Heave away, my Johnny sea shanty

Leggi in Italiano

The second sea shanty sung by A.L. Lloyd in the film Moby Dick, shot by John Huston in 1956, is a windlass shanty or a capstan shanty. As we can clearly see in the sequence, crew action the old anchor winch.
Kenneth S. Goldstein commented on the cover notes of the album “Thar She Blows” by Ewan MacColl and A.L. Lloyd (1957)”A favourite shanty for windlass work, when the ship was being warped out of harbour at the start of a trip. A log rope would be made fast to a ring at the quayside and run round a bollard at the pierhead and back to the ship’s windlass. The shantyman would sit on the windlass head and sing while the spokesters strained to turn the windlass. As they turned, the rope would round the drum and the ship nosed seaward amid the tears of the women and the cheers of the men. This version was sung by the Indian Ocean whalers of the 1840s“.

The song starts at 1:50, when the catwalk is pulled off and the old spike windlass is activated, model replaced by the brake windlass around 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) the curse of every sailor at the time of sailing ships: Cape Horn

This sea shanty presents a great variety of texts even with different stories, so sometimes it is a song of the whaleship other times a song of emigration. (a collection of various text versions here).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Dubbing Cape Horn was a feared affair by sailors, being a stretch of sea almost perpetually upset by storms, a cemetery of numerous unlucky ships.
The wind dominated the bow, so the ship was pushed back for days with the crew exhausted by effort and icy water that was breaking on all sides.

Louis Killen from Farewell Nancy 1964  “capstan stands upright and is pushed round by trudging men. A windlass, serving much the same function, lies horizontally and is revolved by means of bars pulled from up to down. So windlass songs are generally more rhythmical than capstan shanties. Heave Away is usually considered a windlass song. Originally, it had words concerning a voyage of Irish migrants to America. Later, this text fell away. The version sung here was “devised” by A. L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick

Assassin’s Creed Rogue

I
There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.
II
The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls, we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
III
Farewell to you, my Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
IV
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.

NOTES
1) Kingston upon Hull (or, more simply, Hull) is a renowned fishing port from which flotillas for fishing in the North Sea started from the Middle Ages. In the song, the departing ships also head for the Indian Ocean (see routes )

Barbara Brown & Tom Brown  from Just Another Day 2014, from the repertoire of the seafaring songs of Minehead (Somerset) collected by Cecil Sharp from only two sources – the retired captains Lewis and Vickery.

trad and Tom Brown verses
I
As I walked out one morning all in the month of May,
Heave away, me Johnny, heave away,
I thought upon the ships and trade that sailed out of our bay,
Heave away, me jolly boys, we’re all bound away.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Wexford town and sometimes for St. John,
And sometimes to the Med we go, just to get the sun.
III
We’re running to St. Austell Bay, with coal we’re loaded down;
A storm came down upon us before we reached Charlestown.
IV
There’s dried and pickled herring we’ve shipped around the world,
Two hundred years of fishing, until they disappeared.
V
It’s green oak bound for Swansea town, it’s salt we bring from France,
But it’s down into the Indies to lead those girls a dance.
VI
With a cargo now of kelp, me boys, for Bristol now we’re bound,
To help them make the glass, you know, all in that famous town.
VII
Flour and malt and bark and grain are on the Bristol run;
The Jane and Susan beat them all in eighteen-sixty-one.
VIII
We’ve sailed the world in ships of fame that came from Minehead hard,
And Unanimity she was the last from Manson’s Yard.

NEWFOUNDLAND VERSION

Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook # 49) was released by Pius Power, Southeast Bight,  in 1979 Genevieve Lehr writes “this is a song which was often used to establish a rhythm for hauling up the anchors aboard the fishing schooners. Many of these ‘heave-up shanties’ were old ballads or contemporary ones, and very often topical verses were made up on the spur of the moment and added to the song to make the song last as long as the task itself.”

The Fables from Tear The House Down, 1998 a cheerful version with a decidedly country arrangement

I
Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
III
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
IV
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”

NOTES
1) duds in this context means “clothes” but more generally the large canvas bag containing the sailor’s baggage
2) Saint John’s, known in Italian as San Giovanni di Terranova for the Marconi experiment, is a city in Canada, capital of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located in the peninsula of Avalon, which is part of the Newfoundland island
3) clearly a “flying” verse taken from the many farewells here is Nancy answering

 

broadside ballad: The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
 emigration song: The Irish girl or Mr Tapscott

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/722-heave-away-my-johnny
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/default.htm

Heave away, my Johnny

Read the post in English

Il secondo sea shanty cantato da A.L. Lloyd nel film Moby Dick, girato da John Huston nel 1956 , è un windlass shanty o un capstan shanty. Come si vede bene nella sequenza è intonato dallo shantyman al verricello dell’ancora quando non era ancora in adozione il modello brake windlass . (vedi parte prima)
Kenneth S. Goldstein ha commentato nelle note di copertina dell’album “Thar She Blows” di Ewan MacColl e A.L. Lloyd (1957) “La sea shanty preferita per il lavoro ai verricelli, quando la nave veniva portata fuori dal porto all’inizio di un viaggio. Una cima robusta si agganciava  ad anello sulla banchina e girava intorno a una bitta del molo e di nuovo al verricello della nave. Lo shantyman si sedeva sulla testa del verricello e cantava mentre i marinai che rispondevano nel coro si sforzavano di girare il verricello. Come manovravano, la corda si avvolgeva attorno al tamburo e la nave avanzava piano verso il mare in mezzo alle lacrime delle donne e agli applausi degli uomini. Questa versione fu cantata dai balenieri dell’Oceano Indiano negli anni ’40 dell’Ottocento“.

Il brano inizia a 1:50, quando viene tirata via la passerella e viene azionato il vecchio spike windlass, modello sostituito dal brake windlass verso il 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) la maledizione di ogni marinaio all’epoca dei velieri, Capo Horn

E tuttavia il brano presenta una grande varietà di testi anche con storie diverse, così a volte è una canzone delle baleniere altre volte un canto d’emigrazione. (una raccolta di varie versioni testuali qui).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, essendo un tratto di mare quasi perennemente sconvolto dalle tempeste, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
Il vento dominava di prua, così la nave veniva spinta indietro per giorni e giorni con l’equipaggio stremato dallo sforzo e dall’acqua gelida che rompeva da tutte le parti.

Louis Killen in Farewell Nancy 1964 che scrive nelle note: “l’argano per salpare (capstan) è in posizione verticale e viene spinto da uomini che arrancano in tondo. Un verricello, che serve più o meno alla stessa funzione, è in orizzontale ed è ruotato con delle barre spinte su e giù. Quindi le canzoni dei verricelli (windlass shanty) sono generalmente più ritmiche di quelle all’argano (capstan shanty). Solitamente Heave Away è considerato una windlass song. Originariamente aveva le parole riguardanti un viaggio di emigranti irlandesi in America. Più tardi, questo testo è venuto meno. La versione cantata qui è stata “ideata” da A.L Lloyd per il film di Mody Dick
Assassin’s Creed Rogue


There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.

The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls,
we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
And farewell to you,
my Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ecco che alcuni partono per la città di New York
e altri per la Francia
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny, vira a lasciare
E altri partono per
il Golfo del Bengala
ad insegnare la danza alle balene
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny,
siamo in partenza.
Il pilota è in attesa
che cambi la marea
e poi mie ragazze, la faremo
andare ancora
con una buona brezza da ovest.
E addio a voi,
ragazze di Kingston (1)
addio moli di St Andrews
se mai ritorneremo ancora,
faremo dondolare le vostre culle.
Venite tutti marinai, uomini che
che lavorano sodo
che doppiano il capo delle tempeste
accertatevi di avere stivali e cerate
o non vorrete essere mai nati

NOTE
1) Kingston upon Hull (o, più semplicemente, Hull) è un rinomato porto di pescatori da cui fin dal medioevo partivano le flottiglie per la pesca nel Mare del Nord. Nella canzone le navi in partenza si dirigono anche nell’oceano indiano (vedi rotte)

Barbara Brown & Tom Brown  in Just Another Day 2014  dal repertorio dei canti marinareschi di Minehead (Somerset) raccolti da Cecil Sharp da due sole fonti – i capitani in pensione Lewis e Vickery.

trad e versi di Tom Brown
I
As I walked out one morning all in the month of May,
Heave away, me Johnny, heave away,
I thought upon the ships and trade that sailed out of our bay,
Heave away, me jolly boys, we’re all bound away.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Wexford town and sometimes for St. John,
And sometimes to the Med we go, just to get the sun.
III
We’re running to St. Austell Bay, with coal we’re loaded down;
A storm came down upon us before we reached Charlestown.
IV
There’s dried and pickled herring we’ve shipped around the world,
Two hundred years of fishing, until they disappeared.
V
It’s green oak (1) bound for Swansea town, it’s salt we bring from France,
But it’s down into the Indies to lead those girls a dance.
VI
With a cargo now of kelp, me boys, for Bristol now we’re bound,
To help them make the glass, you know, all in that famous town.
VII
Flour and malt and bark and grain are on the Bristol run;
The Jane and Susan beat them all in eighteen-sixty-one.
VIII
We’ve sailed the world in ships of fame that came from Minehead hard,
And Unanimity she was the last from Manson’s Yard.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Mentre passeggiavo un mattino nel mese di Maggio
vira mio Johnny, vira a lasciare
pensavo alle navi commerciali che salpavano dalla nostra baia,
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny,
siamo in partenza.
II
A volte si parte per la città di Wexford e a volte per  St. John
e a volte nel Mediterraneo andiamo,
solo per prendere il sole
III
Stavamo correndo verso la Baia di San Austell, con il carbone da scaricare e una tempesta ci colpì prima di raggiungere Charlestown.
IV
Ci sono aringhe affumicate e sotto sale che abbiamo spedito in tutto il mondo,
duecento anni di pescato finchè è scomparso
V
E’ un giovane legno in partenza per la città di Swansea, è il sale che portiamo dalla Francia, ma è nelle Indie che insegniamo la danza a quelle ragazze
VI
Con un carico di alghe, ragazzi, siamo in partenza per Bristol,
ad aiutarli a fare il vetro, si sa, in quella città famosa.
VII
Farina e malto, pelli e grano sono sulla rotta di Bristol;
la Jane e la Susan li batterono tutti a diciotto e sessantuno.
VIII
Abbiamo navigato il mondo in navi di fama che provenivano da Minehead,
e l’Unanimity era l’ultima da Manson’s Yard.

NOTE
* prima stesura, da rivedere, alcune frasi sono tradotte in senso letterale, ma non ne ho compreso il significato
1) letteralmente  quercia verde, è modo marinaresco per dire vascello, essendo il legno di quercia ampiamente usato un tempo per la costruzione dello scafo

LA VERSIONE DI TERRANOVA

La variante pubblicata da Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook #49) è stata raccolta da Pius Power, Southeast Bight, (Terranova) nel 1979 Genevieve Lehr scrive “questa è una canzone che è stata spesso usata per stabilire un ritmo per tirare su le ancore a bordo delle golette di pesca. Molte di queste ‘heave-up shanties’ erano vecchie ballate o contemporanee, e molto spesso versi d’attualità erano inventati al momento e aggiunti alla canzone per renderla lunga quanto il compito stesso”

The Fables in Tear The House Down, 1998 un’allegra versione con un arrangiamento decisamente country


Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Venite a preparare la vostra sacca, perchè stiamo per attraversare il mare
virate a lasciare, compagni,
virate a lasciare
Venite a preparare la vostra sacca,  perchè partiremo domani
virate a lasciare, allegri compagni,
siamo in partenza.
a volte partiamo per Liverpool
a volte partiamo per la Spagna
ma ora siamo in partenza per il vecchio St. John, dove tutte le ragazze ballano.
Ho scritto al mio amore una lettera, mentre ero sulla Jenny Lind.
Ho scritto al mio amore una lettera e l’ho firmata con un anello
e ora addio mia cara Nancy
perchè ti devo lasciare adesso
“mi hai promesso che mi avresti sposato, ma ora mi lasci”

NOTE
1) duds  in questo contesto significa “vestiti” ma più genericamente la grossa sacca di tela contenente il bagaglio del marinaio
2) Saint John’s, conosciuta in italiano come San Giovanni di Terranova per l’esperimento di Marconi, è una città del Canada, capitale della provincia di Terranova e Labrador, situata nella penisola di Avalon, che fa parte dell’isola di Terranova.
3) chiaramente un verso “volante” preso dai tanti farewell qui è Nancy che risponde

broadside ballad: The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
emigration song: The Irish girl or Mr Tapscott (Heave away my Johnnies)

FONTI
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/722-heave-away-my-johnny
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html