Archivi tag: Wicklow

Follow me up to Carlow

Leggi in italiano

The text of “Follow me up to Carlow” was written in the nineteenth century by the Irish poet Patrick Joseph McCall (1861 – 1919) and published in 1899 in the “Erinn Songs” with the title “Marching Song of Feagh MacHugh”.
Referring to the Fiach McHugh O’Byrne clan chief, the song is full of characters and events that span a period of 20 years from 1572 to 1592.

McCall’s intent is to light the minds of the nationalists of his time with even too detailed historical references on a distant epoch, full of fierce opposition to English domination. 16th century Ireland was only partly under English control (the Pale around Dublin) and the power of the clans was still very strong. They were however clans of local importance who changed their covenants according to convenience by fighting each other, against or together with the British. In the Tudor era Ireland was considered a frontier land, still inhabited by exotic barbarians.
front1

FIACH MCHUGH O’BYRNE

The land of the O’Byrne clan was in a strategic position in the county of Wicklow and in particular between the mountains barricaded in strongholds and control posts from which rapid and lethal raids started in the Pale. The clan managed to survive through raids of cattle, rivalries and alliances with the other clans and acts of submission to the British crown, until Fiach assumed the command and took a close opposition to the British government with the open rebellion of 1580 that broke out throughout the Leinster . In the same period the rebellion was reignited also in the South of Munster (known as the second rebellion of Desmond)

The new Lieutenant Arthur Gray baron of Wilton that was sent to quell the rebellion with a large contingent, certainly gave no proof of intelligence: totally unprepared to face the guerrilla tactics, he decided to draw out the O’Byrne clan, marching in the heart of the county of Wicklow, the mountains! Fiach had retired to Ballinacor, in the Glenmalure valley, (the land of the Ranelaghs), and managed to ambush Gray, forcing him to a disastrous retreat to the Pale.

glenmalure

Follow me up to Carlow

The melody was taken from McCall himself by “The Firebrand of the Mountains,” a march from the O’Byrne clan heard in 1887 during a musical evening in Wexford County. It is not clear, however, if this historical memory was a reconstruction in retrospect to give a touch of color! It is very similar to the jig “Sweets of May” (first two parts) and also it is a dance codified by the Gaelic League.

“Follow me up to Carlow” (also sung as “Follow me down to Carlow”) was taken over by Christy Moore in the 1960s and re-proposed and popularized with the Irish group Planxty; recently he is played by many celtic-rock bands or “barbarian” formations with bagpipes and drums.

Planxty

Fine Crowd

The High Kings live

FOLLOW ME UP TO CARLOW
I
Lift Mac Cahir Óg(1) your face,
broodin’ o’er the old disgrace
That Black Fitzwilliam(2) stormed your place,
and drove you to the Fern(3)
Gray(4) said victory was sure,
soon the firebrand(5) he’d secure
Until he met at Glenmalure(6)
with Fiach McHugh O’Byrne
CHORUS
Curse and swear, Lord Kildare(7),
Fiach(8) will do what Fiach will dare
Now Fitzwilliam have a care,
fallen is your star low(9)
Up with halberd, out with sword,
on we go for, by the Lord
Fiach McHugh has given the word
“Follow me up to Carlow!”(10)
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies

NOTES
1) Brian MacCahir Cavanagh married Elinor sister of Feagh MacHugh. In 1572 Fiach and Brian were implicated in the murder of a landowner related to Sir Nicholas White Seneschal (military governor) of the Queen at Wexford.
2) William Fitzwilliam “Lord Deputy” of Ireland, the representative of the English Crown who left office in 1575
3) In 1572 Brian MacCahir and his family were deprived of their properties donated to supporters of the British crown
4) Arthur Gray de Wilton became in 1580 new Lieutenant of Ireland
5) appellation with which he was called Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
6) Glenmalure Valley: valley in the Wicklow mountains about twenty kilometers east of the town of Wicklow, where the battle of 1580 occurred that saw the defeat of the English: the Irish clans ambushed the English army commanded by Arthur Wilton Gray made up of 3000 men
7) In 1594 the sons of Feach attacked and burned the house of Pierce Fitzgerald sheriff of Kildare, as a result Feach was proclaimed a traitor and he become a wanted crimunal
8) Feach in Irish means Raven
9) William Fitzwilliam returned to Ireland in 1588 once again with the title of Lieutenant, but in 1592 he was accused of corruption
10) Carlow is both a city and a county: the town was chosen more to rhyme than to recall a battle that actually took place: it is more generally an exhortation to take up arms against the British. Undoubtedly, the song made her famous.
11) Glen Imael, Tassagart and Clonmore are strongholds in Wicklow County
12) English Pale are the counties around Dublin controlled by the British. The phrase “Beyond the Pale” meant a dangerous place
13) Rory the young son of Rory O’More, brother of Feagh MacHugh, killed in 1578
14) Sir Nicholas White Seneschal of Wexford fell seriously ill in the early 1590s, shortly thereafter fell into disgrace with the Queen and was executed.
15) in the original version the character referred to is Sir Ralph Lane but is more commonly replaced by Arthur Gray who had left the country in 1582
16) Elizabeth I. Actually it was Feach’s head to be sent to the queen!
The new viceroy Sir William Russell managed to capture Fiach McHugh O’Byrne in May 1597, Feach’s head remained impaled on the gates of Dublin Castle.

LINKS
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52454&page=2
http://thesession.org/tunes/1583
http://thesession.org/tunes/10645
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/follow-me-up-to-carlow
http://www.clannobyrne.com/glenmalure.html
http://neverfeltbetter.wordpress.com/2012/09/25/irelands-wars-the-battle-of-glenmalure/
http://www.blogofmanly.com/2012/09/17/heroes-feach-mchugh-obyrne/
http://www.doyle.com.au/chiefs.html

AVONDALE A SONG FOR PARNELL

La canzone è stata scritta da Dominic Behan (1928-1989), scrittore e drammaturgo irlandese e militante repubblicano, proveniente da una famiglia con forti ideali socialisti.
Sia lui che il fratello entrarono e uscirono di prigione per le loro convinzioni politiche. Dominic fu autore di molte canzoni che cantava egli stesso, mentre le melodie erano prese per lo più dalle arie tradizionali irlandesi, innestandosi così con la sua opera, nel vivo solco della trasmissione orale e conservazione di un immenso patrimonio musicale popolare

La canzone è dedicata a Charles Stewart Parnell (1846-1891), membro della nobiltà protestante anglo-irlandese e uomo politico carismatico che lottò per realizzare la Riforma Agraria in favore dei contadini poveri. Nel 1870 fu tra i fondatori dell’Home Rule Party [in italiano “il partito per l’autonomia“] che si era posto come primo obiettivo  il conseguimento dell’autonomia dell’Irlanda, anche se non era chiaro tra tutti i suoi sostenitori, se si auspicasse un completo distacco dell’Irlanda dal Regno Unito, o solo una  limitata autonomia.
La melodia è un’aria tradizionale dal titolo “The Orange Maid of Sligo

ASCOLTA The Dubliners (voce Jim McCann)

ASCOLTA Christy Moore 1969


Oh, have you been to Avondale
and lingered in its lovely vale
Where tall trees whisper of
the tale of Avondale’s proud eagle(1).
I
Where pride and ancient glory fade,
such was the land where he was laid
Like Christ(2), was thirty pieces paid,
for Avondale’s proud eagle.
II
Long years that green and lovely vale,
has nursed Parnell, our grandest Gael
And curse the land that has betrayed
Fair Avondale’s proud eagle.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sei stato ad Avondale a passeggiare nella sua bella valle, dove alti alberi  sussurrano la leggenda dell’Aquila gloriosa di Avondale(1)?
I
Dove fama e l’antica gloria sfioriscono, tale era la terra in cui egli fu deposto, come Cristo(2), si pagarono 30 denari
per l’Aquila gloriosa di Avondale
II
Per lunghi anni quella verde e bella valle ha nutrito Parnell il nostro più grande celta, maledetta la terra che ha tradito l’Aquila gloriosa della bella Avondale

NOTE
1) nei canti di protesta e di ribellione era consuetudine identificare il personaggio con uno pseudonimo
2) Cristo e Parnell sono accomunate nel novero delle vittime storiche anche da James Joyce (il quale paragonò Parnell a Mosè: “poiché ha portato un popolo turbolento e instabile dalla vergogna ai confini della Terra Promessa”). Ma il natale di quell‟anno, il 1889, il destino mutò definitivamente per Parnell: il capitano William O’Shea chiese il divorzio alla moglie Katharine, rea di aver commesso adulterio con Parnell. Egli aveva tollerato la faccenda per dieci anni e gli fu addirittura offerto un seggio in parlamento in cambio del silenzio. Il divorzio fu accordato il 17 novembre 1890. Inizialmente Parnell riuscì a tenere le redini del partito e il suo luogotenente Tim Healy affermò fermamente che non si poteva abbandonare il leader in vista della Terra Promessa. Ma ben presto la pressione di Davitt, di Gladstone, dei vescovi cattolici e dello stesso Healy causarono la fine della carriera politica di Parnell. Nel 1891 le sue condizioni di salute peggiorarono drasticamente e dopo alcuni mesi dopo aver sposato Kitty O‟Shea, morì di crepacuore il 6 ottobre 1891. Al funerale del re senza corona parteciparono circa 150.000 persone. (tratto da vedi). Parnell aveva solo 45 anni!

avondale

IL GIARDINO D’IRLANDA

Avondale è una tranquilla città a Wicklow, contea eletta a “giardino d’Irlanda” per i suoi paesaggi; si trova proprio a Sud di Dublino e ne costituisce il polmone verde, un incantato paradiso naturale dominato per la maggior parte dalle Wicklow Mountains, luoghi favoriti dagli amanti dell’escursionismo!!
Ad Avondale si trova la casa natale di Charles Stewart Parnell, una villa georgiana ora sede di un museo a lui dedicato.

FONTI
http://www.irlanda.cc/contea-di-wicklow.html http://ilforumdellemuse.forumfree.it/?t=57057531 http://www.irlandando.it/cultura/storia/nuove-rivolte
http://etd.adm.unipi.it/t/etd-06202011-234944
http://www.storiainpoltrona.com/la-rivoluzione-irlandese-nel-xix-secolo http://www.irlanda.cc/lhome-rule-irlandese.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50601
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=23701 http://www.folklorist.org/song/The_Blackbird_of_Avondale_ (The_Arrest_of_Parnell) http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/charles_stewart_parnell.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=153261 http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/850011?uid=3738296&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&sid=21104241628977

THE MEETING OF THE WATERS: NATURE FOR ROMANTICS

“The meeting of the waters” è una canzone scritta da Thomas Moore nell’estate del 1807 durante un suo soggiorno nei dintorni della Valle di Avoca (contea di Wicklow); solo in un secondo tempo alla poesia è stata abbinata una vecchia melodia dal titolo “The Old Head of Dennis“.

AVONMORE &AVONBEG

Il nome indica un punto ben preciso del territorio irlandese ovvero il punto in cui il fiume Avonmore si incontra con il fiume Avonbeg per formare l’Avoca . Il punto tuttavia non è univoco nel senso che ci sono due incontri: uno a Woodenbridge e l’altro a Castle Howard sovrastante sulla collina che divide i due rami.

Fu lo stesso Moore a risolvere la querelle affermando in una lettera indirizzata ad un suo amico: “I believe the scene under Castle Howard was the one which suggested the song to me.” Sul luogo non può mancare ovviamente la statua commemorativa del poeta, ovvero il suo busto (vedi).  L’abitazione sulla collina fu ristrutturata e costruita nella sua forma attuale di castello nel 1811 (vedi).

Meeting_of_the_Waters,_Avoca,_Ireland,_1882
Meeting of the Waters come appariva ai tempi del poeta: i due fiumi si congiungono e sull’altura s’intravede Castle Howard.

Il posto è ricco di fascino e al poeta è ancora più prediletto perchè è lo scenario del tempo trascorso in compagnia con gli amici più cari, così chi ascolta può evocare nella sua mente i luoghi altrettanto affascinanti che ha condiviso con i suoi amici del cuore. E quando la vecchiaia verrà con le sue debolezze o quando la vita ci renderà difficile il cammino essi (amici e natura) ci proteggeranno. Così la natura nel suo aspetto bucolico e tranquillo, nel suo essere al di fuori del caos cittadino e degli affanni potrà rigeneraci; ma il poeta avverte che il ritiro non dovrà essere solitario bensì condiviso con gli amici più cari, solo così la natura potrà agire da balsamo!

Per i Romantici la natura è lo specchio delle passioni e dei sentimenti perchè anch’essa ha un’anima, una forza divina. A volte natura matrigna o tragica nella sua indifferenza (o maestosa e immaginativa nei suoi paesaggi) è anche natura amica e confortatrice.

La melodia “The Old Head of Dennis” è un tradizionale irlandese riportata da George Petrie nella sua collezione “Ancient music of Ireland” (1855) come raccolta dalla signora Biddy Mongahn di Rathcarrick nella contea di Sligo. Ma tanto per cambiare c’è anche una melodia scozzese dal titolo “The meeting of the Waters”.
ASCOLTA The Meeting of the Waters suonata con la scottish bagpipes

ASCOLTA The Wolfe Tones in “Irish to the Core” 1973 con il titolo di “Vale of Avoca”

ASCOLTA Anuna live al National Concert Hall di Dublino 2010


I
There is not in this wide world a valley so sweet
As that vale in whose bosom(1) the bright waters meet,
Oh! the last rays of feeling and life must depart(2)
Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart.
II
Yet it was not that Nature had shed o’er the scene
Her purest of crystal and brightest of green
‘Twas not her soft magic of streamlet or hill
Oh! no, it was something more exquisite still.
III
‘Twas that friends, the beloved of my bosom were near
Who made every dear scene of enchantment more dear
And who felt that the best charms of nature improve
When we see them reflected from looks that we love.
IV
Sweet Vale of Avoca! how calm could I rest,
In thy bosom (2) of shade, with the friends I love best
Where the storms that we feel in this cold world should cease
And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Non c’è in questo vasto mondo una valle così amabile,
come la valle nel cui grembo (1) le acque limpide s’incontrano,
Oh! Gli ultimi raggi del sentimento e della vita devono andarsene (2)
prima che il fiore di quella valle svanisca dal mio cuore.
II
Eppure non era perchè la Natura aveva versato sulla scena
il cristallo più puro e il suo verde più brillante,
non era per la soffusa magia del ruscello o della collina.
Oh! No era per qualcosa di ancora più squisito.
III
Era perchè gli amici, i più cari del mio cuore (2) erano vicini,
che faceva ogni caro scenario d’incanto ancora più caro,
a chi ritiene che il migliore fascino della natura migliori,
quando lo vede riflesso negli sguardi che amiamo.
IV
Dolce Valle di Avoca! Come ho potuto riposare
tranquillo in seno (2) al boschetto, con gli amici che amo di più,
dove le tempeste che ci toccano in questo freddo mondo dovrebbero cessare e i nostri cuori, come le tue acque, si mescoleranno in pace.

NOTE
1) La parola bosom ricorre nelle strofe in una sorta di umanizzazione materna della Valle e richiama il sentimento d’affetto riposto nel cuore del poeta
2) il poeta vuole dire che serberà il ricordo della valle fino alla sua morte

FONTI
http://hogfiddle.blogspot.it/2012/03/thomas-moore-meeting-of-waters.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37446
http://thesession.org/tunes/4679
https://sites.google.com/site/frankensteincampbell/anexplication

Follow me up to Carlow

Read the post in English

Il testo di “Follow me up to Carlow” è stato scritto nell’Ottocento dal poeta irlandese Patrick Joseph McCall (1861 – 1919) e pubblicato nel 1899 nelle “Erinn Songs” con il titolo “Marching Song of Feagh MacHugh“.
Per quanto si faccia riferimento al capo clan Fiach McHugh O’Byrne la canzone è ricca di personaggi e vicende che abbracciano un periodo di 20 anni dal 1572 al 1592.

L’intento di McCall è quello di accendere gli animi dei nazionalisti del suo tempo con riferimenti storici anche fin troppo dettagliati su un epoca lontana, ricca di fiere opposizioni al dominio inglese. L’Irlanda del XVI secolo era solo in parte sotto il controllo inglese (il cosiddetto Pale intorno a Dublino ) e il potere dei clan era ancora molto forte. Erano tuttavia clan di importanza locale che cambiavano le alleanze a seconda della convenienza combattendo tra di loro, contro o insieme gli inglesi. In epoca Tudor l’Irlanda era considerata una terra di frontiera, abitata ancora da esotici barbari.
front1

FIACH MCHUGH O’BYRNE

La terra del clan O’Byrne si trovava in una posizione strategica nella contea di Wicklow e in particolare tra le montagne asserragliata in roccaforti e postazioni di controllo dalle quali partivano rapide e letali incursioni nel Pale. Il clan riuscì a barcamenarsi tra razzie di bestiame, rivalità e alleanze con gli altri clan e atti di sottomissione alla corona britannica finchè Fiach assunse il comando e intraprese una serrata opposizione al governo inglese sfociato nell’aperta ribellione del 1580 che divampò in tutto il Leinster. Nello stesso periodo si era riaccesa la ribellione anche nel Sud del Munster (nota come la seconda ribellione del Desmond)

Il nuovo Luogotente Arthur Grey barone di Wilton mandato a sedare la ribellione con un grosso contingente, non diede certo prova di intelligenza: totalmente impreparato a fronteggiare le tattiche di guerriglia dei clan decise di snidare gli O’Byrne marciando nel cuore della contea di Wicklow, le montagne! Fiach si era ritirato a Ballinacor, nella valle di Glenmalure, (la terra dei Ranelagh) e riuscì a tendere un imboscata all’incauto Grey costringendolo a una disastrosa ritirata verso il Pale.

glenmalure

Follow me up to Carlow

La melodia è stata tratta dallo stesso McCall da “The Firebrand of the Mountains”, una marcia del clan O’Byrne sentita nel 1887 durante una serata musicale nella contea di Wexford. Non è ben chiaro tuttavia se tale memoria storica sia stata una ricostruzione a posteriori per dare un tocco di colore! E’ molto simile alla jig “Sweets of May” (prime due parti) anche danza codificata dalla Gaelic League.

“Follow me up to Carlow” (cantato anche come “Follow me down to Carlow“) è stato ripreso da Christy Moore negli anni 60 e riproposto e reso popolare con il gruppo irlandese Planxty; recentemente è interpretato da molte band celtic-rock o dalle formazioni “barbare” con cornamuse e tamburi.

Planxty

Fine Crowd

The High Kings live


I
Lift Mac Cahir Óg(1) your face,
broodin’ o’er the old disgrace
That Black Fitzwilliam(2) stormed your place,
and drove you to the Fern(3)
Gray(4) said victory was sure,
soon the firebrand(5) he’d secure
Until he met at Glenmalure(6)
with Fiach McHugh O’Byrne
CHORUS
Curse and swear, Lord Kildare(7),
Fiach(8) will do what Fiach will dare
Now Fitzwilliam have a care,
fallen is your star low(9)
Up with halberd, out with sword,
on we go for, by the Lord
Fiach McHugh has given the word
“Follow me up to Carlow!”(10)
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies<
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Alza il viso giovane Mac Cahir e smetti di rimuginare sulla passata disgrazia,
Black Fitzwilliam ha  distrutto la tua casa
e ti ha mandato per la macchia.
Gray diceva che la vittoria era certa
e presto avrebbe tenuto a bada il “sobillatore”, finchè non s’incontrò a Glenmalure con Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
RITORNELLO: Giuri e maledici Lord Kildare, Fiach farà quello che Fiach oserà
ora Fitzwilliam devi preoccuparti
è caduta in basso la tua stella!
Su con l’alabarda, fuori la spada,
andiamo dal Lord
Fiach McHugh ha detto
“Seguitemi a Carlow”
II
Guarda le spade a Glen Imaal
lampeggiare sull’ English Pale
Guarda i figli dei Celti
sotto la bandiera di O’Byrne
Gallo di un lignaggio guerriero
vuoi che il gallo sassone
voli come un corvo sull’Irlanda?
Vola alto e insegnagli le buone maniere
III
Da Tassagart a Clonmore
scorre un fiume di sangue sassone,
che grande è il giovane Rory O’More
a mandare gli stupidi nell’Ade;
White è malato, Gray è fuggito
allora per il cranio di Black FitzWilliam,
glielo manderemo tutto inzuppato di rosso, alla Regina Lisa e alle sue damigelle

NOTE
1) Brian MacCahir Cavanagh ha sposato Elinor sorella di Feagh MacHugh. Nel 1572 Fiach e Brian sono stati implicati nell’omicidio di un proprietario terriero imparentato con Sir Nicholas White siniscalco (governatore militare) della Regina a Wexford.
2) William Fitzwilliam “Lord Deputy” d’Irlanda ovvero il rappresentante della Corona Inglese che lasciò la carica nel 1575
3) Nel 1572 Brian MacCahir e la sua famiglia sono stati privati delle loro proprietà donate ai sostenitori della corona britannica
4) Arthur Grey de Wilton diventato nel 1580 nuovo Luogotenente d’Irlanda
5) appellativo con cui veniva chiamato Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
6) Glenmalure Valley: vallata tra i monti Wicklow a una ventina di kilometri a est della cittè di Wicklow, in cui avvenne la battaglia del 1580 che vide la sconfitta degli Inglesi: i clan irlandesi tesero un’imboscata all’esercito inglese comandato da Arthur Grey di Wilton composta da ben 3000 uomini
7) Nel 1594 i figli di Feach hanno attaccato e dato alle fiamme la casa di Pierce Fitzgerald sceriffo di Kildare, come conseguenza Feach venne proclamato traditore e fu messa una taglia sulla sua testa.
8) Feach che in irlandese significa Corvo
9) William Fitzwilliam ritornò in Irlanda nel 1588 ancora una volta con il titolo di Luogotenente, ma nel 1592 venne accusato di corruzione
10) Carlow è sia una città che una contea: la cittadina è stata scelta più per fare rima che per richiamare una battaglia effettivamente svoltasi: è in senso più generale un’esortazione a prendere le armi contro gli inglesi. Indubbiamente la canzone l’ha resa famosa.
11) Glen Imael, Tassagart e Clonmore sono roccaforti nella contea di Wicklow
12) English Pale sono le contee intorno a Dublino controllate dagli inglesi. La frase “Beyond the Pale” stava a indicare un luogo pericoloso
13) Rory il giovane figlio di Rory O’More cognato di Feagh MacHugh ucciso nel 1578
14) Sir Nicholas White siniscalco di Wexford si ammalò gravemente nei primi anni del 1590, poco dopo cadde in disgrazia presso la regina e venne giustiziato.
15) nella versione originale il personaggio a cui si fa riferimento è Sir Ralph Lane ma più comunemente viene sostituito da Arthur Grey che aveva lasciato il paese nel 1582
16) Elisabetta I. In realtà fu la testa mozza di Feach a essere mandata alla regina
Il nuovo vicerè Sir William Russell riuscì a catturare Fiach McHugh O’Byrne nel maggio del 1597, la testa di Feach rimase impalata sui cancelli del castello di Dublino.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52454&page=2
http://thesession.org/tunes/1583
http://thesession.org/tunes/10645
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/follow-me-up-to-carlow
http://www.clannobyrne.com/glenmalure.html
http://neverfeltbetter.wordpress.com/2012/09/25/irelands-wars-the-battle-of-glenmalure/
http://www.blogofmanly.com/2012/09/17/heroes-feach-mchugh-obyrne/
http://www.doyle.com.au/chiefs.html