Stolen Child in music

Leggi in italiano

Fairies are not benevolent creatures at all, attracted by the strength and vitality of mankind, they kidnap children and especially newborns, or seduce (for the purpose of kidnapping) beautiful girls and boys.
The Fairy Kidnappings were once an attempt to rationalize the pain of an devastating death, when he catches life still in bud. There was consolation in thinking that the fairies had stolen that young life from a sad destiny, according to the ancient religion only those who are dear to the gods die young!


We also tried to explain abnormal behaviors, such as autism or depression, so it was said that the returned abductees had lost their soul, because they had tasted the food of the fairies!
Tales, fairy tales and ballads of the Celtic tradition are rich in fairy Kidnappings and describe a wide range of situations to warn the unfortunates: you must never stop on a high grass lawn and inside a circle of mushrooms because they are enchanted rings, doors to the other world; never fall asleep at the foot of a hill because it could be a fairy mound, home of the elven castle. But the biggest danger is the food of the fairies, because those who taste it retain a poignant desire very often fatal. (see more)

STOLEN CHILD

Slish Wood and Lough Gill, Co. Sligo (from here)

Stolen Child is the poem written by W. B. Yeats (in The Wanderings of Oisin and Other Poems, 1889) in which a fairy rapture is described. Yeats was a scholar of Irish mythology and a passionate collector of fairy tales and legends (he published Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry in 1888 and Fairy Folk Tales of Ireland in 1892)

The poem is set in the county of Sligo, where the poet spent most of his time, “his spiritual homeland”, “land of desires and hearts!” and precisely at Lough Gill a dragon-shaped lake, full of islets. In the poem he also describes two other places beloved by fairies: Rosses Point in the Bay of Sligo and the Glencar waterfall halfway between Sligo and Manorhamilton, in the county of Leitrim.

These are the waters where the county’s fairies go to have fun, the lakes of Gill, where on the island of Innisfree they accumulate provisions and make feast, then the Bay of Sligo on whose sand they love to dance in the moonlight, chasing the surf , and finally the Glencar waterfall where they play treats to the trout and take a shower under the ferns.

Stolen Child
W. B. Yeats
I
Where dips the rocky highland
Of sleuth wood in the lake
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats
There we’ve hid our fairy vats
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand
II
Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim grey sands with light
By far off furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles
Whilst the world is full of troubles
And is anxious in its sleep.
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand
III
Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above glen car
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand
IV
Away with us he’s going
The solemned eyed
He’ll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace unto his breast
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand.

MUSICAL SETTINGS

The poem was put into music in the following century by the English composer Cyril Rootham
Stolen Child op 38

Loreena McKennitt from Elemental, 1985

Loreena McKennitt- Stolen Child-Nights From The Alhambra 2007

In 2014 Cuan Alainn (=Beautiful Harbour) have made an arrangement in Russian of the composition of Loreena McKennitt, text translated by Gregory Kruzhkova for info on the video  (here)
The folk-rock version of the Waterboys dates back to 1988: they put the “refrain” into music, leaving the speech on the strophes (voice by Tomas Mac Eoin)

Heather Alexander from Wanderlust 1994

Hamilton Camp  composes yet another melody – rather interesting, with a very catchy refrain – and records the song with the title “Celts” in the album Sweet Joy, 2006 ( Spotify)
Merrymouth from “Simon Fowlers Merrymouth” 2012, music composed by Simon Fowler/ Dan Sealey /Mike Mcnamara Kate Price from Songs from the Witches Wood 2009


I
Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood (1) in the lake
There lies a leafy island (2)
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats
There we’ve hid our fairy vats
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand (3)
II
Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim grey sands with light
By far off furthest Rosses (4)
We foot it all the night
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles
Whilst the world is full of troubles
And is anxious in its sleep.
III
Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above glen car (5)
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star (6)
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears (7)
Give them unquiet dreams
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams
IV
Away with us he’s going
The solemned eyed
He’ll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace unto his breast
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand.
NOTES
1) Sleuth Wood is Slish Wood,  “Sleuthwood by the lake”, once a dense oak forest along the southern shores of Lake Gill, most of the trees were cut down to provide the timber needed for the war efforts of World War II. The forest descends steeply to meet the water between large boulders covered with moss
2) Innishfree (‘Isle of Heather’)uninhabited island in the Lough Gill where Yeats wanted to live in a small cottage (see more)
3) the attitude of the fairies is compassionate, the fate of the child (or the world of men) is cruel and they dont’ want to make him suffer
4) Rosses Point is a beach in Sligo Bay, (on the opposite side of the lake) a popular holiday resort of the Yeats family: a small strip of sand and a grassy expanse behind it. At the northern corner of Rosses there is a small promontory of sand, rocks and grass: no wise peasant would fall asleep at his feet for fear of a fairy rapture
5) it is the Glencar waterfall near the lake of the same name, in the county of Leitrim. When the wind blows from the west, instead of falling, the water rises towards the sky. For this reason, the waterfall is also called “the devil’s chimney”. Actually there are two waterfalls, the highest and most imposing one and the lower and more modest one, set between the rocks and the foliage with a stepped pool
6) the patches of water are so small that they hardly reflect the stars of the sky
7) Although the fish do not have the outer ear, they are nevertheless able to hear: the organs of hearing are located in the back of the skull (inner ear). Fish perceive sounds that have a frequency between 16 and 7,000 hertz.

Clann Stolen Child from Seelie a KIN Fables trilogy: Kin, Salvage, Requiem

LINK
http://www.turismoletterario.com/blog/viaggio-con-yeats-a-sligo-parte-seconda/

http://walksireland.com/?p=1129
http://www.voicesfromthedawn.com/rosses-point/
http://ireland-calling.com/the-stolen-child-notes-and-analysis/
http://unitalianoasligo.com/archives/42730
http://benvenutiasligo.blogspot.it/2013/05/una-gita-glencar.html
https://www.aransweatersdirect.com/blogs/blog/121549377-glencar-waterfall-and-lake

Silver apples of the moon

MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933) The Silver Apples of the Moon
MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933)
The Silver Apples of the Moon

Leggi in italiano

The song of wandering Aengus was published in 1899, in the collection of poems “The Wind among the reeds” by William Butler Yeats (1865-1939).

Aengus (Oengus)  is the god of love of Irish mythology, belonging to the mythical ranks of the Tuatha De Dannan, eternally young ruler of the Brug na Boinne near the banks of the river Boyne. It is said of him that he fell in love with a beautiful girl seen in a dream and, sick with love, looked for her for a long time before finding and taking her to his kingdom (see the story).

In poetry, however, the character is a young mortal (perhaps the poet himself) in search of his poetic inspiration or the most ancestral side of knowledge. He tells of his initiation into the past, because he became old, in the perennial search for beauty, or poetic enlightenment, embodied by the girl with the apple blossoms in her hair.

The first to put the poem into music was the same Yeats who composed or adapted a traditional Irish melody: in 1907 he published his essay ‘Speaking to the Psaltery’ in which the poem is recited bardically, sung with the accompaniment of the psaltery; but many other artists were inspired by the text and composed further melodies.

Burt Ives with the title The Wandering of Old Angus  in ‘Burl Ives: Songs of Ireland‘ Decca DL 8444 (ca. 1954) in the liner notes the Yeats melody is credited

Judy Collins with the title ‘Golden Apples of the Sun’  – Golden Apples of the Sun 1962. “Learned from the singing of Will Holt, this stunning song is a musical setting of a W. B. Yeats poem ‘The Song of the Wandering Angus’. It is not a folk song, it tends to be an art song. It has a traditional feeling about it; the repetitiveness gives you the impression of an incantation, which the poem does too. Of her learning it I had heard the song almost two years ago. When I heard Will Holt sing it late one night at the Gate of Horn, I was greatly impressed, and determined to learn it. Will sang it for me a number of times, and even gave me a tape of it. I lived with the Golden Apples of the Sun almost a year-and-a-half before I ever sang it, and then it burst out one day – almost of its own accord – while I was visiting friends. It took me a long time to assimilate it, but now it’s part of me. I feel that the song has something to do with what people want – what they don’t have – and sometimes the desire for these things is almost as satisfying as the getting.'”

Donovan in H. M. S. 1971

Richie Havens in “Mixed Bag II” 1974

Christy Moore in “Ride On” 1986

Paul Winter & Karen Casey in Celtic Solstice 1999

Jolie Holland in Catalpa 2003

Waterboys in “An Appointment with Mr Yeats” 2011
an almost spoken version

Sedrenn  in De l’autri cotè 2013 (the review of the cd here

Robert Lawrence & Jill Greene (music by Jill Diana Greene) 2016

I
I went out to the hazel wood
because a fire was in my head(1)
and cut and peeled a hazel wand(2)
and hooked a berry to a thread.
II
And when white moths were on the wing
and moth-like stars were flickering out
I dropped the berry in the stream(3)
and caught a little silver trout(4).
III
When I had laid it on the floor
I went to blow the fire aflame
But something rustled on the floor
and someone called me by my name.
IV
It had become a glimmering girl
with apple blossom(5) in her hair
who called me by my name and ran
and vanished through the brightening air
V
Though I am old with wandering
through hollow lands and hills lands
I will find out where she has gone
and kiss her lips and take her hands.
VI
And walk among long dappled grass
and pluck till time and times are done
the silver apples of the moon
the golden apples of the sun(5).

NOTES
1) it’s the fire what characterizes the visionary experience of shamanism (see). In the book “The Fire in the Head” (2007) Tom Cowan examines the connections between shamanism and Celtic imagination, analyzing the myths, the stories, the ancient Celtic poets and narrators and describing the techniques used to access the world of the shamans. So the protagonist approaches the waters of the river to practice a ritual that allows him to travel in the Other World.
2) the hazelnut is the fruit of science and falls into the sacred spring, where it is eaten by salmon / trout (which becomes the salmon of knowledge).
3) most likely it is the Boyne River. According to mythology, Brug na Boinne or “Boyne River Palace” is the current Newgrange. Dimora del Dagda and then the son Aengus (Oengus) and the most important gods. The mound rises on the north bank of the Boyne River, east of Slane (County Meath).

new-grange
here is how the mound was once

4)A reference to a mythological tale by Fionn Mac Cumhaill (salomon of knowledge).

Even the trout is considered by the Celtic tradition as a guardian spirit of the waterways, and represents the Underworld, which it is materially embodied under the gaze of the poet in a young girl from the Other World, in a sort of dream or vision ( aisling) that disappears when the day is cleared: the poet tells us he will dedicate his life to chasing that girl or to reach (in life) the Other World
5) The apple tree and its fruit are always present in the Otherworld and most of the time it is a female creature to offer the golden apple to the hero or the poet. The apple is the fruit of immortality but also of death, of eternal sleep.
The access (in life) to the Other Celtic World is an honor reserved for poets, semi-divine heroes and a few privileged visitors (sometimes ravished by fairies for their beauty), Yeats hopes to be able to feed on Avalon apples and obtain the gift of immortality (poetic).

Aengus il vagabondo

Angelo Branduardi in “Branduardi canta Yeats” 1986 music by Donovan, text-translation by Luisa Zappa

Fu così che al bosco andai,
chè un fuoco in capo mi sentivo,
un ramo di nocciolo io tagliai
ed una bacca appesi al filo.
Bianche falene vennero volando,
e poi le stelle luccicando,
la bacca nella corrente lanciai
e pescai una piccola trota d’argento.
Quando a terra l’ebbi posata
per ravvivare il fuoco assopito,
qualcosa si mosse all’improvviso
e col mio nome mi chiamò.
Una fanciulla era divenuta,
fiori di melo nei capelli,
per nome mi chiamò e svanì
nello splendore dell’aria.
Sono invecchiato vagabondando
per vallate e per colline,
ma saprò alla fine dove e`andata,
la bacerò e la prenderò per mano;
cammineremo tra l’erba variegata,
sino alla fine dei tempi coglieremo
le mele d’argento della luna,
le mele d’oro del sole.

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44244 http://branoalcollo.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/le-metamorfosi-di-yeats/ http://lebuoneinterferenze.blogspot.it/2010/02/le-mele-della-notte.html http://www.ilcerchiosciamanico.it/articoli/p2/123/il-regno-sotto-le-acque-il-recupero-dello-sciamanesimo-celtico-di-sharon-paice-macleod.html

Stolen Child

Read the post in English

Le fate non sono affatto creature benevole, attratte dalla forza e vitalità del genere umano, rapiscono i bambini e in particolare i neonati, o seducono (a scopo di rapimento) belle fanciulle e giovinetti.
I Rapimenti fatati erano un tempo un tentativo di razionalizzare il dolore per una morte sconvolgente, quando coglie la vita ancora in boccio. Si trovava consolazione nel pensare che le fate avessero sottratto quella giovane vita a un triste destino, secondo l’antica religione solo chi è caro agli dei muore giovane!


Si cercava anche di spiegare dei comportamenti anomali, come l’autismo o la depressione, così si diceva che i rapiti ritornati avevano perso l’anima, perchè avevano assaggiato  il cibo delle fate!
Racconti, fiabe e ballate della tradizione celtica sono ricchi di rapimenti fatati e descrivono una vasta gamma di situazioni per mettere in guardia i malcapitati: non bisogna mai fermarsi su di un prato d’erba alta e dentro un cerchio di funghi perchè sono anelli fatati, porte verso l’altro mondo; mai addormentarsi ai piedi di una collina perchè potrebbe essere un tumulo fatato, dimora del castello degli elfi. Ma il pericolo più grande è costituito dal cibo delle fate, perchè chi lo assaggia ne conserva uno struggente desiderio molto spesso fatale.  (vedi)

STOLEN CHILD

Slish Wood and Lough Gill, Co. Sligo (tratto da qui)

E’ la poesia scritta da W. B. Yeats (in The Wanderings of Oisin and Other Poems, 1889)  in cui si descrive per l’appunto un rapimento fatato. Yeats fu uno studioso di mitologia irlandese e appassionato raccoglitore di racconti e leggende sulle fate (ha pubblicato Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry nel 1888 e Fairy Folk Tales of Ireland nel 1892)

La poesia è ambientata nella contea di Sligo, dove il poeta trascorse la maggior parte del suo tempo, “la sua patria spirituale”, “terra dei desideri e del cuore!” e precisamente al Lough Gill un lago a forma di drago, ricco di isolette. Nella poesia descrive anche altre due località care alle fate: Rosses Point nella Baia di Sligo e la cascata di Glencar a metá strada tra Sligo e Manorhamilton, nella contea di Leitrim.

Sono le acque in cui le fate della contea vanno a divertirsi, quelle lacustri di Gill, dove sull’isola di Innisfree accumulano le provviste e banchettano, poi la Baia di Sligo sulla cui rena amano danzare al chiaro di luna, rincorrendo la spuma delle onde che si rifrangono sul bagnasciuga, e infine la cascata di Glencar dove giocano scherzetti alle trote e si fanno la doccia sotto alle felci.

ASCOLTA la poesia recitata da Anya Yalin e illustrata (salta la III strofa)

Stolen Child
W. B. Yeats
I
Where dips the rocky highland
Of sleuth wood in the lake
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats
There we’ve hid our fairy vats
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand
II
Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim grey sands with light
By far off furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles
Whilst the world is full of troubles
And is anxious in its sleep.
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand
III
Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above glen car
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand
IV
Away with us he’s going
The solemned eyed
He’ll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace unto his breast
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand.
Il fanciullo rapito
Traduzione italiano di Roberto Sanesi*
I
Laggiù dove i monti rocciosi
Di Sleuth Wood si tuffano nel lago,
Laggiù si stende un’isola fronzuta
Dove gli aironi svegliano, sbattendo
Le ali, i sonnolenti topi d’acqua;
Laggiù abbiamo nascosto i nostri tini
Fatati, ricolmi di bacche e ciliege
Fra le più rosse di quelle rubate.
Vieni, fanciullo umano!
Vieni all’acque e nella landa
Con una fata, mano nella mano,
Perché nel mondo vi sono più lacrime
Di quanto tu non potrai mai comprendere.
II
Laggiù dove l’onda del chiaro di luna risveglia
Riflessi luminosi nelle grigie e opache
Sabbie, lontano, là presso la lontana
Rosses (3), tessendo danziamo
Tutta la notte le più antiche danze,
Intrecciando le mani e intrecciando gli sguardi
Finché la luna non abbia preso il volo;
E avanti e indietro a balzi
Inseguiamo le bolle spumeggianti,
Mentre il mondo è ricolmo di pene
E dorme un sonno ansioso.
Vieni, fanciullo umano!
Vieni all’acque e nella landa
Con una fata, mano nella mano,
Perché nel mondo vi sono più lacrime
Di quanto tu non potrai mai comprendere.
III
Dove l’acqua zampilla, vagabonda,
Dalle colline sopra Glen-Car
Nei laghetti fra i salici
Dove a stento una stella potrebbe
Bagnarsi, cerchiamo le trote assopite
E bisbigliando, ai loro orecchi doniamo
Ad esse sogni inquieti;
Lievemente sporgendoci
Dalle felci che versano
Le loro lacrime sui giovani ruscelli.
Vieni, fanciullo umano!
Vieni all’acque e nella landa
Con una fata, mano nella mano,
Perché nel mondo vi sono più lacrime
Di quanto tu non potrai mai comprendere.
IV
E con noi egli viene,
Il fanciullo dall’occhio solenne:
Mai più potrà udire i muggiti
Dei vitelli sui tepidi pendii
O la teiera sopra il focolare
Cantargli la pace nel petto,
Né vedere i sorci bruni
Che corrono attorno alla madia.
Perché egli viene, il fanciullo umano,
Viene all’acque e nella landa
Con una fata, mano nella mano,
Da un mondo dove esistono più lacrime
Di quanto egli potrà mai comprendere.

NOTE
* traduzione di Roberto Sanesi da Poesie di Yeats, Mondadori 1974

La poesia fu  messa in musica  nel secolo successivo dal compositore inglese Cyril Rootham
ASCOLTA Stolen Child op 38, la versione per coro e orchestra

A dare notorietà alla poesia nell’ambito della musica folk ci ha pensato Loreena McKennitt con il suo album d’esordio, componendo la melodia.
Loreena McKennitt in Elemental, 1985 nel video si mostrano i paesaggi nella contea di Sligo tra la foschia, in suggestive albe o crepuscoli

Loreena McKennitt- Stolen Child-Nights From The Alhambra 2007

ASCOLTA Cuan Alainn (in inglese Beautiful Harbour) hanno realizzato un arrangiamento in russo della composizione di Loreena McKennitt -2014, testo tradotto da Gregory Kruzhkova per info sul video (qui)
ASCOLTA La versione folk-rock dei Waterboys risale al 1988: che mettono in musica il “ritornello” lasciando il parlato sulle strofe (voce di Tomas Mac Eoin)

ASCOLTA Heather Alexander in Wanderlust 1994, altra melodia

ASCOLTA Hamilton Camp  compone ancora un’altra melodia -piuttosto interessante, con un ritornello molto orecchiabile – e registra il brano con il titolo “Celts” nell’album Sweet Joy, 2006 (su Spotify)
ASCOLTA Merrymouth nell’album d’esordio “Simon Fowlers Merrymouth” 2012, su melodia composta da Simon Fowler/ Dan Sealey /Mike Mcnamara , molto intensaASCOLTA Kate Price in Songs from the Witches Wood 2009


I
Where dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats
There we’ve hid our fairy vats
Full of berries
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away oh human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand
II
Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim grey sands with light
By far off furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles
Whilst the world is full of troubles
And is anxious in its sleep.
III
Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above glen car
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams
IV
Away with us he’s going
The solemned eyed
He’ll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace unto his breast
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child
To the waters and the wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world’s more full of weeping
Than you can understand.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Dove l’altipiano roccioso
di Sleuth Wood (1) si immerge nel lago,
laggiù si trova un’isola boscosa (2)
dove il battito d’ali degli aironi,
sveglia i topi d’acqua dormiglioni;
laggiù abbiam nascosto delle fate
i mastelli ricolmi di mirtilli,
e delle più rosse ciliege rubate .
Vieni, fanciullo umano!
alle acque e ai boschi
mano nella mano di una fata
perché il mondo contiene più lacrime
di quante tu possa sopportare (3)
II
Dove l’onda al chiaro di luna tira a lucido le sabbie grigio scuro
lontano, presso la lontana Rosses (4),
per tutta la notte danziamo
la trama dei balli più antichi,
intrecciando mani e sguardi
finché la luna avrà preso il volo;
e avanti e indietro a balzi
inseguiamo le bolle schiumose,
mentre il mondo è ricolmo di pene
e dorme un sonno ansioso.
III
Dove l’acqua errabonda zampilla,
dalle colline sopra Glencar (5)
in pozze fra i giunchi, che a stento una stella potrebbe bagnarsi, (6)
cerchiamo le trote addormentate
e bisbigliandogli nelle teste (7)
doniamo loro sogni inquieti,
sporgendoci piano
dalle felci che piangono lacrime
sui rivoli novelli.
IV
Via con noi egli andò,
il fanciullo dagli occhi gravi:
mai più sentirà i muggiti
dei vitelli sui tiepidi pendii,
o il bollitore sopra il focolare
cantargli la pace nel petto,
nè vedrà i topolini bruni
circolare attorno alla dispensa.(8)
Perché egli viene, il fanciullo umano,
alle acque e ai boschi
mano nella mano di una fata
perché il mondo contiene più lacrime
di quante tu possa sopportare

NOTE
1) Sleuth Wood noto come Slish Wood,  “Sleuthwood by the lake”, un tempo un folto bosco di querce lungo la sponda meridionale  del Lago Gill, gran parte degli alberi vennero abbattuti per procurare il legname necessario agli sforzi bellici della II Guerra Mondiale. Il bosco scende ripido per incontrare l’acqua tra grandi massi coperti di muschio
2) letteralmente “isola di foglie”, è Innishfree (‘Isle of Heather’) l’isola disabitata nel Lough Gill in cui Yeats avrebbe voluto vivere abitando in un piccolo cottage (continua)
3) l’atteggiamento delle fate è compassionevole, il fato del fanciullo (o il mondo degli uomini) è crudele e vogliono evitargli delle sofferenze
4) Rosses Point è una spiaggia nella baia di Sligo, (dalla parte opposta del lago) una popolare località di villeggiatura della famiglia Yeats: una piccola striscia di sabbia e alle spalle una distesa d’erba. All’angolo nord di Rosses c’è un piccolo promontorio di sabbia, rocce ed erba: nessun contadino saggio si addormenterebbe ai suoi piedi per timore di un rapimento fatato
5) è la cascata di Glencar vicino al lago omonimo, nella contea di Leitrim.  Quando il vento soffia da Ovest l’acqua, invece di cadere, s’innalza verso il cielo. Per questo motivo, la cascata viene anche chiamata “il comignolo del diavolo”. Per la verità le cascate sono due, quella più alta e imponente e quella più bassa e più modesta, incastonata tra le rocce e il fogliame con una polla a gradoni
6) le chiazze d’acqua sono così piccole che a malapena rispecchiano le stelle del cielo
7) letteralmente “sussurrando alle loro orecchie” Sebbene i pesci non abbiano l’orecchio esterno, sono tuttavia in grado di udire: gli organi dell’udito sono localizzati nella parte posteriore del cranio ( orecchio interno). I pesci percepiscono i suoni che hanno una frequenza compresa tra i 16 e i 7.000 hertz.
8) la madia con la farina d’avena

ASCOLTA Clann una versione strumentale intitolata Stolen Child (le parole sono solo dei vocalizzi -di Charlotte Oleena- ma che atmosfera!!) in Seelie e di cui la KIN Fables ha prodotto una trilogia: Kin, Salvage, Requiem

FONTI
http://www.turismoletterario.com/blog/viaggio-con-yeats-a-sligo-parte-seconda/

http://walksireland.com/?p=1129
http://www.voicesfromthedawn.com/rosses-point/
http://ireland-calling.com/the-stolen-child-notes-and-analysis/
http://unitalianoasligo.com/archives/42730
http://benvenutiasligo.blogspot.it/2013/05/una-gita-glencar.html
https://www.aransweatersdirect.com/blogs/blog/121549377-glencar-waterfall-and-lake

Loreena McKennitt: The two trees

Maud Gonne

William Butler Yeats scrisse la poesia “The Two Trees” nel 1892 e la dedicò a Maud Gonne, la bella attrice, femminista e rivoluzionaria che aveva donato il suo cuore all’Irlanda. La donna non ne volle mai sapere di sposarsi con Yeats, ma lui la prese come sua musa ispiratrice e l’amò per tutta la vita. (continua)
William Butler Yeats wrote the poem “The Two Trees” in 1892 and dedicated it to Maud Gonne, the beautiful actress, feminist and revolutionary who had given her heart to Ireland. She never wanted to get married to Yeats, but he took her as his muse and loved her for ever. (see more)

La poesia è stata messa in musica nel secolo successivo dalla canadese Loreena MacKennitt (cantante, arpista, compositrice), una poesia esoterica che parla d’amore, un amore cosmico sospeso tra terra e cielo.
The poem was put to music in the following century by the Canadian Loreena MacKennitt (singer, harpist, composer), an esoteric poem that speaks of love, a cosmic love suspended between earth and sky.
Alla ricerca di un quadro che affrontasse tematiche simili mi è venuto subito in mente il parallelo con “L’albero della vita” di Gustav Klimt che il pittore sviluppò  per la residenza di Bruxelles dell’industriale Adolphe Stoclet. Un dipinto-mosaico di marmi, pietre dure, maioliche e corallo.
In search of a framework that dealt with similar issues, I immediately thought of the parallel with “The Tree of Life” by Gustav Klimt, which the painter developed for the residence of Brussels of the industrialist Adolphe Stoclet. A mosaic-painting of marble, hard stones, majolica and coral.

Gustav Klimt: L’albero della vita, 1905

Nella poesia di Yeats due alberi si contrappongono uno il duale dell’altro: l’albero della vita e l’albero della morte e il poeta esorta la donna amata ad abbandonarsi all’amore (per lui) simboleggiato da un albero santo.
In the poetry of Yeats two trees are opposed one the dual of the other: the tree of life and the tree of death: the poet exhorts the beloved woman to surrender to love (for him) symbolized by a holy tree.

L’ALBERO DELLA VITA

All’epoca Yeats faceva parte del Golden Dawn (l’Ordine Ermetico dell’Alba Dorata) e così vediamo l’albero della vita come l’albero sefirotico con le sue dieci sfere, che nasce nel cuore, centro della spiritualità umana :  è l’albero cosmico della creazione che contiene i quattro elementi formativi; il secondo è l’albero della morte, l’immagine distorta del primo, sterile e desolato dove di posano i corvi in attesa del macabro banchetto.
At the time Yeats was part of the Golden Dawn (the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn) and so we see the tree of life as the sephirotic tree with its ten spheres, who is born in the heart, the center of human spirituality: it is the cosmic tree of creation that contains the four formative elements; the second is the tree of death, the distorted image of the first, sterile and desolate where the ravens lay waiting for the macabre banquet.
Ma il ragionamento filosofico da seguire è lungo e complesso diciamo da “iniziati”, quello che invece è più immediato nella poesia è il concetto di dualità della natura umana: l’uomo può scegliere di guardare dentro di sé (alla fetta di paradiso che ha nel cuore) invece che di abbandonarsi ai tormenti della mente.
But the philosophical reasoning to follow is long and complex, we say by “initiates”, what is more immediate in poetry is the concept of duality of human nature: man can choose to look inside himself (to the slice of paradise he has in the heart) instead of surrendering to the torments of the mind.
Dal punto di vista stilistico si può affermare che l’amata Maud viene descritta similmente con i termini con cui Dante Alighieri descrive la sua Beatrice nel Paradiso, specchio dell’immagine di donna angelicata raffigurata in quegli anni nei quadri dei preraffaelliti.
From the stylistic point of view Maud is described similarly with the terms with which Dante Alighieri describes his Beatrice in Paradise, mirror of the image of angelic woman depicted in those years in the pre-Raphaelite paintings.

Nel cuore della donna nasce un albero sacro e mentre scuote la sua chioma una musica armoniosa si spande fino al cuore del poeta e lo ispira a scrivere la sua canzone. Il secondo albero è invece il riflesso distorto dell’amore non corrisposto.
In the heart of the woman a sacred tree is born and while shaking her hair a harmonious music spreads to the poet’s heart and inspires him to write his song. The second tree is instead the distorted reflection of unrequited love.

 THE TWO TREES

Loreena McKennitt compose la musica nel 1994 per l’uscita dell’album “The Mask and Mirror“, il brano della lunghezza di 9 minuti circa è introdotto da una melodia dal titolo, Ce He Mise Le Ulaingt? composta e suonata da Patrick Hutchinson con la cornamusa irlandese (uillean pipe). Il titolo Cé hé mise le fulaingt  (‘ulaingt’ = ‘fulaingt’) è una sorta di citazione biblica Who am I to suffer  (tradotto anche come who am I to bear it) vedi
Loreena McKennitt composed the music in 1994 for the release of the album “The Mask and Mirror”, the song about 9 minutes long is introduced by a melody titled, Ce He Mise Le Ulaingt? composed and played by Patrick Hutchinson with the Irish bagpipe (uillean pipe). The title Cé hé mise le fulaingt (‘ulaingt’ = ‘fulaingt’) is a sort of biblical quotation “Who am I to suffer”  or who am I to bear it (see)

Loreena MacKennitt in “The Mask and Mirror” intro: Cé hé mise le fulaingt

live


I
BELOVED(1), gaze in thine own heart,
The holy tree is growing there;
From joy the holy branches start,
And all the trembling flowers they bear.
The changing colours of its fruit
Have dowered the stars with metry light;
The surety of its hidden root
Has planted quiet in the night;
The shaking of its leafy head
Has given the waves their melody,
And made my lips and music wed,
Murmuring a wizard song for thee.
There the Joves a circle go,
The flaming circle of our days,
Gyring(2), spiring to and fro
In those great ignorant leafy ways;
Remembering all that shaken hair
And how the winged sandals dart,
Thine eyes grow full of tender care:
Beloved, gaze in thine own heart.
II
Gaze no more in the bitter glass
The demons, with their subtle guile.
Lift up before us when they pass,
Or only gaze a little while;
For there a fatal image grows
That the stormy night receives,
Roots half hidden under snows,
Broken boughs and blackened leaves.
For ill things turn to barrenness
In the dim glass the demons hold,
The glass of outer weariness(3),
Made when God slept(4) in times of old.
There, through the broken branches, go
The ravens of unresting thought;
Flying, crying, to and fro,
Cruel claw and hungry throat,
Or else they stand and sniff the wind,
And shake their ragged wings; alas!
Thy tender eyes grow all unkind:
Gaze no more in the bitter glass.
III (4)
Beloved, gaze in thine own heart,
The holy tree is growing there;
From joy the holy branches start,
And all the trembling flowers they bear.
Remembering all that shaken hair
And how the winged sandals dart,
Thine eyes grow full of tender care;
Beloved, gaze in thine own heart.
versione italiana di Marianna Piani*
I
Amore(1), guarda dentro il tuo cuore,
l’albero santo è lì che sta fiorendo;
dalla gioia i santi rami si partono,
e tutti i frementi fiori che essi sostengono.
I color cangianti dei suoi frutti
hanno adornato le stelle con luce serena;
la saldezza delle sue radici profonde
ha radicato la quiete nella notte;
il cullare della sua chioma frondosa
ha donato alle onde la loro melodia,
e le mie labbra ne sposarono l’armonia
nel mormorare per te un magico canto.
Là vanno gli amori danzando,
nel giro fiammante dei nostri giorni,
vorticando(2), turbinando qui e là
nei vasti incoscienti viali coperti di foglie; rammentando quella gran chioma agitata dal vento
e come sfrecciano i sandali alati
i tuoi occhi si colmano di tenerezza:
guarda, guarda dentro il tuo cuore, amore mio.
II
Non guardare più nello specchio amaro
che i demoni, con la loro sottile scaltrezza
ci pongono di fronte, passando,
o almeno lanciaci appena uno sguardo;
poiché vi si forma un’immagine fatale
che raccoglie la notte di tempesta,
radici seminascoste nella neve,
rami spezzati, foglie annerite.
Poiché ogni cosa sterile diviene
in quello specchio opaco che i demoni reggono,
specchio dell’espressa stanchezza(3),
creato mentre Dio riposava(4) nel suo tempo senile.
Là, tra i rami spezzati, passano i corvi
del pensiero senza requie;
volando, gridando, qui e là,
con i loro artigli crudeli e la gola vorace,
oppure rimangono immobili a fiutare il vento,
e scuotono le loro ali cenciose, ahimè!
I tuoi teneri occhi perdono la loro dolcezza:
no, non guardare più in quello specchio amaro.
III
Amore, guarda dentro il tuo cuore,
l’albero santo è lì che sta fiorendo;
dalla gioia i santi rami si partono,
e tutti i frementi fiori che essi sostengono,
rammentando quella gran chioma agitata dal vento
e come sfrecciano i sandali alati
i tuoi occhi si colmano di tenerezza:
guarda, guarda dentro il tuo cuore, amore mio.

NOTE
da qui
1) è il poeta che si rivolge alla donna amata
it is the poet who turns to the beloved woman
2) l’immagine sviluppata da Yeats dei “gyres” è quella di due coni interdipendenti ma contrapposti che ruotano l’apice dell’uno in contatto con il punto centrale della base dell’altro. La visone venne elaborata in un libro dal titolo “A Vision”, in cui Yeats spiega i mutamenti della personalità umana, l’avvicendarsi della storia e la trasformazione dell’anima dopo la morte.
Mi piace quest’immagine di pulsazione degli opposti in cui due vortici accoppiati, ovvero dei coni rotanti interpenetranti, girano in direzioni opposte e si annullano uno nell’altro. “per me tutte le cose sono costituite dal conflitto fra due stati di coscienza, fra due esseri o persone che reciprocamente muoiono l’uno la vita dell’altro, e vivono l’uno la morte dell’altro. Ciò vale anche per la vita e per la morte. Due coni o vortici, l’apice dell’uno nella base dell’altro” (Yeats in “A vision”).
the image developed by Yeats of the “gyres” is that of two interdependent but opposing cones that rotate the apex of the one in contact with the central point of the base of the other. The vision was elaborated in a book entitled “A Vision”, in which Yeats explains the changes in the human personality, the succession of history and the transformation of the soul after death.
I like this image of pulsation of opposites in which two coupled vortices, or interpenetrating rotating cones, turn in opposite directions and cancel each other. “To me all things are made of the conflict of two states of consciousness, beings or persons which die each other’s life, live each other’s death. That is true of life and death themnselves. Two cones (or whiels), the apex or each in the other’s base“(Yeats in” A vision “).
3) weariness nel senso sia di stanchezza che di consapevolezza
4) quando Dio si addormentò il Diavolo forgiò lo specchio ovvero l’albero della conoscenza: così la perdita dell’innocenza fu il libero arbitrio dell’uomo (il peccato). Secondo William Blake Albione è simbolo archetipo della creatività, esistenza immaginativa, libertà spirituale: l’albero della vita è il simbolo della forza immaginativa e sessuale, mentre l’albero della conoscenza rappresenta il sapere razionalistico proprio di Urizen (il Dio bibblico).
When God fell asleep the Devil forged the mirror or the tree of knowledge: thus the loss of innocence was man’s free will (sin). According to William Blake Albion is an archetypal symbol of creativity, imaginative existence, spiritual freedom: the tree of life is the symbol of the imaginative and sexual force, while the tree of knowledge represents the rationalistic knowledge of Urizen (the biblical God).
Qui ci troviamo filosoficamente parlando all’inverso dell’illuminismo: se il sonno della ragione genera mostri, per Yeats/Blake è invece il pensiero che occulta la verità-fede
Here we find ourselves philosophically speaking the opposite of enlightenment: if the sleep of reason generates monsters, for Yeats / Blake it is instead the thought that conceals the truth-faith.
Che è poi il pensiero gnostico “ Se voi conoscerete la Verità, la Verità vi farà Liberi. L’Ignoranza è uno schiavo, la Conoscenza è libertà. Se noi riconosceremo la Verità, ritroveremo i Futti della Verità in noi stessi. Se ci uniremo con essa, essa produrrà il nostro perfezionamento (Vangelo di Filippo, Vers. 123).
If you know the truth, the truth will make you free. Ignorance is a slave, Knowledge is freedom. If we know the truth, we shall find the fruits of the truth within us. If we join it, it will fulfill us. (The Gospel of Philip, The Gnostic Gospels) 
Ma contrariamente al binomio sesso-peccato stigmatizzato dal cristianesimo (l’albero della conoscenza è il peccato carnale, il diavolo tenta l’uomo con i piaceri della carne e della materia) per Blake la sessualità è positiva perchè libera la energie creative dell’uomo.
But contrary to the binomial sex-sin stigmatized by Christianity (the tree of knowledge is carnal sin, the devil tempts man with the pleasures of flesh and matter) for Blake, sexuality is positive because it releases the creative energies of man .
4) Loreena aggiunge un’interpolazione finale
Loreena adds a final interpolation

William Blake La danza di Albione, 1795
William Blake La danza di Albione, (Albione dance) 1795

LINK
http://www.gustav-klimt.com/The-Tree-Of-Life.jsp
http://www.didatticarte.it/Blog/?p=1708
http://www.yeatsvision.com/
https://rosariomariocapalbo.wordpress.com/2011/06/18/william-butler-yeats/
http://dublinoapiedi.com/2516/la-storia-damore-tra-maud-gonne-e-w-b-yeats/
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/great-works/great-works-the-dance-of-albion-circa-1795-william-blake-1965101.html
http://www.unigalatina.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2468

http://www.yeatsvision.com/geometry.html

The Wandering of Old Angus

Read the post in English

MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933) The Silver Apples of the Moon
MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933)
The Silver Apples of the Moon

The song of wandering Aengus (La canzone di Aengus l’errante) è stata pubblicata nel 1899, nella raccolta di poesie “The Wind among the reeds” (Il vento fra le canne) di William Butler Yeats (1865-1939).

Aengus (Oengus) è il dio dell’amore della mitologia irlandese, appartenente alle mitiche schiere dei Tuatha De Dannan, eternamente giovane regnante del Brug na Boinne vicino alle rive del fiume Boyne. Di lui si narra che si fosse innamorato di una bellissima fanciulla vista in sogno e, malato d’amore, la cercasse a lungo prima di trovarla e portarla nel suo regno. (la storia qui)

Nella poesia però il personaggio è un giovane mortale (forse il poeta stesso) alla ricerca dell’ispirazione poetica o del lato più ancestrale della conoscenza. Egli narra della sua iniziazione al passato, poiché si è fatto vecchio, alla perenne ricerca della bellezza, ovvero dell’illuminazione poetica, incarnata dalla fanciulla con i boccioli di melo tra i capelli.

Il primo a mettere in musica la poesia è stato lo stesso Yeats che la compose o che vi adattò una melodia tradizionale irlandese : nel 1907 diede alle stampe il suo saggio ‘Speaking to the Psaltery’ in cui la poesia viene recitata alla maniera bardica ovvero cantata con l’accompagnamento del salterio; ma molti altri artisti furono ispirati dal testo e composero ulteriori melodie.

Burt Ives con il titolo The Wandering of Old Angus  in ‘Burl Ives: Songs of Ireland‘ Decca DL 8444 (ca. 1954) nelle note di copertina si accredita la melodia a Yeats

Judy Collins con il titolo ‘Golden Apples of the Sun’  – Golden Apples of the Sun 1962. La stessa Collins dice in merito: “Imparata dal canto di Will Holt, questa stupenda canzone è la messa in musica di una poesia di W. B. Yeats “La canzone del vagabondo Angus”. Non è una canzone popolare, quanto piuttosto una art song [cantata per voce e pianoforte]. Ha un sensibilità di tipo tradizionale a riguardo; la ripetitività ti dà l’impressione di un incantesimo, quello che fa anche la poesia. In merito al suo apprendimento avevo sentito la canzone quasi due anni fa. Quando ho sentito Will Holt cantarla a tarda  notte al Gate of Horn, sono rimasta molto colpita e determinata a impararla. La cantò per me un certo numero di volte, e persino me la diede su nastro. Ho vissuto con the Golden Apples of the Sun quasi un anno e mezzo prima di cantarla, e poi è esplosa un giorno – quasi di sua spontanea volontà – mentre visitavo degli amici. Mi ci è voluto molto tempo per assimilarla, ma ora è parte di me. Sento che la canzone ha qualcosa a che fare con ciò che la gente vuole – ciò che non hanno – e talvolta il desiderio di queste cose è quasi altrettanto soddisfacente dell’averle”

Donovan in H. M. S. 1971

Richie Havens in “Mixed Bag II” 1974

Christy Moore in “Ride On” 1986

Paul Winter & Karen Casey in Celtic Solstice 1999

Jolie Holland in Catalpa 2003 con venature country

Waterboys in “An Appointment with Mr Yeats” 2011
una versione quasi parlata che chiude con la melodia del flauto, come un refolo di vento

Eoin O’Brien 2013

ASCOLTA Sedrenn  in De l’autri cotè 2013 (la recensione del cd qui

Robert Lawrence & Jill Greene (su musica di Jill Diana Greene) 2016

I
I went out to the hazel wood
because a fire was in my head(1)
and cut and peeled a hazel wand(2)
and hooked a berry to a thread.
II
And when white moths were on the wing
and moth-like stars were flickering out
I dropped the berry in the stream(3)
and caught a little silver trout(4).
III
When I had laid it on the floor
I went to blow the fire aflame
But something rustled on the floor
and someone called me by my name.
IV
It had become a glimmering girl
with apple blossom(5) in her hair
who called me by my name and ran
and vanished through the brightening air
V
Though I am old with wandering
through hollow lands and hills lands
I will find out where she has gone
and kiss her lips and take her hands.
VI
And walk among long dappled grass
and pluck till time and times are done
the silver apples of the moon
the golden apples of the sun(5).

NOTE
1) il ‘fuoco nella testa’ è quello che caratterizza l’esperienza visionaria propria dello sciamanesimo (vedi). Nel libro “Il fuoco nella testa (2007) Tom Cowan esamina le connessioni tra sciamanismo e immaginazione celtica, analizzando i miti, i racconti, gli antichi poeti e narratori celtici e descrivendo le tecniche usate per accedere al mondo degli sciamani. Gli sciamani sono in grado di accedere a un particolare stato di coscienza nel quale sperimentano un viaggio nei regni non-ordinari dell’esistenza dove raccolgono conoscenza e potere che usano poi per se stessi o a favore di altri membri del loro gruppo sociale. In quest’ottica e in una lettura autobiografica il protagonista si avvicina alle acque del fiume per praticare un rituale che gli permetta di viaggiare nell’Altro Mondo
2) la nocciola è frutto della scienza e cade nella sorgente sacra, dove viene mangiata dal salmone/trota (che diventa il salmone della conoscenza)
3) molto probabilmente si tratta del fiume Boyne. Secondo la mitologia il Brug na Boinne o «Palazzo del fiume Boyne», è l’attuale Newgrange. Dimora del Dagda e poi del figlio Aengus (Oengus) e degli dèi più importanti. Il tumulo sorge sulla riva settentrionale del fiume Boyne, a est di Slane (contea di Meath).

new-grange
ecco come doveva presentarsi un tempo il tumulo di Newgrange

4) Il riferimento ai boschi di nocciolo e all’apprestarsi a cucinare una trota appena pescata sembra riferirsi ad un racconto mitologico di Fionn Mac Cumhaill. All’epoca era a fare il suo apprendistato presso il maestro Finnegas che da ben sette anni dava la caccia al salmone della saggezza (o conoscenza, ispirazione poetica): infine lo cattura e lo fa cucinare dal fanciullo con la raccomandazione di non mangiare la sua carne (perchè tutta la saggezza va a colui che ne mangia il primo boccone) Fionn si scotta un pollice e si porta il dito alla bocca, così facendo inghiotte un pezzetto di pelle di salmone: ogni volta che si succhierà il dito potrà fare ricorso alla saggezza.
Anche la trota è considerata dalla tradizione celtica uno spirito-guardiano dei corsi d’acqua, e rappresenta il Mondo di Sotto, che materialmente si incarna sotto lo sguardo del poeta in una fanciulla dell’Altro Mondo, in una sorta di sogno o visione (aisling) che scompare al rischiararsi del giorno: il poeta ci dice dedicherà la sua vita a inseguire quella fanciulla ovvero a raggiungere (in vita) l’Altro Mondo 
5) Il melo e il suo frutto sono sempre presenti nell’AltroMondo e il più delle volte è una creatura femminile a offrire la mela d’oro all’eroe o al poeta. La mela è il frutto dell’immortalità ma anche della morte, del sonno eterno.
L
‘accesso (in vita) all’Altro Mondo celtico è un onore riservato a poeti, eroi semi-divini e pochi privilegiati visitatori (a volte rapiti dalle fate per la loro bellezza), Yeats spera di potersi nutrire delle mele di Avalon e di ottenere il dono dell’immortalità (poetica).

La canzone di Aengus il vagabondo

Angelo Branduardi in “Branduardi canta Yeats” 1986 sulla melodia di Donovan, testo-traduzione di Luisa Zappa

Fu così che al bosco andai,
chè un fuoco in capo mi sentivo,
un ramo di nocciolo io tagliai
ed una bacca appesi al filo.
Bianche falene vennero volando,
e poi le stelle luccicando,
la bacca nella corrente lanciai
e pescai una piccola trota d’argento.
Quando a terra l’ebbi posata
per ravvivare il fuoco assopito,
qualcosa si mosse all’improvviso
e col mio nome mi chiamò.
Una fanciulla era divenuta,
fiori di melo nei capelli,
per nome mi chiamò e svanì
nello splendore dell’aria.
Sono invecchiato vagabondando
per vallate e per colline,
ma saprò alla fine dove e`andata,
la bacerò e la prenderò per mano;
cammineremo tra l’erba variegata,
sino alla fine dei tempi coglieremo
le mele d’argento della luna,
le mele d’oro del sole.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44244 http://branoalcollo.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/le-metamorfosi-di-yeats/ http://lebuoneinterferenze.blogspot.it/2010/02/le-mele-della-notte.html http://www.ilcerchiosciamanico.it/articoli/p2/123/il-regno-sotto-le-acque-il-recupero-dello-sciamanesimo-celtico-di-sharon-paice-macleod.html

Rambling Boys of Pleasure

“You (or Ye) Rambling Boys of Pleasure” is a ballad of Irish origins dated 1785 (in the Bodliean Library Broadside Ballad) taken as inspiration by William Butler Yeats for his poem “An Old Song Re-Sung” (and then “Down by the Sally Gardens“)
“You (o Ye) Rambling Boys of Pleasure” è una ballata di origine irlandese datata al 1785 (in Bodliean Library Broadside Ballad) presa come punto di ispirazione da William Butler Yeats per la sua poesia An Old Song Re-Sung” (e poi “Down by the Sally Gardens“)

The protagonist became a tramp because he was hurt by the behavior of the woman to whom he gave his love, but who rejected him. So he would like to be in a big city (imaginary like Willow town or real as Belfast) to have a good time with her, or else have emigrated to America where there is work and luck.
The melody associated is “Sally Garden”.
Il protagonista è diventato un vagabondo perchè  ferito dal comportamento della donna a cui ha dato il suo amore, ma che lo ha respinto. Così vorrebbe essere in una grande città (immaginaria come Willow town o reale come Belfast) a spassarsela con lei, oppure essere emigrato in America dove c’è lavoro e fortuna.
La melodia associata al brano dovrebbe essere quella ben più conosciuta come “Sally Garden” qui con andamento diverso.

Planxty in “After The Break” 1979.
Andy Irvine subsequently recorded the song also as a soloist.
Andy Irvine successivamente ha registrato il brano anche come solista.

Loreena McKennitt &The Chieftains in Tears of Stone 1999 ( I, II, IV)

Jarlath Henderson in Hearts Broken, Heads Turned 2016


I

You rambling boys of pleasure,
give ear unto these lines I write,
(It is true that ) I own I’m a rover,
in rambling I take great delight.
I cast my mind (placed my heart )
on a handsome girl

and oftentimes she does me slight,
my mind is never easy,
except when my true love is in my sight.

II
Down by flowery gardens
where me and my true love do (did) meet
I took her in my arms
and unto her gave kisses sweet
She bade me to take love easy
just as the leaves fall from the tree
But I being young and foolish(1) 
with my own true love I did not agree.
III
And the second time I met my love
I thought that her heart was surely mine,
But as the season changes

my darling girl has changed her mind
Gold is the root of evil (2),
although it bears a glistening hue
Causes many’s the lad and the lass to part
though their hearts like mine
be e’er so true

IV
And I wish I was in Belfast town (Americay)
and my true love along with me
And money in my pocket
to keep us in good company
Liquor to be plenty
a flowing glass  (bowl) on every side
Hard fortune would ne’er daunt me
for I am young and the world is wide.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Voi nomadi del piacere
date ascolto a questi versi che scrivo,
è vero che sono un vagabondo
e nel girovagare traggo grande gioia,
ma ho donato il mio cuore
a una bella ragazza
che spesso mi fa penare
e il mio spirito non è mai tranquillo, tranne quando la mia cara ho innanzi agli occhi.
II
Laggiù nei giardini in fiore
dove io e la mia amata c’incontrammo
la presi tra le braccia
e le diedi dolci baci.
M’invitò a prendere amore così come veniva, come le foglie crescono sull’albero;
ma io, giovane e sciocco, (1)
non volli ubbidire al suo invito
III
Il secondo giorno che l’incontrai,
ero certo che il suo cuore fosse mio,
ma come mutano le stagioni,
così la mia cara ragazza ha cambiato idea.
L’oro è la radice del male (2),
sebbene emani un colore abbagliante,
porta molti ragazzi e ragazze a separarsi,
anche se i loro cuori, come il mio,
sono sempre sinceri.
IV
Vorrei essere a Belfast, (America)
con il mio vero amore insieme a me.
e i soldi in tasca
per tenerci in buona compagnia.
Con liquore abbondante,
che trabocca il bicchiere, la fortuna avversa non mi potrà intimidire,
perchè sono giovane e il mondo è grande.

NOTE
1)  the protagonist, because too young and inexperienced hesitates in his first experience of love, despite being invited to grasp the love and the image of the leaves that grow on the tree recalls a young sprout, of fresh and green bud that grows according to nature.
il protagonista, perché troppo giovane e inesperto esita nella sua prima esperienza d’amore con la sua innamorata, nonostante sia invitato a cogliere l’amore –She bid me to take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree– e l’immagine delle foglie che crescono sull’albero richiama un che di giovane virgulto, di fresco e verde germoglio che cresce secondo natura.
2) the girl prefers to wait for a richer sweetheart
la ragazza che si è lasciata corteggiare il giorno prima, ci ha ripensato e preferisce aspettare un innamorato più ricco

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=128254
http://www.theballadeers.com/plx_d05_break.htm
http://www.8notes.com/scores/6212.asp

DOWN BY THE SALLY GARDENS

Dolcissima e malinconica canzone tratta da una poesia di William Butler Yeats, dal titolo “Down by the Sally Gardens” (in italiano=Là nel giardino dei salici).
Yeats la scrisse nel 1889 pubblicandola nella raccolta giovanile “The Wanderings of Oisin and other poems” con il titolo “An Old Song Re-Sung“, ispirandosi alla ballata popolare “The Rambling Boys of Pleasure” di cui riprende alcuni versi della seconda strofa, facendoli diventare il tema principale della sua poesia, intitolata poi “The Salley Gardens” nella ristampa del 1895.

I versi popolari
She advised me to take love easy, as the leaves grew on the tree.
But I was young and foolish, with my darling could not agree.
nella mano di Yeats diventano
She bid me to take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree
But I being young and foolish, with her I did not agree

LA MELODIA

Solo nel 1909 la poesia fu messa in musica dal compositore Herbert Hughes sul brano tradizionale di “Maids of Mourne Shore”  e sebbene successivamente altri autori composero delle melodie per la canzone, quello più accreditato dagli interpreti contemporanei è rimasto proprio l’arrangiamento di Hughes.

IL VIALE DEGLI INNAMORATI

Dante Gabriel Rossetti "Water willow" 1871Ancora aperta la discussione su quale albero abbia voluto indicare Yeats con il suo Salley e le opzioni spaziano dall’eucalipto alla betulla, ma senza dubbio il salice piangente è l’albero che più rispecchia il “mood” della poesia; il protagonista, perché troppo giovane e inesperto esita nella sua prima esperienza d’amore con la sua innamorata, nonostante sia invitato a cogliere l’amore –She bid me to take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree– e l’immagine delle foglie che crescono sull’albero richiama un che di giovane virgulto, di fresco e verde germoglio che cresce secondo natura. L’attimo fuggente non colto è perduto per sempre e ciò che resta è il rimpianto (e i rami di salice sono così onnipresenti nelle ballate popolari delle cosiddette warning song sui pericoli e i dolori dell’esperienza sessuale).

Molti sono gli artisti che interpretano questa canzone e non solo nell’ambito del folk, tra tutte due gemme

Clannad in The Ultimate Collection live


Loreena McKennitt
  in The Wind That Shakes the Barley, 2010: Loreena apporta delle lievi modifiche testuali

VERSIONE CLANNAD
I
Down by the Sally Gardens,
my love and I did meet
She passed the Sally Gardens,
with little snow-white feet
She bid me to take love easy,
as the leaves grow on the tree
But I being young and foolish,
with her I did not agree
II
In a field by the river,
my love and I did stand
And on my leaning shoulder,
she laid her snow-white hand
She bid me to take life easy,
as the grass grows on the weirs
But I was young and foolish,
and now I am full of tears
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Nei Giardini dei Salici
il mio amore ed io c’incontrammo
attraversava i Giardini dei Salici
con piedini candidi come neve.
Mi pregò di prendere l’amore come viene, così come le foglie crescono sugli alberi, ma giovane e sciocco
con lei non concordavo
II
In un campo accanto al fiume
il mio amore ed io ci fermammo
e sulla mia spalla ossuta
mise la mano candida
pregandomi di prendere la vita come viene, così come l’erba cresce sulle rive
ma ero giovane e sciocco
e ora non mi restano che lacrime
TRADUZIONE di Roberto Sanesi (edizioni Mondadori)
I
Fu là nei giardini dei salici
che la mia amata ed io ci incontrammo;
Ella passava là per i giardini
con i suoi piccoli piedi di neve.
M’invito’ a prendere amore così come veniva, come le foglie crescono sull’albero;
Ma io, giovane e sciocco, non volli ubbidire al suo invito.
II
Fu in un campo sui bordi del fiume
che la mia amata ed io ci arrestammo,
E lei poso’ la sua mano di neve sulla mia spalla inclinata.
M’invito’ a prendere la vita cosi’ come veniva, come l’erba cresce sugli argini;
Ma io ero giovane e sciocco,
e ora son pieno di lacrime.
Angelo Branduardi – Nel giardino dei salici in Branduardi canta Yeats 1985 la poesia è tradotta ed adattata dalla moglie di Angelo, Luisa Zappa su musica scritta da Branduardi

I
Nel giardino dei salici
ho incontrato il mio amore
là lei camminava
con piccoli piedi bianchi di neve
là lei mi pregava
che prendessi l’amore come viene
così come le foglie crescono sugli alberi.
II
Così giovane ero
io non le diedi ascolto
così sciocco ero
io non le diedi ascolto
fu là presso il fiume che
con il mio amore mi fermai
e sulle mie spalle lei posò
la sua mano di neve.
III
Nel giardino dei salici
ho incontrato il mio amore
là lei mi pregava
che prendessi la vita così come viene
così come l’erba
che cresce sugli argini del fiume
ero giovane e sciocco
ed ora non ho che lacrime.


SALLY GARDEN REEL
Sally garden è anche il titolo di un popolare reel irlandese
ASCOLTA Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Éireann

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/you_rambling_boys_of_pleasure.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.CFM?threadID=13144
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/down-by-the-salley-gardens
http://www.debaser.it/recensionidb/ID_6756/
Angelo_Branduardi_Branduardi_canta_Yeats.htm

http://thesession.org/tunes/98
http://comhaltas.ie