcia e marcia per far uscire la schiera.
VII
Che ne dici di questa dimora?
Le sue offerte sono convincenti,
Con bevande, torte e porridge,
E ciliegie e bacche dalla dispensa.
VIII
Sonagli alla tua porta!
Non aver paura, ma dacci qualcosa di più!
Una fata-donna o una fata-uomo si delizieranno
accanto al nuovo fuoco.
CORO

NOTE
1) “woman of the fairies”
2) Fer-side [Fershee], a male fairy

LA RICETTA

Con il nome di Soul Cake si indicano molte varianti di dolcetti tradizionali che vanno dal panino dolce alla torta di frutta secca.

Una ricetta che arriva dall’America è come piace a me, con le quantità ad occhio! (tradotto da http://www.greenchronicle.com/recipes/soul_cake_recipe.htm)

3/4 tazze di burro a temperatura ambiente
3/4 zucchero a velo
4 tazze di farina, setacciata
3 tuorli d’uovo
1 cucchiaino di spezie miste (ovvero la Pumpkin Pie Spice già pronta: cannella, macis, zenzero, noce moscata e chiodi di garofano)
1 cucchiaino di pepe della Giamaica
3 cucchiai di uva passa
un po’ di latte

LAVORAZIONE
Lavorare il burro a crema con lo zucchero fino a quando diventa soffice, incorporare i tuorli d’uovo sbattuti, la farina e le spezie e tanto latte quanto basta per ottenere un impasto morbido. Alla fine aggiungere l’uvetta.
Nella ricetta non è chiaro se l’impasto è da stendere e quindi ritagliare in forma tonda o se distribuire a cucchiaiate, come sia non deve risultare troppo morbido perchè deve poter essere inciso con una croce a partire dal centro. Ovviamente la teglia deve essere imburrata o si deve mettere la carta-forno. Cuocere in forno caldo fino a doratura.

Un dolce tipico nel Lancashire e nello Yorkshire è il Parkin cake, un tipico gingerbread (torta di zenzero) della tradizione anglosassone. Potrebbe sembrare un brownie ma è composto da fiocchi d’avena e melassa (golden syrup o black treacle)
Soul-mass Cake
https://crumpetsandco.wordpress.com/2013/11/05/parkin-per-la-notte-dei-falo-parkin-for-bonfire-night/​
http://oakden.co.uk/harcake-soul-mass-cake/
http://oakden.co.uk/yorkshire-parkin/

In Italia la tradizione è basata principalmente sui biscotti che ricordano vagamente le ossa dei morti o le dita delle mani. In Piemonte sono gli “ossa d’mort“, a base di mandorle, tra la meringa e l’amaretto, ma possono anche essere una variante delle offelle con fichi secchi, mandorle e uva sultanina (Lombardia e Toscana) o dalla forma di cavalli (Trentino Alto-Adige).
La tradizione del Sud è un’esplosione di colori e di sapori: il torrone napoletano, il marzapane siciliano, la colva o colua pugliese con grano bollito, cioccolato, noci e mandorle, melograno e vino cotto. Anche la consistenza di questi dolci può essere diversissima da morbidi a croccanti o spacca denti.

Assolutamente da provare
FAVE E OSSA D’MORT:
http://www.lericettedellavale.com/biscotti-ossa-di-morto-1657.html
http://cookingbreakdown.blogspot.it/2011/10/ognissanti-e-il-nostro-halloween-fave.html
PANE DEI MORTI:
http://www.ricettemania.it/ricetta-pane-dei-morti-443.html

La festa di Samain (il Capodanno dei Celti) si concludeva l’11 novembre una festa pagana ancora sentita nell’Alto Medioevo, a cui la Chiesa sovrappose il culto cristiano di San Martino. continua seconda parte

APPROFONDIMENTO
Samahin: http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/samain.htm

FONTI
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/news/antica/
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/news/moderna/feste-e-tradizioni/santi-e-morti-e-le-fave-nere.htmlusi—curiosita/Cibo-per-i-morti.html

http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/216.html
http://www.mayflowerchorus.org/pdf/A%20Soalin.pdf
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/hey_ho_nobody_home.htm
http://paulbommer.blogspot.it/2010/12/advent-calendar-22nd-mari-lwyd.html
http://www.museumwales.ac.uk/cy/279/